The Book of Joy
Two great spiritual masters share their own hard-won wisdom about living with joy even in the face of adversity.  The occasion was a big birthday. And it inspired two close friends to get together in Dharamsala for a talk about something very important to them. The friends were His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu. The subject was joy. Both winners of the Nobel Prize, both great spiritual masters and moral leaders of our time, they are also known for being among the most infectiously happy people on the planet.From the beginning the book was envisioned as a three-layer birthday cake: their own stories and teachings about joy, the most recent findings in the science of deep happiness, and the daily practices that anchor their own emotional and spiritual lives. Both the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Tutu have been tested by great personal and national adversity, and here they share their personal stories of struggle and renewal. Now that they are both in their eighties, they especially want to spread the core message that to have joy yourself, you must bring joy to others.Most of all, during that landmark week in Dharamsala, they demonstrated by their own exuberance, compassion, and humor how joy can be transformed from a fleeting emotion into an enduring way of life.

The Book of Joy Details

TitleThe Book of Joy
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 18th, 2016
PublisherAvery
ISBN-139780399185045
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Spirituality, Self Help, Philosophy, Religion

The Book of Joy Review

  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    I simply loved this book. The Book of Joy is a conversation between the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu about finding joy and happiness in the face of suffering and grief. The two old friends met in India for the Dalai Lama's 80th birthday, and they had long discussions over several days. Writer Douglas Abrams helped facilitate the dialogue, asking questions and taking detailed notes. The reader gets the benefit of both the wisdom of the spiritual leaders and an outside perspective on how I simply loved this book. The Book of Joy is a conversation between the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu about finding joy and happiness in the face of suffering and grief. The two old friends met in India for the Dalai Lama's 80th birthday, and they had long discussions over several days. Writer Douglas Abrams helped facilitate the dialogue, asking questions and taking detailed notes. The reader gets the benefit of both the wisdom of the spiritual leaders and an outside perspective on how the two friends interacted and behaved. It was joyous to read about how the men would tease each other, and then drop some fantastic bit of knowledge. Abrams commented that it's a sign of how much the two love each other that they can be mischievous together. Because the Dalai Lama and the Archbishop are getting older and have more difficulty traveling, this was likely their last meeting, and their goodbye was a tearful moment for this reader.I am not a practicing Buddhist or Christian, but I found great comfort and inspiration in this book. There are several helpful meditation practices included at the end. I would highly recommend The Book of Joy to anyone seeking more happiness and peace in a troubled world. Favorite Quotes"People would like to be able to take a pill that makes their fear and anxiety go away and makes them immediately feel peaceful. This is impossible. One must develop the mind over time and cultivate mental immunity. Often people ask me for the quickest and best solution to a problem. Again, this is impossible. You can have quickest or you can have best solution, but not both. The best solution to our suffering is mental immunity, but it takes time to develop." -- Dalai Lama"We suffer from a perspectival myopia. As a result, we are left nearsighted, unable to see our experience in a larger way. When we confront a challenge, we often react to the situation with fear and anger. The stress can make it hard for us to step back and see other perspectives and solutions ... But if we try, we can become less fixated, or attached, to use the Buddhist term, to one outcome and can use more skillful means to handle the situation. We can see that in the most seemingly limiting circumstance we have choice and freedom.""We are social animals. Even for kings or queens or spiritual leaders, their survival depends on the rest of the community. So therefore, if you want a happy life and fewer problems, you have to develop a serious concern for the well-being of others. So then when someone is passing through a difficult period or difficult circumstances, then automatically will become a sense of concern for their well-being. And if there is the possibility to help, then you can help. If there is no possibility to help, you can just pray or wish them well ... This concern for others is something very precious. We humans have a very special brain, but this brain causes a lot of suffering because it is always thinking me, me, me, me. The more time you spend thinking about yourself, the more suffering you will experience. The incredible thing is that when we think of alleviating other people's suffering, our own suffering is reduced. This is the true secret to happiness." -- Dalai Lama
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  • Antigone
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, they are rascals! Impish spirits, the both of them, who giggle and joust and tease their way through this late-in-life meeting; evincing in almost every moment the very joy they've gathered to discuss.The friendship of these illustrious men, who've met a mere half dozen times and then only briefly, calls to mind that deep and instantaneous bond so frequently formed by children - back when our hearts were filled with trust and our world with potential companions in adventure. Clearly kindred Oh, they are rascals! Impish spirits, the both of them, who giggle and joust and tease their way through this late-in-life meeting; evincing in almost every moment the very joy they've gathered to discuss.The friendship of these illustrious men, who've met a mere half dozen times and then only briefly, calls to mind that deep and instantaneous bond so frequently formed by children - back when our hearts were filled with trust and our world with potential companions in adventure. Clearly kindred spirits, the Dalai Lama has been known to swipe the Archbishop's signature sailing cap right off his head, and Desmond Tutu, in turn, to demand recompense for every compliment he tenders. Pay me, he says, extending his arm and rubbing his fingers together. The best way to measure a love is to gauge its flexibility to antics of this nature, and you can tell this is, indeed, a magnificent affection. It's a pleasure to witness. Even on the page it has power enough to produce a string of smiles...and resurrect a dream or two.Which is not to say their wisdom is in any way overshadowed, or their keenness underplayed.The occasion is the Dalai Lama's eightieth birthday. Archbishop Tutu has flown to India for a visit of several days during which these scamps will settle in as best they can and address, between them, how to introduce joy into life. You might imagine this would be a lofty enterprise but it is very much like the friendship; sincere and down-to-earth. Though they agree on a lot, their approaches have individual distinctions. In the arena of emotion, for example, the Dalai Lama promotes learning how to objectively examine our feelings while the Archbishop is more concerned with putting an end to the shame we have over what we feel. (One is a course of mindfulness, the other of self-compassion.) Their interlocutor, Douglas Abrams, has some difficulty with this development as he places the positions in opposition. I did not have that difficulty, finding them complimentary strategies.But I'm doing the material a disservice to elevate it in this manner. It's not an esoteric exchange. These are solid conclusions about grief, compassion, humility, loneliness and despair, extended simply as the product of a lifetime's careful and conscientious thought. In fact, one of the principal benefits I drew from my first reading had to do with the news media. I've been having a tough time with the news lately. It's not so much the content as it is the way it's presented to me. Everything seems tailored to make me anxious; to scare me enough to keep me tuning in. The Dalai Lama and Archbishop Tutu spent a moment discussing this.The Archbishop introduces the subject:"Yes, there are many, many things that can depress us. But there also are very many things that are fantastic about our world. Unfortunately, the media do not report on these because they are not seen as news.""I think you are right," the Dalai Lama said. "When bad things happen they become news, and it is easy to feel like our basic human nature is to kill or to rape or to be corrupt. Then we can feel that there is not much hope for our future."All these things happen, but they are unusual, which is why they become news. There are millions and millions of children who are loved by their parents every day. Then in school their teachers care for them. Okay, maybe there are some bad teachers, but most of them really are kind and caring. Then in the hospital, every day millions of people receive immense caring. But this is so common that none of it becomes news. We take it for granted."And they're right. The kind acts and fruitful accomplishments that happen every day? They're not news because they are the common experience. Goodness and productivity are the norm. Cruelty and catastrophe are what is deemed exceptional enough to merit airtime. This broadened my perspective, and helped me out.The work is filled with insight and numerous, moving personal experiences culled from the lives of both men. Rascals they may be, it is still quite easy to see how they've become two of the most esteemed spiritual figures of our generation.For me, this was less a book than a privilege. Highly recommended.
