Shankara
A classic text on the path to God through knowledge. The basic teaching is that God alone is the all-pervading reality; the individual soul is none other than the universal soul. According to Shankara, it is the ignorance of our real nature that causes suffering and pain. The desire for happiness is essentially a longing to awaken to who and what we truly are. Through the path of self-knowledge, Shankara clearly teaches how to awaken from ignornce created by the mind, and abide in the peace of our true nature.

Shankara Details

TitleShankara
Author
ReleaseJan 1st, 1978
PublisherVedanta Press
ISBN-139780874810349
Rating
GenrePhilosophy, Spirituality, Religion, Hinduism, Eastern Philosophy

Shankara Review

  • Sanjay Gautam
    January 1, 1970
    This book gives the aphorism to reach non duality by the greatest advaita vedanta teacher.
  • Harish Challapalli
    January 1, 1970
    I don't think I know sufficient words to write a review about this book!!I can simply say its A great book!!
  • Bill
    January 1, 1970
    This was a required book in a class I took around 1970 at Cal Tech in Pasadena, California. Little did I realize that later, meditating on Shankara's words, I would come closer than I had ever come to mystical union with the Infinite Ocean of Absolute Truth. I knew in an instant that I would never forget that experience, and that has remained true to this day. Shankara wrote so many words, but the things that stay with me whenever I wish to recall his wisdom are "Atman is Brahman" (the self is This was a required book in a class I took around 1970 at Cal Tech in Pasadena, California. Little did I realize that later, meditating on Shankara's words, I would come closer than I had ever come to mystical union with the Infinite Ocean of Absolute Truth. I knew in an instant that I would never forget that experience, and that has remained true to this day. Shankara wrote so many words, but the things that stay with me whenever I wish to recall his wisdom are "Atman is Brahman" (the self is the Self) and his definition of Maya as both "illusion" and "the creative force", as well as likening Maya to a perceived snake which is later, in illumination, seen as a mere rope. I've found the work itself for free at these addresses:Crest Jewel of Wisdom translated by John RichardsThe Crest-Jewel of Wisdom translated by Charles Johnston
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  • Purnacandra Sivarupa
    January 1, 1970
    This is an excellent translation from Swami Prabhavananda and Christopher Isherwood (who also produced a marvelous translation of Bhagavad-Gita together). I only gave it four rather than five stars because it does not include verse numbering, which makes it much more difficult to refer to individual verses. I will grant that this seems a minor complaint, and there is good reason for it: the translators chose to render the book in prose rather than verse for the sake of English readability. This is an excellent translation from Swami Prabhavananda and Christopher Isherwood (who also produced a marvelous translation of Bhagavad-Gita together). I only gave it four rather than five stars because it does not include verse numbering, which makes it much more difficult to refer to individual verses. I will grant that this seems a minor complaint, and there is good reason for it: the translators chose to render the book in prose rather than verse for the sake of English readability. Still, it would not have been too hard to include verse numbers in brackets or superscript. This minor complaint aside, I recommend this translation as easily the clearest, most readable one available of Adi Shankara's Vivekachudamani, and this edition for its compact, durable form.
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  • Jason Gregory
    January 1, 1970
    Shankara's Vivekachudamani (Crest-Jewel of Discrimination) is a pure transmission of the nondual teachings of Vedanta. In some sense, Shankara lays out the nondual teachings of Advaita Vedanta more clearly for everybody than the Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita, and Brahma Sutras. This is because not everybody can grasp the mystical depth of the three main texts of Vedanta. But even though the three main texts of Vedanta are more more important to read and contemplate long-term, the Vivekachudmani is Shankara's Vivekachudamani (Crest-Jewel of Discrimination) is a pure transmission of the nondual teachings of Vedanta. In some sense, Shankara lays out the nondual teachings of Advaita Vedanta more clearly for everybody than the Upanishads, Bhagavad Gita, and Brahma Sutras. This is because not everybody can grasp the mystical depth of the three main texts of Vedanta. But even though the three main texts of Vedanta are more more important to read and contemplate long-term, the Vivekachudmani is an extension of them and a great explanation of them, especially for people new to Vedanta. Shankara had a wonderful ability to see into the heart of Vedanta and bring back this jewel of wisdom from the eternal ocean of Brahman to the shores of our world.
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  • Yaron
    January 1, 1970
    Mere words can't express the experience this book gives when contemplating on its wisdom. Now it's time to get to work...
