Diary of a Tokyo Teen
A book for comic lovers and Japanophiles of all ages, Diary of a Tokyo Teen presents a unique look at modern-day Japan through a young woman's eyes.Born in Tokyo to a Japanese mother and an American father in 1997, Christine Mari Inzer spent her early years in Japan and relocated to the United States in 2003. The summer before she turned sixteen, she returned to Tokyo, making a solo journey to get reacquainted with her birthplace. Through illustrations, photos, and musings, Inzer documented her journey. In Diary of a Tokyo Teen, Inzer explores the cutting-edge fashions of Tokyo's trendy Harajuku district, eats the best sushi of her life at the renowned Tsukiji fish market, and hunts down geisha in the ancient city of Kyoto. As she shares the trials and pleasures of travel from one end of a trip to the other, Inzer introduces the host of interesting characters she meets and offers a unique—and often hilarious—look at a fascinating country and an engaging tale of one girl rediscovering her roots. **Listed as a 2016 Great Graphic Novel for Teens by the Young Adult Library Services Association**

Diary of a Tokyo Teen Details

TitleDiary of a Tokyo Teen
Author
ReleaseSep 6th, 2016
PublisherTuttle Publishing
ISBN-139784805313961
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Nonfiction, Travel, Autobiography, Memoir, Cultural, Japan

Diary of a Tokyo Teen Review

  • Mariah Roze
    January 1, 1970
    I lived in Japan for a summer and taught English, so when I saw this book at the school that I teach at I had to read it.The main character was born in Tokyo and raised there for her first couple years of life. Her mother is Japanese and grew up in Japan and her father is American. The summer before she turned sixteen, she returned to Tokyo to visit her grandparents by herself. This book shares images, drawings and stories from that summer.
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  • Erica
    January 1, 1970
    Now this, this is what I'd wanted from An Age of License: A Travelogue.Here is Christine Mari Inzer's illustrated travel diary from her 2013 trip to Japan.Inzer grew up in Japan and moved to the United States when she was 5 or 6. It seems like her family goes back to visit every five years, or so. She understands the language, though her speaking skills may not be overly strong. She has anxiety about returning to a culture that she perceives differently every time she's there. It was home when s Now this, this is what I'd wanted from An Age of License: A Travelogue.Here is Christine Mari Inzer's illustrated travel diary from her 2013 trip to Japan.Inzer grew up in Japan and moved to the United States when she was 5 or 6. It seems like her family goes back to visit every five years, or so. She understands the language, though her speaking skills may not be overly strong. She has anxiety about returning to a culture that she perceives differently every time she's there. It was home when she was little, then it was an amazing place with some fond memories when she was 10, and now she's experiencing her other country as a 15-year-old almost-adult. Her trip is half home-coming and half tourist destination, reliving favorite experiences (Mosburger) and seeing things for the first time with understanding eyes (hotel rooms that rent by the hour). For most of her visit, it's just her and her Baba. The rest of her family come along in the final two weeks of her stay. Throughout, she's at the threshold of adulthood, not quite ready to step out into the bigger world, but no longer comfortable in her role as a child and she knows this and she understands this trip is what will push her into her next phase of life.In addition, I appreciated her travel photos next to her drawings; it was interesting to compare the two, to see how she got the feel of a moment in her sketches.I enjoyed this travelogue immensely and hope she writes more!
