A Daughter's Deadly Deception
2017 Arthur Ellis Award, Best Nonfiction Book — WinnerA sinister plot by a young woman left her mother dead and her father riddled with bullets.From the outside looking in, Jennifer Pan seemed like a model daughter living a perfect life. The ideal child, the one her immigrant parents saw, was studying to become a pharmacist at the University of Toronto. But there was a dark, deceptive side to the angelic young woman.In reality, Jennifer spent her days in the arms of her high school sweetheart, Daniel. In an attempt to lead the life she dreamed of, she would do almost anything: lie about her whereabouts, forge school documents, and invent fake jobs and a fictitious apartment. For many years she led this double life. But when her father discovered her web of lies, his ultimatum was severe. And so, too, was her revenge: a plan that culminated in cold-blooded murder. And it almost worked, except for one bad shot.The story of Jennifer Pan is one of all-consuming love and devious betrayal that led to a cold-hearted plan hatched by a group of youths who thought they could pull off the perfect crime.

A Daughter's Deadly Deception Details

TitleA Daughter's Deadly Deception
Author
ReleaseNov 12th, 2016
PublisherDundurn
ISBN-139781459735255
Rating
GenreCrime, True Crime, Nonfiction, Cultural, Canada, Psychology, Mystery

A Daughter's Deadly Deception Review

  • Jaidee
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 "upsetting, riveting, excellent" stars !!! 2017 Honorable Mention Read Mr. Grimaldi has written a remarkable book. This is one of the best true crime books I have read and I have read a few hundred since my early teens. Look at the homely plain Asian girl on the cover. Could she have arranged, organized a murder scheme that left her mother dead and her father desolate and in chronic pain. The facts of this case are terribly upsetting and frightening. I followed this case over the years and 4.5 "upsetting, riveting, excellent" stars !!! 2017 Honorable Mention Read Mr. Grimaldi has written a remarkable book. This is one of the best true crime books I have read and I have read a few hundred since my early teens. Look at the homely plain Asian girl on the cover. Could she have arranged, organized a murder scheme that left her mother dead and her father desolate and in chronic pain. The facts of this case are terribly upsetting and frightening. I followed this case over the years and the way the news outlets portrayed Ms. Pan was largely erroneous although the facts were detailed and to the point. In fact a therapist who looked at this case from afar surmises that Ms. Pan is a psychopath. This is also how the media portrayed her as well. This is very misleading. Was Ms. Pan a longtime compulsive liar? Oh yes she was. We need to look at the motivations of the lies however. Ms. Pan was a highly sensitive girl that was excellent in many areas and superb in others. She was pushed from morning until night to achieve more and nothing was ever good enough for her papa. Her mother although softer vacillated between keeping the peace and standing by her husband. Jennifer Pan had little affection and much criticism. Very little nurturing and she failed to develop a secure sense of self. She crashed under the pressure and began to lie and cheat and manipulate all for the love of a misguided boy who had his own identity issues. Ms. Pan after twenty two years of parental rejection, and disappointment cracked and no longer turned her anger on herself through cutting, anxiety and dysphoria but turned her rage onto her parental figures who did not allow her an individual identity. The story unfolds from there.... I was hooked from the get go as the author very skillfully describes the crime and then the ensuing trial vividly and with good and interesting detail. Many true crime writers get this part right. However, Mr. Grimaldi goes much further and with a lot of depth describes Ms. Pan's developmental history, adolescent experiences and the progression of her lies to try and be an everyday teen, to manipulations to keep her boyfriend to the outright villainy of planning her parents' murder. Mr. Grimaldi consulted with parenting experts, asian-informed mental health workers, cultural theorists and a whole host of individuals that were directly involved in some way with Ms. Pan.There is an excellent afterward by a psychologist who describes Ms. Pan through an attachment theory and psychodynamic lens that very skillfully describes how Ms. Pan developed a wretched and distressing personality disorder. Although not named, I suspect that Ms. Pan suffers from very severe Dependent and Borderline personality disorders. Ms. Pan is not a psychopath that hurts others for the pleasure of it. She killed as she was psychologically annhilated and now she will pay the price for the rest of her life as will her father and brother. I am going to naively suggest that if this family had received family therapy intervention of an intensive sort when Ms. Pan was young and her parents had some parenting supports (they both likely had their own traumas as they came to Canada from Vietnam ) this dark tragic unfolding of events could have been prevented. I am glad this book is done despite its excellence as it is both horrifying and likely did not have to occur if people around this family had paid closer attention to the bomb that lay within Ms Jennifer Pan.Highly recommended and I look forward to Mr. Grimaldi's next case !!