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  • Cheri
    January 1, 1970
    “Wherever you have friends that’s your country, and wherever you receive love, that’s your home.” ― Dalai Lama XIV, The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing WorldWhen two people, both Nobel Peace Laureates, are as world-renowned as His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu it takes an event for them to travel. In this case, the Dalai Lama’s 80th birthday offered them a chance to gather together and discuss their lives, their beliefs and to enjoy each other’s company in Dh “Wherever you have friends that’s your country, and wherever you receive love, that’s your home.” ― Dalai Lama XIV, The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing WorldWhen two people, both Nobel Peace Laureates, are as world-renowned as His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu it takes an event for them to travel. In this case, the Dalai Lama’s 80th birthday offered them a chance to gather together and discuss their lives, their beliefs and to enjoy each other’s company in Dharamsala, India for a week. For these two longtime friends, this was an occasion of joy, brought together to discuss the topic of joy. I’ve seen them for brief moments of time, seen photographs, heard snippets of speeches before, but I had never spent so much time “in the company of” these two spiritual leaders, so I was expecting a more quiet representation of joy, more ‘inner’ joy. I wasn’t expecting the gentle teasing, their playfulness, the boisterous laughter, and while I expected a high level of respect, I wasn’t expecting the overwhelming sense of gratitude and love they had for one another. It was very enlightening and moving.This was narrated by the author, Douglas Carlton Abrams, and the narrator for Dalai Lama was Francois Chau, with Desmond Tutu’s words were narrated by Peter Francis James. Chau and James both seemed to me to do an excellent job of narrating and capturing the voices of both Desmond Tutu and the Dalai Lama. I really enjoyed listening to this, although there was a bit of repetition that seemed to be noticeable, but I’d notice it, and then quickly return to paying attention to each spoken word. To hear them talk about the years in the past, the trials they’ve faced, and their views on these was something that reminded me a lot of a woman who lived two houses away from me when I was growing up. In the years before I moved away, I saw her go from a vibrant healthy young mother of four to being wheelchair bound from polio. Then her second oldest began having seizures that took too long to diagnose properly and find the right treatment for. Not long after that, her husband, a pilot like my father, was cleaning out the yard at their new home they’d just moved to, inhaled whatever weed killer / toxic chemical and came running into the kitchen. Rushed to the hospital, he survived, although he was in the hospital for a while. He was cleared to fly again, and died upon reaching altitude on his first flight out. The next year, it was only that her oldest, attending Kent State, had been involved in the riots. The thing is, I never saw her lose a sense of joy, even in those moments where the world was falling apart, she had this aura - yes, this moment in my life really sucks, but it is a moment, only. She was always so full of joy. Hearing the Dalai Lama speak about his exile, reminded me of her ability to see the things she’d gained through her losses, and not just the losses themselves. “So, personally, I prefer the last five decades of refugee life. It’s more useful, more opportunity to learn, to experience life. Therefore, if you look from one angle, you feel, oh how bad, how sad. But if you look from another angle at that same tragedy, that same event, you see that it gives me new opportunities." ― Dalai Lama XIV, The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing WorldThere really are people out there who have endured incredible hardships and cling to joy, and they have a lesson to share with the rest of us. If these two men, after all they’ve suffered, all they’ve endured, are so filled with joy, can they show us the way to find our own joy, to appreciate and increase the joy in our lives? “We are fragile creatures, and it is from this weakness, not despite it, that we discover the possibility of true joy.” —Desmond Tutu, The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing WorldMaybe lesson sounds too much like school, they have wisdom to share with us, and what a wonderful way to receive it. I listened to the audio, so I don’t own the book – yet – but I intend to buy a copy, so I can refer to the meditation practices at the end of the book, and the pictures!One of my favourite quotes from this book that covered a multiple of topics from joy, fear, despair, suffering, adversity, loneliness, as well as the Eight Pillars of Joy, surprisingly wasn’t from either the Dalai Lama or Archbishop Desmond Tutu, but from Douglas Abrams, the author, himself. I think every parent will relate to his thought: “It probably takes many years of monastic practice to equal the spiritual growth generated by one sleepless night with a sick child.” —Douglas Abrams, The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing WorldThe ‘preface’ – “The Invitation to Joy” speaks of the beginnings of this book, how they wished to give all a “birthday” gift to all – an “invitation to more joy and more happiness” , and ends with the following. “Every day is a new opportunity to begin again. Every day is your birthday.“May this book be a blessing for all sentient beings, and for all of God’s children—including you.” Tenzin Gyatso, His Holiness the Dalai Lama Desmond Tutu, Archbishop Emeritus of South AfricaHappy Birthday!
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  • Zoe's Human
    January 1, 1970
    The Book of Joy started out in an ordinary enough manner. It was well-written, interesting, at times humorous, and full of truth. But then . . . right book, right time, it guided me to closure on something I'd been struggling with for a decade. This is literally a life changing book for me.Even if you don't experience an epiphany like me, this book still has the potential to make your life better. You can already be happy and take something from this. You don't have to be Christian or Buddhist f The Book of Joy started out in an ordinary enough manner. It was well-written, interesting, at times humorous, and full of truth. But then . . . right book, right time, it guided me to closure on something I'd been struggling with for a decade. This is literally a life changing book for me.Even if you don't experience an epiphany like me, this book still has the potential to make your life better. You can already be happy and take something from this. You don't have to be Christian or Buddhist for it to be effective either. The guidance within applies perfectly well to the secular life.I received a complimentary copy of this book via a Goodreads giveaway. Many thanks to all involved in providing me with this opportunity.