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  • Mehsi
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a delight to read, I am definitely happy I bought this one!I just adore books about travelling, especially if that travels happens to Japan. This book is about a girl who is half Japanese, half American, who lived for quite a bit of her life in Japan, but then moved to America. She visits every few years, but this year is different, she can go alone! Sure, she will be staying with her grandparents, and her parents, siblings, will also come but not until much much later.This book fo This was such a delight to read, I am definitely happy I bought this one!I just adore books about travelling, especially if that travels happens to Japan. This book is about a girl who is half Japanese, half American, who lived for quite a bit of her life in Japan, but then moved to America. She visits every few years, but this year is different, she can go alone! Sure, she will be staying with her grandparents, and her parents, siblings, will also come but not until much much later.This book follows our girl's journey through Japan, now she sees everything from a teenage view (which is quite different from what she was there 5 years earlier). The book is filled with photographs, comics, illustrations, and much more. I loved the format, I wasn't sure what to expect, I just bought this one because it sounded so much fun + the whole Japan travelling part. And then I find out it is filled with the brim with creativity, and I just want to keep on reading, and I just want more books about Japan from this girl. I also loved that she was rediscovering her roots in Japan. You could also see that not everything was pleasure, there were a few scenes which clearly showed she wasn't always too happy. Because of too many people, changing scenery, the fact that she just didn't match with other teenagers there. I don't know about the last part, but I do know the feeling of seeing so many people, the feeling of when you go somewhere and things have changed. But she just tries out, and keeps going. That is really admirable. It was quite fun to see how much of Japan she explores. She doesn't just stay at the same space, or close to her grandparents place, instead she goes out and sees quite a bit of Japan. A lot of the sights were those I already knew (not because I went to Japan, but because of books, anime, jdrama, documentaries), but it was still fun to see them from her POV. It does seem that a lot of people have trouble with the toilets there. Either they are the old-fashioned one (Big NOPE), or they are the fancy new ones with so many buttons that you are worried you might do something wrong, or with a spray that pops up (also not recommended). It is quite funny because this kind of thing keeps popping up in so many books/etc. about Japan.What more? Mm, I think I got everything. I definitely would recommend this book to everyone. Review first posted at https://twirlingbookprincess.com
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  • Chi – cuddle.thereader
    January 1, 1970
    Yayyy cuốn này quá đáng yêu, kiểu trước đấy mình từng đọc 1 bài đăng của bên Wings giới thiệu về cuốn này, thấy ưng cái bụng lắm vì Nhật Bản là một trong những nơi mình rất muốn tới, nhưng đọc những cuốn sách về du lịch bình thường thì lại không vui lắm nhỉ.Xong hôm mở gói quà nhận được cuốn này mình như kiểu woww cầu được ước thấy =))))Để dành em nó cho 1 ngày bão lỡ hẹn ăn trưa xong trà chiều với bạn đang buồn, mình mở ra đọc, vì là sách tranh và phần kể rất ngắn gọn đáng yêu nên vèo cái hết l Yayyy cuốn này quá đáng yêu, kiểu trước đấy mình từng đọc 1 bài đăng của bên Wings giới thiệu về cuốn này, thấy ưng cái bụng lắm vì Nhật Bản là một trong những nơi mình rất muốn tới, nhưng đọc những cuốn sách về du lịch bình thường thì lại không vui lắm nhỉ.Xong hôm mở gói quà nhận được cuốn này mình như kiểu woww cầu được ước thấy =))))Để dành em nó cho 1 ngày bão lỡ hẹn ăn trưa xong trà chiều với bạn đang buồn, mình mở ra đọc, vì là sách tranh và phần kể rất ngắn gọn đáng yêu nên vèo cái hết luôn huhu.Christine chia sẻ những trải nghiệm trong chuyến đi Nhật Bản của cô, những món ăn, những ngôi chùa, những điều kì lạ ở Nhật Bản và cả những cảm xúc chân thật khi đến những nơi cô đã từng đi khi còn nhỏ và nhớ lại khi ấy nữa.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this graphic novel and learning more about Japan and it's culture.
  • Pim
    January 1, 1970
    Cute and funny
  • Miri
    January 1, 1970
    A fun way to take a guided tour of Japan. As a Japanese American who spent her childhood in Tokyo, Inzer is herself half-local and half-tourist, which puts her in a unique position to show us both perspectives simultaneously. She was a teenager when she wrote this one, and I'd love to see her go back as an adult (for a slightly different experience).
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel reminded me so much of my recent trip to Japan. I experienced many of the same things as she did.
  • Masako
    January 1, 1970
    Related so, so much to this book. Felt like I could have written this as a teen after my summer visits to Japan. Page 122 made me cry so, so much because I was reading the exact experience I had which is one of the last few memories I have of my obachan.