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  • Louise Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    A young woman left her mother for dead and her father riddled with bullets.Jennifer Pan seems like a model daughter. An ideal child who was studying to become a pharmacist. But Jennifer had a darker side. She spent her days in the arms of her sweetheart Daniel. She would lie about her whereabouts. She forged school documents, invent fake jobs and even a fictitious apartment. Then her father discovers her double life. His ultimatum is severe and so was her revenge.I like true crime stories and th A young woman left her mother for dead and her father riddled with bullets.Jennifer Pan seems like a model daughter. An ideal child who was studying to become a pharmacist. But Jennifer had a darker side. She spent her days in the arms of her sweetheart Daniel. She would lie about her whereabouts. She forged school documents, invent fake jobs and even a fictitious apartment. Then her father discovers her double life. His ultimatum is severe and so was her revenge.I like true crime stories and this one did not disappoint.I would like to thank NetGalley, Dundurn and the author Jeremy Grimaldi for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Amanda Jane
    January 1, 1970
    A Daughter's Deadly Deception by Jeremy Grimaldi is as bone chilling as it is captivating. A true crime story of how a young woman does what would have to be considered the ultimate betrayal to her parents. They say that fact is stranger than fiction, well in this case that is certainly true.On a Monday night at approximately 10:13 pm, in a quiet suburb on a quiet street, a home invasion takes place, a mother dead, a father shot in the face and a daughter tied upstairs listening to the desperate A Daughter's Deadly Deception by Jeremy Grimaldi is as bone chilling as it is captivating. A true crime story of how a young woman does what would have to be considered the ultimate betrayal to her parents. They say that fact is stranger than fiction, well in this case that is certainly true.On a Monday night at approximately 10:13 pm, in a quiet suburb on a quiet street, a home invasion takes place, a mother dead, a father shot in the face and a daughter tied upstairs listening to the desperate cries and pleas of her parents. She hears the shots that have killed her mother and watched her father bloody, staggering his way to the front door and collapsing outside. His daughter shouts out to her father asking if he is okay. Fortunately, the daughter has her mobile phone nearby and calls 911. A tragic situation by any stretch of the imagination but what the police discover makes this one of the most harrowing cases that these seasoned, hardened Canadian detectives have ever come across. The daughter, Jennifer Pan who was in the home invasion, was every parent's dream, whether it was school, Piano recitals or ice skating she was excellent almost to the point of being perfect. She was studying to be a pharmacist and had a part time job. From the outside looking in Jennifer, her brother Felix and her parents had what appeared to be more than a good life but a great life. The night of the home invasion shattered all of this forever.I mentioned that Jennifer was almost perfect, but everything she portrayed was all fake. The only thing that she did perfect was lie and manipulate. She was not a good Asian girl, she lied to her parents constantly for years, she had a boyfriend her parents didn't know about.The boyfriend's name was Daniel and the Pan family particularly her father Hann does not like him. Jennifer did not care what her parents thought, she would see Daniel any chance she got, they became pretty much addicted to one another. What Jennifer does to keep Daniel over the years almost beggars belief. When she wants something, she will find a way to have it by any means possible. When Jennifer's father finds out about her web of lies and about seeing Daniel, he gives her an Ultimatum..an Ultimatum that changes the course of many people's lives forever.I highly recommend this novel, to say the author Grimaldi has written a fascinating book would be an understatement. The author worked as a crime journalist on this case for 10 months, he knows what he is talking about! I myself have read many true crime books, and this is up there with the best. We are taken through the whole crime, interrogations, court testimonies, people that knew Jennifer, her childhood, to psychological evaluations. What I loved about the book, Grimaldi doesn't drag us through any of the boring testimonies or police interviews, we are given the incredible facts of one of the more disturbing cases in Canada's history.An easy 5 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️Thank you to Netgalley, Jeremy Grimaldi and the publisher Dundurn for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest and unbiased review.
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  • Lee
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very dark read and I was totally captivated by it. It is fascinating to see how the human mind would drive a young woman to seek such revenge on parents who tried to give her the world. Her parents were very tough on her, expecting a lot educationally, in regards to family obligations and cultural activities and it is this that drove Jennifer away from them looking for an escape. Jennifer is a compulsive liar, manipulative, has low self esteem and self worth and would go to remarkable This was a very dark read and I was totally captivated by it. It is fascinating to see how the human mind would drive a young woman to seek such revenge on parents who tried to give her the world. Her parents were very tough on her, expecting a lot educationally, in regards to family obligations and cultural activities and it is this that drove Jennifer away from them looking for an escape. Jennifer is a compulsive liar, manipulative, has low self esteem and self worth and would go to remarkable efforts to hide her real life and thoughts from everyone around her. She wanted to please her parents by being the best at everything, but once smitten by the love of a boy this all began to slip away. Jennifer's answer to this was to continue to lie, forge documents to say she was excelling at university and in her musical studies and basically live a double life. Eventually it all becomes to much and cracks appear that will then lead to her downfall and sadly the lives of her parents and brother. Well written and highly recommended.
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  • Joce (squibblesreads)
    January 1, 1970
    Read this to know more about the case. No opinions about the book or the writing.
  • Sifra (brilliant bookshelf)
    January 1, 1970
    Read this review at Brilliant BookshelfNetgalley provided me with a free copy in exchange for an honest review. A Daughter’s Deadly Deception is a great read if you want to gain more insight into the Jennifer Pan case, which is both horrifying and intriguing. This book is brilliant in the sense that it gives you a lot of information, in a way that is understandable, without boring the reader. It describes the night the (attempted) murders went down and takes the reader through the crime investig Read this review at Brilliant BookshelfNetgalley provided me with a free copy in exchange for an honest review. A Daughter’s Deadly Deception is a great read if you want to gain more insight into the Jennifer Pan case, which is both horrifying and intriguing. This book is brilliant in the sense that it gives you a lot of information, in a way that is understandable, without boring the reader. It describes the night the (attempted) murders went down and takes the reader through the crime investigation and the trial.Its absolute strength however lies in the additional information provided on top of that. It really makes you appreciate the amount of research done. For example, the author gives background information on interrogation techniques and references case-law about voluntary confessions. The focus doesn’t stay on the crime aspect though, as the workings of Asian immigrant families are explored, information is given on tiger moms and dads and even a psychological evaluation of Jennifer’s mental state is given. All the different aspects are given attention, often backed up by statements from professionals or literature.Moreover, the different perspectives of the people involved are also explored. Naturally, a lot of attention is spend on Jennifer’s side of the story and what made her plan the murder of her parents. In addition, the perspectives of her family (most prominently her father and brother) and her boyfriend are highlighted, which allows you to decide for yourself how you think and feel about everything. It perhaps gives you a more nuanced view.The only thing that I did not like about the book was its structure. It felt unnatural to me that the trial was discussed before it was revealed what really went down during planning and execution of the murder that night.However, this is only a small downside to an otherwise very good book. It is extremely informative and an interesting read. I’d recommend it to anyone who is interested in criminal law, crime or psychology.
