Everything All at Once
From the author of The Half Life of Molly Pierce and The Lost & Found comes a magical new YA novel about 24 dares, 3 weeks, and taking a leap into the unknown.Lottie Reeves has always struggled with anxiety, and when her beloved Aunt Helen dies, Lottie begins to fear that her own unexpected death might be waiting around every corner.Aunt Helen wasn’t a typical aunt. She was the author of the best–selling Alvin Hatter series, about siblings who discover the elixir of immortality. Her writing inspired a generation of readers. In her will, she leaves one last writing project—just for Lottie. It’s a series of letters, each containing mysterious instructions designed to push Lottie out of her comfort zone. Soon, Lottie’s trying some writing of her own, leaping off cliffs, and even falling for a boy she’s only just met. Then the letters reveal an extraordinary secret about the inspiration for the Alvin Hatter series. Lottie finds herself faced with an impossible choice, one that will force her to confront her greatest fear once and for all.This gorgeous novel is perfect for fans of Jennifer Niven, with the scavenger hunt feel of Thirteen Little Blue Envelopes, and a dash of magic that evokes Tuck Everlasting.

Everything All at Once Details

TitleEverything All at Once
Author
FormatKindle Edition
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 6th, 2017
PublisherHarperCollins Children's Books
Number of pages360 pages
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult, Health, Mental Health

Everything All at Once Review

  • Cait (Paper Fury)
    April 10, 2017
    Oh this book was a special little pocket of goodness. It perfectly combines contemporary with a smidge of magical realism that just pleases my heart greatly because MAGIC. I love magic!! And this one kind of sneaks up on you, because it's first and foremostly about dealing with grief, anxiety disorders, epic families, slightly mysterious boys, and a whole lot of ice cream. As books should be. Honestly if a book doesn't have ice cream, what's the point of its face. I ASK YOU.THINGS I LOVED SO MUC Oh this book was a special little pocket of goodness. It perfectly combines contemporary with a smidge of magical realism that just pleases my heart greatly because MAGIC. I love magic!! And this one kind of sneaks up on you, because it's first and foremostly about dealing with grief, anxiety disorders, epic families, slightly mysterious boys, and a whole lot of ice cream. As books should be. Honestly if a book doesn't have ice cream, what's the point of its face. I ASK YOU.THINGS I LOVED SO MUCH I CAN'T EVEN:• It has such a good representation of anxiety. Like just spot-on and accurate. And NO magical-cure messages. Lottie is following directions from her dead aunt's letters but it's none of the "go throw a wild party and suddenly become an extrovert" nonsense. It's good stuff. I like.• The family is SO GOOD AND WHOLESOME. Nice parents in a YA book??? Hold me I'm GOBSMACKED. Lottie's were just the bessst. And I particularly adored how lovely her brother Abe was (he was like a massive bookworm) and their relationship was just afdjksafldas. I adore books with fantastic siblings.• Also SO. MUCH. BOOKWORM. APPRECIATION. The author knoooows us. SHE KNOWS. This is full of people who treasure books, who are obsessed with books, who reread and collect and find their homes and hearts in books. Lottie's dead aunt was a super famous children's author and so everyone is obsessed with her books and it's just so sweet. And also goals??? Can I pls have Aunt Helen's career???• Oh and they sniff books. It just needs to be mentioned how awesome that is.• Excellent female friendships! #LIKE• The romance was honestly very very smol. Which I think is great because the book was really focusing on Lottie and her anxiety and dealing with losing her aunt...and her relationship with Sam was soooo not instalove. It was like this warm goldenly delightful friendship ALL BATHED IN MYSTERIES because Sam doesn't quite ever give anyone the full picture. And I loved him so much?!? (I actually have a weakness for Sam's in books. See: Shiver.) He was so sweet and I liked how lovely their romance was.• Diversity!! Lottie is half Peruvian and her best friend is a lesbian, and then there are anxiety disorder rep and cancer rep.• It talked about some HUGE topics. Like death. Lots of death talk. And about the meaning of life. And I just really liked having something so BIG and EXISTENTIAL CRISIS-ISH to think about. Nice.I only had a few quibbles, really. And that was mostly that the magical part didn't come in till the end and then the book just up and ENDED. I think the ending was too abrupt. I do like open endings, but this left me going "ok but we didn't conclude anything at all". Which leaves me a little peeved. (I also think that, since I'm a fantasy addict, the fact that it was 98% contemporary and 2% fantasy just wasn't a me thing. So not particularly the book's fault.) Also I do think (view spoiler)[that aunt Helen's letters were a bit manipulative after all. At first I really liked Aunt Helen?? But she basically used Lottie as a dumping ground for her biggest regret in life: ignoring Sam when he told her he was immortal. And I HATE that we didn't really discover much about Sam's immortality, like the whys and hows. Buuuut I guess that wasn't the point of the book?!? (hide spoiler)]OH AND I TOTALLY GUESSED THE PLOT TWIST!! About 50% in!! I had it ALL figured out!! Boom. So either it was a touch predictable or I am super super smart. Let's assume the latter.ALL IN ALL: this was definitely a special and lovely story. It's not fast paced and it was a bit "whaaaaa" mind bending with all the existential theories going on about the meaning of life (which is cake, duh, I'm sad they didn't come to that conclusion). The friendship and family and romance levels are A+ perfection and SO CUTE. And just omggggg the sheer amount of bookworm appreciation?!? I LOVE IT.