#Prettyboy Must Die
A CIA prodigy's cover is blown when he accidentally becomes an internet sensation in #Prettyboy Must Die, inspired by the #Alexfromtarget story.When Peter Smith's classmate snaps a picture of him during a late night run at the track, Peter thinks he might be in trouble. When she posts that photo--along with the caption, "See the Pretty Boy Run,"--Peter knows he's in trouble. But when hostiles drop through the ceiling of his 6th period Chem Class, Peter's pretty sure his trouble just became a national emergency.Because he's not really Peter Smith. He's Jake Morrow, former foster-kid turned CIA operative. After a massive screw-up on his first mission, he's on a pity assignment, a dozen hit lists and now, social media, apparently. As #Prettyboy, of all freaking things.His cover's blown, his school's under siege, and if he screws up now, #Prettyboy will become #Deadboy faster than you can say, 'fifteen minutes of fame.' Trapped in a high school with rabid killers and rabid fans, he'll need all his training and then some to save his job, his school and, oh yeah, his life.

#Prettyboy Must Die Details

Title#Prettyboy Must Die
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 13th, 2018
PublisherTor Teen
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Thriller, Mystery Thriller

#Prettyboy Must Die Review

  • ✨ jamieson ✨
    January 1, 1970
    INSPIRED BY ALEX FROM TARGET WITH SPIESTHIS IS EVERYTHING( I literally attempt to read any spy book I see I love them)
  • Annika
    January 1, 1970
    #Hashtags Must Die
  • *The Angry Reader*
    January 1, 1970
    ***I received an ARC of this book to provide an honest review***Normally when I read YA I go for the intense stuff. I wasn't sure what kinda vibe PBMD would have, but I figured I'd give it a try. It turned out to be a lot more light-hearted and silly than I'd anticipated, but that isn't a bad thing. "All that gym time required of my CIA training hasn't hurt it either, but damn, these girls are jockin' me."Teenage CIA operative "Peter Smith" ends up in a Colorado boarding school chasing down a ha ***I received an ARC of this book to provide an honest review***Normally when I read YA I go for the intense stuff. I wasn't sure what kinda vibe PBMD would have, but I figured I'd give it a try. It turned out to be a lot more light-hearted and silly than I'd anticipated, but that isn't a bad thing. "All that gym time required of my CIA training hasn't hurt it either, but damn, these girls are jockin' me."Teenage CIA operative "Peter Smith" ends up in a Colorado boarding school chasing down a hacker. After a photo of him taken by a classmate goes viral Peter's cover is blown. Suddenly there's a LOT going on at his school - in the form of repelling mercenaries, kidnapping, spies, counter-spies and a handful of near-death experiences..for everyone. And a little romance. "I hold her like it will be the last time. She kisses me again like it's only a preview of more to come."
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  • OutlawPoet
    January 1, 1970
    This is a really cute read.Sure, you sometimes need to turn off your logic sensors. Every so often your brain pops in and reminds you of the fact that the African American Teenage Spy working for the CIA who speaks six languages and manages to somehow convince Ukrainian mobsters that he’s a Ukrainian Speaking Tunisian Food Deliver Boy is (whew!) slightly unbelievable.But, give it a minute because soon you just won’t care. You’ll be too busy enjoying the story. It’s fun, suspenseful, and a little This is a really cute read.Sure, you sometimes need to turn off your logic sensors. Every so often your brain pops in and reminds you of the fact that the African American Teenage Spy working for the CIA who speaks six languages and manages to somehow convince Ukrainian mobsters that he’s a Ukrainian Speaking Tunisian Food Deliver Boy is (whew!) slightly unbelievable.But, give it a minute because soon you just won’t care. You’ll be too busy enjoying the story. It’s fun, suspenseful, and a little bit silly. And Prettyboy is pretty cool. This is an over the top adventure – a pure fun adrenaline rush – and I’m very glad I got to read it!*ARC Provided via Net Galley
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  • Laura (bbliophile)
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up the ARC I received from Macmillan a few hours after I received it because I felt like I was going to enjoy this book a lot, but... I didn't. Full review to come.