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  • TC
    January 1, 1970
    Originally attracted to this case because of Karen Ho's amazing telling in Toronto Life magazine in 2015, I was excited to find an entire book about it that I hoped would give even more details on the girl at the center of it all, Jennifer Pan.There are details here, to be sure. I know a lot more about her, and her co-conspirators, including her boyfriend. I also learned a bit more about her family. But unfortunately, those interesting facts were buried in this tomb of clunky prose that was just Originally attracted to this case because of Karen Ho's amazing telling in Toronto Life magazine in 2015, I was excited to find an entire book about it that I hoped would give even more details on the girl at the center of it all, Jennifer Pan.There are details here, to be sure. I know a lot more about her, and her co-conspirators, including her boyfriend. I also learned a bit more about her family. But unfortunately, those interesting facts were buried in this tomb of clunky prose that was just ham-fisted together. For example, early on there's a chapter that just comes from nowhere, telling us the life story of a hardened criminal named Eric Carty. It is not tied together at all with what came before, even though by chapter's end we eventually understand that this person will become important in this story.Had that story been told like a story, unfolding chronologically, it would have been easier to read. Its impact would have been greater. The details would make more sense in their context. And we could have been spared much of the gorp in the last section which is full of psycho-babble and armchair sociology. As fate would have, this section is also the one with the most interesting details, as it does actually focus mostly on Jennifer and her life of lies. The author really makes you work.The rest of the book is really about the trial, including a lot of mechanical details on it. But even that is not told in a way that makes for compelling courtroom drama, even though it supposedly was a dramatic trial.The author will probably blame this book's problems on the fact he could not get access to primary sources. All the main characters in this saga turned him down for interviews (which he whines about quite a bit at the end). In their absence, he fills the pages with quotes from friend-of-friends and unattributed monologues from some of the key people (including Jennifer) that I assume were from police interrogations—I don't know for sure, since there isn't a single end note or citation for anything said here. When he ran out of that stuff, he quoted random message board users and a shrink he found willing to provide a psychological assessment of Jennifer based just on his notes.Granted, that assessment is still interesting, and it confirms what I always suspected: Jennifer's story is less about the downside of tiger parenting, as many opined on this tale, and more about a garden-variety sociopath who was expert at manipulating. By the end of this frustratingly assembled book, I had no doubt that she was not just some sad girl who drowned in a sea of lies she created to try to live up to expectations, and was instead just someone who became expert at acting whatever part was necessary to get her way. So admittedly, I'm now a little less interested in this story, because I'm not sure that Jen Pan was ever anything other than evil, and just-plain-evil isn't really that interesting. But I would probably still appreciate reading a better book about her that is written by someone more skilled at both obtaining interviews, and in editing it all together into a cohesive narrative. Hopefully there will be one someday.(Post-script edit: After reading through the other reviews, which I never do until I write my own, I would like to point out that unlike apparently the majority of the readers here, my copy was not supplied for free by anyone—I bought it with real money from Amazon, brand new; so the author got his pay from me. Not sure which is worse for an author—getting praise from people who you earned nothing from, or getting paid by someone who slagged on you. But anyway, there's my FTC disclaimer.)
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  • ♥ Marlene♥
    January 1, 1970
    If you are interested in psychology you will enjoy this book. Half of the book is about how she did it and then why. That being said I did find it interesting. Like the differences between raising a child in the western manner (which in my opinion has changed from parents being parents to parents walking on tiptoes around their children. Not learning them that no is no, constantly trying to protect them for everything so when they then become adults, they are not able to cope with the real world If you are interested in psychology you will enjoy this book. Half of the book is about how she did it and then why. That being said I did find it interesting. Like the differences between raising a child in the western manner (which in my opinion has changed from parents being parents to parents walking on tiptoes around their children. Not learning them that no is no, constantly trying to protect them for everything so when they then become adults, they are not able to cope with the real world where they will have to adjust but lacking the tools to do so. ) Okay rant over, the difference between the western way and the Asian way. The Asian way it is all about respect and obeying the parents but also about setting very high goals for their children. Many Asian are very well educated. That sounds nice but a lot of parents also do not compliment their kids thinking that once they do the kids will stop working so hard and as someone who as a child was also criticized a lot and hardly received compliments I know from experience it makes you insecure and you become a pleaser. That was what happened with Jennifer but she was also a psychopath lacking empathy.Because I do enjoy talking about psychology I did enjoy this book although with out there would not have bene much substance because the main characters of this book did not want to cooperate with the author. 3.5*
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  • Jeanette
    January 1, 1970
    The first third of the book is linear in time from the event of the crime- a truly horrific November night. Just almost exactly 15 minutes of terror for the Pan parents and yet horrendous in both the results and the applications to why it occurred. Staged as if it were a robbery? Jennifer Pan being in the house the entire time of the break-in, but on the top floor tied to a banister. Just.The thorough series of Jennifer Pan interrogations by the Toronto area police were absolutely 5 star. It's r The first third of the book is linear in time from the event of the crime- a truly horrific November night. Just almost exactly 15 minutes of terror for the Pan parents and yet horrendous in both the results and the applications to why it occurred. Staged as if it were a robbery? Jennifer Pan being in the house the entire time of the break-in, but on the top floor tied to a banister. Just.The thorough series of Jennifer Pan interrogations by the Toronto area police were absolutely 5 star. It's rather the rest of the book, the other Parts (divided that way with the big P)that flawed this for me. Not that they lead you into an error of factual progressions, but because of the way it was written. Style jumps and at times with the suspects and within all the telephone applications, it is so wandering that after reading a page or 3 twice? Not clear to me, even after a reread. It didn't help that the conversations were in such severe dialect that they needed to be interpreted. And at times, the cop who was the interpreter, just didn't. Jennifer had two mobile phones and there were multitude "burner" phones. It would have been SO more instructive to list the contents of order of calls in real time for each, IMHO. Instead of the way it was done. But beyond that there were lines of material that didn't intersect with the body of the suspect connections already presented.This is one of those cases (like the Casey Anthony) in which the cause and the outcome conspire to a level of real hatred, vitriol for the perp. And in this one, because she did not pull the trigger, and because of how premeditated the situation truly was, it was probably at a top rung level, the hate lash. Because of Jennifer's appearance and style of speaking- the dichotomy seemed even worse? But regardless of all this public audience reality, the "voice" of this book was the one aspect that made me downgrade it 1 whole star. There seemed to me to be judgmental and hard levels of affect in the writer's voice and in word usage and application. Not just reporting the facts and fall outs for the crime, but also using words that slant the entire outlook about it. Almost exactly as the USA media does to the news for the "other" side's politico. Not in an English such as- "This man stated this etc. etc." But in the form of- "This man claimed etc. etc. and of course, we rolled our eyes as the audience smirked." That's a subtle but truly different exposure that I rarely see in this genre. And I read many non-fiction for this category.The Canadian differences in interrogation permissions, ability to keep a suspect in jail surrounds and close proximity, and especially the complete listings from all those different phone records (some of which were from people totally unconnected to the