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  • Faizah Aulia R
    January 1, 1970
    tipe buku yg cocok dibaca kalau lagi reading slump kkkIsinya sederhana, semua orang bisa bikin tentang resume perjalanan ke Jepang, pergi kemana aja, bertemu siapa aja, apa aja yang unik dll dllSebenernya kalau secara informasi ini kurang banget, tapi aku menikmati aja bukunya, karena bergambar wqwq
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  • Critterbee❇
    January 1, 1970
    Christine Mari Inzer has created a bright, expressive, completely and adorably wonderful book! She tells and shows her experience as a teen returning to and rediscovering Japan. For me, this was a sweet, snack-sized reminder of living in Japan as a foreigner, and on almost every page I thought "I know EXACTLY she feels, that was me, too!" Mister Donut? Check! Defensive subway riding? Check! Trippy television that defies explanation? Check!The adorable illustrations perfectly balance the photogra Christine Mari Inzer has created a bright, expressive, completely and adorably wonderful book! She tells and shows her experience as a teen returning to and rediscovering Japan. For me, this was a sweet, snack-sized reminder of living in Japan as a foreigner, and on almost every page I thought "I know EXACTLY she feels, that was me, too!" Mister Donut? Check! Defensive subway riding? Check! Trippy television that defies explanation? Check!The adorable illustrations perfectly balance the photographs, and the descriptions are funny and accurate. Anyone who has lived in Japan as a foreigner will love this book, and it is a must-read for anyone interested in Japanese culture.I love the energy that the author has captured in the book. This book is not a thorough analysis or commentary on contemporary Japanese life. This is her catching the feelings and emotions of her journey and packaging them in a way that is both touching and hilarious. Well done, and highly recommended.
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  • A.J. Bauers
    January 1, 1970
    This was a pretty cute book. I really liked the narrative tone of the teenage author, and her drawings were awesome. However, I am a bit disappointed with the book's content. Had I been expecting more of a story about the author, rather than a closer in-depth profile to the places in Japan she visited, I probably would have rated in higher. The few sections she did provide detail for were great (including Harajuku and the Golden Pavilion), but then there were things she mentioned that didn't giv This was a pretty cute book. I really liked the narrative tone of the teenage author, and her drawings were awesome. However, I am a bit disappointed with the book's content. Had I been expecting more of a story about the author, rather than a closer in-depth profile to the places in Japan she visited, I probably would have rated in higher. The few sections she did provide detail for were great (including Harajuku and the Golden Pavilion), but then there were things she mentioned that didn't give much information. I would have loved to know some of her favorite ramen stands or some of the drinks in a vending machine, but these areas were sadly lacking. Still, this was a fun read. So anyone wanting more of a memoir experience versus a Japan tour book, this would be up your alley.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    One part memoir, one part travelogue, and one part graphic novel about a Japanese-American girl who spent the summer of 2013 with her Japanese grandparents in Tokyo and the surrounding area. Does a really awesome job of integrating real stories of being an American in Japan and experiencing the culture up close. Descriptions of teen-friendly things like food, TV, and the mall abound, mixed in with stories of the author's adventures of various tourist sites. Really great--I can't wait to share th One part memoir, one part travelogue, and one part graphic novel about a Japanese-American girl who spent the summer of 2013 with her Japanese grandparents in Tokyo and the surrounding area. Does a really awesome job of integrating real stories of being an American in Japan and experiencing the culture up close. Descriptions of teen-friendly things like food, TV, and the mall abound, mixed in with stories of the author's adventures of various tourist sites. Really great--I can't wait to share this with my anime club kids.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    What can I say, I'm a sucker for travel journal-esque GNs! This one was super cute!
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    This was so cute! It felt so genuine and earnest. Some laugh out loud moments, as well as cringe-worthy and anxiety-ridden instances of traveling as a teen.
  • Maija
    January 1, 1970
    I was first drawn to this book by the artwork, but what a great visual memoir and she self-published at 17? I want to build a whole program around this book!