** QUOTES ***taken from the eARC so pls don't re-quote until you've read a finished copy!!"I'm fine," I said quickly, because we are taught as children that automatic response: I'm fine, when we are not. I'm fine, when we are anything but. I'm fine, when we can't stop thinking about death, about dying, about ceasing to be."You know she has the first editions of every single Roald Dahl book, right? I can't wait to..." He blushed, turned away from me, and cleared his throat."Were you about to say smell them?" I said."Obviously, no," he mumbled.Buy yourself some books, Lottie. They help with everything.Aunt Helen always said if you really wanted to get to know someone, take them to a bookstore. You can tell a lot about a person based on how they behave around books. Sam beelined right for historical fiction and picked up a book about pirates.#BE #STILL #MY #BEATING #HEARTWriting isn't for everyone. It takes a lot of time and a lot of effort. It takes a little bit of talent, but mostly it takes practise and determination."Do you ever sleep?""Once a week I try and take a little nap."
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  • Sarah
    May 6, 2017
    (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HarperCollins and Edelweiss.) “I know Aunt Helen is the one who died, but now it kind of feels like I’m next.” This was a YA contemporary story, with a bit of a fantasy twist towards the end.Lottie was an okay character and I felt sorry for her when she had to try and deal with anxiety and panic attacks. It was also quite sad that her aunt had died so young. The storyline in this was about Lottie receiving 24 letters from her aunt af (I received an advance copy of this book for free. Thanks to HarperCollins and Edelweiss.) “I know Aunt Helen is the one who died, but now it kind of feels like I’m next.” This was a YA contemporary story, with a bit of a fantasy twist towards the end.Lottie was an okay character and I felt sorry for her when she had to try and deal with anxiety and panic attacks. It was also quite sad that her aunt had died so young. The storyline in this was about Lottie receiving 24 letters from her aunt after her aunt’s death, and slowly opening them and doing whatever her aunt asked her to do in the letter such as reading a book, attending a party, or buying a copy of her aunts favourite record. I didn’t find these tasks all that exciting though, and they really didn’t come across as ‘dares’ like the blurb suggests. We also got a twist towards the end which was more out of a fantasy story than anything, which was a little odd, and which I didn’t really see coming.The ending to this was okay, and the book did have some nice messages about stepping outside of your comfort zone and really doing something with your life, but overall I just wasn’t wowed by this book. 6.25 out of 10
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  • Crini
    February 7, 2017
    MANY FEELS, NO WORDS TO WRITE A COHERENT REVIEW RN.Do yourself a favor and pre-order this book!
  • Sana
    March 13, 2017
    Every single thing that happens in Everything All at Once is nothing short of amazing. It was, simultaneously, too late and too early in the week for all the emotions that this book made me feel.It was so easy, almost effortless, to relate to Lottie. So many little things and big things about life and loss and death and family and siblings and friendship to relate to. ENDLESS LOVE FOR THIS BOOK LIKE HOW IS SUCH PERFECTION EVEN REAL.Lastly, there are so, so many words just dedicated to books and Every single thing that happens in Everything All at Once is nothing short of amazing. It was, simultaneously, too late and too early in the week for all the emotions that this book made me feel.It was so easy, almost effortless, to relate to Lottie. So many little things and big things about life and loss and death and family and siblings and friendship to relate to. ENDLESS LOVE FOR THIS BOOK LIKE HOW IS SUCH PERFECTION EVEN REAL.Lastly, there are so, so many words just dedicated to books and reading and aahhh. One of my favorites (because I pretty much highlighted like 3/4th of the book):'I can’t wait to . . .' He blushed, turned away from me, and cleared his throat. 'Were you about to say smell them?' I said. 'Obviously no,' he mumbled. 'You know it’s mildew, right? That’s what you’re smelling.''It’s not mildew,' he said, raising his voice slightly, then lowering it when he realized he was getting defensive about books. 'It’s the chemical breakdown of  . . . You know what? It’s none of your business.''You’re going to get high off ink.''I’m not even talking about this with you,' he hissed.*Review to come when I'm feeling more than just keyboard slamming my feelings.*Quote taken from the ARC and may change upon publication.