committing of this crime except by happenstance of business or relative/blood connection)! This is so different that most of the countries I read for non-fiction crime! Although in many nations it is guilty until proven innocent, the long telephone conversation disclosures would not have taken place. And many have a very limited time to hold a suspect. Yet many do not. But the only clearly stated, IMHO, as a variance procedure was in regards to permissions to use the Reid Technique of authority prevarication and other evidence exposures as "real" facts during inquiry. That is not only in opposition to the USA law, but also to many other locals on different continents. It would be a form of bullying that is against the rights of the citizens accused. But what truly gave me the direction of the 3 star instead of the 4 star was the numbers of pages and professional analysis in numbers for the "tiger parents". Some of it was worth the read but at least half was not. And the "facts" of the stats were bias, as well. Because in real numbers it is HARDER for Asian students to be accepted in prestige establishments than it is for other races. The quotas are in identity politics and their competition is extreme against other Asians. In this story the perps were all different Asian races and most were split family origins in two or three places. Not only for their lives, but most of their parents' lives. Jennifer's father was a perfect example. At the fall of Saigon he was 22. Jennifer did not "fit". Not into her family structure, nor into her larger environment. Language forms and context, style of approach, self-identity coupled with that tech, make believe thinking- all of it was a terrible fit to the actual place, time she lived within. To use her race and parental style alone as such a criteria for the psychobabble and other authors' interpretation? Well, I thought it a stereotypical cheap shot approach. And like describing the Titanic disaster by a fine portraiture of the iceberg that appeared above the water line. The ending section with the present day outcomes was done rather well. Most of those would not be interviewed and it is highly understandable why. Also it is SO ironic that Jennifer clearly resides in the easiest prison, the most genial life for her personality and by far the least aggressive or distressing living arrangements. She THRIVED on being completely supported without any onus for being hard at work or schooling. She did it for 7 or 8 years straight by lying about her daily placements. That's part of the core of why she couldn't leave family existing as they were (support and "home") or couldn't stay either (too much limitation on her movements and nasty verbal feedback for her behaviors). Jennifer didn't want to continue the lie pyramid for a decade of years. Those constructions were collapsing into a kind of internment besides. Although despite this, she did NOT want to be self-sustaining and do what it took to be self-sustaining, either. Yes, very ironic her present outcome in such an easy living sentencing. Lastly, it seems that this 3 plus 1- as a group? The stupidity of how it occurred and the lack of any intelligence toward not being discovered? Incredulous that they could have thought that the drug business or any other gang or past loyalty would have sufficed to cover their tracks. Why would they not understand that it was far better to commit when Jennifer was not home. The door opening was barely a cipher? Most criminals have far more considerable savvy.Well, with no DNA or physical evidence- and without the Reid Technique use in great depth of lying- I doubt they would have gotten the sentences that they did get. Most will be out before they are 50. I don't agree with parole for one after 6-9 years. These are dangerous individuals. All of them.
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  • SundayAtDusk
    January 1, 1970
    When you look at the cover of this book, it's hard to believe the girl on it arranged for the murder of her parents. (How old was she when that picture was taken? Certainly not 24.) By the time you get to the end of the book, though, it's easier to understand why she did. It's easier because author Jeremy Grimaldi does a really good job of presenting all different types of viewpoints about why someone like Jennifer Pan, the daughter of two hard working Vietnamese immigrants, ended up like she en When you look at the cover of this book, it's hard to believe the girl on it arranged for the murder of her parents. (How old was she when that picture was taken? Certainly not 24.) By the time you get to the end of the book, though, it's easier to understand why she did. It's easier because author Jeremy Grimaldi does a really good job of presenting all different types of viewpoints about why someone like Jennifer Pan, the daughter of two hard working Vietnamese immigrants, ended up like she ended up. This is not a story about abusive, uncaring parents, or about a young woman who snapped one night and killed her parents in a rage. It's a story about how many Asian parents raise their children to be successful in life in a way that unknowingly mentally breaks some of those children. This is not to say that Jennifer Pan's parents were to blame for what happened to them, but that, as Toronto psychologist Betty Kershner says at the end of the book, Ms. Pan and her parents were mismatched. Toronto is where this story takes place, and that makes it a bit more interesting for readers in the United States. Readers learn how the Canadian police operate and how the Canadian court system works. Mr. Grimaldi jumps right into the story by starting off with the home invasion in 2010, the murder of Bich Pan, the severe injury of Hann Pan, the police investigation and the trial. Much of that is extremely interesting reading; although whenever the author wrote about the men involved in the crime, with the exception of Daniel Wong, the story got confusing and badly bogged down. Although not as confusing and bogged down as when the story concentrated on the usage of cell phones, and how the police used cell phone records to crack open the case. It may have been brilliant detective work, but I fear the average reader is not going to be all that interested in all the tedious details. (It sort of makes you wish cell phones were never invented!)After the trial and sentencing, the author then takes the story back to when the Pans came to Canada, and thoroughly looks at Jennifer Pan's life. Her parents had high expectations for her and always expected her to come out on top of everything she did--school, piano, ice skating. Winning was everything, friendships and team work nothing. Ms. Pan was indeed a very successful young child; but by the time she was a teenager, she had the feeling she would never be good enough no matter how hard she tried. When her grades started slipping, knowing her parents would be mad, if not downright disgraced, she started forging report cards. That led to more and more forging and more and more lies. She would eventually be lying about graduating from high school and college, when she did neither. Her whole life became one big lie, always fueled by the fear of what would happen if her parents found out about all her lies; the shame it would bring on both her and them.In her analysis of Jennifer Pan's life, Dr. Kershner proposed one reason Ms. Pan came to the conclusion that she must have her parents killed was to prevent them from experiencing that shame and disgrace; from ever totally understanding what a deceitful daughter they had. That was only one possible reason, though, and Jeremy Grimaldi does seem to be trying very hard to be fair to everyone involved in the case. Dr. Kershner, who was not involved in the case at all, was one of many, many individuals quoted in the book who was trying to figure out what went wrong. The author gives her assessment the most space, though, and the final word. Personally, I thought her analysis of Jennifer Pan's life was extremely enlightening, and helped explained many things that seemed so confusing about her. Yet neither the psychologist nor the author gave Jennifer Pan a "Get Out Of Jail Free" card. As Dr. Kershner stated, it is all the choices in one's life that determines how one behaves and how one ends up. Choices and experiences can lead to a personality disorder, but that is "not an excuse for murder".Jennifer Pan plotted with a group of men to kill her parents. She was paying them to do so. The night of the home invasion, she said goodnight to her mother downstairs and unlocked the front door, so those men could easily enter the house. She then went upstairs and signaled the men outside by turning a light on and off. After the men entered the house, she quietly conversed with one of them while her father was being taken downstairs, where her terrified mother was waiting. Jennifer Pan than sat upstairs waiting and listening, as the men terrorized and shot her parents. After the men left, she soon heard her horribly wounded father howling in agony, as he dragged himself out the front door. Realizing he wasn't dead like he was suppose to be, she called out to him: "Dad? I'm calling 911 . . . I'm okay." I'm okay. Another lie by Jennifer Pan. On the night of the planned murder, she was not okay. In fact, she was as far from being okay as a human being could possibly be, for there was something horribly wrong with her mind, heart and soul.(Note: I received a free e-copy of this book from NetGalley and the publisher or author.)