  • Mandy
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars (2.75 probably but I don't even know anymore), but we're rounding up for the fun that was had.This book was a bit of a hard one to rate. There were times that I really really enjoyed it, but there were other times that had me raising my eyebrows and skimming past it as fast as I could. However, I will say that Reid managed to take something that seemed pretty unbelievable and make it fun, quirky, and pretty enjoyable.First, I have to say that I loved Jake/Peter. He was so much fun as a 2.5 stars (2.75 probably but I don't even know anymore), but we're rounding up for the fun that was had.This book was a bit of a hard one to rate. There were times that I really really enjoyed it, but there were other times that had me raising my eyebrows and skimming past it as fast as I could. However, I will say that Reid managed to take something that seemed pretty unbelievable and make it fun, quirky, and pretty enjoyable.First, I have to say that I loved Jake/Peter. He was so much fun as a narrator. His voice was so clear and entertaining. Reid did just a fantastic job with him, and I definitely would jump into his story again if I had a chance. He was definitely a main factor that kept me going with this story, and I enjoyed him a lot. The other characters were a bit of hit or miss for me. I really wasn't a fun of Katie too much. There were moments that I did enjoy her character and I loved what a great strong female role model she was, but at times she just felt...well, she was a little too perfect. I really don't know if she has any flaws? And she just seemed way too cliche perfect mysterious spy girl. I wasn't quite into that. I did enjoy Bunker as a side character as well. I loved how quirky he was, and his backstory really made him stand out from the rest of the regular YA sidekicks. He was fun and I super enjoyed him and Jake's dynamics as well.I also loved the aspect of the viral sensation. This whole concept was just so much fun. I used to be really into spy stories and movies, but I kind of am quite eh on them now. This book definitely brought the fun back to the genre for me, and I liked how they added in the whole "Alex from Target" aspect that really set this book apart from the rest for me. I guess one of the main issues I had with the book is just how much you have to suspend belief. I mean, this a spy novel with three teens that basically save the entire day. Things came a little too easy to them sometimes. I figured I would have to suspend belief about some things, but I didn't really think that I would have to suspend whole idea beliefs so much. It almost was too unrealistic for me, and I will admit that it did affect my thoughts on the book and how much I was enjoying it. It also did get a bit cliched in parts and that kind of bugged me - especially the romance. Overall, this book was fun for the most part, and Reid definitely carved herself out a spot in the spy novel market by having such a creative idea, good writing, and a memorable narrator. Other things might have fallen apart in areas, but overall, I did have a pretty good time with it. I'm not sure how memorable it will be in the long run, but it was a good enough book to satisfy you if you're looking for some action and adventure. 3 crowns and a Pocahontas rating!
