Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles
Eleven-year-old Bailey believes in miracles. She has to; it will take a miracle to keep her warring parents together. This summer they are at a Marriage Counselling camp, leaving Bailey and her little brother Kevin with their estranged grandmother in the island town of Felicity Bay. There, an eccentric deposed minister makes a prophecy that a stranger from the sea will change everything. When Bailey discovers a mermaid-shaped piece of driftwood, she begins to believe that the mermaid is this stranger from the sea. Then, when a dolphin becomes stranded on the beach, Bailey forgets her own troubles and rouses the reluctant locals into action. Written in light and lyrical free verse, Shari Green's warm and wistful novel brings Bailey face to face with both hard and beautiful truths about growing up and growing into her own ability to shape the world.

Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles Details

TitleRoot Beer Candy and Other Miracles
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 9th, 2016
PublisherPajama Press
ISBN-139781772780079
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Cultural, Canada, Poetry, Fiction

Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles Review

  • K.A.
    January 1, 1970
    I received and arc of this book in exchange for an honest review. Oh . . . my . . . heart. This book.This was a soft-spoken treasure of love and loss, finding miracles when miracles seem in short supply, about friendship, and being human, and finding out who you are, and what you are made of. I was so touched, I cried--which is rare for me in books. This book curled up in my lap and sang softly to me. I loved it so, and cannot recommend it enough.
    more
  • Stefanie Wass
    January 1, 1970
    Written in lovely, lyrical free verse, this book will remind you of the importance of family, belief in something greater than self, and the mysteries that lie in the sea.A lovely novel in verse, perfect for middle grade readers.
  • Claire - The Coffeeholic Bookworm
    January 1, 1970
    How can something so simple, so naive, so innocent put a dent to my heart? How can two utterly faultless kids see the world in a whole new light, while I can only see darkness and despair? How can miracles come true in the form of a mermaid? Or was it really the driftwood mermaid the stranger on the beach?This book is tugging at my heartstrings. I feel so protective of the main characters, Bailey and Daniel. I love Bailey's narration, I see the world in her eyes, I see the driftwood mermaid comi How can something so simple, so naive, so innocent put a dent to my heart? How can two utterly faultless kids see the world in a whole new light, while I can only see darkness and despair? How can miracles come true in the form of a mermaid? Or was it really the driftwood mermaid the stranger on the beach?This book is tugging at my heartstrings. I feel so protective of the main characters, Bailey and Daniel. I love Bailey's narration, I see the world in her eyes, I see the driftwood mermaid coming to life. It's so relaxing and overwhelming getting into her thoughts. She's a proof that miracles do exist. I also want to hug Daniel and stop his hacking coughs. I want to remove the pain in his heart. And I cry for Jasper. That poor old man. Why are people cruel to a man with an ice cream & fudgsicle cart and his prophesies?And Nana Marie? She was the biggest surprise in the book. Seriously! (wait, let me grab my favorite spoon and hide)... This novel came as a surprise to me. I wasn't sure how to go about it when I read the first few pages. When Bailey and her brother talked about magic, that's when the tidal of emotions came rushing to me. And I couldn't stop reading from thereon. This had been a really beautiful yet very simple story about a miracle that bound a broken family, a magic that reunited a estranged community, a love that never fade even when you think you've already lost it.I read this to my kids and they both enjoyed the root beer candies and fudgsicles. And oh yeah, I saw some glimpse of misty eyes, too. Author Shari Green is amazing!
    more
  • Jensen
    January 1, 1970
    This is a really lovely, poignant MG verse novel. So many MGs feature dead parents, when I'm not sure how many MG readers relate to that level of loss, and not nearly enough feature parents whose marriage is failing. I was really pleased to see that explored so thoughtfully in this book. So many MG readers can relate to divorce or separation or parents fighting, and they will find a character they can connect to in this narrator. A number of difficult, delicate themes are woven together quite sk This is a really lovely, poignant MG verse novel. So many MGs feature dead parents, when I'm not sure how many MG readers relate to that level of loss, and not nearly enough feature parents whose marriage is failing. I was really pleased to see that explored so thoughtfully in this book. So many MG readers can relate to divorce or separation or parents fighting, and they will find a character they can connect to in this narrator. A number of difficult, delicate themes are woven together quite skillfully. Recommended!
