Sleep Over
For fans of the oral history genre phenomenon World War Z, a worldwide plague of insomnia creates a devastating new apocalypse.Remember what it’s like to last an entire night without sleep? That dull but constant headache. The feeling of your brain on edge. How easily irritated you were. How difficult it was to concentrate, even on seemingly menial tasks. It was just a single restless night, but everything felt just a little bit harder to do, and the only real comfort was knowing your head would finally hit the pillow at the end of the day, and when you awoke the next morning everything would return to normal.But what if sleep didn’t come the next night? Or the night after? What might happen if you, your friends and family, your coworkers, the strangers you pass on the street, all slowly began to realize that rest might not ever come again?How slowly might the world fall apart? How long would it take for a society without sleep to descend into chaos?Sleep Over is collection of waking nightmares, a scrapbook of the haunting and poignant stories from those trapped in a world where the pillars of society are crumbling, and madness is slowly descending on a planet without rest.Online vigilantism turns social media into a deadly gamble.A freelance journalist grapples with the ethics of turning in footage of mass suicide.A kidnapped hypnotist is held hostage by those at wit’s end for a cure.In Sleep Over, these stories are just the beginning. Before the Longest Day, the world record was eleven days without sleep. It turns out most of us can go much longer.

Sleep Over Details

TitleSleep Over
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 16th, 2018
PublisherTalos
ISBN-139781940456690
Rating
GenreHorror, Science Fiction, Apocalyptic, Post Apocalyptic, Dystopia, Fiction

Sleep Over Review

  • Taryn
    January 1, 1970
    Can you imagine a world without sleep?As the sun rises in each time zone, people around the globe realize that no one was able to sleep the night before. There's no relief the next night or in the following days. Sleep Over is a collection of interviews with survivors who explain what it was like to live through the Longest Day. If there had been a great bolt of lightning or a thunderclap, if the earth had shaken, if a blood moon had risen and cast a hellish pall over the whole world, we would h Can you imagine a world without sleep?As the sun rises in each time zone, people around the globe realize that no one was able to sleep the night before. There's no relief the next night or in the following days. Sleep Over is a collection of interviews with survivors who explain what it was like to live through the Longest Day. If there had been a great bolt of lightning or a thunderclap, if the earth had shaken, if a blood moon had risen and cast a hellish pall over the whole world, we would have had some event to point to and say “There, there is where the end of the world began.” No dogs howled, no wave of prickling goosebumps swept over our skin, no measurable occurrence registered in any of the things we love to measure. The end of the world began not with something happening, but with something not happening. And because we don’t do well with understanding danger from absence, and most people didn’t know that going without sleep is fatal, the whole world began to die. No one knows what's happening at first. Maternity wards are swamped with expectant mothers, as even those tucked inside the womb aren't safe. Children are among the hardest hit and their reactions are a harbinger of the horrors to come. The Center for Disease Control investigates the phenomenon, but even their scientists are struggling with the effects of sleeplessness. Going twenty-four hours without sleep leaves a person in a state equivalent to being legally drunk. What starts off as a global summer party quickly descends into chaos. It only takes a few days for the established order to break down. Decades-long feuds boil over and a number of international incidents erupt, as governments take advantage of the situation or act rashly due to cognitive impairment. Terrorists and rioters bring violence to the streets. Spiritual groups enjoy a resurgence as people flock to them for answers and absolution. Stage one is a bummer; light insomnia, coupled with the panic attacks, paranoia, and phobias that develop as a result. Stage two is shit; basically escalation as the insomnia becomes more pronounced, and hallucinations get added to the increasing panic attacks as the body starts to realize just how hooped it truly is. Stage three: you’re fucked. It begins when sleep becomes completely impossible. Accompanied by rapid weight loss. Finally, in stage four (completely, ultra-mega-fucked), people exhibit what is essentially severe dementia. They become completely mute and unresponsive. If no one was taking care of people at this stage, they would die (as if they could even make it to this stage without being cared for). Death arrived from seven to thirty-six months after the onset of symptoms. The people interviewed are from a variety of backgrounds and countries. Everyone dealt with the situation differently. There are those who tried to keep everything functioning normally, opportunistic people who profited off the desperation for a cure, people who simply did the best they could to keep a routine, and the unlucky ones who drifted into oblivion. The insomnia plague ends eventually, but Earth's population numbers declined drastically. Could this second chance be an opportunity to create a better world? Will the survivors be able to convince future generations not to repeat the mistakes of the past? It’s not like there was an enemy to fight. All our firepower, our armies, all our contingency plans, and the closest thing we had to help us were plans in place for influenza outbreaks. But how to you counter a disease (and we didn’t even know if it was a disease) which already had one hundred percent saturation? How do you enact plans when our collective competency was dipping past the point of klutziness and into danger?  