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  • Jazmen This Girl Reads A lot
    January 1, 1970
    Reading this one reminded me just how much I love the male perspective. I just really do. Something about it. Anyway, #prettyboymustdie was right up my alley. I very much love espionage, hacking and spies...especially if it's teens--because you don't expect it. So the book, definitely had that going for it. It was also pretty action-packed from the very beginning. The author wasted no time getting right down to it. Before I fully dive into what I liked about this book--let me briefly talk about Reading this one reminded me just how much I love the male perspective. I just really do. Something about it. Anyway, #prettyboymustdie was right up my alley. I very much love espionage, hacking and spies...especially if it's teens--because you don't expect it. So the book, definitely had that going for it. It was also pretty action-packed from the very beginning. The author wasted no time getting right down to it. Before I fully dive into what I liked about this book--let me briefly talk about what the book is actually about. #PrettyBoyMustDie follows, Peter--who is an African-American teenager, and also a CIA operative/prodigy. He's apart of this section of the CIA that was created by one of the higher ups. It was pretty much created to give Peter a space to use the skills, they sought after him for. He's young but he's useful for his strength and hacking skills. The CIA sends Peter to this uppity, guarded private school to help on a mission. While on this mission, he makes some mistakes that threaten his already precarious position with the C.I.A. He makes a friend--and even falls for someone. That's a no-no--and now someone's taken it upon themselves to make him a celebrity and almost completely blow his cover. His good looks--have just made him #prettyboy--and he's gone viral.Don't be dismayed--I think it sounds pretty silly. Like oh yeah, you're so good looking you're viral--but it works in this story.What I liked:Again, the main character--the male perspective is fitting and Peter is really likable. You can almost forget he works with the CIA, because he's such a regular kid--in the ways that matter. He's really kind--and although it works against him in the story, it makes him endearing to the reader.Bunker--Peter's, should not be his best friend, best friend. Peter's in the CIA and on a mission--he shouldn't be getting close to anyone. It leaves that person at risk--and it makes Peter weak. But, I can honestly see why it was hard for Peter to stay away--even though Bunker didn't make it easy for him to stay away if he wanted to. Bunker was so loyal--and just a sweetie. I really enjoyed his character and his companionship to Peter.Katie--she was tough. Ballsy. I loved her style--and I liked the dynamic between her and Peter--and even with some of the other characters. I could almost hear in my head as I read her POV. I really enjoyed that. She was lifelike in my mind.The characters really come to life, and it easily reads in a cinematic tone.What I didn't like:The action drags. I mentioned that the action happens from page one--and this is perfectly fine and makes since for the genre--but I kind of felt like we could have more than one thing happen in this book. It kind of felt like the big moments happened, pretty early on and just kept on until the story ended.I'm not sure if I'm making sense, but I hope you understand what I mean. I definitely felt like I was watching a movie, but I also felt like I had reached the climax a little too early on.I would've liked for something else, major to happen in the later half--and although it kind of did--it was still too solidly connected to the things that were already going on.The good thing is it didn't hinder my reading in anyway--it's just something I would've added to the story.I really enjoyed this book, it wasn't a hands down winner, but it was fun--and provided a lot of thrill. I would recommend it.
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  • Shereen Lee
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. The quotation I have put in is not from a final version of the book.1.5 stars"This is our job; they're coming for us. They won't hurt you if you stay out of their way. So you need to do as Peter asks and go back to your classroom."Rachel nods, and it seems her friends finally get that this is serious business. A few of them wish us good luck before they all turn and run.When I was reading this passage, I got the feeling that it I received an ARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. The quotation I have put in is not from a final version of the book.1.5 stars"This is our job; they're coming for us. They won't hurt you if you stay out of their way. So you need to do as Peter asks and go back to your classroom."Rachel nods, and it seems her friends finally get that this is serious business. A few of them wish us good luck before they all turn and run.When I was reading this passage, I got the feeling that it strongly represented the book--and not in a good way. This book was oozing with condescension. Sixteen-year-old teen spies are constantly making grandiose band self-important statements like "this is serious business" (non-ironically), and everyone besides the main characters (and even the main characters, sometimes) are treated like they have no brains at all. This isn't helped by the gender dynamic between the teen girls who fangirl over him, who are treated as singlemindedly vacuous and totally devoid of any motivations besides getting a photo of him. I mean, what?? (view spoiler)[ The school is on lockdown, there are terrorists in the building, and you're telling me that there's a girl roaming around the hallways looking for a hot guy? Nope. I don't buy it. (hide spoiler)]I found the portrayal very patronizing, and mildly sexist. I absolutely hated being inside Peter (the MC)'s head, because he was constantly underestimating women and girls (and everyone else, for the matter). Toward the beginning of the book, he literally says that he thinks someone isn't a spy because she's too nice and too pretty, an analysis which fascinated me with its blockheadedness. Sure, sure, it could be a satire, but I feel like Peter was so overconfident throughout the book that regardless, I don't have much trust in the author's portrayal. Several times, MC treats his best friend Bunker as nothing more than a lackey who doesn't have anything to do except follow Peter around and worship him. Jeez. Peter claims that he doesn't make friends because of the riskiness of his job, but I'm having a hard time believing that he would make friends even if his job allowed it. More than that, there's no character growth. Even towards the end, there are scenes when Peter orders his best friend around rudely and, and the best friend, Bunker, immediately complies. When he encounters professional difficulties, a deus ex machina swoops in and (kind of) saves his job. Peter seems to never face the brunt of his arrogance, rashness, and all-around jerk factor, which was extremely dissatisfying. For a while I thought that his unlikable personality was there for a reason, but it turns out that it's just a lesson in the fact that sometimes, the mean guys come in first and never realize they're horrible all the while. THIS "MESSAGE" IS NOT WHAT I READ FLUFFY YA FOR! Even worse, it seems wholly unintentional, which just makes me sad.Besides that, I think suspension of belief will definitely make the story better, though. Another major flaw is the unfeasible plot but it can be kind of funny if you get used to it. If you don't think too much, it's a clunky read but mildly entertaining.