  • Sarri
    January 1, 1970
    Christine Mari Inzer on puoliksi japanilainen amerikkalaistyttö, joka on tehnyt sarjakuvakirjan käynnistään sukulaistensa luona Japanissa. Christine on tehnyt ensimmäisen version tästä jo 17-vuotiaana, jolloin myös julkaisi kirjan omakustanteena. Sarjakuvapäiväkirjassaan Christine kertoo eräästä kesästä, jolloin hän matkusti isovanhempiensa luo Kashiwaan, pienehköön kaupunkiin noin puolen tunnin junamatkan päähän Tokiosta. Siellä ja Tokion reissuilla hän tapasi sukulaisia, tarkkaili ja koki japa Christine Mari Inzer on puoliksi japanilainen amerikkalaistyttö, joka on tehnyt sarjakuvakirjan käynnistään sukulaistensa luona Japanissa. Christine on tehnyt ensimmäisen version tästä jo 17-vuotiaana, jolloin myös julkaisi kirjan omakustanteena. Sarjakuvapäiväkirjassaan Christine kertoo eräästä kesästä, jolloin hän matkusti isovanhempiensa luo Kashiwaan, pienehköön kaupunkiin noin puolen tunnin junamatkan päähän Tokiosta. Siellä ja Tokion reissuilla hän tapasi sukulaisia, tarkkaili ja koki japanilaista kulttuuria sekä teki huomioita japanilaisista asioista. Christine pitää todella paljon japanilaisesta ruoasta, joten ruoka on hyvin näkyvästi esillä kirjassa. Toisaalta hän koki myös ulkopuolisuutta, joten päiväkirjassa on paljon turistinäkökulmaa. Sarjakuvapäiväkirja koostuu pienistä tuokiokuvista niin kulttuurikohteissa, ruokailuhetkistä kuin muistakin asioista kesän aikana. Tutuksi tulevat mm. lebels Harajuku, matsuri, kaiten sushi ja ramen. Sarjakuvapäiväkirja on kiva pieni katsaus Japaniin, vaikkei tästä ihan matkaoppaaksi tai edes Japanin matkan innoittajaksi ole. Luulisin kuitenkin kiinnostavan nuoria, sillä tekijä on itsekin ollut nuori tätä tehdessä.
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  • Emma Klein
    January 1, 1970
    The book I read was Diary of A Tokyo Teen by Christine Mari Inzer. This book talks about Christine and her journey to Tokyo. The book explained how she lives in the US now but used to live in Tokyo and she mentions all the things she misses about living in Tokyo. This book introduces you to her, mom, grandpa, and grandma, and her aunt and cousins. The genre of this book is nonfiction.In the beginning of the book it takes place in the airport, as the book goes on it takes place in Tokyo, at the e The book I read was Diary of A Tokyo Teen by Christine Mari Inzer. This book talks about Christine and her journey to Tokyo. The book explained how she lives in the US now but used to live in Tokyo and she mentions all the things she misses about living in Tokyo. This book introduces you to her, mom, grandpa, and grandma, and her aunt and cousins. The genre of this book is nonfiction.In the beginning of the book it takes place in the airport, as the book goes on it takes place in Tokyo, at the end of the book it takes place in the US. The book started out by telling us about her travels to Tokyo, where she sat on the plane, what she did on the plane, how scared she was to get off the plane because she did not for sure know what to do. When she was getting off the plane she went to the baggage claim and her grandparents were waiting for her. She was staying with them. She was in Tokyo for about a week, she went on many adventures and told us about the japanese culture! One of the adventures she went on is she went to downtown Tokyo by herself. She showed us food that is normally eaten in Tokyo and where people do most of their shopping. I really did like this book because it was a short fast reader but also I learned a lot by reading it. I would also recommend this book to anyone because there was a lot of detail and pictures, it wasn't like a normal book that only had pages and pages of words. The words were spaced out and there were normally pictures on each of the pages. I knew this was a nonfiction book because there were actual pictures from her trip to to Tokyo. The pictures were real and very interesting to look at. After reading this book I definitely would love taking a trip to Tokyo.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    It's more of a 4.5 but not quite a 5. If you don't know much about Japan and it's people and culture, here you get the gist of it in a beautifully illustrated nutshell. The author is a Japanese-American girl/woman who was born in Tokyo but did most of her growing up in the States. When she was a teenager she spent a summer in Japan with her grandparents to reconnect with 'her' culture. She kept a diary in words, illustration and photos which she is sharing here with us. It's a fun read with many It's more of a 4.5 but not quite a 5. If you don't know much about Japan and it's people and culture, here you get the gist of it in a beautifully illustrated nutshell. The author is a Japanese-American girl/woman who was born in Tokyo but did most of her growing up in the States. When she was a teenager she spent a summer in Japan with her grandparents to reconnect with 'her' culture. She kept a diary in words, illustration and photos which she is sharing here with us. It's a fun read with many interesting details and it shows vividly how things don't always go smoothly when diving into another culture even if it is your own in some way.