I loved reading about how different people experienced a single, catastrophic event! The only issue was that everyone had the same voice, despite the fact they had diverse backgrounds and lived all over the world. I enjoyed the writing style, but my interest in collections like this plummet if there's not a ton of character variety. The most memorable perspectives were the ones where the voice most matched the character: the internet vigilante, the gamer, the five friends who made a bet to stay awake as long as they could before they realized they didn't have a choice, and the man who takes it upon himself to care for those who have ceased functioning. In terms of content, I was most interested in the perspectives of those who worked during the chaos: teachers, nurses, air traffic controllers, journalists, scientists, power operators, and the corpse collectors. What happens when even the first responders and problem-solvers can't be protected? Certainly, during those times it brought out the best in people, but also the worst—those ugly, dark parts of us that we keep covered up to be able to function in society. But when that facade is no longer needed? When things are crumbling all around you?  How long could you go without sleep? I pulled an all-nighter once in college and that was enough to turn me off the concept for the rest of my life! Sleep Over is so relatable because (ideally) we all spend one-third of our lives sleeping. Most of us have also experienced the days after the nights where sleep didn't come so easily. The story is more open-ended that I would have liked, but it's a really interesting thought experiment. The imaginative scenarios that the author concocted show the expected and unexpected effects of a global insomnia plague. The testimonials are sometimes humorous, but always horrifying. Chilling descriptions of the humanity slowly draining from peoples' faces as the days passed will stick with me for a long time. The horrors and uncertainty experienced during the Longest Day show how important it is to support scientific research in the best of times, because it's already too late by the time the worst hits. “I don’t know what all the fuss is about; I finally have time to read.” —On an otherwise blank page on the story wall of Champs-Élysées Related:Fatal Familial Insomnia (Referenced in the book several times, though it may or not be related to what happened) - a genetic disorder that renders its victims unable to sleep. There's a nonfiction book about this topic: The Family That Couldn't Sleep: A Medical Mystery by D.T. MaxTimeline: The Effects of Sleep Deprivation  What happens after 24/36/48/72/96 hours of no sleep?How 180 Hours Without Sleep Affects the Body: The CIA kept "detainees awake for up to 180 hours, usually standing or in stress positions," according to the Senate's blockbuster report.Here’s A Horrifying Picture Of What Sleep Loss Will Do To You (Diagram)Waking Up to the Health Benefits of Sleep from the Royal Society for Public HealthWhat’s the Longest Amount of Time Someone Has Stayed Awake?How Long Can Humans Stay Awake?_____________I received this book for free from NetGalley and Skyhorse Publishing/Talos. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. It's available now!
    more
  • Alina
    January 1, 1970
    ***Note: I received a copy curtesy of Netgalley and Skyhorse Publishing in exchange for an honest review.Very interesting premises: one day, totally out of the blue, people can't sleep anymore - at all! The most affected are the youngsters and the old, pregnant women suffer spontaneous abortions or give birth to still-borns in most of the cases, less than 10% of the population managing to survive. Before the pandemic, world population was approaching eight billion. Now our best estimates place u ***Note: I received a copy curtesy of Netgalley and Skyhorse Publishing in exchange for an honest review.Very interesting premises: one day, totally out of the blue, people can't sleep anymore - at all! The most affected are the youngsters and the old, pregnant women suffer spontaneous abortions or give birth to still-borns in most of the cases, less than 10% of the population managing to survive. Before the pandemic, world population was approaching eight billion. Now our best estimates place us around seven hundred million. I very much liked how the whole event is presented, in the form of a collection of testimonials from different survivals, sharing their experiences during different stages of the calamity: some before, some during, some after. There was no morning, not as we used to have it. No start to our day, because there was no end. But I did like to still have a sort of order to my time; beginnings and endings went a long way to maintaining, if not sanity, then at least a routine. And through routine, functionality. The story touches on topics like morality and ethics, vigilantism, returning to primordial state, survival, dictatorship for the good of mankind. What I disliked was that most of the voices were not very distinct, the cause of the pandemic was not known and there was no real conclusion (fortunately the structure of the story implicated the lack of resolution, so at least that wasn’t strange).The stories I liked best were the gamers’ and the one with the five friends at the end. “I don’t know what all the fuss is about; I finally have time to read.” —On an otherwise blank page on the story wall of Champs-Élysées
    more
  • Matthew
    January 1, 1970
    Meh.