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  • Mimi
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fun read - by no means earth-shaking, but what the story lacked in character or originality, it made up with the simple magic that it reminded me of being a kid and wanting to be a spy.Who has not dreamed about being a teenage secret agent at one point in their lives? For Jake Morrow, it's reality. Tasked to find a hacker at the highly prestigious Carlisle Academy, Jake tries to blend in with the other students. Until the day his magnificent face and body (hey, it's YA, after all) bre This was a fun read - by no means earth-shaking, but what the story lacked in character or originality, it made up with the simple magic that it reminded me of being a kid and wanting to be a spy.Who has not dreamed about being a teenage secret agent at one point in their lives? For Jake Morrow, it's reality. Tasked to find a hacker at the highly prestigious Carlisle Academy, Jake tries to blend in with the other students. Until the day his magnificent face and body (hey, it's YA, after all) breaks the internet with the hashtag PrettyBoy and blows his cover right along with it. Hours later, Jake finds his school under attack, with hostiles looking to x him out of existence.What I liked about the book was the pacing. There's never a dull moment, from the beginning where Jake works undercover in the house of a Ukrainian mobster, all the way to figuring out who the hacker is that Jake was sent to stop at Carlisle Academy. There are spies, funny quips, a sweet, clumsy sidekick and even a bit of romance. A quick and fun read that makes for a suspenseful afternoon.
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  • Natasha
    January 1, 1970
    Review also on my blog • Twitter • BookstagramI received an arc from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.#Prettyboy Must Die is a spy novel with a comedic edge. It follows a seventeen-year-old black CIA agent and hacker, who arguably a genius, named Jake. He is working undercover at a prestigious high school called Carlisle Academy, for those who exceed academically. Jake is there to uncover a hacker, his lead suspects being any of the new students, notably the senior st Review also on my blog • Twitter • BookstagramI received an arc from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.#Prettyboy Must Die is a spy novel with a comedic edge. It follows a seventeen-year-old black CIA agent and hacker, who arguably a genius, named Jake. He is working undercover at a prestigious high school called Carlisle Academy, for those who exceed academically. Jake is there to uncover a hacker, his lead suspects being any of the new students, notably the senior students. However, his identity could potentially be revealed when a picture of him goes viral on Twitter, calling him “Prettyboy”. A tagline of this book is that it’s ‘inspired by #AlexFromTarget, which is where that connection is. One of the books strongest points is the characters. It’s understandable why Jake is in the CIA at seventeen, as he shows a lot of intelligence, mostly in tech and hacking, but also shows in chemistry. He is also able to speak eight languages. His closest friend is a boy named Bunker, who is a strange character and the comedic relief. His character is unique as he spent fifteen years in a bunker – hence the nickname – due to his father believing in the Year 2000 conspiracy theory. He is also suspicious of Jake after he saw him beat up multiple guys and drills him with questions. The other major character is Katie who is the love interest of sorts. I adored Katie. She was an intelligent character and also one who didn’t take people belittling her. She was so much fun to read about, especially since so much mystery surrounds her (but not in a manic pixie dream girl sort of way).The plot was done really well and there were mystery elements to it, since it was a thriller. Although, it did feel kind of limited with the setting, as the entire book takes place at Carlisle Academy. The author did use the setting well but it did make the book drag at times as there’s only so much you can do in a high school setting. The start of the novel was also really slow, mostly because the author spent time introducing the characters, the main conflict, and threat. It took until 26% of the book for it to really start. But once it does pass the slow start, it gets difficult to put down as the plot gets more and more intense. Overall, #Prettyboy Must Die was both a fun and gripping spy novel and was a great read.