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  • Maraia
    April 10, 2017
    This was all sorts of perfect. I love that Katrina Leno's books are 100% relatable and 0% cheesy. She never "cures" her characters. She lets them grow while still being themselves, and they're always wonderful. This is a very emotional book, and I read it at exactly the right/wrong time, which only made my feelings while reading it that much more intense. Also: A+ for all the book love!
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  • Catherine Tinker
    February 4, 2016
    This sounds exactly like my sort of thing. I need it so bad.10/12/16: WE HAVE A COVER https://www.facebook.com/katrinalenob...
  • Molly
    December 16, 2016
    I HAVE SO MANY EMOTIONS RIGHT NOW. This book was so amazing and hit me so close to home. Much like Lottie, I was close to my grandmother the same way she was with her aunt. All of her emotions and grief I felt deeply while reading this and there were parts that really gut punched me at the most random times.This book made me cry. I rarely cry over books and I choked up quite a few times and kinda lost it at the end. SO MANY EMOTIONS.The characters were all so wonderful. I really love the way tha I HAVE SO MANY EMOTIONS RIGHT NOW. This book was so amazing and hit me so close to home. Much like Lottie, I was close to my grandmother the same way she was with her aunt. All of her emotions and grief I felt deeply while reading this and there were parts that really gut punched me at the most random times.This book made me cry. I rarely cry over books and I choked up quite a few times and kinda lost it at the end. SO MANY EMOTIONS.The characters were all so wonderful. I really love the way that Katrina Leno writes siblings and best friends. I also loved the parents in this book A LOT. Abe was my favorite & I wish that I had a brother like him.The whole Alvin Hatter book series was fucking perfection. To be honest I am NOT a fan of the "book within a book" type of books (I loved Fangirl but hated the Simon parts and won't read Carry On. There have also been other books that I have skipped or dropped because of the book within a book parts) but it worked SO WELL in this book. The sections that were from the Alvin books actually made me yearn for a Harry Potter reread. But the best thing about the Alvin books is that they AREN'T Harry Potter specifically. They are Narnia, they are Percy Jackson, they are A Wrinkle in Time, they are The Golden Compass. Alvin Hatter is the stand in for your favorite childhood books paying homage to them all. And that is what I loved so much about them. (Yes Aunt Helen is totally the JKR of this world).This book is surprising too and if you're a close reader you'll be able to figure out the magic. I was SO PLEASED with the ending and with the clues and with Aunt Helen's big secret. I was so happy with the choices Lottie made too.There is also A TON of diversity in this book that is reflective of the world around us. I really love how naturally Katrina writes diverse characters without it feeling like she just forced them in for diversity's sake. It feels very REAL and authentic.I feel like this book was meant for me. I am so honored that Katrina let me read it so early. This book was made up of so many things that I love (letters in a book! Amazing friendships, quite romance, hilarious conversations, musings about time and the universe, magic, Conor Oberst). Lastly, if you are a book lover or a writer, this book will be something that you can really understand and just really connect with. So please check it out this coming July!
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  • Molly
    May 25, 2017
    Laughter, tears, and a little bit of magic. What else can one want in a book?