  • Jodie
    January 1, 1970
    Book ReviewTitle: Sleep OverAuthor: H. G. BellsGenre: HorrorRating: DNFReview: What I can gather from the blurb is that Sleep Over is a collection of waking nightmares, a scrapbook collection of haunting and poignant stories from those trapped in a world where the pillars of society are crumbling, and madness is slowly descending on a planet without rest. In this world there are zombie, asteroids or anything otherworldly comes to destroy Earth but rather one night everyone on the planet loses th Book ReviewTitle: Sleep OverAuthor: H. G. BellsGenre: HorrorRating: DNFReview: What I can gather from the blurb is that Sleep Over is a collection of waking nightmares, a scrapbook collection of haunting and poignant stories from those trapped in a world where the pillars of society are crumbling, and madness is slowly descending on a planet without rest. In this world there are zombie, asteroids or anything otherworldly comes to destroy Earth but rather one night everyone on the planet loses their ability to sleep. Obviously because this is an oral collection, there are tons of short stories threaded together to create a collective image, the first story details the first few days where no one sleeps and how the onset of sleep deprivation can affect us far more than we realise. As we approach the ¼ mark in the novel, there are stories from people and companies blamed for the mass insomnia and for healthcare professionals trying to cope with the crisis themselves. It was very saddening to read about mothers going into early labour and the deaths of many babies in the process and how even the babies that were delivered safely died shortly afterwards. We see how people are affected and how certain individuals are already preparing for the worst, but mass panic hasn’t ensued yet, but it is building towards that especially since neither health organizations or the governments of the world have any answers for this strange condition. Children seem to be more affected than adults falling into deep hallucinations and they are known as Dreamers and these hallucinations even drive a few to suicide. As we cross the ¼ mark in the novel, I really enjoyed the way the novel looked at the media and how it handled the panic that came with the sleeplessness. The media reporters obviously narrating this story looks and their perspectives on the rising panic and riots as well as the investigation for causes and cures was interesting but as suicides voluntary or not start rising people begin to realise there isn’t anything they can do, and they rebel against it. As we approach the halfway mark in the novel, the world is going down the pan and everyone from the everyday people to government officials are desperately searching for a solution while trying to cope with extreme sleep deprivation. Things get worse when the emergency services completely withdraw from society leaving people to fend for themselves. As people start experimenting with different drugs and remedies to try and sleep some succeed but the information is kept closed off from the public. Despite the apocalyptic nature of this novel most similar stories have happyish endings but this book was straight up depressing. As we cross into the second half of the novel, the symptoms of sleep deprivation are becoming clearer and more and more people are looking for a way out. There is also a rise of religious fanatics praying and worshipping old gods like Hypnos; the god of sleep searching for answers that obviously aren’t there. After this point the novel became extremely confusing and I had to stop reading because I had no idea what was going on.
    more
  • Gemma
    January 1, 1970
    Really enjoyed this book. An interesting look into a world without sleep. Liked that it gave multiple perspectives from different people around the world and their experience during the event. The story beginnings seemed abrupt and choppy, this could have been a kindle issue but made it lose a star for me. All in all I would read more from this author, thanks to netgalley for the advance copy.
