Hey Black Child
Six-time Coretta Scott King Award winner and four-time Caldecott Honor recipient Bryan Collier brings this classic, inspirational poem to life, written by poet Useni Eugene Perkins. Hey black child,Do you know who you are?Who really are? Do you know you can beWhat you want to beIf you try to beWhat you can be? This lyrical, empowering poem celebrates black children and seeks to inspire all young people to dream big and achieve their goals.

Hey Black Child Details

TitleHey Black Child
Author
ReleaseNov 14th, 2017
PublisherLittle, Brown
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Poetry, Cultural, African American

Hey Black Child Review

  • Brittany J Thurman
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so needed! Glad it's out in the world!
  • Earl
    January 1, 1970
    An inspiring celebration of the potential of children. Based on a poem, the possibilities for what they can do and can be are opened up for them to explore.
  • Stacey Giglio
    January 1, 1970
    "Hey Black Child" by Useni Eugene Perkins addresses the changes in the world that need to be made. In this poem the black child is told they can be what they want to be but first they need to learn what they need to learn, do what they need to do and then they will be able to make this a nation they want it to be. The illustrator, Bryan Collier, does an amazing job of using words in the illustrations to convey the feeling of the poem. The message of this poem is loud and clear. The author believ "Hey Black Child" by Useni Eugene Perkins addresses the changes in the world that need to be made. In this poem the black child is told they can be what they want to be but first they need to learn what they need to learn, do what they need to do and then they will be able to make this a nation they want it to be. The illustrator, Bryan Collier, does an amazing job of using words in the illustrations to convey the feeling of the poem. The message of this poem is loud and clear. The author believes in the "black child" and in the possibility of change but not without hard work. I would use this poem as a link to social studies for fourth graders and then have students identify figures in history who have made positive changes in our nation. I would love to connect this poem with a biography about a historical figure who made changes in our nation. This poem could also be used to develop students writing. Students could create their own poems that could rhyme or be in poetic prose responding to Perkins about how they are going to learn what they need to learn and do what they need to do to make changes in the world.
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  • Margie
    January 1, 1970
    There are books which fill readers with a surge of joy, welling up inside us and growing stronger with each page turn. There are books you want to read aloud and alone standing in a grassy meadow at the top of a hill you navigate with difficulty. There are books you wish to share in a sanctuary filled with people, reading each phrase slowly with purpose so those gathered together can feel the power of those words.There are books brimming with glorious illustrations, lifting the narrative to new There are books which fill readers with a surge of joy, welling up inside us and growing stronger with each page turn. There are books you want to read aloud and alone standing in a grassy meadow at the top of a hill you navigate with difficulty. There are books you wish to share in a sanctuary filled with people, reading each phrase slowly with purpose so those gathered together can feel the power of those words.There are books brimming with glorious illustrations, lifting the narrative to new heights. There are books with colors, patterns, light and shadow carefully pieced and placed together, singing off the page like a melody straight from the creator's soul to our hearts. There are books with words and images complementing each other in such excellence they are engraved in our memories. Hey Black Child (Little, Brown And Company, November 14, 2017) written by Useni Eugene Perkins with illustrations by Bryan Collier is all of those books.My full recommendation: http://librariansquest.blogspot.com/2...
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  • Julie Kirchner
    January 1, 1970
    I first saw and read this book at ALA last summer. I recently sat down to re-read it more completely and to take time with the illustrations. What a lovely, empowering book. It is encouraging and motivating. The author, Useni Eugene Perkins, in his own words in the note says he “wanted to inspire and motivate all black children to achieve their God-given potential, regardless of the challenges they face in life.” Reading the author and illustrator’s notes at the end, I loved learning of the back I first saw and read this book at ALA last summer. I recently sat down to re-read it more completely and to take time with the illustrations. What a lovely, empowering book. It is encouraging and motivating. The author, Useni Eugene Perkins, in his own words in the note says he “wanted to inspire and motivate all black children to achieve their God-given potential, regardless of the challenges they face in life.” Reading the author and illustrator’s notes at the end, I loved learning of the background of this poem and now I want to see the musical! Reading about Bryan Collier’s inspiration for his illustrations and why he chose the medium he did adds to the beauty of the story. Love this book and I’m excited to share it and add it to our library.
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  • Brianna Crall
    January 1, 1970
    This book will be on my classroom shelf. Powerful message with stunning pictures.
  • Shari Vassello
    January 1, 1970
    Inspiring
  • Hapzydeco
    January 1, 1970
    Collier's watercolor collages breathe new life into Perkins's edifying poem.
  • Brenda Kahn
    January 1, 1970
    Simply stunning - the loving, affirming words are brilliantly illustrated. A must-have for every classroom and library serving all patrons.
  • Kristina Jean Lareau
    January 1, 1970
    What an incredibly powerful and beautifully illustrated book. The poem is lyrical and the collage/watercolors are just impeccably drained and rendered.
  • Elisabeth
    January 1, 1970
    I always thought that Maya Angelou wrote this poem...so I was happy to find the correct author (and according to his author note, I wasn't the only one!)
  • Mary Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful. Positive.
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    Read at NCTE! A beautiful book!
  • Caitlin Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    review: Poetry about a different race, to motivate that just because your "different" doesn't mean it should stop you from being who you really are. use: To teach children that just because you are different does not mean you can not be who you really are. grade: preschool-3
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