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  • Brandice
    January 1, 1970
    The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World provides countless insight from Archbishop Desmond Tutu and the Dalai Lama, two spiritual masters and moral leaders, as the book synopsis appropriately characterizes them. These two well-known and highly respected men are friends, and their interaction throughout the book had a playful tone while still showing great admiration and respect for one another. I enjoyed the book overall as a whole, yet found the greatest enjoyment and takeaways i The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World provides countless insight from Archbishop Desmond Tutu and the Dalai Lama, two spiritual masters and moral leaders, as the book synopsis appropriately characterizes them. These two well-known and highly respected men are friends, and their interaction throughout the book had a playful tone while still showing great admiration and respect for one another. I enjoyed the book overall as a whole, yet found the greatest enjoyment and takeaways in the chapters focused on each of the 8 Pillars of Joy: perspective, humility, humor, acceptance, forgiveness, gratitude, compassion, and generosity.There were so many interesting points, perspectives, and stories shared throughout the book that ultimately focus on how to reframe one’s mindset, and reconsider situations. This is the type of book you can revisit often, learning something new each time. Different sections of the book will likely resonate each time too, depending on what’s going on in your life at the moment. For me in particular, this time around it was Acceptance. While there is a plethora of great information to be found (and of course, ultimately implemented) in this wonderful read, The Book of Joy, I leave you with the following few favorites:“We are meant to live in joy,” the Archbishop explained. “This does not mean that life will be easy or painless. It means that we can turn our faces to the wind and accept that this is the storm we must pass through. We cannot succeed by denying what exists. The acceptance of reality is the only place from which change can begin.”“The two leaders had told us over the course of the week that there is no joy without sorrow, that in fact it is the pain, the suffering that allows us to experience and appreciate the joy. Indeed, the more we turn toward the suffering, our own and others, the more we can turn toward the joy. We accept them both, turning the volume of life up, or we turn our backs on life itself, becoming deaf to its music. They had also told us and demonstrated that true joy is a way of being, not a fleeting emotion. What they had cultivated in their long lives was that enduring trait of joyfulness. They had warned us that we cannot pursue joy as an end in itself, or we will miss the bus. Joy comes, rather, from daily thoughts, feelings, and actions. And they had told us repeatedly the action that gets us on the bus: bringing joy to others.”
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  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful, exquisite, full of love and friendship between Archbishop Tutu and the Dalai Lama. I listened to this on audio; incredible to hear the different voices (narrators were actors, very good actors) and quotes from these two enlightened friends. I will refer back to with frequency the helpful practice chapters at the end on meditation/thought changes. This is the premier "book of joy" I've read thus far. Empowering and thought provoking with humor and love for self and others.
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  • Gerri Leen
    January 1, 1970
    I expected to like this more than I did. There is an old writing rule of "Show, don't tell" and this book, with it's third person narrator describing everything and very much inserted into the thing, is pretty much all tell. And there's a lot of repetition. The overall message is good but frankly a bit light on content.
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  • madamescozycorner
    January 1, 1970
    4.5I have listened to this book on audible, but as I found so many important messages and useful practices in it, I wanted to have a physical copy as well to reread and mark my favourite passages in! It's that kind of book! <3 Especially regarding the current situation in the world, but also for years in everyday life, I found myself agreeing: we are all in it together. We are all human beings looking for happiness and trying to free ourselves from suffering. So we should be more kind to othe 4.5I have listened to this book on audible, but as I found so many important messages and useful practices in it, I wanted to have a physical copy as well to reread and mark my favourite passages in! It's that kind of book! <3 Especially regarding the current situation in the world, but also for years in everyday life, I found myself agreeing: we are all in it together. We are all human beings looking for happiness and trying to free ourselves from suffering. So we should be more kind to others and to ourselves.The only thing I found to be a liiittle downer, is that there is often talk of the importance of relationships. But only a very little part actually goes deeper into how shy or lonely people can overcome their struggles. (In a wider sense, they can, of course, by applying the practices of kindness and mindfulness on their everyday life.) But the fact, that a lot of us still struggle remains the same. Then again, that's life, huh?
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Read this book.I so desperately needed to read this book but I didn't know it until tears were running down my face. Not from sadness, but from the opportunity it presents. Suffering is unavoidable. But practicing joy is a choice that we can control when so much is out of our control. It's a simple concept but potentially life changing nonetheless. The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World is self-help in nature with elements of documentary, spiritualism, and world culture. It teach Read this book.I so desperately needed to read this book but I didn't know it until tears were running down my face. Not from sadness, but from the opportunity it presents. Suffering is unavoidable. But practicing joy is a choice that we can control when so much is out of our control. It's a simple concept but potentially life changing nonetheless. The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World is self-help in nature with elements of documentary, spiritualism, and world culture. It teaches how to practice joy through redirecting our thoughts, showing compassion, choosing gratitude, and by purposefully giving joy to others. There is a manual at the end that goes into greater detail/instruction for interested readers. Highly recommend!My favorite quote:“There are going to be frustrations in life. The question is not: How do I escape? It is: How can I use this as something positive?”
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  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    ‘Wherever you have friends that’s your country, and wherever you receive love, that’s your home.’” --Tibetan ProverbTwo Nobel Peace laureates meet for a week in Dharamsala, India and engage in a spiritual dialogue and these talks will become the basis for a book. Sounds a bit lofty and just a smidge dull except that the two men at the heart of these discussions are his Holiness the Dalai Lama, he of the beatific smile, and the Honorable Archbishop Desmond Tutu, himself a bit mischievous. The res ‘Wherever you have friends that’s your country, and wherever you receive love, that’s your home.’” --Tibetan ProverbTwo Nobel Peace laureates meet for a week in Dharamsala, India and engage in a spiritual dialogue and these talks will become the basis for a book. Sounds a bit lofty and just a smidge dull except that the two men at the heart of these discussions are his Holiness the Dalai Lama, he of the beatific smile, and the Honorable Archbishop Desmond Tutu, himself a bit mischievous. The result of these far-ranging discussions is this book filled with insights and laughter in equal measure and I was filled with joy just listening to it.Structured on the Eight Pillars of Joy--perspective, humility, humor, acceptance, forgiveness, gratitude, compassion and generosity--these principles provide the basis for finding joy in every moment and in every encounter. And while these precepts seem simple enough, how hard is it for all of us to live with these thoughts top of mind every day? Certainly not I when the fifth driver of the day cuts me off, but this is why I listen to books like this, so that I can keep drumming the message into my head. All issues big and small can be overcome with a modicum of compassion, reconciliation and perspective.What resonated most and why I’m most grateful to have listened to this book is the perspective the Dalai Lama brought to his own predicament. How the tragedy of his exile when seen from a different angle brought the plight of the Tibetan people and the teachings of Buddhism to a larger audience that might not have been cast in the limelight had he remained in Lhasa. In his own words:There are different aspects to any event. For example, we lost our own country and became refugees, but that same experience gave us new opportunities to see more things. For me personally, I had more opportunities to meet with different people, different spiritual practitioners, like you, and also scientists. This new opportunity arrived because I became a refugee. If I remained in the Potala in Lhasa, I would have stayed in what has often been described as a golden cage: the Lama, holy