    more
  • Clair
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderfully chilling apocalyptic book that questions what would become of the world if no-one was able to sleep?  We follow the story as the world breaks apart, bit by bit.  The horror created by the insomnia of the entire human race is easily comparable to that of zombies or killer viruses.  Its a highly original and thrilling read.The book consists of a number of personal testimonials from different characters.  There are tales from an amazingly diverse range of  people with different backgr A wonderfully chilling apocalyptic book that questions what would become of the world if no-one was able to sleep?  We follow the story as the world breaks apart, bit by bit.  The horror created by the insomnia of the entire human race is easily comparable to that of zombies or killer viruses.  Its a highly original and thrilling read.The book consists of a number of personal testimonials from different characters.  There are tales from an amazingly diverse range of  people with different backgrounds, all scattered around the world.  You get to see the effect of insomnia through the eyes of scientists, policy makers, a taxi driver, gamers, nurses, to name but a few.  The stories are grouped into time frames and each one reveals more about what is happening to the world.   Some of the people's stories show humanity descending into its worse traits, others show survival and there are some touching tales demonstrating real caring and the best of humanity.  The writing is beautifully haunting, vividly capturing the horror each person experiences but with brief moments of hope and joy scattered throughout.   There are loads of brilliant thoughts and ideas packed into the 300 pages as we see the apocalypse through many different viewpoints.  I don't want to give away any spoilers so will just add this is a book I really enjoyed and will read again in the future.Overall this is a brilliant and original apocalyptic thriller.  It's a thought provoking book that I'd suggest all sci-fi fans read.I'd highly recommend to fans of: horror, apocalyptic thrillers, dystopia and  sci-fiI received a free copy via Netgallery in return for an honest review.  
    more
  • Stef Mc
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC eBook from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.The first thing I have to say about Sleep Over: An Oral History of the Apocalypse (hereafter referred to as ”Sleep Over”) is that I genuinely have no idea why I requested to read it. As a reluctant gift recipient of short stories/anthologies/essays/collections et al., I don’t seek out books that lack a cohesive, consistent storyline throughout. So, why I chose to read a book that is quite literally nothing more than a collec I received an ARC eBook from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.The first thing I have to say about Sleep Over: An Oral History of the Apocalypse (hereafter referred to as ”Sleep Over”) is that I genuinely have no idea why I requested to read it. As a reluctant gift recipient of short stories/anthologies/essays/collections et al., I don’t seek out books that lack a cohesive, consistent storyline throughout. So, why I chose to read a book that is quite literally nothing more than a collection of narratives through dozens of viewpoints, all relating to the same period of time, is beyond me.The second thing I have to say about Sleep Over is that I am genuinely thrilled that I requested to read it.Sleep Over is a collection of first-hand stories by survivors of the event/plague/situation that almost eradicated humanity—no, it’s not nuclear war or SARS or global warming…it’s insomnia. What you may assume could pose no greater threat than irritability and malaise, insomnia is actually quite terrifying and insidious when observed through a more critical lens. Author H.G. Bells doesn’t have time for Doubting Thomas’ and makes quick work of your cynicism before you’re even 100 words in: ”The end of the world began not with something happening, but with something not happening. And because we don’t do well with understanding danger from absence, and most people didn’t know that going without sleep is fatal, the whole world began to die.” What follows are accounts of “the longest day” by a veritable smorgasbord of characters, from a nighttime film projectionist, energy spray company owner, pediatric nurse, and taxi driver, to a coffee shop owner, teacher, cop, gamer, and monk. Initially people are just a bit curious and nonplussed about collectively being unable to sleep, especially considering that the difference in time zones means some people didn’t experience the insomnia until almost one full day after others. People are a little tired, grumpy, and maybe a bit sluggish, but it's more of an oddity than a pandemic at first. But as the days progress and sleep still eludes all humans (other species are unaffected), the danger becomes starkly apparent: Not just the pure biological ramifications, but the sociological and psychological ones as well. This is where I’ll leave the remainder of the stories to the author (and contributors) and share the Good and the Bad of Sleep Over.The Good:-It’s scarily relatable: Bells does an outstanding job of verbalizing how you feel when you’re tired…and then exhausted…and then so beyond the feeling that the world starts to tilt on you. “Words take so long to think of. Words take ages to form properly…if it takes too many more words from me I shall have to kill it, and with it, me.” I found myself empathizing so much with the contributors that I was fighting off yawns and anxiety as their situations became ever more desperate. -It’s disturbing: This may not be a “pro” for everyone, but I found it very effective. Not far into the book you learn that expectant mothers throughout the world are going into early labor and, without the body’s ability to heal, regenerate, and thrive through rest, 20% of mothers and 90% of babies die almost immediately after birth. In fact, kids are affected more powerfully sooner because their brains aren’t developed fully, so they’re the first group to exhibit the archetypes that develop: Starers(are technically living, but behave as though in a trance and need to be manually manipulated to eat and move), Dreamers (they see