    more
  • Adrienne
    January 1, 1970
    Bailey and her little brother Kevin are staying with their grandmother for a month while their parents adding a marriage counseling camp. While Bailey is enjoying getting to know her estranged grandmother, she's worried about her parents and unsettled by some of the people in Felicity Bay, who want to run Jasper, a former preacher who was already run out of the church for making prophecies, out of town. Bailey actually hopes Jasper's prophecies are real--because if a stranger from the sea change Bailey and her little brother Kevin are staying with their grandmother for a month while their parents adding a marriage counseling camp. While Bailey is enjoying getting to know her estranged grandmother, she's worried about her parents and unsettled by some of the people in Felicity Bay, who want to run Jasper, a former preacher who was already run out of the church for making prophecies, out of town. Bailey actually hopes Jasper's prophecies are real--because if a stranger from the sea changes things, like Jasper said, maybe the stranger can fix her parents' rocky relationship. Just when everything seems to be falling apart, Bailey stumbles across a problem the town will have to unite to solve.This was a captivating novel in free verse. I thought it was really lovely and realistically portrayed the emotions of a tween girl dealing with family troubles. I also thought the adults were portrayed realistically--not overly perfect or overly evil, just imperfect human beings dealing with their issues--which I appreciated; it was nice to see a little depth to characters who too often in children's lit are flat and unrealistic. I also liked how there was a hopeful ending--even though Bailey didn't get everything she hoped for.I read a free copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Carlee
    January 1, 1970
    I was given an ARC for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book.I read Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles with my nine-year-old daughter and she hated when we had to stop for the day. The language was not only lyrical but engaging. The setting was magical and even my child noted how often the setting crept into the story so well it felt like we were on the beach with the characters. The story is heartwarming and charming. Dear daughter is asking for Shari Green's next book e I was given an ARC for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book.I read Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles with my nine-year-old daughter and she hated when we had to stop for the day. The language was not only lyrical but engaging. The setting was magical and even my child noted how often the setting crept into the story so well it felt like we were on the beach with the characters. The story is heartwarming and charming. Dear daughter is asking for Shari Green's next book every day and while I could go on and on about how much I love this book, I'll just say that I, too, can't wait to see what Shari Green writes next.
    more
  • Amanda Durfee-Spencer
    January 1, 1970
    Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles by Shari Green was a beautiful and moving read. I was drawn to this book by the whimsical cover art and I’m really glad I judged this book by its cover and requested to read it. When I first opened the book and started reading I was a bit apprehensive at first about the free verse style of writing, but only because I had never read a book written in this way. After just a couple of pages however I melted into the book and fell in love with Green’s story telling Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles by Shari Green was a beautiful and moving read. I was drawn to this book by the whimsical cover art and I’m really glad I judged this book by its cover and requested to read it. When I first opened the book and started reading I was a bit apprehensive at first about the free verse style of writing, but only because I had never read a book written in this way. After just a couple of pages however I melted into the book and fell in love with Green’s story telling.This book tells the story of eleven year old Bailey who is spending part of her summer at her grandmother’s house, who she has never met, while her parent’s attend a marriage camp in an attempt to save their failing marriage. Even though she has her brother and new friend Daniel to seek summer fun and adventures with, she worries daily about the fate of her parents’ marriage and what will happen to their family. After hearing a prophecy from Jasper, the former reverend, about a stranger from the sea who will perform miracles, a driftwood mermaid washes on shore and Bailey believes that this mermaid is part of a miracle that can save her parent’s marriage and make things alright in her world again.This novel also approached the topic of loss and how it’s dealt with in more ways than just Bailey’s parent’s marriage. We experience it in Nana Marie’s feelings for her deceased husband Harold, and Bailey’s mother’s actions towards Nana Marie after Nana Marie remarries. Loss is there in the future Daniel doesn’t make plans for because of his illness. It’s present in the way people turn their backs on Jasper, and the way the town no longer enjoys the simple pleasures of being in the water. I felt this book had so much depth for a children’s book. To the point where I’m sitting here still trying to process everything.Let me say that I may