  • Laurène Poret
    November 8, 2016
    Both deep and surprising, connected really well to the protagonist. Wasn't able to put it down til I finished it at 4am. (and yes I had class in the morning)
  • Anne
    March 22, 2017
    "Everything All at Once" was what I would call a summer weekend read. You didn't have to invest much time or heart into it, but it was pleasant nonetheless. I have no doubt that I enjoyed it as much as I did because I was emerging from a pile of dense books ripped apart by analysis for school. It was a breath of clean air, with a simple enough story, likable characters, and a senior-year-of-high-school adventure. The cast of characters was more diverse than I expected, though I wish Lottie's bes "Everything All at Once" was what I would call a summer weekend read. You didn't have to invest much time or heart into it, but it was pleasant nonetheless. I have no doubt that I enjoyed it as much as I did because I was emerging from a pile of dense books ripped apart by analysis for school. It was a breath of clean air, with a simple enough story, likable characters, and a senior-year-of-high-school adventure. The cast of characters was more diverse than I expected, though I wish Lottie's best friend wasn't such a stereotypical "AHH I'm sO cRazy and I'm always urging the main character outside her comfort zone!!1!" However, that being said, Em was fairly well developed, as well as the rest of the cast. They weren't my favorite characters ever, but they were multi-dimensional enough that the story flowed well. I truly think that my four-star review is a personal, subjective one, not from the eyes of an objective reader. It was lovely to read a story that I didn't have to cut into little pieces for an essay. If you're looking for a quick, easy read that isn't shallow or superficial, then this is a good bet.
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  • Jennifer
    May 15, 2017
    Original story, engaging complex characters that were spot on and relatable. Lottie captured me in the first few pages with her clear honest voice. I just couldnt put it down, and I'm on vacation in Sri Lanka with elephants! The embedded Alvin Hatter series was a delightful way to re-experience the joy of reading Harry Potter and supported the entire story. Beautifully written. The ending was a delicate balancing act. It could have ruined the book but instead Leno deepened the experience. Sure t Original story, engaging complex characters that were spot on and relatable. Lottie captured me in the first few pages with her clear honest voice. I just couldnt put it down, and I'm on vacation in Sri Lanka with elephants! The embedded Alvin Hatter series was a delightful way to re-experience the joy of reading Harry Potter and supported the entire story. Beautifully written. The ending was a delicate balancing act. It could have ruined the book but instead Leno deepened the experience. Sure to be popular.Important: Despite this book being about a senior in high school there is no sexual or drug content.
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  • Julie
    April 13, 2017
    This book was magical and yet reminded me of a bit of PS I love you. Her aunt has her do many things to get over her grief. She meets Sam and gets to know him. She also has great friends. I also loved parts from the book series that her aunt wrote mixed in the book. I seriously loved this book. Very magical but trying to deal with grief. I did like that it talked about time, family, living forever.
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  • emma
    April 10, 2017
    When Lottie's aunt passes away, she's left with a stack of letters, words of wisdom and 24 dares from famous children's writer Helen Reaves. My Dearest Lottie,Do not be overwhelmed with sadness. It won't do you any good. Eventually, I think something interesting will come out of these.*Bittersweet and unexpectedly magical, Katrina Leno's latest novel is reminiscent of Thirteen Little Blue Envelopes, yet unique in and of itself. Everything at Once is a gorgeous story of life, death, and everythin When Lottie's aunt passes away, she's left with a stack of letters, words of wisdom and 24 dares from famous children's writer Helen Reaves. My Dearest Lottie,Do not be overwhelmed with sadness. It won't do you any good. Eventually, I think something interesting will come out of these.*Bittersweet and unexpectedly magical, Katrina Leno's latest novel is reminiscent of Thirteen Little Blue Envelopes, yet unique in and of itself. Everything at Once is a gorgeous story of life, death, and everything in between. *note: this quote is from an arc and hasn't been checked against the published copy because it wasn't out at the time this review was written.
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  • Maureen
    April 1, 2017
    This was a wonderful novel, well thought out with characters who were fully developed. I'm still trying to wrap my head around it. On the surface, it is about Lottie learning to cope after the death of her beloved aunt. However, it goes so much deeper. This is truly a must read.