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  • Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 StarsThe story behind this book was incredibly compelling.This book begs the question: what would drive a young woman to plan the murder of her own parents? I found the first chapters very engaging, but some of the later section dragged due unnecessary details. This is quite a dark and depressing book, but it will appeal to fans of the true crime genre.
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  • Margaret Bryant
    January 1, 1970
    What a fascinating -- and terrifying -- story!
  • Jazmine
    January 1, 1970
    An extremely well written & well put together story of a daughter's decision to have her parents murdered. This is definitely a case that stays with you.
  • Debbie
    January 1, 1970
    This was definitely an in depth story of a girl who paid people to kill her parents. It took into account the culture of her race, the way she was being raised, how she was being treated by her parents, how she had been lying to her parents since 9th grade, etc.It also talked about her psyche, how a person could turn out this way, what could have made her do this and what kind of state she was in at the time she did this.There was a lot of detail. You can tell that the author spent a lot of time This was definitely an in depth story of a girl who paid people to kill her parents. It took into account the culture of her race, the way she was being raised, how she was being treated by her parents, how she had been lying to her parents since 9th grade, etc.It also talked about her psyche, how a person could turn out this way, what could have made her do this and what kind of state she was in at the time she did this.There was a lot of detail. You can tell that the author spent a lot of time in writing this book. It is amazing to me that this girl could have done that. It's also amazing how many texts she sent out and the messages that she wrote to her "boyfriend". This girl was definitely cray cray.It was a good read, I did find my eyes glazing over several times when the author was talking about the culture and tiger woman. However, that's just me. The eerie part was at the very end with her cousin in 2016. That was creepy.Thanks to Dundurn for approving my request and to Net Galley for providing me with a free e-galley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • ❤
    January 1, 1970
    This is a really thoroughly researched book, full of details about this strange case of an even stranger girl who hired a group of young men to kill her parents, though I did find the writing to be a little dry in certain places.What I liked about it most was how insightful it was into who Jennifer Pan was. There's a lot of detail about her personal life and how she got to the point of planning the murder of her parents, but there's also a good amount of information and background on her family This is a really thoroughly researched book, full of details about this strange case of an even stranger girl who hired a group of young men to kill her parents, though I did find the writing to be a little dry in certain places.What I liked about it most was how insightful it was into who Jennifer Pan was. There's a lot of detail about her personal life and how she got to the point of planning the murder of her parents, but there's also a good amount of information and background on her family as well as the dynamics within the family. With so much info on all involved in the case, I also found the tone to be nicely unbiased. The author was equally as sympathetic toward Jennifer's upbringing/troubles as he was critical of her actions and excuses, while at the same time never victim-blaming the parents but still shining a light on the psychological repercussions their harsh parental style/traditions may have had in playing a role in causing their daughter to make the choices she did.
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  • Carla (Carla's Book Bits)
    January 1, 1970
    Jennifer Pan was in university for pharmacy, volunteering at Sick Kids Hospital, a childhood skating champion, and a prolific piano player. But a few years ago, she was sentenced to life in prison for hiring hitmen to kill her parents in their own home.This was disturbing! Jennifer Pan looks so innocent and just like any other girl I've met and gone to school with, but there's so much underneath the surface. It really leads one to ask why this girl, who seemingly had everything going for her, wo Jennifer Pan was in university for pharmacy, volunteering at Sick Kids Hospital, a childhood skating champion, and a prolific piano player. But a few years ago, she was sentenced to life in prison for hiring hitmen to kill her parents in their own home.This was disturbing! Jennifer Pan looks so innocent and just like any other girl I've met and gone to school with, but there's so much underneath the surface. It really leads one to ask why this girl, who seemingly had everything going for her, would want to do something as twisted as kill her parents. Some of the details near the end felt a little bit repetitive, but overall, this story was gripping, interesting, and SO unnerving.Jennifer Pan is a real person, and she is batshit crazy. Who knows where else another Jennifer Pan may be hiding?Another good foray for me into true crime. I will definitely read more!
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  • Veronica
    January 1, 1970
    "A Daughter's Deadly Deception: The Jennifer Pan Story" by Jeremy Grimaldi is an amazing read. I usually stick to Ann Rule because many true crime stories rely on gory descriptions but this book relates more of the emotional background to the story and especially depicts a sense of compassion for the victims. The book was well researched and very well written. I will definitely be reading more of Jeremy Grimaldi's books.
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  • Alex Popoff
    January 1, 1970
    This book is gripping, if a bit repetitive. I really did enjoy the first third, but delving so deep into the lies Jennifer Pan told started to mess with my head. I didn't sleep well while reading this book, but would still recommend reading it - it is certainly an interesting story, and it is obvious the author did a lot of research in putting it together.
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  • Lynn Mccarthy
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 34%Thank you Netgalley the publisher and Author sorry I just could not finish it...