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  • Mimi
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fun read - by no means earth-shaking, but what the story lacked in character or originality, it made up with the simple magic that it reminded me of being a kid and wanting to be a spy.Who has not dreamed about being a teenage secret agent at one point in their lives? For Jake Morrow, it's reality. Tasked to find a hacker at the highly prestigious Carlisle Academy, Jake tries to blend in with the other students. Until the day his magnificent face and body (hey, it's YA, after all) bre This was a fun read - by no means earth-shaking, but what the story lacked in character or originality, it made up with the simple magic that it reminded me of being a kid and wanting to be a spy.Who has not dreamed about being a teenage secret agent at one point in their lives? For Jake Morrow, it's reality. Tasked to find a hacker at the highly prestigious Carlisle Academy, Jake tries to blend in with the other students. Until the day his magnificent face and body (hey, it's YA, after all) breaks the internet with the hashtag PrettyBoy and blows his cover right along with it. Hours later, Jake finds his school under attack, with hostiles looking to x him out of existence.What I liked about the book was the pacing. There's never a dull moment, from the beginning where Jake works undercover in the house of a Ukrainian mobster, all the way to figuring out who the hacker is that Jake was sent to stop at Carlisle Academy. There are spies, funny quips, a sweet, clumsy sidekick and even a bit of romance. A quick and fun read that makes for a suspenseful afternoon
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  • Sam Kozbial
    January 1, 1970
    This was a lot more fun than I expected and that's a good thing. Fast paced and packed with lots of action, I was fully engaged and couldn't wait to see how it all turned out. Full review to follow.*You can read the first chapter HERE.ARC received in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Edelweiss PlusGreat if you want a spy/thriller similar to Gallagher Girls or Cherub. For my taste, too much of it took place at the school (exotic locales, or at least more traveling around is what my students seem to want in their spy stories), and then half way through there was an f-bomb, so I think I will pass on purchase.
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  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    A fun spy novel, the latter of which is not normally my thing. I feel like the only downfall was the setting, while it was done well...it would have been nice to not only be there. I received an ecopy of this through netgalley; however all opinions are my own.
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  • Deejaye
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Net Gallery for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review. #Prettyboy Must Die is whole lot of fun if you can turn your brain off to some ridiculous situations. However my guess if you are picking up an YA book loosely based on Alex from Target you have the ability to take this story for what is. That being an intensely silly, fun contemporary about a CIA agent who has a really bad day of high school. I was surprised by how much fun this story was. It has something f Thank you to Net Gallery for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review. #Prettyboy Must Die is whole lot of fun if you can turn your brain off to some ridiculous situations. However my guess if you are picking up an YA book loosely based on Alex from Target you have the ability to take this story for what is. That being an intensely silly, fun contemporary about a CIA agent who has a really bad day of high school. I was surprised by how much fun this story was. It has something for everyone, mystery, intrigue, and a little romance.
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  • L.H. Brown
    January 1, 1970
    The storyline was interesting, but ultimately just wasn't my thing.