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  • Tyler
    January 1, 1970
    I liked how there were lots of facts about the book. I thought overall It was a good book and it had lots of good information that I learned. Born in Tokyo to a Japanese mother and an American father in 1997, Christine Mari Inzer spent her early years in Japan and relocated to the United States in 2003. In the summer she turned 16 and flew back out to Tokyo. There were very good illustrations. The strengths of the book were that it was well written and great pictures but it was very short.The I liked how there were lots of facts about the book. I thought overall It was a good book and it had lots of good information that I learned. Born in Tokyo to a Japanese mother and an American father in 1997, Christine Mari Inzer spent her early years in Japan and relocated to the United States in 2003. In the summer she turned 16 and flew back out to Tokyo. There were very good illustrations. The strengths of the book were that it was well written and great pictures but it was very short.The was effective because it described the mood of the story. I agree with the author in situations how they came out but there were not that many. I think she went to Tokyo and was scared at first and conquered it. he was being brave took the risk that could embarrass her self like at the water fountain when she used the water out of the spoon scooper thing. Overall I thought this was a good book and I suggest this to people how to want to read a quick book that is still good
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    A very cute graphic novel about a teenager visiting her grandparents in Japan from where she lives in America. I took a bunch of notes for my own trip to Tokyo and Kyoto later this year. Fun to read the perspective of someone who has lived in Japan, but generally has the default American view of the world.
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  • Trish
    January 1, 1970
    Don't let the "young adult" label or the author's age deter you from reading this illustrated account of the author's time in Japan. I laughed at Inzer's commentary and I learned more about Japanese culture. A quick and delightful read.
  • Eliana Prawer-Stock
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great book for teens. It is hilarious, and you will not want to put this book down after reading it. Plus the illustrations are cool, cute, and make the book even MORE awesome! Christine Mari Inzer has to make more books like this!
  • Kyle Tark
    January 1, 1970
    The book TOKYO TEEN is the most fabulous book ever I read about TOKYO, even though I have been TOKYO I did not know there are such as places that the Christine visited whose the narrator and character of this book.
  • Sachi Argabright
    January 1, 1970
    DIARY OF A TOKYO TEEN features illustrations highlighting Inzer’s return to Japan after moving out of the country 6 years prior. From MOS Burger to the temples of Kyoto, this book highlights some of the best aspects of Japanese culture (in my opinion)!I absolutely LOVED this book. I could relate to it so much, and it made me long for Japan. Inzer is a half Japanese women, like me, and I truly enjoyed reading about her journey. Side note: Her and I must have similar taste because all the food hig DIARY OF A TOKYO TEEN features illustrations highlighting Inzer’s return to Japan after moving out of the country 6 years prior. From MOS Burger to the temples of Kyoto, this book highlights some of the best aspects of Japanese culture (in my opinion)!I absolutely LOVED this book. I could relate to it so much, and it made me long for Japan. Inzer is a half Japanese women, like me, and I truly enjoyed reading about her journey. Side note: Her and I must have similar taste because all the food highlighted in her book are my favorites from Japan (MOS burger, tonkatsu, katsudon, ramen, crepes!!). I also loved her illustrations. They were fun, witty, and very informative! Perfect for readers who want to learn more about Japan or are longing to go back (like me)!
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  • Pam Tickner
    January 1, 1970
    A clever and easy to read look at the weird and wonderful unique features of Tokyo. Good as a reference of what to expect and look out for if you are travelling to Japan or just a great look at a different culture through the eyes of a teen. Congratulations to the author for her idea - she is a very clever 17 year old!
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  • Carly
    January 1, 1970
    Very lovely account of a half-Japanese girl experiencing Japan and her independence. Very cute with a light-hearted comedic feel.
  • Alice
    January 1, 1970
    And so, Japanese culture makes me fall in love with it yet another time. Really funny drawings and worth a laugh. Made me crave for ramen. Damn...
  • Piyali
    January 1, 1970
    A fantastic account of Christine Mari Inzer's solo trip to Japan as a 15 year old to spend 8 weeks with her maternal grandparents. The descriptions are funny and the illustrations mixed with actual photographs make the travelogue very meaningful.
  • Dana Giusti
    January 1, 1970
    Short, sweet, and very charming!
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