  • William Braddell
    January 1, 1970
    Shankara's Viveka-Chumandi or Crest Jewelof Discrimination is very far from supplying an exhaustive explanation of Advaita Vedanta (although no text in existence probably does provide this) but as far as serving as an introduction to Advaita, Swami Prabhavananda's translation of this text would most likely be my first recommendation. It is small, fairly easy and enjoyable to read (given the complexity of the subject at hand) and the translation focuses on transmitting the meaning of the content Shankara's Viveka-Chumandi or Crest Jewelof Discrimination is very far from supplying an exhaustive explanation of Advaita Vedanta (although no text in existence probably does provide this) but as far as serving as an introduction to Advaita, Swami Prabhavananda's translation of this text would most likely be my first recommendation. It is small, fairly easy and enjoyable to read (given the complexity of the subject at hand) and the translation focuses on transmitting the meaning of the content rather than staying 100% faithful to the literal Sanskrit rendering which means it isn't borderline inaccessible to Westerners and others who don't speak Sanskrit (unlike some works). If anyone is looking for an introduction to Advaita Vedanta and Shankara but does not want to be overwhelmed then they could certainly do a lot worse than Swami Prabhavananda's translation of the Viveka-Chudamundi.
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  • Tomaj Javidtash
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a wonderful instruction, a must have, for the contemplative seeker. I could not put it down and enjoyed reading it very much. It is a short book that contains the highest truths of Advaita Vedanta in their naked essence: Brahman is Real, world is illusory, Atman is Brahman . If you are simply interested in the inner message and essence of nondualism, or above all if you are an aspirant of the path of knowledge, Jnana Yoga, then this book is highly recommended.
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  • Aravind
    January 1, 1970
    Although this is not the version of the book I had studied, I can only sit back and wonder what is it that has prevented me from coming across this piece of 'Jewel', these many years! With just a single read of this, I know for sure that I am not the same person anymore. This is an other-worldly piece of work, both literally and metamorphically!
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  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    This one flew over my head like a fighter jet...lol.
  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    To grasp for happiness in the realm of the sense-pleasures is to grab for a crocodile mistaking it for a log as you cross the river of life!
  • Dean
    January 1, 1970
    What to say? An ancient classic, also serves as a good introduction and overall summary of Advaita Vedanta.
  • Alok
    January 1, 1970
    **A manual for knowing your Real Self**Vivekchudamani means 'Crest Jewel of Discrimination', and this book is considered to be the masterpiece of Advait Vedanta, written by Adi Shankaracharya. In this wonderful translation of the Sanskrit Text, you will find the original Sanskrit verses, their translation in simple English, and the explanation of various words and concepts used in the book. It's published by Ramakrishna Mission whose books on Vedanta are wonderful and extremely helpful for **A manual for knowing your Real Self**Vivekchudamani means 'Crest Jewel of Discrimination', and this book is considered to be the masterpiece of Advait Vedanta, written by Adi Shankaracharya. In this wonderful translation of the Sanskrit Text, you will find the original Sanskrit verses, their translation in simple English, and the explanation of various words and concepts used in the book. It's published by Ramakrishna Mission whose books on Vedanta are wonderful and extremely helpful for spiritual aspirants.In this book, Shankaracharya suggest us to learn the discrimination between the real and the unreal. The world of senses we are living in is as unreal as the dreams we see while sleeping. But it appears real to us just like the dreams look real to us while we are asleep. Then what's the reality? Reality is a never changing state of consciousness which is full of bliss. We are that state of consciousness, but we cannot see it because of the constant state of illusion we are living in. Shankaracharya makes his point by giving the example of a rope which looks like a snake in the darkness. That rope has always been a rope, but due to our illusion we think it's snake and get scared.The goal of Advait Vedanta is to help us remove that illusion so that we can know what we really are and we can live in that state of everlasting bliss. Although this book contains Shankaracharya's philosophy, but he warns against becoming a philosopher again and again. A philosopher is somebody whose knowledge is limited to book-reading and intellectual understanding. Shankaracharya makes a strong suggestion of meditating on the real self which is the only way to realize our true nature. Just like reading the prescription won't help us cure our disease, in the same way merely reading the book won't help us in ralizing our self. If reading this book inspires you to practice meditation, only then its purpose will be fulfilled.