Dalai Lama.” He was now sitting up stiffly as he once had to when he was the cloistered spiritual head of the Forbidden Kingdom. “So, personally, I prefer the last five decades of refugee life. It’s more useful, more opportunity to learn, to experience life. Therefore, if you look from one angle, you feel, oh how bad, how sad. But if you look from another angle at that same tragedy, that same event, you see that it gives me new opportunities.’I think this is the most difficult of the concepts to accept and adopt from this book, but it can be the most significant in terms of how we view the misfortunes in our own lives. It has certainly changed the way I am viewing my own tragedies. How can these two men who’ve endured such adversity and losses still find their way to joy? This is the ultimate lesson in how to make lemonade out of lemons.I can’t say I’ll become a better person overnight and I won’t guarantee that if you cut me off in traffic I won’t yell a few expletives (yes, I have been known to use 'colorful' language in the privacy of my car), but I have been thinking about this book for two months since listening to it and I do find myself squashing more of the negative feelings and replacing them with more kind and productive thoughts. And while I still despair some days at the state of our world, I focus instead on what I can do in my little corner. How can I be there for my family? How do I support my friends? What charities can I lend my talents to that will make a difference in my neighbors' lives?It’s not a perfect book, it does get a bit repetitive in parts and the author (moderator) injects himself into the narrative ‘mansplaining’ sometimes, but overall these are small criticisms in the overall message. And who is going to dock two holy men stars? Who needs that kind of bad karma?So take a step back, practice humility, laugh often, accept things as they are, forgive when necessary, be grateful, be kind and help others. And if you fail at one or any of these today, remember that every day is an opportunity to begin again. I will step off the soapbox now, I’m sure someone needs the wood.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    This audiobook is life-changing. I know that sounds like a dramatization but it’s really not. This audiobook covers a week long conversation between dear friends His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu. What a wonderful conversation to listen in on! These two men, from different religious backgrounds, come together and show the world that spirituality is universal and not defined by a specific religious context. Their messages are simple and straightforward which makes it even mo This audiobook is life-changing. I know that sounds like a dramatization but it’s really not. This audiobook covers a week long conversation between dear friends His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu. What a wonderful conversation to listen in on! These two men, from different religious backgrounds, come together and show the world that spirituality is universal and not defined by a specific religious context. Their messages are simple and straightforward which makes it even more shocking that we all need to be reminded of them. They propose eight pillars of joy and discuss each one from their different perspectives and life experiences to teach us to ground ourselves in compassion for others. I listened to this book straight through then listened to it again and then bought the hardcover so that I could have a reference. What wonderful and inspirational thoughts from two men who have suffered from extreme hardships and still remain joyful, hopeful and caring about humanity, even those who have hurt them personally. It’s a triumph of goodness and selflessness in a world laden with self-righteousness and self-absorption. Pick this up and listen to their peaceful and enthusiastic voices. It will bring you JOY!
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  • Bonnie
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyed multiple parts of this book, but spent more time frustrated with the collaborator who just couldn't seem to get out of the way. For a book that multiple times stressed that people who use the word, "I," more often die earlier, he certainly seemed to get a lot in. If you skim for quotation marks so you can focus on the Dalai Lama and the Archbishop's discussion, as well as where you see some discussion of the psychology and neuro-science, there's a good book in there.
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  • Kacey Kells
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone (well, almost!) agrees that we should do our best to make this world a safer and better world… i.e.: “a happier, kinder, more compassionate world”. Sadly however, most people think it’s a beautiful but unattainable dream. In this book however, His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu stated that it is in our Human Nature to seek happiness and joy; hence, since we are social animals, the only way to be happy and joyful is to look at others, to be compassionate. Indeed, if Everyone (well, almost!) agrees that we should do our best to make this world a safer and better world… i.e.: “a happier, kinder, more compassionate world”. Sadly however, most people think it’s a beautiful but unattainable dream. In this book however, His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu stated that it is in our Human Nature to seek happiness and joy; hence, since we are social animals, the only way to be happy and joyful is to look at others, to be compassionate. Indeed, if you focus on yourself, you will feel lonely and sad: “Everybody wants a happy life, and our individual happy life depends on a happy humanity. So we have to think about humanity” said the Dalai Lama. Hence, joy depends on our ability to go beyond ‘self-centeredness’.Archbishop Desmond Tutu added: “We are most joyful when we focus on others, not on ourselves. In short, bringing joy to others is the fastest way to experience joy oneself”. “The people we admire are those who have been other-regarding”… And, citing Martin Luther King: “We must learn to live together as sisters and brothers, or we will perish together as fools”. “A person is a person through other persons”. However, if “we are meant to live in Joy, this doesn’t mean that life will be easy or painless. It means that we can turn our faces to the wind and accept that this is the storm we must pass through. We cannot succeed by denying what exists. The acceptance of reality is the only place from which change can begin” (Desmond Tutu). Later, His Holiness stated: “Religion is not sufficient. I think the only way really is, as we have said, through education. Education is universal. We must teach people, especially our youth, the source of happiness and satisfaction”.After several days of discussion, the two Nobel laureates concluded that there are eight pillars of Joy: a wider perspective (rejecting self-centeredness), humility, sense of humor and ability to laugh at ourselves, acceptance of life, forgiveness, gratitude, compassion, and generosity: in other words, sense of otherness and acceptation of reality. "Why be unhappy about something if it can be remedied? And what is the use of being unhappy if it can't be remedied?" asked the Dalai Lama. Yes, ‘The book of Joy’ is enthralling. Written with a dash of humor, it radiates happiness. More importantly, it enabled me to share a fabulous, a beautiful and enriching experience; it brings hope and lightens the path. I really loved it! Kacey Kells.
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  • Elsa
    January 1, 1970
    Five Stars because there are just 5.I said it before but I mention it again: this was THE most beautiful book I have read the last years. So touching, sometimes so funny, and so deeply true.It took me a while to finish it because every time I would read some pages I just wanted to stop and think about it or it would take me to think about situations that I lived.I have this urge now to talk about it to everyone I know and I care, kind of trying to make them read it and take it serious. It would Five Stars because there are just 5.I said it before but I mention it again: this was THE most beautiful book I have read the last years. So touching, sometimes so funny, and so deeply true.It took me a while to finish it because every time I would read some pages I just wanted to stop and think about it or it would take me to think about situations that I lived.I have this urge now to talk about it to everyone I know and I care, kind of trying to make them read it and take it serious. It would be so good if people would read this book and believe that we, each one of us, can really make the difference. That we can really forgive one another, that one can spread love just by giving a smile to a stranger on the streets.Compassion... isn't it a beautiful word?JoyLove Forgiveness All wonderful feelings.If you want to read this book, take time and grab a pencil because I am sure you will stop thousands of times to write something on the side... or to underline some sentences.Thank you so much Dalai Lama, Desmond Tutu and Douglas Abrams
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  • Mizanur Rahman
    January 1, 1970
    Buddhism always fascinates me. Not as a religion but as philosophy. Perhaps, of all religions (philosophical view) collectively, Buddhism effectively reaches the core of human nature, and thus promote its fellow believer to nurture their soul. This book is not about Buddhism or Christianity, though it features two topmost representatives of those religions/views. It talks about human nature, about joy, and obviously, it’s worth reading.