hallucinations, which often leave them open to danger, like jumping off of roofs), and Screamers (think Dreamers, but if the hallucinations were never-ending nightmares). That’s to say nothing of the other abhorrent behavior people succumb to when society starts to crumble. -The writing is haunting : This book is full of pitch black poetry that is all at once horrifying and honest. “I opened the door, but outside was only a mirror. The man there did look like me, and had terrible wounds, and a tooth missing, gums bleeding. I will shoot him now.” “For it’s not enough to say that we looked tired. It was like we were dead men walking. The slackness in our faces was broken through by micro expressions of extreme anguish and terror, and above all despair.” “…a little girl that, if the circumstances had been different, if I had been a tollbooth attendant and they were passing by, I might have mistaken for being asleep. But the color was wrong in the face. ”The Bad:-The resolution: The fact that “the longest day” ends is not a secret throughout the book. But, without going into spoiler-zone specifics, I was very disappointed with how it was explained. Maybe it was the most realistic ending possible in a book so true to real life, but I guess I was greedy in wanting something more.-Uneven pacing: The majority of the stories were short, some barely a page, others no more than two or three. But then randomly there would be pages and pages of the same story, which, more often than not, wasn’t nearly as interesting as the shorter ones. If the rest of the stories had been longer in length, this may not have bothered me so much, but as it was I found the change in momentum tedious and annoying. -A lack of distinct voices: This was the weakest part of the book for me. While the writing was excellent and the characters spanned gender, age, social status, education, religion, nationality, and country, they all sounded essentially the same. As a matter of fact, I was pretty shocked to find out Bells is a woman, and not a man, as I felt the tone had a “white, middle-aged, middle-class man” affectation. I won’t pretend that taking on dozens of unique voices is an easy feat, but it did affect my suspension of disbelief throughout. TL;DR:Take it from someone who doesn’t even like this style of writing, Sleep Over is an engaging, haunting, disturbing, thought-provoking, unique read that you won’t want to put down…as long as you can manage to ignore the power of suggestion and stay awake. I think this has the makings of a real sleeper hit (ha!).
    more
  • Lorraine
    January 1, 1970
    A REALLY interesting idea that was well explored. One or two of the accounts got boring but on the whole I was completely intrigued.
  • Platon P
    January 1, 1970
    You must’ve had a sleepless night. Working on that work project? Studying for finals? Writing that long essay? You go out in the morning, deliver your work, manage to get through the day until it’s finally time to get home. You go to sleep earlier than usual, and that moment when your head hits the pillow and you’re under the covers lives up to every unrealistic expectation of happiness you’ve built up in your mind throughout the day. But, what if when you get home you have another project, anot You must’ve had a sleepless night. Working on that work project? Studying for finals? Writing that long essay? You go out in the morning, deliver your work, manage to get through the day until it’s finally time to get home. You go to sleep earlier than usual, and that moment when your head hits the pillow and you’re under the covers lives up to every unrealistic expectation of happiness you’ve built up in your mind throughout the day. But, what if when you get home you have another project, another exam, another deadline the next day, and you need to stay up all night again? What if you had to stay up all night for weeks and weeks on end? It’s terrifying, right? Welcome to the world of Sleep Over.From https://www.pendoramagazine.com/book-...H.G. Bells imagines a world where the entire human race loses the ability to sleep all of a sudden. Mass insomnia starts off as an inconvenience, and develops into the deadliest threat to humanity’s existence. The novel is laid out in the “oral history” genre popularised by World War Z, giving you a different account of the Insomnia Apocalypse every few pages. The accounts are commissioned and compiled by an editor whose thoughts frame the book’s narrative, in an effort to document the stories of the few people who survived the apocalypse. An office worker in New York, a farmer who witnesses the collapse of The Three Gorges Dam in China, a child who was already living with severe insomnia even before the apocalypse, a researcher who goes far beyond the borders of morals and ethics trying to find the cure for this pandemic.All around the world, people start dying of exhaustion. You may know some of the consequences of sleeplessness, but you probably don’t know about all of them. About what happens to your brain after a week without sleep. About what insomnia does to a young child, who needs sleep a lot more than adults. About what it does to babies, newborn or still in the womb. Tiredness, hallucinations, paranoia. Cities start burning down because of riots by mobs who have to take out their frustration on someone, or something, since the cause of their pain is unknown. This is one of the most remarkable and well-delivered aspects of the novel: how fragile we are that we don’t need zombies or alien invasions to risk our existence; a simple thing like mass insomnia will destroy us within a few weeks. You can see this realisation underlying the stories of most survivors, whether they were people who went far out of their way to help other when they could barely stand up themselves, or opportunistic drug dealers who made quick small fortunes by selling uppers to Wall Street executives. The final tone of the book is a blend of hope, catharsis, and closeness.H.G. Bell’s Sleep Over: An Oral History of the Apocalypse is out today in the Uk and the US. Fans of World War Z, you’ll love this one. Pro tip: if you’re confident you’re going to like this book, I think a good reading strategy is going through one story each night before going to sleep.(Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.)