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  • Tarun Rattan
    January 1, 1970
    Vivekachudamani or Crest-jewel of Discrimination is a masterpiece of Advaita school of Indian Philosophy written by Adi Shankaracharya, the greatest seer of Hinduism. The book’s cardinal tenet is"Brahman (Universal Soul) alone is real, universe is unreal, and the individual soul is no other than the Universal Soul." The book analyses this tenet from different perspectives in the form of a spiritual teacher and student discourse written in the form of a poem in Shardula Vikridita metre. The poem Vivekachudamani or Crest-jewel of Discrimination is a masterpiece of Advaita school of Indian Philosophy written by Adi Shankaracharya, the greatest seer of Hinduism. The book’s cardinal tenet is"Brahman (Universal Soul) alone is real, universe is unreal, and the individual soul is no other than the Universal Soul." The book analyses this tenet from different perspectives in the form of a spiritual teacher and student discourse written in the form of a poem in Shardula Vikridita metre. The poem discusses Viveka (discrimination between real and unreal) which is expounded as the central task of spiritual or philosophical life and then goes on to prove the oneness of Atman and Brahman.
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  • John Dee
    January 1, 1970
    To sum this book up real quick - The outside world is condemned, in way that it simply springs up because of the power of your consciousness and is not to be considered outside. It's you who conjures up the world and if you say something is wrong with it, then something is wrong with you. Because the very notion of the world arises from the belief of 'there is a world'. 'And something is wrong with this world', which is, 'not you' is apparently an insane statement. Such things as ‘not you’ To sum this book up real quick - The outside world is condemned, in way that it simply springs up because of the power of your consciousness and is not to be considered outside. It's you who conjures up the world and if you say something is wrong with it, then something is wrong with you. Because the very notion of the world arises from the belief of 'there is a world'. 'And something is wrong with this world', which is, 'not you' is apparently an insane statement. Such things as ‘not you’ simply do not exist. Adi Sankara is a really wise guy, but quite an angry one.
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  • Rewa Rishi
    January 1, 1970
    I am amazed at the knowledge of our ancestors about who I am and from where I have come where I will go after death.
  • Cheri Flake
    January 1, 1970
    This book speaks all knowing and holy truth but not that fun to read. The last ten pages are amazing - five stars. This book speaks all knowing and holy truth but not that fun to read. 😂The last ten pages are amazing - five stars.
  • Antuan Elis
    January 1, 1970
    Quote:Тот, кто все еще заботится о теле при поиске истинного Я, напоминает человека, ухватившегося за крокодила, чтобы пересечь реку.Если выпускаешь стрелу в животное, думая, что это тигр, но оно оказывается коровой, может ли стрела быть отозвана назад?Хотя твой ум растворен и ты похож на забывшего мир, оставайся всегда пробужденным, напоминая, однако, не пробудившегося.Он, кто есть всеобщее Я, принимает по желанию бесчисленные формы и имеет бесчисленные переживания. В одном месте он ведет себя, Quote:Тот, кто все еще заботится о теле при поиске истинного Я, напоминает человека, ухватившегося за крокодила, чтобы пересечь реку.Если выпускаешь стрелу в животное, думая, что это тигр, но оно оказывается коровой, может ли стрела быть отозвана назад?Хотя твой ум растворен и ты похож на забывшего мир, оставайся всегда пробужденным, напоминая, однако, не пробудившегося.Он, кто есть всеобщее Я, принимает по желанию бесчисленные формы и имеет бесчисленные переживания. В одном месте он ведет себя, словно идиот, в другом - подобно ученому, в третьем - подобно обманутому. И снова, в одном месте он движется, словно человек Мира, в другом - как царь, еще в другом - как нищий, питающийся с ладони из-за отсутствия чаши для подаяния. В одном месте он обожаем, в другом - хулим. Таким образом он живет везде, и Истина позади него не может быть осознана другими. Хотя у него нет богатств, он - вечно в Блаженстве. Хотя другие могут и не помочь ему, он могуч силой. Хотя он может не поесть, он вечно удовлетворен. Он смотрит на все вещи беспристрастно. Хотя и действуя, он - не действующий, хотя и питающийся, он - не тот, кто есть; хотя он имеет тело, он - бестелесен. Хотя и обособленный, он есть Единое Неделимое Целое. Знающий Брахмана и освобожденный еще в теле, он не затрагивается влечениями и отвращениями, радостями и скорбями, благоприятными и неблагоприятными вещами, естественными для обычного человека, привязанного к телу. ..
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    With the commentary, excellent introduction to the philosophy of advaita. Less opaque than other works of Shankara. Prabhavandana's commentary makes the concepts very easy to understand. I plan to read again since the core ideas of advaita are profound if philosophically simple.
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Introduction and then the actual teachings of Shankara, a 7th century Hindu philosopher. His ideas on discrimination, the Atman, reality, liberation, and so on. (Apparently, this didn't make a very deep impression on me...)
  • Gina
    January 1, 1970
    Great spiritual book. Gets you thinking about how the soul is in all and the all is God
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