be a 28 year old married woman, but I was still able to really able to relate to Bailey and her inner turmoil over the changes happening to her family. I was the same age as Bailey when my own parents separated so my heart ached right alongside her. There were definitely a couple of moments when I became teary eyed especially with Bailey’s reactions when Bailey’s Dad isn’t there to pick them up from Nana Marie’s with Bailey’s mom and she learns about the separation. Bailey’s character was so well written. I often find that (as an adult), when I read books with characters around Bailey’s age they tend to be snotty and disrespectful, but I never felt that way about Bailey. There were a couple of times she may have gotten a little sassy with her mom but you knew it was coming from a place of hurt and by the end of the story Bailey grows into this mature young girl who is able to look at her family and other situations much more objectively. It was a beautiful transformation to watch.Another aspect of this book I enjoyed would be the setting. I just loved the small beach town of Felicity Bay. But then again, what isn’t to love about small towns, beaches, and the eclectic mix of small town personalities? I adored Bailey’s character but the town also offered up other great characters as well. Characters such as Jasper, the former reverend now ice cream selling beach prophet. And then there’s Daniel, Bailey’s new best friend who’s always beep-click-beeping with his camera at every turn. Her younger brother who isn’t actually a half bad little brother. And of course, there is Bailey’s spoon stealing grandma Nana Marie. I thought the ending was really well done as well. Green tidied up all the lose strings and ended the book on an upbeat message of hope, faith, love and miracles after the turmoil of the story. I really can’t say enough about how fantastic I found the writing in this book. For me this book was 5 stars all the way through, from the beginning to the end. This is one book that I will highly recommend.More reviews available on my blog www.themoscatomommy.wordpress.com
    more
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    This is a beautiful story written in easy to understand prose. Middle age readers will find it easy to comprehend and older readers will be able to read in-between the lines. It is the story of a Bailey and her brother who are sent to stay for a month with the grandmother she never really knew. Nana Marie lives by the ocean in a sleepy little town. Jasper, the town prophet and bicycle cart ice cream vendor makes a prediction that it will come to pass that a stranger from the sea will change ever This is a beautiful story written in easy to understand prose. Middle age readers will find it easy to comprehend and older readers will be able to read in-between the lines. It is the story of a Bailey and her brother who are sent to stay for a month with the grandmother she never really knew. Nana Marie lives by the ocean in a sleepy little town. Jasper, the town prophet and bicycle cart ice cream vendor makes a prediction that it will come to pass that a stranger from the sea will change everything. Bailey forms a friendship with a local boy who has weak lungs. Bailey wants to believe all will be well, that her friend Daniel will be healed, that her parents who are trying to save their marriage will make it work, that her friend Jasper will not be ostracized anymore, and that Our Lady of the Bay will be her own savior to help make things right. Bailey is full of faith, but fear also, and she learns that sometimes the greatest gifts come from unexpected places.
    more
  • Amanda Rawson Hill
    January 1, 1970
    This book is everything heartfelt MG is supposed to be. lovely, lyrical free verse. hard truths, bits of wisdom. family. I loved it.
  • K. Wolf
    January 1, 1970
    Damn.I don't remember the last book that actually made me full-on cry. Tear up? Sure. Need some recovery time? Oh yeah. But I straight up cried because man this just struck an emotional cord with me. I smiled and a laughed and I cared so deeply about this book. Wow.
    more
  • La La - Everyone's Crazy Aunt
    January 1, 1970
    If I could give this story six stars, I would!I don't know if I can gather my thoughts enough right now to even mini-review it! I have so much love for it... LOVE, LOVE, LOVE, LOVE!It is about friends and family, hope, belief, wishes, LOVE, imperfect adults, ice cream bars, kids who sometimes understand things better from their uncluttered perspectives, LOVE, fractured families, little brothers, big brothers, illness, memories, LOVE, gossip, grudges, pancakes, mementos, LOVE, treehouses, communi If I could give this story six stars, I would!I don't know if I can gather my thoughts enough right now to even mini-review it! I have so much love for it... LOVE, LOVE, LOVE, LOVE!It is about friends and family, hope, belief, wishes, LOVE, imperfect adults, ice cream bars, kids who sometimes understand things better from their uncluttered perspectives, LOVE, fractured families, little brothers, big brothers, illness, memories, LOVE, gossip, grudges, pancakes, mementos, LOVE, treehouses, community, sorrow, disappointment, forgiveness, rootbeer candy, and LOVE.I was approved for an eARC, via Netgalley, in return for an honest review. I wish I had a physical copy because I would big squishy hug it!I will be reviewing this on both my main blog and my MG blog and will add the links after they are posted.