    more
  • Brian's Book Blog
    January 1, 1970
    View this review and many more on Brian's Book BlogWhat Would You Do With No Sleep?To start off, I need to admit that I did not read World War Z, the book that this is considered to be similar to (an oral history of an apocalypse).  I’m not sure if I had if it would change my review of Sleep Over or not.  With that being said, I loved the heck out of this book. Ironically, I found myself staying up later into the night to finish one more chapter.Sleep Over follows the premise of what if everyone View this review and many more on Brian's Book BlogWhat Would You Do With No Sleep?To start off, I need to admit that I did not read World War Z, the book that this is considered to be similar to (an oral history of an apocalypse).  I’m not sure if I had if it would change my review of Sleep Over or not.  With that being said, I loved the heck out of this book. Ironically, I found myself staying up later into the night to finish one more chapter.Sleep Over follows the premise of what if everyone (and I mean everyone) stopped sleeping at the same time.  They don’t know what caused it, but no one could fall asleep.  They didn’t know if they were ever going to get a good nights rest again or even a cat nap.The premise of this felt really unique and different to me.  No zombies or flesh-eating virus.  Just everyone stops sleeping.  The absolute havoc that this would cause around the world would be almost unimaginable.  The first few days would be okay since some people were used to pulling an all-nighter for college or a business deadline, but after 3 days or a week without sleep, can you imagine how messed up your brain would be?The characters were all over the place from different backgrounds and lived all over the world. I loved that it would jump from someone in the US to someone in Ireland and then go somewhere else.  It really showed how this affected every single person in the world.Without giving too much away, I really liked the ending of this.  I felt like it could have been rushed, but it had the right “feel” to it.  Bells was able to describe what changed and... well, I can’t say much more without ruining the book.  I wasn’t sure how it was going to end, but I was happy with it.The narration provided by a group of awesome narrators made this book for me.  I don’t know how much I would have liked it had I read it, but hearing the different accents and the different nuances for each person really took this from good to great.Overall, Sleep Over is an early contender for one of the best books of 2018.  I won’t be forgetting this one anytime soon. Let’s just say the next time I’m up past 2am, I’m going to listen to my body. Since I never know when I’ll get a chance to sleep again.
    more
  • Arybo ✨
    January 1, 1970
    2.75Sleep over is a book made of a bunch of experiences written and narrated by different people all around the world. The first hundred pages are so perfect, they are interesting and captivating. They can be hard to read. There are described facts that are painful, as children self-harm. There are first impressions about the plague, mothers loose babies and doctors don’t know how to react. Everyone’s trying their first day without sleeping and they don’t know how to make things happen and cont 2.75Sleep over is a book made of a bunch of experiences written and narrated by different people all around the world. The first hundred pages are so perfect, they are interesting and captivating. They can be hard to read. There are described facts that are painful, as children self-harm. There are first impressions about the plague, mothers loose babies and doctors don’t know how to react. Everyone’s trying their first day without sleeping and they don’t know how to make things happen and continue. And then, the second 200 pages are slow. The narrative becomes repetitive, and I, as a reader, no longer feel attracted by events. I lost interest in scientific explanations and experiments on animals and people. I did not understand where the horror part of the story was, because it could be a dystopian book, something like “Blindness” by Saramago. This is a novel based on the same idea: what would happen if ...? However, in this book we don’t have the same narration from a single point of view, but a chorus of narrators. I really liked this fact - as hearing different testimonies. The problem was precisely this: I lost interest. I went on by inertia. A book recommended for those interested in “what if” worlds.• I received a free copy from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review •
    more
  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    It's nice to see another book written in the oral history format of WWZ. There was a lot of good science about insomnia in here, and some really well thought out scenarios. There's a kernel of a good book in here somewhere.That being said...1) Typos. Typos, everywhere... considering I got this as a library ebook, I was surprised at how much editing it needed.2) All the stories were written in the same voice - none of the "subjects" of the history sounded distinctive or different. This might be t It's nice to see another book written in the oral history format of WWZ. There was a lot of good science about insomnia in here, and some really well thought out scenarios. There's a kernel of a good book in here somewhere.That being said...1) Typos. Typos, everywhere... considering I got this as a library ebook, I was surprised at how much editing it needed.2) All the stories were written in the same voice - none of the "subjects" of the history sounded distinctive or different. This might be the biggest problem with this novel. We need to believe in different characters.3) Several of the stories ended in such a way as the subjects could *not* have related their story for the fictional editor (dead dudes don't give interviews, is what I'm saying).4) The conclusion/conference transcript was incoherent and it was very difficult for me to understand how we went from an apocalpytic medical disorder to the proposals in this chapter. There was no bridge, no connector, no hint in the rest of the stories that would lead the reader to understand how humanity got to the extreme positions espoused in the last story. Especially given the... lack of resolution to the main problem.So - could be worse, but more like a draft than a finished book. I wanted to love it, but I struggled, a lot.