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  • Alli Lubin
    January 1, 1970
    I am savoring this book. "The Dalai Lama and the Archbishop Desmond Tutu are two of the great spiritual masters of our time, but they are also moral leaders who transcend their own traditions and speak always from a concern for humanity as a whole..."JOY is much bigger than happiness. While happiness is often seen as being dependent on external circumstances, joy is not." This book is the result of a week they spent together talking about the "purpose of life -- the goal of avoiding suffering an I am savoring this book. "The Dalai Lama and the Archbishop Desmond Tutu are two of the great spiritual masters of our time, but they are also moral leaders who transcend their own traditions and speak always from a concern for humanity as a whole..."JOY is much bigger than happiness. While happiness is often seen as being dependent on external circumstances, joy is not." This book is the result of a week they spent together talking about the "purpose of life -- the goal of avoiding suffering and discovering happiness." The Archbishop expressed concerns "about crossing wits with the Dalai Lama. "He is much more cerebral," referring to the Dalai Lama's great love of debate, intellectual inquiry, and scientific exploration. "I am more instinctual," as deep visceral knowing and prayerful surrender had guided all of the major turning points in his life and his mission in the struggle to end apartheid. Thus begins the dialogue on the nature of true joy. The question most asked of them when they began the project was not about how we could discover our own joy but how we could possibly live with joy in a world filled with so much suffering.
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  • Ann Living It Up
    January 1, 1970
    Definitely a must read in cultivating a peaceful, joyful and compassionate life. The world needs this book of wisdom, especially now with so much political division going on. These two spiritual teachers, the Dalai Lama XIV and Archbishop Desmond Tutu have wonderful words of wisdom in how to deal with everyday struggles, especially in regards to our personal relationships and the world around us. It doesn't matter what your religious beliefs are or where you are in the world, this book and the e Definitely a must read in cultivating a peaceful, joyful and compassionate life. The world needs this book of wisdom, especially now with so much political division going on. These two spiritual teachers, the Dalai Lama XIV and Archbishop Desmond Tutu have wonderful words of wisdom in how to deal with everyday struggles, especially in regards to our personal relationships and the world around us. It doesn't matter what your religious beliefs are or where you are in the world, this book and the exercises in the back of the book are a great teaching tool in how to have a joyful, peaceful existence and I paid special attention to the parts of the book on how not to be judgmental of myself and others, because we are all human. Learning to be more compassionate is definitely the road to a more loving life that I personally want to have.I especially loved the banter between these two compassionate souls. Their conversations made me laugh and made me realize too that we shouldn't take ourselves so seriously and to laugh at ourselves more. Of all the spiritual books I've read, the ones by the Dalai Lama or written about him and what he is all about are all my favorite. He is the most loving, peaceful person I know. And now I have a new profound respect for an additional compassionate soul: Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Definitely a must read.
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  • George
    January 1, 1970
    "The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World" by the Dalai Lama, Desmond Tutu, and Douglas Abrams is a book about the important things in life. The Dalai Lama (a Buddhist), Tutu (a Christian), and Abrams (a Secular Jew) spent a week together in dialogue - discussing the principles and values they considered most important. This book is the result of that week. In their dialogue, they discussed principles and values such as compassion, generosity, forgiveness, acceptance, righteous ang "The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World" by the Dalai Lama, Desmond Tutu, and Douglas Abrams is a book about the important things in life. The Dalai Lama (a Buddhist), Tutu (a Christian), and Abrams (a Secular Jew) spent a week together in dialogue - discussing the principles and values they considered most important. This book is the result of that week. In their dialogue, they discussed principles and values such as compassion, generosity, forgiveness, acceptance, righteous anger, and courage. And they devoted significant time to discussing suffering and joy. To the cynic (and I can be cynical at times), these values might seem quaint or simplistic. However, I have to admit that, several times, they were able to pierce my cynical armor. Tutu shared incidents from his life and his experiences in the South African anti-Apartheid movement (of which he was a leader). The Dalai Lama shared incidents from his own life and about the Tibetan people’s refugee experiences. And Abrams discussed insights of modern science and a few of his own life experiences. The dialogue was held at the Dalai Lama's home in India. The high point of the week was the Dalai Lama's 80th birthday celebration at the Tibet children's school. This is the kind of book you can either read straight through or you can read a couple of paragraphs or pages each day and then reflect on it throughout the day. Also, at the end of the book, there are a dozen or so stand-alone meditation exercises. Since listening to this book I have endeavored to be more compassionate in my daily life. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to reflect on the important things in life and to those seeking encouragement in life. Rating: 4 out of 5 starsNote(s): Audiobook: Narration credits: Douglas Carlton Abrams, read by the author Dalai Lama, read by Francois Chau Desmond Tutu, read by Peter Francis James Length: 10 hours and 12 minutes Unabridged Audiobook Release Date: 2016-09-20 Publisher: Penguin Audio
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  • Nora|KnyguDama
    January 1, 1970
    "Džiaugsmo knygą" spirgėjau perskaityti iki Jo šventenybės vizito Lietuvoje. Prieš mėnesį rezervavau ją bibliotekoje, bet eilė kaip neatėjo, taip neatėjo. Vyras pavargo klausyti mano zyzimo ir galų gale man padovanojo šitą knygą. Galvojau, oi kaip dabar kibsiu į ją - vienu prisėdimu perskaitysiu ir visa apsišvietusi klausysiuosi Dalai Lamos paskaitos. Pradėjau skaityti ir... ir mano užsispyrimas bei noras kuo greičiau leidinį įveikti kaip mat išgaravo. Nuo pirmų puslapių, įžangos supratau, kad " "Džiaugsmo knygą" spirgėjau perskaityti iki Jo šventenybės vizito Lietuvoje. Prieš mėnesį rezervavau ją bibliotekoje, bet eilė kaip neatėjo, taip neatėjo. Vyras pavargo klausyti mano zyzimo ir galų gale man padovanojo šitą knygą. Galvojau, oi kaip dabar kibsiu į ją - vienu prisėdimu perskaitysiu ir visa apsišvietusi klausysiuosi Dalai Lamos paskaitos. Pradėjau skaityti ir... ir mano užsispyrimas bei noras kuo greičiau leidinį įveikti kaip mat išgaravo. Nuo pirmų puslapių, įžangos supratau, kad "Džiaugsmo knygą" skaitysiu itin lėtai. Jei reikės, jei norėsis, pastraipas ir skyrius skaitysiu du kartus, tris kartus. Kol visas knygos gėris nusės tiesiai į sielą. Taip ir dariau. Ir, o Dievai - tai viena nuostabiausių mano skaitytų knygų. Manasis egzempliorius visas subraukytas pieštuku, prižymėtas kilusių minčių, puslapiai papuošti šauktukais ir širdelėmis. Dar niekada jokia kita knyga mano lentynoje taip neatrodė."Džiaugsmo knyga" tai dviejų dvasinių vadovų susitikmo, diskusijų, pokalbių vaisius. 