  • Alissa
    January 1, 1970
    I'd like to thank Net Galley and the publisher for providing me with a digital ARC of this book! (Note: I requested this while I was on a month long break and as I am now knee deep in 5 classes and working I cannot guarantee I will be able to read this before its release.)
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  • Miriam Joy
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fairly enjoyable book. I was a fan of Alex Rider when I was eleven or twelve, and it turns out I haven't entirely grown out of the 'teenage secret agents improbably save the day' phase (does anyone?). I've read a couple of books recently with similar themes and, while objectively I know that they're not very realistic, I still enjoy them, including this one.Highlights, for me, included the character of Bunker and his friendship with 'Peter' (#PrettyBoy). Bunker grew up in, well, a bun This was a fairly enjoyable book. I was a fan of Alex Rider when I was eleven or twelve, and it turns out I haven't entirely grown out of the 'teenage secret agents improbably save the day' phase (does anyone?). I've read a couple of books recently with similar themes and, while objectively I know that they're not very realistic, I still enjoy them, including this one.Highlights, for me, included the character of Bunker and his friendship with 'Peter' (#PrettyBoy). Bunker grew up in, well, a bunker -- that's where he gets the nickname -- with his doomsday-prepper father, and as a result is a fun mix of naive and paranoia. There were some enticing peeks into his backstory, though honestly I would've been happy with more. But I also enjoyed their friendship, because it was that rare kind of male friendship where the characters aren't afraid to give each other proper hugs now and again, and where they both really care about each other, despite each having their own reasons for being weird about interpersonal relationships. So, that was nice. I felt, however, that there was too much in the way of explaining the plot to each other in dialogue, which threw the pacing off a bit and didn't feel entirely natural. (I know I do it in my own writing, and I also know it's one of the things I'm most trying to stop doing, so perhaps I'm hyper-aware of it because of that.) I also managed to guess a couple of the biggest twists, which meant they didn't have the impact that they should have done. As usual, though, I can't tell if they were too obvious or if it was just my annoying habit of guessing plot points out of thin air, which happens way too often and inevitably ruins surprises. There were still some plot twists that caught me, though, so that sort of made up for it. I enjoyed that the romantic plotline was partially pre-established before the timeline of the book -- 'Peter' had already been on a date with Katie, so it felt more realistic than if it had developed within the rapid timescale of the book itself. I wasn't super enthusiastic about it generally, because I'm just not big on romance, but it didn't annoy me too much or make me roll my eyes too often (except when Peter kept jumping to conclusions about whether or not Katie was involved in events. Seriously, dude, stop a minute and gather the actual info, will you?). Katie was also an enjoyable character. Although Peter rescued her a couple of times, she also rescued HIM more than once, and was competent and badass with gadgets to spare, even if she made a couple of silly mistakes that seemed unrealistic for someone who was generally so good at things. She was supposedly English, and I didn't find too many reasons to doubt that, except for the use of the word 'gotten' -- seriously, protip for American authors, we don't say 'gotten' and it sounds super American when you put it in British characters' dialogue. I also liked that she insisted on differentiating between English and British, because she did have a point -- a 'British' accent could be Scottish or Welsh, and what Americans usually mean when they use the term is 'English'. On the whole, then, this was an enjoyable book, but I felt too much of the plot was conveyed through dialogue between characters who, at times, just seemed to be explaining to each other things they probably already knew.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Perfect for fans of I'd Tell You I Love You But Then I'd Have to Kill You. So great.
  • Tara
    January 1, 1970
    Not quite as good as the I Am the Weapon series, but will appeal to the same readers. A fast paced, action book with a teenage boy CIA operative as the main character.