    more
  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book through a goodreads giveaway. Thank you to the author, and to goodreads.I am 9 years old and found the reading level a little bit easy, but good. I liked the way the book was written, a combination of a poem and a story. I liked that Jasper had a bike that was half bike, half ice cream truck. I also liked there were root beer candies in the store. I also liked that there was a storm every single Tuesday. Thank you
    more
  • Krista the Krazy Kataloguer
    January 1, 1970
    [I'd actually like to give this 3 1/2 stars.] This book reminded me of another book I read recently, Kwame Alexander's Booked. In both, a young person is faced with the breakup of their family, and is reluctant to face reality. In this novel in verse, 11-year-old Bailey and her brother Kevin are staying on an island with their Grandmother while their parents are in "marriage camp." Bailey uses magical thinking to convince herself that everything will be all right. She believes that a piece of dr [I'd actually like to give this 3 1/2 stars.] This book reminded me of another book I read recently, Kwame Alexander's Booked. In both, a young person is faced with the breakup of their family, and is reluctant to face reality. In this novel in verse, 11-year-old Bailey and her brother Kevin are staying on an island with their Grandmother while their parents are in "marriage camp." Bailey uses magical thinking to convince herself that everything will be all right. She believes that a piece of driftwood on the shore that looks like a lady has the power to grant wishes. Slowly during the course of the story, Bailey learns to look at reality and rely on her own inner resources rather than depend on some outside magical force to fix everything in her life. And yet, the author hints that magic may not be completely outside the realm of possibility, if it comes from the right source. The local ice cream vendor, Jasper, a former priest, seems to have magic of his own, that he says comes from God, in the form of prophecies. Though Bailey's hopes for her family do not turn out as she had expected, nevertheless the book ends on a positive note. The reader is left with the feeling that Bailey has grown and will be able to cope with whatever the future brings. A satisfying read. Recommended.
    more
  • Tracie Martin
    January 1, 1970
    I had the deep privilege of receiving an arc of this incredible book. A true and deep delight, with the kind of lyricism that leaves a rich, sweet aftertaste you'll savor for months to come. Refresh your spirit with Shari Green's moving tale of a love and learning to adapt to change, faith, and the precious hope that miracles will never be in short supply. Green's free verse is so flowing and clear, I swear if you hold the book up to your ear, you'll hear the ocean. Or your own heartbeat. Or bot I had the deep privilege of receiving an arc of this incredible book. A true and deep delight, with the kind of lyricism that leaves a rich, sweet aftertaste you'll savor for months to come. Refresh your spirit with Shari Green's moving tale of a love and learning to adapt to change, faith, and the precious hope that miracles will never be in short supply. Green's free verse is so flowing and clear, I swear if you hold the book up to your ear, you'll hear the ocean. Or your own heartbeat. Or both.
    more
  • Rosalyn Eves
    January 1, 1970
    This little gem of a middle-grade verse novel is like the perfect blanket--you just want to wrap yourself up in it. I loved the deftness of the relationships (Bailey with her new friend Daniel, her grandmother, even the eccentric old ice-cream seller who used to be a local preacher). The beach setting was so vivid you could almost smell the sea salt. I loved the meditation on family and faith, the way belief and magic can sometimes feel like the same thing.
    more
  • Heather Truett
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my! So beautiful in language and in image. It perfectly gets inside the head of a child watching so much fall apart, desperate for magic and miracles. The setting was my dream as a kid, and I loved every minute of this book.
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this story. Through the entire thing I was right there with Bailey feeling the highs and lows of her time on the island. I could almost smell the sea air. I do question the author's choice to write in poetry rather than prose. I love poetry, I write it myself, but I didn't feel that having this story told as a series of poems added anything to the narrative. If the text were written in paragraph form it would not have changed the story. By breaking the lines and having the words I really enjoyed this story. Through the entire thing I was right there with Bailey feeling the highs and lows of her time on the island. I could almost smell the sea air. I do question the author's choice to write in poetry rather than prose. I love poetry, I write it myself, but I didn't feel that having this story told as a series of poems added anything to the narrative. If the text were written in paragraph form it would not have changed the story. By breaking the lines and having the words appear as poems on the page, I don't think there is anything gained. Some middle years readers may actually be turned off by the thought that the book is poetry. That being said, the writing is lovely. It paints a clear picture of small town island life and reminds me of childhood summers at the lake.
    more
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    Novel in verse. The cover and description really appealed to me, but the softcover format makes it something that just won't work in my library.
  • J & J
    January 1, 1970
    I just didn't like this one...