80-ojo Dalai Lamos gimtadienio proga, jo tremties šalyje Indijoje, Dharmasaloje jį aplanko arkivyskupas Desmondas Tutu. Pagalvokit vien koks tai yra grožis: dvi skirtingos religijos, absoliučiai kitoks tikėjimas, dauguma besikertančių dalykų, o jokios neapykantos, pykčio - vien tyra meilė ir draugystė. Ir išties Dalai Lama ir Desmondas Tutu yra tikri draugai ir tai akivaizdu iš jų pokalbių. "Šiitai ar sunitai, krikščionys ar musulmonai. Mes tokie patys žmonės. Religiniai skirtumai yra asmeninis reikalas. Blogis slypi ne tikėjimuose. Bėdas sukelia tikintieji." Per septynias arkivyskupo viešnagės dienas, dvasininkai diskutavo apie religiją, kančią, džiaugsmą, tikėjimo ir meditacijos svarbą. Palietė pasauliui aktualias ir nepatogias temas. Bet nepagalvokit, kad ši knyga kažkoks akademinis, pedagoginis leidinys kaip viską mylėti ir ką daryti, kad pasaulis būtų geresnis. Visiškai ne. Tai gana šmaikštus, be galo intelektualus, daug apmąstymui minčių suteiksiantis dvasingas dviejų draugų pokalbis. Tikrai - vietomis net juokiausi. Tutu nuolat pašiepė Dalai Lamą dėl jo populiarumo ir prastos anglų kalbos. O Dalai Lama vis juokaudavo, kad arkivyskupas jam pavydi. Knyga net iliustruota judviejų nuotraukomis, kurios akivaizdžiai liudija šių vyrų draugystę.Buvo ir itin jautrių momentų. Kuomet buvo kalbama apie Tibeto likimą ar apertheidą. Dalai Lama skaudžiai teigė, jog nebeprašo išvaduoti Tibeto. Tiesiog maldauja jį išsaugoti. Tuo pačiu jis pridūrė, jog nelaiko jokio pykčio Kinijai. Jis suvokia, jog tokią politiką veda ne šalis, o atskiri žmonės. Likusiųjų jam gaila. Tutu pasakojo apie Afrikos žmonių naikinimus, žiaurius kankinimo būdus, apie savo asmenines netektis ir išgyvenimus. Daugumos dalykų pati nežinojua, tad dar plačiau domėjausi internete. Ši knyga man buvo kaip filosofijos vadovėlis. Gyvenimiškos filosofijos, kupinos meilės ir atjautos kiekvienam. Iš dvasininkų pokalbio pasisėmiau tiek gėrio, kiek jokia marolizuojanti knyga, laida ar žmogus nebuvo pateikę. Ji mane įkvėpė keistis, keisti požiūrį į gyvenimą, matyti bei mąstyti plačiau. Pamatysi kitus gyvenimo atvejų kampus. Ar apie daug knygų galiu taip pasakyti? Tikrai ne. Gal vos apie kelias. "Džiaugsmo knyga" mūsų namuose bus skaitoma daug kartų. O subraukyti pieštuku lapai atversti kai tik pritrūks jėgų ar įkvėpimo. Pabaigai noriu pateikti Dalai Lamos požiūrio į gyvenimą esmę: "Kam liūdėti dėl ti, ką galima ištaisyti? Ir kokia prasmė liūdėti, jeigu tai nepataisoma?" Argi nepasilengvintume savo pečių jei kasdien mokintumėmės vadovautis šiais žodžiais?
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  • Calista
    January 1, 1970
    I love the Dalai Lama and everything he has to say. I feel so fortunate to have his words in todays age. He has seen many horrors and tragedies in his long life and he has this wonderful perspective. I admire him and I want to have his views on life. I wish I could quote adequately from this book. There were so many quotes form the book that rang true for me. This book really made me think and exam my life. It was a joy to read a savor. Both of these men have lived amazing lives and they really I love the Dalai Lama and everything he has to say. I feel so fortunate to have his words in todays age. He has seen many horrors and tragedies in his long life and he has this wonderful perspective. I admire him and I want to have his views on life. I wish I could quote adequately from this book. There were so many quotes form the book that rang true for me. This book really made me think and exam my life. It was a joy to read a savor. Both of these men have lived amazing lives and they really are filled with joy. I want to radiate that kind of joy. This book came at the perfect time for me and I would like to read it again sometime. It also makes me want to read more of the Dalai Lama's works. The meditations at the end of the book are nice. I want to own the book so I have them to practice.
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  • Caidyn (SEMI-HIATUS; BW Reviews; he/him/his)
    January 1, 1970
    This review and others can be found on BW Book Review.Personally, when I think of religion, this is what I think of. The fundamental good of it, all the ways that they draw people together and accept them no matter what. The Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu are prime examples of that. They really exemplify the love and compassion, all while showing immense happiness no matter what. Even in the bad times, they show joy and acceptance, all while fighting for change. However, the people who d This review and others can be found on BW Book Review.Personally, when I think of religion, this is what I think of. The fundamental good of it, all the ways that they draw people together and accept them no matter what. The Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu are prime examples of that. They really exemplify the love and compassion, all while showing immense happiness no matter what. Even in the bad times, they show joy and acceptance, all while fighting for change. However, the people who do bad get the most press rather than these people, giving religion a different look.Joy is so important to live your life. I try to live like that, to have as much joy as possible. Half the time when I'm talking about things that upset me, I'll throw in a joke and find a way to laugh at it. I accept it and I'm not going to stop fighting for a change, but there's no point in being upset. Having happiness in your life really improves it. I could cite so much research on that one little thing. It's hard to find, though, in the world we live in. This book is a great introduction to this through an interreligious dialogue between Buddhism and Christianity, two widely different religions that come together.This book brings up a lot of concepts, but I'm only going to touch on a few.For me, compassion is key. I've had a love of the topic since I read Pema Chodron last year. She's an amazing author and if you haven't read her, I'd highly suggest it. She brings in so many base concepts and ideas to live by. Yes, she weaves in religion, but you can take that out and still find truth in it. Compassion leads to so many things since, to properly practice it (and, by that, I mean a specific Buddhist practice that I won't get into here) you have to first love yourself. That brings joy. Then, you extend compassion to friends and family then to people you feel neutral about to people you somewhat like and even to people you don't like. It grows your joy, being able to see how we're all the same with the same wants.The next two are humility and humor. I see them as very combined because to have humility, you have to find humor in things. And to find humor, you need to be humble. I always laugh at myself. Not a day goes by when I, much like Tutu, make a self-depreciating comment about myself. It sets off the situation and keeps me from getting on my high horse. Then, I also admit when I don't know something. I don't like pretending. I've done that enough in my life to know it's not for me.Now, as I said, the world is a very different place. It's full of hate and sadness. Just when I was listening to this book, Hurricane Harvey was on the news. Not to mention the transgender ban from the military. Or the white supremacy battle. I hate to say this and agree with Trump, but there is hate on both sides of this. We do need more people like the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Tutu. Self-change leads to changing the world.I completely recommend this book. I recommend the audiobook more so since the man who compiled these dialogues narrates it, and there are two other people who read as the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Tutu. It adds a lot to the listen, not to mention that there are so many practices at the end (mainly Christian and Buddhist) that you can find out what could work for you since most really aren't that religious.