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  • Grace Usleman
    October 25, 2016
    I am so freaking pumped to read this book I don't think you understand. Not sure what to expect at all, and im not usually one for realistic fiction, but I NEED THIS IN MY LIFE NOW!Also #secondreview whaddup But seriously super pumped
  • Andrea at Reading Lark
    May 26, 2017
    Review Posted on Reading Lark 5/26/17: http://readinglark.blogspot.com/2017/...Grief is one of those things that is universal. It crosses all ethnicities, faiths, and cultures. It doesn't distinguish based on skin color, place of worship, or language spoken. Humanity lives knowing that some day our time will come to an end. For many of us, this means that we try to make the most of our time. We spend it with those we love, we make memories, and we soak up goodness whenever possible. It doesn't m Review Posted on Reading Lark 5/26/17: http://readinglark.blogspot.com/2017/...Grief is one of those things that is universal. It crosses all ethnicities, faiths, and cultures. It doesn't distinguish based on skin color, place of worship, or language spoken. Humanity lives knowing that some day our time will come to an end. For many of us, this means that we try to make the most of our time. We spend it with those we love, we make memories, and we soak up goodness whenever possible. It doesn't mean that aside from grief life is a cakewalk. It's difficult at times - especially when stress invades or like the main character in this novel, Lottie, you suffer from anxiety.I typically shy away from books that deal with the grief process. I know death is part of life and it certainly plays a role in fiction, but I typically don't go for sad reads unless something else about them calls to me. I want to spend my reading time immersed in fantastical lands, making literary friends, and losing myself in someone else's issues. Grief novels tends to trigger my own anxiety and make me think too long and too hard about difficult topics like how fleeting time truly is and how to make the most of every second. This often makes me want to quit my job and travel the world with my family soaking up beautiful sites and history while I keep us all wrapped in a protective bubble safe from harm, but that's hardly practical. What truly drew me to this novel was the unique way Lottie works through her aunt's death and her particular form of anxiety.Lottie's Aunt Helen was something special to many people. To Lottie and her younger brother, Abe, Aunt Helen was like a second mother. When she is diagnosed with advanced stage cancer, the family is in disbelief. She was so healthy and vivacious that they don't understand how this could be possible, but cancer isn't a choosy disease. It attacks people from all walks of life. Aunt Helen is also in a unique situation because she has fans throughout the world who love her children's book series which follows a pair of immortal siblings named Alvin and Margo. In my mind, I kept visualizing Aunt Helen as J.K. Rowling as their writing careers followed similiar trajectories. When Helen learns of her fate, she begins to make plans which include writing letters with specific instructions for Lottie once she is gone. Helen knows that her death will hit Lottie the hardest due to her anxiety and she wants to provide her some small measure of comfort.Lottie is shocked when she receives the bundle of letters at the will reading, but she is thrilled that in some way Aunt Helen is still alive and guiding her path. The letters lead Lottie to experience life beyond the confines of her comfort zone and force her to deal with her anxiety rather than brushing it off as no big deal. The way mental health is addressed in this novel is important because Lottie learns its always okay to ask for help. Nobody should have to suffer through anxiety all on their own.In addition to the very real issues of grief and anxiety, the novel has a hint of magical realism. The concept of mortality vs. immortality is evaluated multiple times. There is also speculation about a multiverse. I won't give away exactly how these themes plays out, but I thought it was an intriguing way to add a little glimmer of fantasy to what was otherwise a serious read.My only complaint with this one was the second half felt like it was less about Lottie and more about Sam. I understood the reasoning, but I found the first 60% to be hard to put down and parts of the last 40% didn't hold my attention as well.One Last Gripe: Lottie often seemed a lot younger than her actual age. There were times when this felt like a middle grade novel, but then I would quickly be reminded by a scene that it was a YA novel.Favorite Things About This Book: Aunt Helen's letters & the pop culture referencesFirst Sentence: The day we threw Aunt Helen's ashes into the Atlantic Ocean was very windy.Favorite Character: AbeLeast Favorite Character: I didn't have one.
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  • Kaylene
    May 21, 2017
    DNF @ 50%This was cute, but it just wasn't my thing. It was too fluffy and I just wasn't in the mood for fluffy. I was looking forward to reading this because the main character had anxiety but I just didn't feel like it was portrayed correctly. I know there are all kinds of anxiety and everyone deals with it differently but I just didn't feel like it got it quite right. It also was a little too juvenile for me. But like I said, it was cute and that is what kept me reading, but half way through DNF @ 50%This was cute, but it just wasn't my thing. It was too fluffy and I just wasn't in the mood for fluffy. I was looking forward to reading this because the main character had anxiety but I just didn't feel like it was portrayed correctly. I know there are all kinds of anxiety and everyone deals with it differently but I just didn't feel like it got it quite right. It also was a little too juvenile for me. But like I said, it was cute and that is what kept me reading, but half way through I just decided it wasn't my type of read.