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first time I read a book in verse and I simply loved it. Although I no longer read middle grade fiction with my kids (they're teens now) I will read a middle grade book from time to time if it catches my interest. This one did right from the start.With few words and lyrical prose, this richly written tale quickly drew me into 11 year-old Bailey's life. She and her little brother are spending the summer with a kind grandmother they barely know while her parents go through marriage cou This is the first time I read a book in verse and I simply loved it. Although I no longer read middle grade fiction with my kids (they're teens now) I will read a middle grade book from time to time if it catches my interest. This one did right from the start.With few words and lyrical prose, this richly written tale quickly drew me into 11 year-old Bailey's life. She and her little brother are spending the summer with a kind grandmother they barely know while her parents go through marriage counselling. Their grandmother lives in an island town called Felicity Bay where all the townsfolk know each other and some mysterious things are happening through the prophesies of the town's former minister turned ice-cream salesman.The setting of the beach and ocean is almost like a character in this novel, reminiscent of my own family's summers at Wildwood. Written in the first person through Bailey's point of view, we get to experience her coming-of-age view of learning the complexities of relationships, from her parents, to mother and daughter and even the townsfolk and each other. Bailey is such a lovely tween. She experiences wonder and touching moments as she forges a friendship with her grandmother and also the neighbouring boy who suffers from cystic fibrosis. She also experiences heartbreak as she tries to figure things out about her fighting parents.It is a summer in which she will learns things about herself and about her family. She will learn that there are things she cannot change and things she can change and make a difference. I was impressed at how easily the author developed such unforgettable characters using free verse, all while building a great plot with excellent pacing.I know I would have loved this book as a tween, and I highly recommend it. It's delightful and poignant and one of my favorite books so far of 2017.Disclosure: I received a complimentary copy of this book. I willingly chose to read and post an honest review.
    more
  • Ben Langhinrichs
    January 1, 1970
    Bailey and her younger brother, Kevin, are staying with their Nana Marie in the small town of Felicity Bay for a month, but it is not quite a vacation. Their parents are struggling, and have gone away on a retreat called Marriage Repair. Bailey and Kevin barely know Nana Marie, but as they have nowhere else to go, they get to spend a month near the ocean with her. Bailey believes in miracles, and hopes for one to make her parents happy again.Meanwhile, Felicity Bay feels like a miracle of its ow Bailey and her younger brother, Kevin, are staying with their Nana Marie in the small town of Felicity Bay for a month, but it is not quite a vacation. Their parents are struggling, and have gone away on a retreat called Marriage Repair. Bailey and Kevin barely know Nana Marie, but as they have nowhere else to go, they get to spend a month near the ocean with her. Bailey believes in miracles, and hopes for one to make her parents happy again.Meanwhile, Felicity Bay feels like a miracle of its own. Bailey makes a new friend, Daniel, and loves exploring and playing in the sea. But when Daniel keeps coughing, and she finds out he has cystic fibrosis, she starts to lose faith.Then a mermaid appears (well, a driftwood mermaid), and a retired pastor with an ice cream cart starts shouting prophecies. Bailey thinks that just maybe a miracle is possible after all, if only everything doesn't fall apart first.The story is lovely, and winds up in a beautiful way with Bailey discovering that sometimes you have to make your own miracles, and that sometimes even miracles aren't enough. But through the sadness and joy, Bailey remains optimistic, and discovers that families always love each other, even when it is hard to get along.I strongly recommend this to all who love the sea, and families, and miracles. And even root beer candy.
    more
  • Wendy MacKnight
    January 1, 1970
    This book, written in free verse, is a glorious portrait painted in words and images! Bailey and her younger brother are sent to spend the month with their grandmother at her place in Felicity Bay while their parents work to save their marriage. Desperate for things to work out, Bailey begins to search for signs. Could Old Jasper, the ice cream man, whose prophesies are making everyone upset, be the signs she's looking for? But then nothing seems to be working out the way she wants them to...Thi This book, written in free verse, is a glorious portrait painted in words and images! Bailey and her younger brother are sent to spend the month with their grandmother at her place in Felicity Bay while their parents work to save their marriage. Desperate for things to work out, Bailey begins to search for signs. Could Old Jasper, the ice cream man, whose prophesies are making everyone upset, be the signs she's looking for? But then nothing seems to be working out the way she wants them to...This is a beautifully written book, that acutely addresses the powerlessness children feel when the adults in their lives make decisions that have profound impacts on them. I loved this book so much and I believe children will love Bailey and her story, too!