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  • Ita
    January 1, 1970
    I was reading this book at the hairdressers and when I was paying, one of the hairdressers came to me to tell me she enjoyed watching me read as she saw me chuckling while reading it. Then I showed her the title and said that it must be working already! I like this quote "Wherever you have friends that's your country, and wherever you receive love, that's your home". And I like the concept of "mudita" which means "the practice of rejoicing in others' good fortune". I got a lot out of this book a I was reading this book at the hairdressers and when I was paying, one of the hairdressers came to me to tell me she enjoyed watching me read as she saw me chuckling while reading it. Then I showed her the title and said that it must be working already! I like this quote "Wherever you have friends that's your country, and wherever you receive love, that's your home". And I like the concept of "mudita" which means "the practice of rejoicing in others' good fortune". I got a lot out of this book and I liked that this book is a week-long conversation between two good friends who happen to be spiritual leaders in Buddhism and Christianity. I didn't always agree with what they were saying, but that is probably because I am not a holy man! It certainly made me think and reflect, definitely worth the time to read this gem of a book.
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  • Kathryn
    January 1, 1970
    What an absolutely wonderful book. It does not matter what your spiritual beliefs are you cannot help but glean something from reading this book. These two men have the most touching and magnificent friendship. They laugh and tease each other. They enjoy each others thoughts and their ability to understand each other is what makes for such good reading. The book is filled with quotes. One of my favorites is:Gratitude helps us catalog, celebrate and rejoice in each day and each moment before they What an absolutely wonderful book. It does not matter what your spiritual beliefs are you cannot help but glean something from reading this book. These two men have the most touching and magnificent friendship. They laugh and tease each other. They enjoy each others thoughts and their ability to understand each other is what makes for such good reading. The book is filled with quotes. One of my favorites is:Gratitude helps us catalog, celebrate and rejoice in each day and each moment before they slip through the vanishing hourglass of experience.
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  • Brad McKenna
    January 1, 1970
    What happens when you put The Dalai Lama and The Archbishop Tutu in a room together to talk about Joy? Laughter, chuckles, chortles, and deep unbridled belly laughs. Not to mention good natured ribbing that would make any pair of siblings proud. According to these two spiritual giants, joy is more than just plain happiness, it’s a state of being. They have suffered tremendously, the Dalai Lama being forced into exile and the Archbishop lived through Apartheid. They think that because of, not in What happens when you put The Dalai Lama and The Archbishop Tutu in a room together to talk about Joy? Laughter, chuckles, chortles, and deep unbridled belly laughs. Not to mention good natured ribbing that would make any pair of siblings proud. According to these two spiritual giants, joy is more than just plain happiness, it’s a state of being. They have suffered tremendously, the Dalai Lama being forced into exile and the Archbishop lived through Apartheid. They think that because of, not in spite of, these horrid happenings they are the joyful peacemakers they are today. It’s truly astounding. Their co-author Doug Abrams weaves both religions together with scientific studies to provide proof one needn’t be religious to find joy. This is so many uplifting moments in this book that I can’t hope to do it justice by continuing my synopsis.So I won’t.Here is a list, in no particular order, of quotes that made me stop and think.“‘Forgiveness,’ the Dalai Lama continued, ‘does not mean we forget. You should remember the negative thing, but because there is a possibility to develop hatred, we mustn't allow ourselves to be lead in that direction- we choose forgiveness.’ The Archbishop was also clear about this: forgiveness does not mean you forget what someone has done, contrary to the saying ‘forgive and forget.’ Not reacting with negativity, or giving in to the negative emotions, does not mean you do not respond to the acts or that you allow yourself to be harmed again. Forgiveness does not mean that you do not seek justice or that the perpetrator is not punished.” ~The Dalai Lama and Doug Abrams“I say to people that I am not an optimist, because that, in a sense, is something that depends on feelings more than actual reality. We feel optimistic, or we feel pessimistic. Now, hope is different in that it is based not on the ephemerality of feelings but on the firm ground of conviction.”~The Archbishop Tutu“Ubuntu [says] a person is a person through other persons.”~The Archbishop Tutu“I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. I felt fear more times than I can remember, but I hid it behind a mask of boldness. The brave [woman] is not she who does not feel afraid, but [s]he who conquers that fear.”~Nelson Mandela “There is nothing wrong with faiths. The problem is the faithful.”~Archbishop TutuI could go on...in fact, one more!“The goal is not just to create joy for ourselves but, as the Archbishop poetically phrased it, ‘to be a reservoir of joy, an oasis of peace, a pool of serenity that can ripple out to all those around you.’”~Doug Abrams & The Archbishop TutuOk. I hope I’ve enticed you enough to pick up a copy from your friendly neighborhood librarian. On the heels of the most rancorous presidential campaign in my lifetime, and what is shaping up to be a first 100 days filled with outrage and superciliousness, this book should be required reading.
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  • P.E.
    January 1, 1970
    3/5La note reflète mal l'avis en donnant l'impression d'une moyenne. Ce livre comporte des éléments qui me paraissent une franche réussite et à la fois des éléments qui le tirent vers le bas.Les plus :- L'idée de base de faire se rencontrer le Dalaï-Lama et l'Archevêque Tutu pour causer de la joie.- La clarté et la méthode dans la liste d'outils proposés : la perspective, la dérision, l'attention, la compassion.- Les approches contrastées entre les trois co-auteurs de ce livre.- La rencontre tou 3/5La note reflète mal l'avis en donnant l'impression d'une moyenne. Ce livre comporte des éléments qui me paraissent une franche réussite et à la fois des éléments qui le tirent vers le bas.Les plus :- L'idée de base de faire se rencontrer le Dalaï-Lama et l'Archevêque Tutu pour causer de la joie.- La clarté et la méthode dans la liste d'outils proposés : la perspective, la dérision, l'attention, la compassion.- Les approches contrastées entre les trois co-auteurs de ce livre.- La rencontre touchante entre deux hommes façonnés par de dures épreuves.Les moins : - Les redites.- Je préfère la partie plus décousue des entretiens au catalogue systématique répété plusieurs fois, avec les quelques franches longueurs que ça suppose.- Le langage un peu lénifiant par endroit, l'argumentation scientiste naïve qui ne parle que des thèses sympathisantes aux vues des participants (par souci d'économie de place, peut-être, mais alors il était possible de moins se répéter : c'est un choix).