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    Jake Morrow is an undercover CIA operative currently posing as Peter Smith at a fancy boarding school in Colorado. He’s flying pretty low under the radar until one of the girls at the school posts his picture to Twitter with the caption “See the pretty boy run.” All of a sudden, #prettyboy is trending, not just at his school, not just in Colorado, but across the United States.I love a good teenage spy novel. I also have a complicated relationship with them, because sometimes I think I place a bi Jake Morrow is an undercover CIA operative currently posing as Peter Smith at a fancy boarding school in Colorado. He’s flying pretty low under the radar until one of the girls at the school posts his picture to Twitter with the caption “See the pretty boy run.” All of a sudden, #prettyboy is trending, not just at his school, not just in Colorado, but across the United States.I love a good teenage spy novel. I also have a complicated relationship with them, because sometimes I think I place a bit too much importance on the suspension of disbelief. Now, of course, I know that books like this aren’t going to be realistic. I know that there aren’t kids highly trained in military combat hanging out at high schools across the country. I also know that foreign powers probably aren’t going to send out skilled assassins to take down a seventeen-year-old kid. But when a book is written realistically enough that I can shut down that part of my brain, I’ll probably love it.Unfortunately, my entire brain was screaming at me that Jake/Peter was the worst spy who ever spied. I mean, the kid gets nauseated anytime he has to do something remotely spy-ish. Every little thing makes him lightheaded. I figured out who the “mystery hacker” was within the first 25 pages, but CIA kid took forever to put the pieces together. He’s also a sassy little teenager who has zero respect for the chain of command. (That’s me as an adult talking.)I loved Katie and Bunker. I think that the general idea of the plot was good. I love the whole idea of #alexfromtarget being spun like this -- what if he was an undercover operative? How would he handle his face suddenly being everywhere? I just thought that the plot was a little messy and I couldn’t get over the fact that the main character would actually make a terrible spy.Final rating: ★★☆☆☆I received a free ARC of #Prettyboy Must Die from the publisher (via Netgalley) in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Ok, really 3.5 stars. This is one of the better "boy agent" books (think: Boy Nobody, etc.) because it's not too implausible. Really! So, why only 3.5 stars? I wanted more of Bunker (can we get a backstory, please??) and, well, Katie annoyed me. Yes, she's a strong female (possibly older than we think) but there was something so flat and implausible about her that got me. And yes, I know that the idea of a 16-year-old expert computer hacker who speaks six languages and has mad fighting skills is Ok, really 3.5 stars. This is one of the better "boy agent" books (think: Boy Nobody, etc.) because it's not too implausible. Really! So, why only 3.5 stars? I wanted more of Bunker (can we get a backstory, please??) and, well, Katie annoyed me. Yes, she's a strong female (possibly older than we think) but there was something so flat and implausible about her that got me. And yes, I know that the idea of a 16-year-old expert computer hacker who speaks six languages and has mad fighting skills isn't the most plausible idea out there. Still... Katie annoyed me. ARC provided by publisher.
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  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    Jake is an undercover CIA operative in a experimental program. He's pretty good at computers - it's how he was recruited, but he gets an early shot at working in the field because his boss cuts some corners in a time crunch. Being a 17 year old boy, of course he knows better than his boss, which is why he gets himself in over his head and put on probation. He's convinced he can get back on his boss' good side by finding a hacker associated with his first mission, but the hacker finds him first. Jake is an undercover CIA operative in a experimental program. He's pretty good at computers - it's how he was recruited, but he gets an early shot at working in the field because his boss cuts some corners in a time crunch. Being a 17 year old boy, of course he knows better than his boss, which is why he gets himself in over his head and put on probation. He's convinced he can get back on his boss' good side by finding a hacker associated with his first mission, but the hacker finds him first. Hijinks abound at the private academy where every other person is part of a governmental organization. Super fun, light read, exactly what I was looking for at the time. Good flow to the story, if a little predictable, but there was plenty of humor and action.
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  • Kerri
    January 1, 1970
    Cute covert operator saves campus full of co-eds in this charming story. It has bit of a "I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You" vibe to it, which meant that I enjoyed it very much.
  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    lol like wtf was this1. I'm so disappointed. 2. Katie?? love her.3. This book has plot holes so big I could drive a truck through some of them. full rtc
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