    more
  • Sandy Brehl
    January 1, 1970
    Unforgettable characters, voices, setting. The depth of emotion is authentic and expressed in both entertaining and heartbreaking ways, with a powerful emotional thread that feels to0 delicate to bear the weight of Bailey's worries and whimsy. But it carries throughout the story like a lifeline.Divorce has become such an accepted event/process among adults that it is all too easy to lose sight go the view from the children in a broken or crumbling family. This focuses readers (and adults) on the Unforgettable characters, voices, setting. The depth of emotion is authentic and expressed in both entertaining and heartbreaking ways, with a powerful emotional thread that feels to0 delicate to bear the weight of Bailey's worries and whimsy. But it carries throughout the story like a lifeline.Divorce has become such an accepted event/process among adults that it is all too easy to lose sight go the view from the children in a broken or crumbling family. This focuses readers (and adults) on the very real childhood tremors and terrors that parents arguing and struggling will generate, even when not immediately observed.
    more
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I have been meaning to post my review of this book because it is a lovely read. I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway (my first time winning!). Something I didn't realize until I opened the first page is that the book is written in verse. I wasn't sure if I would like that at first, but the author's style has a rhythm that I enjoyed. It set a nice ambiance for the story. The book is a bit whimsical with plenty of reality tossed in. The author captured (with few words) the feelings of love, wor I have been meaning to post my review of this book because it is a lovely read. I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway (my first time winning!). Something I didn't realize until I opened the first page is that the book is written in verse. I wasn't sure if I would like that at first, but the author's style has a rhythm that I enjoyed. It set a nice ambiance for the story. The book is a bit whimsical with plenty of reality tossed in. The author captured (with few words) the feelings of love, worry, longing to understand, and deep-down hope for things to work out. It's a sweet, heartfelt look at family and friendship from a narrator who is figuring it out herself. I loved it.
    more
  • Cee
    January 1, 1970
    Written in prose and very evocative, Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles is a deeply meaningful story. Bailey and her younger brother Kevin are staying with Nana Marie, whom they barely know, while their parents are at marriage camp. Bailey is very worried about the outcome of this camp and looks for meaning in prophecies and symbols. The lovely seaside of Felicity beach is an idyllic place for children yet the underlying tensions between the towns-folk adds more drama and worry for Bailey. The n Written in prose and very evocative, Root Beer Candy and Other Miracles is a deeply meaningful story. Bailey and her younger brother Kevin are staying with Nana Marie, whom they barely know, while their parents are at marriage camp. Bailey is very worried about the outcome of this camp and looks for meaning in prophecies and symbols. The lovely seaside of Felicity beach is an idyllic place for children yet the underlying tensions between the towns-folk adds more drama and worry for Bailey. The novel is a quick read and will appeal to middle school students and would be an excellent choice for reluctant readers.
    more
  • Shannon Cooley
    January 1, 1970
    I got to read an ARC of this darling, darling book, and I adored it. Adored is the right word here, because it made me feel all warm and fuzzy inside, and made me want to walk on the beach and see miracles in driftwood and love people who are flawed and broken. The verse form in this is fantastic, and made for a quick read, but don't underestimate it--the amount of emotion and power packed into those few words was super impressive. I will definitely be looking for more books by this author, and I got to read an ARC of this darling, darling book, and I adored it. Adored is the right word here, because it made me feel all warm and fuzzy inside, and made me want to walk on the beach and see miracles in driftwood and love people who are flawed and broken. The verse form in this is fantastic, and made for a quick read, but don't underestimate it--the amount of emotion and power packed into those few words was super impressive. I will definitely be looking for more books by this author, and have already preordered a copy of this one for my shelf.
    more
  • Kathryn Zebrowski-Wray
    January 1, 1970
    Shari Green's middle grade novel about an eleven year old girl named Bailey and her brother Kevin who go to visit their grandmother for a month while their parents are at a marriage counseling camp. Their grandmother (Nana Marie) lives in Felicity Bay, a town by the ocean. I fell in love with Jasper, and the free verse in this novel was stunning. I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley so that I could provide an unbiased review!
    more
  • Mireille Messier
    January 1, 1970
    A beautiful and gentle story of family with a very strong sense of place. Each page turn is like the sound of a wave, sometimes gentle, sometimes crashing. Shari Green sets the stage, makes you fall in love with her characters and ties it all up neatly with an ending that is both satisfying and moving. A splendid novel in prose.
    more
  • Mary Ann Marlowe
    January 1, 1970
    Adorable free verse novel that totally puts you into the mindset of a young girl, watching the mysteries of adults in a gorgeous beach setting. The story was charming, leading to a very heart-string pulling ending.
  • Michelle Kadarusman
    January 1, 1970
    Bring this beauty along on your summer vacation for middle readers and you'll win hearts. The lyrical verse will draw them in immediately and hold them throughout the sweet, poignant and immersive journey. You can practically feel the sand between your toes. Brilliant.
    more
Write a review