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  • Lisa
    May 11, 2017
    This is a one-of-a-kind story that surprised me in the best way possible. Forgiveness, letting go and learning about yourself are set in the forefront of a book about death and the nature of living.Lottie is so relatable and her family and friends are hilarious and fleshed out. I'm so glad Helen wasn't some perfect character either - she comes complete with flaws and vices. The end couldn't have been more perfect.Highly recommended.
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  • Sam Kozbial
    May 7, 2017
    Rating: 4.5 StarsThis was a lovely, but sad, journey I took with Lottie as she worked through her grief. Many tears were shed, but there were smiles and giggles too. Review to follow. BLOG|INSTAGRAM|BLOGLOVIN| FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
  • Nicka (Read by Nicka)
    May 6, 2017
    Woah! I didn't see that one coming. This book was so heartfelt and amazing and everything! Are we getting a sequel here? This would be awesome if it was made into a movie, I'm seeing it's potential. My full review will be up next week!
  • Samantha Sim
    May 19, 2017
    3.5/5 starspretty predictable but interesting nonetheless.
  • Jessie (Ageless Pages Reviews)
    May 21, 2017
    First 3/4 - 4-starsLast 1/4 - 2 starsVery strong and engaging to start, but this heavy contemp loses its way at the end.
  • Kerri
    March 8, 2017
    This was really, really enjoyable, though I found it predictable. The author laid out some very big, obvious clues for the "twist" from the very beginning, so I'm not even sure whether it was meant to be a big reveal per se, but in any case, I knew from pretty much Chapter 2 what was going to go down. I guess if you are going to compare a book to Tuck Everlasting in the blurb, maybe you realize that plot point is not the most important part of the book. And it truly wasn't. In fact I found it so This was really, really enjoyable, though I found it predictable. The author laid out some very big, obvious clues for the "twist" from the very beginning, so I'm not even sure whether it was meant to be a big reveal per se, but in any case, I knew from pretty much Chapter 2 what was going to go down. I guess if you are going to compare a book to Tuck Everlasting in the blurb, maybe you realize that plot point is not the most important part of the book. And it truly wasn't. In fact I found it sort of beside the point. But that didn't dampen my enjoyment at all. Coincidentally, a lot of the media I have been consuming lately, especially the TV I have been watching, has been concerned with death and dying and mortality and legacy, and I have in turn been thinking a lot about those things, so this book fit in perfectly with my current head space. I really liked Lottie's voice (though I wish her anxiety had been explored a bit more intensely), the format of letters and excerpts from books in each chapter, and the general writing style/tone/plot about dying and living and what those two things can really mean. Katrina Leno has become an auto-read author for me after this one (and having read The Lost & Found last year). Contemporary fans will love this one.
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  • Teresa
    February 6, 2017
    * eArc provided by publisher via Edelweiss *
  • Ms. Yingling
    April 11, 2017
    E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreelineLottie's aunt, a famous author of the Alvin Hatter fantasy series, dies of breast cancer at the age of 40, and the world is plunged into grief. Luckily, Lottie's parents and brother, Abe, are still alive, and the family spends a lot of time grieving together. In addition, Lottie is given a set of letters that her aunt wrote, giving her different tasks, since Lottie has always been anxious and afraid to do things. As she reads though the letters, she gets to E ARC from Edelweiss Above the TreelineLottie's aunt, a famous author of the Alvin Hatter fantasy series, dies of breast cancer at the age of 40, and the world is plunged into grief. Luckily, Lottie's parents and brother, Abe, are still alive, and the family spends a lot of time grieving together. In addition, Lottie is given a set of letters that her aunt wrote, giving her different tasks, since Lottie has always been anxious and afraid to do things. As she reads though the letters, she gets to know her aunt a little better and finds out a very important secret about her life involving a young protege, Sam, whom Lottie comes to like. N.B. While Lottie is in high school, it's appropriate for middle school. It's also a fantasy.Strengths: The writing was engaging, and I found myself liking the characters. It was a fun gimmick to have a J.K. Rowling type author as the aunt, and a great twist at the end. This would be a good book for readers who adore Tuck Everlasting. This has some similarities to 13 Little Blue Envelopes, and I felt like the aunt meant well with the letters. Weaknesses: Too many details about being sad. What I really think: The best way to move on after a loss is to stop obsessing about the person. Don't look at pictures, don't think about the person-- move on. I know. Lottie's entire family should have been in therapy a whole lot sooner. The wallowing in loss and obsessing about it seemed very unhealthy and counterproductive.
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  • Melissa Giorgio
    April 23, 2017
    This book was pure MAGIC.
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