  • Jenn
    January 1, 1970
    What a disturbing story.On November 8, 2010, 3 men shot both of Jennifer Pan's parents in their basement, killing her mother and seriously injuring her father. The intruders left Jennifer tied to the railing upstairs where, after they left, she was able to finagle her phone out of her pockets and call the police. What the detectives uncover while searching for the suspects is a deception so deep it's chilling - a murder hit set up by Jennifer Pan herself.I find true crime absolutely fascinating. What a disturbing story.On November 8, 2010, 3 men shot both of Jennifer Pan's parents in their basement, killing her mother and seriously injuring her father. The intruders left Jennifer tied to the railing upstairs where, after they left, she was able to finagle her phone out of her pockets and call the police. What the detectives uncover while searching for the suspects is a deception so deep it's chilling - a murder hit set up by Jennifer Pan herself.I find true crime absolutely fascinating. Books, movies, TV shows - I'm all over them. I've always been interested in the criminal justice system and the psychology behind the crimes. So when I saw this book on Netgally, I immediately requested it. Grimaldi sets the scene right away and follows it all the way through to the sentencing, even including a 'Where Are They Now?' section. As I read more about Jennifer and the life she led with her parents, I still couldn't fathom how one person could plot to kill their own parents. There was no abuse shown in the house, just a strict Asian upbringing that Jennifer was unable to live up to. Instead of telling her parents about her failures, she hid them. She forged report cards, diplomas, acceptance letters to college, all of it. While her parents thought she was at school, she was sneaking off to be with her boyfriend. But the lies came to be too much and her father caught her, forcing her to choose to live with her boyfriend and never come back or come back to the family home. She chose the later and lived in a very controlled environment. This isolation and separation from her boyfriend is what led to her planning her parents death.It was interesting to read how the Crown (the crime took place in Canada) pieced together the story of what happened. There was no DNA evidence, the weapons were never recovered, but they managed to link Jennifer, her boyfriend, and three others together using cell phone tracking and data. These parts were a little hard to follow as there were multiple people in play with multiple phones a piece most using multiple aliases. I felt like I could have used a flow chart to simplify it at times or something to help me keep track.The book was extremely repetitive. Repeating the same information over and over again but in different chapters and using different variations to make it seem new almost. I skimmed most of what happened after trail parts because it was mostly just information we already knew. Another issue I had was multiple words were missing letters making it hard to read. I don't blame this on the author, though. This was from the publisher who used the wrong format for the type of ARC they sent out. Overall, if you like true crime, give this one a shot. I received an e-copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Teena in Toronto
    January 1, 1970
    This is the true story of Bich and Hann Pan, who were Vietnam refugees who eventually settled in Markham, just north of Toronto. They had two children, Jennifer and Felix, and lived frugally to give their children the best they could. Bich and Hann had high expectations for their children and were strict disciplinarians. Jennifer and Felix were expected to get high marks in school and win the awards in whatever they did ... for Jennifer, it was in skating and piano.After grade eight, Jennifer di This is the true story of Bich and Hann Pan, who were Vietnam refugees who eventually settled in Markham, just north of Toronto. They had two children, Jennifer and Felix, and lived frugally to give their children the best they could. Bich and Hann had high expectations for their children and were strict disciplinarians. Jennifer and Felix were expected to get high marks in school and win the awards in whatever they did ... for Jennifer, it was in skating and piano.After grade eight, Jennifer discovered she wasn't the smartest in school anymore and her grades started slipping. Rather than let her parents know, she adjusted her report card to keep them impressed and vowed she'd do better next year. The years ago by and she is stunned to find out that she doesn't have enough credits to graduate from high school. Rather than tell her parents, she forged a high school diploma. Then she told them she was going to Ryerson University and a couple years later showed them another forged diploma. What she was really doing was going to the library, working in a restaurant and hanging out with her boyfriend, Daniel.Rather than being honest with her parents, she kept digging herself into a deeper hole. When her parents found out, they were livid and put restrictions on her ... she had to break up with Daniel, she had to quit her job, she had to enrol in university, she wasn't allowed to leave the house. They ultimately made her choose ... them or Daniel ... and she choose them.Then she started plotting to have her parents murdered so she would be free from their rules and she could be with Daniel. In November 2010, in what looked like a home invasion, Bich was murdered, Hann was wounded and Jennifer was left tied "helpless" to a banister. As the police investigate, they learn the truth. Jennifer and those involved were convicted and sent to prison.This book and story caught my eye and I thought it would be interesting and it was. Surprisingly I don't remember it happening. I liked the writing style. There was a lot of information and I thought the author did a good job in presenting it. Not only does the book tell the story of the Pans and what happened that night in November 2010 but it also covers what happened leading up to it, the trial and where they are now. In addition, there is interesting information about tiger parenting and analyses by experts of the Han family and Jennifer herself.Blog review post: http://www.teenaintoronto.com/2016/11...
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  • Karen Whittard
    January 1, 1970
    A true crime book with a gripping scary tale of a story. The author Jeremy Grimaldi knows this case back to back as he was working on it for 10 months while the trial went on. The book is really horrowing and would make a great horror movie. But it really isn't for the faint hearted. If you don't like things are could be scarily close to home. Then this really isn't for you. But if sounds like your cup of tea. You are in for one hell of a ride. Jennifer the model daughter will for all to see fro A true crime book with a gripping scary tale of a story. The author Jeremy Grimaldi knows this case back to back as he was working on it for 10 months while the trial went on. The book is really horrowing and would make a great horror movie. But it really isn't for the faint hearted. If you don't like things are could be scarily close to home. Then this really isn't for you. But if sounds like your cup of tea. You are in for one hell of a ride. Jennifer the model daughter will for all to see from the outside at least. A grade A student, who was studying to be a Pharmacist at the university of Toronto. Holding down a job so she could get money to pay for her education. Everything she put her mind to she could do perfectly. From the outside this family was perfect. What the family didn't know was that Jennifer skipped school, faked exam results and certificates, never went to work and lied to her parents every waking moment. Jennifer had a boyfriend one her parents didn't like in their slightest. But Jennifer didn't care what they said and bunked off so that she could spend as much time with him as possible. When Jennifer's father finds out about her web of lies. Jennifer weaves a web that is so far twisted it is redicilous What happened next truly begs belief. All was calm and quiet in the suburbs on a Monday night just gone 10pm. All was not quite and calm in Jennifer house. Jennifer was tied up her mother lay on the floor dead and her father has been shot multiple times. Her father staggers to the door as Jennifer calls 911. What the police find in there investigation begs belief and is really a disgusting. A true crime book which will have you gripped and asking why a million times. Thank you to NetGalley, Dundum publishing and Jeremy Grimaldi for the opportunity to read this book for an honest review Happy reading everyone
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  • Authorjen
    January 1, 1970
    As a person, daughter, and sister, this story is heartbreaking. As a mother, this story is terrifying. But not in the way you might think. It doesn't terrify me that my daughter might murder me in my sleep or have me killed, it terrifies me to think that as a parent you try to do everything you can to ensure your child/ren's success, and even doing everything "right" you can still be "wrong" and create a sociopath like this.Were Jennifer's parents perfect? Certainly not. Did they love her and do As a person, daughter, and sister, this story is heartbreaking. As a mother, this story is terrifying. But not in the way you might think. It doesn't terrify me that my daughter might murder me in my sleep or have me killed, it terrifies me to think that as a parent you try to do everything you can to ensure your child/ren's success, and even doing everything "right" you can still be "wrong" and create a sociopath like this.Were Jennifer's parents perfect? Certainly not. Did they love her and do the best they knew how? Absolutely. Did cultural pressures influence they way they raised her? Of course. But we all know plenty of "tiger parents" who don't raise sociopathic murderers.This true story unfolded well and kept my attention. You'll experience a wide range of feelings for all the participants, including: pity, heartbreak, empathy, sympathy, frustration, and anger. Ultimately, regardless of who and what her parents were and did, they loved their daughter, and that daughter's selfishness and lack of coping skills turned her into a murderer, and that ended one life and fractured many.I am so heartbroken by this story. But at least Jennifer will be in prison well into her 50s and won't ever have a family of her own. Hopefully by then she'll be rehabilitated and can make something good out of the years she has left.