    more
  • Reading Badger
    January 1, 1970
    What would become of the world if every living human suddenly could not sleep? What would become of our infrastructure? Could we still function in a relatively structured society or would we turn to rage and despair when our leaders could not save us?The book consists of personal testimonials of different characters from different backgrounds and parts of the world, which gives it an eerily personal feel. You inevitably put yourself in the character’s shoes and think about how you would have act What would become of the world if every living human suddenly could not sleep? What would become of our infrastructure? Could we still function in a relatively structured society or would we turn to rage and despair when our leaders could not save us?The book consists of personal testimonials of different characters from different backgrounds and parts of the world, which gives it an eerily personal feel. You inevitably put yourself in the character’s shoes and think about how you would have acted in the situation.The story follows the world as it breaks into pieces and you see great nations falling one by one, old Gods resurrected, New Gods appearing, religion losing its hold on people as days of sleeplessness pass, people working with each other for the better of the many and people turning against each other in despair.The Reading Badger’s recommendation regarding this book is that it is a must-read for Sci-fi fans. It is well structured, although a bit descriptive in some points which make the action stalled a bit.
    more
  • Katya
    January 1, 1970
    In terms of creativity, this book was off the scale. A TEOTWAWKI story that doesn't rely on zombies, aliens, an EMP, or a standard plague = rare! I really enjoyed how things unfolded in the book. The stories were grouped into time frames, and each person's story revealed more details about what was happening. Each new story was unique, and the narration often jumped from country to country. For all that creativity, though, the "voice" in each story was the same, whether it was a Chinese farmer, In terms of creativity, this book was off the scale. A TEOTWAWKI story that doesn't rely on zombies, aliens, an EMP, or a standard plague = rare! I really enjoyed how things unfolded in the book. The stories were grouped into time frames, and each person's story revealed more details about what was happening. Each new story was unique, and the narration often jumped from country to country. For all that creativity, though, the "voice" in each story was the same, whether it was a Chinese farmer, a young gamer, a stressed scientist, or an air traffic controller. I wish the narration had been a little more unique for each person: different speech patterns, different personalities, etc. That point aside, the fatal-insomnia idea made for an interesting read!Thank you to NetGalley for the opportunity to review this book!
    more
  • Toni Boughton
    January 1, 1970
    This novel can't help but be compared in form to the great 'World War Z', but it stands up to that comparison admirably. The plague of sleeplessness is just as frightening as any zombie or virus. The story is well-written and well-told, and my only complaint is that I would have loved to have names or even little bios for some of the characters, just to know more about them. I definitely recommend this for any fans of apocalyptic fiction.*Free copy from NetGalley*
    more
  • David
    January 1, 1970
    Sleep Over would have worked better as a satire or comic novel because of the nature of the apocalypse but the author writes it as a straight apocalypse. Not a bad book but deeply predictable. For fans of the apocalyptic genre, this may still be enjoyable. Rating: 3 out of 5 Stars
    more
  • Abi
    January 1, 1970
    Really creative! Loved the World War Z vibe.Note: This book was provided to me in exchange for my honest review.
  • DEBORAH
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent
  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley for the copy of this book.I thought it was a well written and original science fiction thiller.I would recommend this book.
Write a review