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    How beautiful and true, evoking, and expanding on, ideas which I notice are appearing in many other things I read!“The real secret of freedom may simply be extending this brief space between stimulus and response” (179). As mentioned in ‘Shantaram’ - we always have the freedom of choice; of choosing our response based on our attitude. This freedom cannot be taken away from us as it is dictated by our mind and the perspective we take. That’s why in ‘Into the Magic Shop’ so much stress is put on p How beautiful and true, evoking, and expanding on, ideas which I notice are appearing in many other things I read!“The real secret of freedom may simply be extending this brief space between stimulus and response” (179). As mentioned in ‘Shantaram’ - we always have the freedom of choice; of choosing our response based on our attitude. This freedom cannot be taken away from us as it is dictated by our mind and the perspective we take. That’s why in ‘Into the Magic Shop’ so much stress is put on perspective. The virtue is in the process of elongating the space between stimulus and reaction - the freedom lays in our ability to achieve wider perspective and control our primitive reaction. A by-product of such control can be happiness, but it is more important to concentrate on the process of control; of freedom of choice, in order to feel joyful. By shifting perspective, creating the right paradigm for ourselves and, thus, actively engaging with our daily life, we stand the best chance of reaching joy - remembering that the virtue is in the process of such living and not in the end destination.“One of the key paradoxes in Buddhism is that we need goals to be inspired, to grow, and to develop, even to become enlightened, but at the same time we must not get overly fixated or attached to these aspirations. If the goal is noble, your commitment to the goal should not be contingent on your ability to attain it, and in pursuit of our goal, we must release or rigid assumptions about how we must achieve it. Peace and equanimity come from letting go of our attachment to the goal and the method. This is the essence of acceptance.” (226-227)This book was truly inspirational and I simply had to stay up all night to finish it. It has the power to awaken and ignite a certain passion due to advocating for virtues so innate that they provoke life-long reflection. Hopefully this reflection motivates us and brings us closer to joy.
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  • Lubinka Dimitrova
    January 1, 1970
    I'll be never too cynical to be able to enjoy, appreciate and cherish the words of these two men which might seem syrupy and nonsensically naive, but are in fact utterly cheerful, lighten our load and help us put a smile on our face each and every day. I myself grew as an agnostic, and it's difficult for me to grasp the deeper beliefs of their respective religions, but for me, they are two of the finest human beings on the planet and a model not only for any spiritual, political or any other typ I'll be never too cynical to be able to enjoy, appreciate and cherish the words of these two men which might seem syrupy and nonsensically naive, but are in fact utterly cheerful, lighten our load and help us put a smile on our face each and every day. I myself grew as an agnostic, and it's difficult for me to grasp the deeper beliefs of their respective religions, but for me, they are two of the finest human beings on the planet and a model not only for any spiritual, political or any other type of leader, but also a model for the kind of life we all should strive to live.
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  • Laila (BigReadingLife)
    January 1, 1970
    I adored listening to this audiobook. (Not narrated by the Dalai Lama or Archbishop Tutu themselves, but skilled narrators with similar accents.). I never knew what a lovely friendship the two spiritual leaders had before this. Often laughing and teasing one another, they truly show how to live in the world with grace, joy, and equanimity. I’d like to buy this book and refer to it again when I need a spiritual lift. It made me feel calmer when I listened. Highly recommended!
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  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    Nothing new here for me except a chance to 'meet' these two amazing men. So charming; they almost persuade one that the things they say are universally true. And, on a Deep level, they are Truths. But the people who truly need to practice these wise meditations, to act with this level of compassion, to internalize the serenity prayer, etc., are not, I assume, the people who are reading the book.I mean, I have felt sorry for Trump for a long time, especially since I learned that he Tweets late at Nothing new here for me except a chance to 'meet' these two amazing men. So charming; they almost persuade one that the things they say are universally true. And, on a Deep level, they are Truths. But the people who truly need to practice these wise meditations, to act with this level of compassion, to internalize the serenity prayer, etc., are not, I assume, the people who are reading the book.I mean, I have felt sorry for Trump for a long time, especially since I learned that he Tweets late at night. But even though he's very likely unhappy & lonely & insecure, will he ever seek help?Paraphrase: 'Humor, humility, and humanity come from the same root: humus, meaning earth.'Another: 'Commit to noble goals, despite not being confident of your ability to attain it. Have no attachment to the outcome, because external factors can interfere... but commit, nonetheless, to do your best.' "Sometimes... our efforts lead to an unexpected outcome that might even be better than what we originally had in mind."No index, biblography, or notes. I don't trust the journalist's interpretation of the science.
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    A friend gave me ‘The Book of Joy’ as a birthday present and told me she had found it life-changing. I can certainly see why - it’s an extraordinary and moving book, and one that I immediately want to recommend to others. In a series of discussions, revolving around ways in which humanity can live joyfully, the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu manage the feat of transcending religion to find an underlying spirituality. The recommending friend is Christian and found the book’s philosophy de A friend gave me ‘The Book of Joy’ as a birthday present and told me she had found it life-changing. I can certainly see why - it’s an extraordinary and moving book, and one that I immediately want to recommend to others. In a series of discussions, revolving around ways in which humanity can live joyfully, the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu manage the feat of transcending religion to find an underlying spirituality. The recommending friend is Christian and found the book’s philosophy deeply appealing; I’m an atheist and so did I. I saw strong echoes with the Stoic philosophy of Epictetus (Discourses, Fragments, Handbook) and the practise of mindfulness (Mindfulness: A Practical Guide to Finding Peace in a Frantic World). Moreover, I appreciated that the wisdom of the two men was never abstract, but grounded in experience, practise, and their relationship. They have a truly lovely friendship and the dynamic between them gives the book a wonderful feeling of affection and humour. I found the comments on humour particularly striking, actually. It’s very important to be able to laugh at ourselves, at difficult situations, and at unfairness. As the book points out, humour is powerful against injustice, as it reveals the inherent absurdity and nonsense of discrimination. The quote that stuck with me most, though, is this one:”You must not hate those who do harmful things,” the Dalai Lama has explained. “The compassionate thing to do is everything you can to stop them.”I think that encapsulates beautifully that hating people is pointless, as well as reminding me of my favourite line from The Leopard by Giuseppe de Lampedusa: 'Nothing could be decently hated except eternity.' ‘The Book of Joy’ also has wise words about gratitude, humility, and forgiveness, amongst other topics. I found it a moving, thought-provoking, and life-affirming read. The chapter at the end about the birthday party made me cry. I used to meditate regularly and ‘The Book of Joy’ has inspired me to try it again. I already use the gratitude technique of writing down three good things about the day just before going to sleep, which is calming. In this world of relentless social media, 24 hour news, and constant pressure to compete and consume, this book is quietly radical as it promotes community, generosity, and compassion. I felt inspired to live better while reading it and really hope that such good intentions won’t be swept away by daily distractions.
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