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  • Joanne
    January 1, 1970
    After bringing it home from the library, I looked at this book several days as it sat on the table waiting for me to pick it up. I'd never heard of Jennifer Pan, so I really wasn't sure what to expect. When I finally decided to read the book, I was plunged into a story so tragic on so many levels that I feel numbed by it.I need to say up front that I feel absolutely zero, none, nada empathy for Jennifer Pan. The picture the author paints of the obsessional, skilled con artist she appears to be d After bringing it home from the library, I looked at this book several days as it sat on the table waiting for me to pick it up. I'd never heard of Jennifer Pan, so I really wasn't sure what to expect. When I finally decided to read the book, I was plunged into a story so tragic on so many levels that I feel numbed by it.I need to say up front that I feel absolutely zero, none, nada empathy for Jennifer Pan. The picture the author paints of the obsessional, skilled con artist she appears to be dismays me completely. The long treatise in Part Three about Tiger Parents and relentless pressure to succeed leaves me totally unmoved. Ironically, I ended up feeling sorry for Daniel Wong, who comes across as a pretty decent guy who got in over his head with a compulsive, relentless girlfriend who was destined to take him down. Even some of the other co-conspirators seem more sympathetic, more caught up in something that got away from them. (Yes, I realize this was a planned murder, not a spur of the moment event, but I still felt that way.) If I have any complaints about the book, it is mainly about when the narrative strays into sociology about immigrants' pressures to succeed, and the cost of this to their offspring. That discussion went on too long. However, overall, I'd say this was an interesting case study of murder and obsession, and worth reading.
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  • Mary Young
    January 1, 1970
    Jennifer Pan, the daughter of Asian immigrants, coldly and callously arranges the murder of her parents. A seemingly normal child, Jennifer grew up with the urge and drive to succeed. When she was unable to get into a college, she began making up stories to satisfy her parents’ wishes. When her lies begin to unravel and she is given the choice between her boyfriend Daniel or her family, she initially chooses her family. What follows is a grim and horror filled story of murder and deceit.I’m not Jennifer Pan, the daughter of Asian immigrants, coldly and callously arranges the murder of her parents. A seemingly normal child, Jennifer grew up with the urge and drive to succeed. When she was unable to get into a college, she began making up stories to satisfy her parents’ wishes. When her lies begin to unravel and she is given the choice between her boyfriend Daniel or her family, she initially chooses her family. What follows is a grim and horror filled story of murder and deceit.I’m not sure how to review this book. The first half of the book addressed the crime, investigation and trial. The second half of the book analyzed Jennifer’s life and the murders. During the first half, the author continuously went back and forth from present to past tense and tended to get bogged down in mindless details. The minutia about the phone calls and texts was particularly tedious. The second half of the book was repetitive psychological analysis that was a complete bore. It gave information about her background that should have been told chronologically during the first half of the book. Overall, an interesting subject matter, but the book itself was a bust.
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  • Christina
    January 1, 1970
    This book really dragged for me, and it was very repetitive.This isn't a spoiler, but it's a mild annoyance that might not bother anyone unfamiliar with the area in which the crime took place:The suspects in the case use cellular phones that have been registered under false names. The author continually refers to the "Peter Robinson" phone, rather than referring to the phone as that of the suspect in question. The author claims that since the suspect lived in the city of Brampton, Ontario, that This book really dragged for me, and it was very repetitive.This isn't a spoiler, but it's a mild annoyance that might not bother anyone unfamiliar with the area in which the crime took place:The suspects in the case use cellular phones that have been registered under false names. The author continually refers to the "Peter Robinson" phone, rather than referring to the phone as that of the suspect in question. The author claims that since the suspect lived in the city of Brampton, Ontario, that he chose the name "Peter Robinson" because that is the name of a local politician.Has the author changed the name to protect the innocent, or did he not bother to fact-check that Peter Robertson (not Robinson) was the Mayor of Brampton from 1991-2000?It's something that probably won't bother anyone else, but it drove me crazy!
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  • Carrie Faith Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    Although I enjoyed this book, the writing was mediocre. It was an interesting story, and I feel the author did an adequate job of tackling the complexities of the case. Unfortunately, some of the writing was unclear. In some areas where brackets were used to change quotes to add clarity, they were unnecessary or used ineffectively. Overall, though, I would still recommend this book. It gives an interesting look at how extreme pressure without parental affection may have caused one woman to murde Although I enjoyed this book, the writing was mediocre. It was an interesting story, and I feel the author did an adequate job of tackling the complexities of the case. Unfortunately, some of the writing was unclear. In some areas where brackets were used to change quotes to add clarity, they were unnecessary or used ineffectively. Overall, though, I would still recommend this book. It gives an interesting look at how extreme pressure without parental affection may have caused one woman to murder.To visit my memoir review blog:https://memoir.blog/ (home)https://memoir.blog/daughters-deadly-... (this book)
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  • Polly Krize
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.True crime at its best! With all the ingredients for an engrossing mystery, this well-written account of Jennifer Pan is researched impeccably. From the outset I got the feeling that there was a lot more to Jennifer than met the eye, and boy, was I right! Deceiving her hard working parents at every turn, Jennifer Pan is a true life monster. Very readable. Recommended.
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  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    I first heard of this chilling story on my favourite true crime podcast, Casefile (seriously, if you're into true crime, you have to check it out). I was surprised and excited to hear about this local Toronto-area case on the Australian podcast, and so of course, I had to look it up for more information. Of course, the book has a lot more detail than the 2-and-a-half-hour podcast, so it was great to delve into this case.Jennifer Pan was the daughter of immigrants from Vietnam who had worked them I first heard of this chilling story on my favourite true crime podcast, Casefile (seriously, if you're into true crime, you have to check it out). I was surprised and excited to hear about this local Toronto-area case on the Australian podcast, and so of course, I had to look it up for more information. Of course, the book has a lot more detail than the 2-and-a-half-hour podcast, so it was great to delve into this case.Jennifer Pan was the daughter of immigrants from Vietnam who had worked themselves silly trying to give Jennifer and her brother a better chance at life. In primary school, Jennifer was a golden child, with almost perfect grades at school and numerous awards in piano and ice skating. Something started to change in her when she hit grade nine, and that's where it all started going downhill for her. Suddenly she wasn't doing so well at school, so she started down a rabbit hole of lies by fudging her report cards. When she failed a subject and her university offer was withdrawn, the web of lies deepened and she started to pretend she was going to school. And all of this so as not to look like a failure in her parents' eyes.Alongside this fabricated life that she made for herself, Jennifer had a boyfriend that her parents just did not approve of. They forbade her from seeing him, which seemed to make her want to see him even more. So again, she was sneaking around seeing him behind their backs. Keep in mind that we are talking about a young woman in her 20s here, and not a 15 year old.So one day, her parents find out about some of these lies and that's when Jennifer snaps. She arranges a group of men to come and stage a home invasion and kill her parents. Sadly, her mother is killed in the incident but her dad's life is spared.The book gives intricate details of everything that happens. There are quotes from Jennifer and excerpts from text conversations between her and her forbidden boyfriend and between some of the "hit men." At the end of the book, the author notes that he was unable to do interviews with Jennifer or any of the other main characters in the story, so I guess the quotes from her came from recorded police interviews, although it doesn't explicitly say. There are a few other experts who get in on it too, such as experts on Asian immigrants' parenting styles and a psychologist who analyzes Jennifer based on just the book.Somehow, for me, these other "experts" kind of made the book seem a bit...tabloid-y. Like the author wanted to pass judgement on the situation, and so he went out and found whoever he could to agree with what he thought. It struck me as a bit odd and disjointed at times.Overall, the book was fairly good. It's a fascinating story, and one that I'm surprised I hadn't heard of before listening to that podcast. I have it three stars for bringing to light this fascinating case, but no more than that because of the disjointed style and sensationalist feel.
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  • Susan Staudinger
    January 1, 1970
    3.25 STARSAs a huge fan of true crime dramas, I was excited to delve into the pages of “A Daughter’s Deadly Deception” and to learn the detailed facts behind the Jennifer Pan story. Thanks to Netgalley, I was given an opportunity to do so, in exchange for an honest review. Jennifer Pan was raised in Toronto by immigrant parents. As a young Asian woman, Jennifer’s Vietnamese parents held high expectations for their daughter. Socially isolated, Jennifer was pushed to succeed in all aspects of her 3.25 STARSAs a huge fan of true crime dramas, I was excited to delve into the pages of “A Daughter’s Deadly Deception” and to learn the detailed facts behind the Jennifer Pan story. Thanks to Netgalley, I was given an opportunity to do so, in exchange for an honest review. Jennifer Pan was raised in Toronto by immigrant parents. As a young Asian woman, Jennifer’s Vietnamese parents held high expectations for their daughter. Socially isolated, Jennifer was pushed to succeed in all aspects of her life. Eventually, Jennifer collapsed under the pressure, and rather than disappoint her parents, she weaved a web of intricate lies in order to conceal her deceit. Over time, Jennifer had essentially created an alternate life. To her parents, Jennifer was the perfect child—talented; hard-working; successful. They believed the scholastic achievements she touted and her supposed plans to become a pharmacist. They believed that Jennifer’s relationship with her high school sweetheart, Daniel Wong had, ended with their ultimatum. They had been wrong on all accounts. In fact, Jennifer was a far cry from the successful, dutiful daughter that her parents believed her to be. Jennifer had perpetrated a very elaborate façade—one that would eventually come crashing down.Divided into several parts, this book goes into great detail about every aspect of Jennifer’s life. From when the lies first started, to her tumultuous relationship with Daniel, to the forging of school documents, to the eventual double life. Along the way, we discover that there were several motivating factors that lead to Jennifer’s planning and executing the cold-blooded murder of her unsuspecting parents. But regardless of her true motive, Jennifer had ample opportunity to stand up to her parents; to walk away; to choose a different path. Instead, she chose murder. Many players came together to devise an elaborate home-invasion scheme, in which Jennifer’s parents would be killed and she, left tied up but the sole survivor. But the night didn’t play out quite as planned. While Jennifer’s father, Hann, was gravely injured, he did survive the brutal assault. Jennifer’s mother, Bich, however, wasn’t so lucky. While I found Jennifer Pan’s story to be interesting and thought-provoking, the author’s execution of this story was often times confusing and overly complicated. Between the numerous conspirators involved in this murder scheme and the police’s elaborate investigation into cell phone messages amongst said culprits, I struggled to maintain focus and to remain engaged in the story as a whole. I do believe that a different approach by the author could have made a huge difference in my overall assessment. That being said, for fans of the true crime genre, “A Daughter’s Deadly Deception” is a good, decent read—it’s just not a great one.
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