The Other Einstein
In the tradition of The Paris Wife and Mrs. Poe, The Other Einstein offers us a window into a brilliant, fascinating woman whose light was lost in Einstein's enormous shadow. It is the story of Einstein's wife, a brilliant physicist in her own right, whose contribution to the special theory of relativity is hotly debated and may have been inspired by her own profound and very personal insight.Mitza Maric has always been a little different from other girls. Most twenty-year-olds are wives by now, not studying physics at an elite Zurich university with only male students trying to outdo her clever calculations. But Mitza is smart enough to know that, for her, math is an easier path than marriage. And then fellow student Albert Einstein takes an interest in her, and the world turns sideways. Theirs becomes a partnership of the mind and of the heart, but there might not be room for more than one genius in a marriage.

The Other Einstein Details

TitleThe Other Einstein
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 18th, 2016
PublisherSourcebooks Landmark
ISBN-139781492637257
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, Audiobook

The Other Einstein Review

  • Angela M
    January 1, 1970
    It's always a dilemma for me to rate books about the woman behind the famous man and I usually wonder just how much influence they have and this was no exception. Even though this a fictionalized account, I have have questions about how much is real, how much is imagined more so than in other novels of this kind. What I know about Einstein can be summed up easily. He was a brilliant scientist, famous for E=mcsquared equation , the theory of relativity and by all pictures I've seen, he had unruly It's always a dilemma for me to rate books about the woman behind the famous man and I usually wonder just how much influence they have and this was no exception. Even though this a fictionalized account, I have have questions about how much is real, how much is imagined more so than in other novels of this kind. What I know about Einstein can be summed up easily. He was a brilliant scientist, famous for E=mcsquared equation , the theory of relativity and by all pictures I've seen, he had unruly hair. I knew absolutely nothing about his personal life so I knew nothing about his first wife Mileva Maric who was a brilliant scientist in her own right . I went in really with no preconceived notions about who he was as a man and certainly none about Mileva.Over the years it appears that there have been questions raised over whether Mileva contributed to Einstein's work, without getting credit. The claims are considered unsubstantiated by accounts, but the premise of this story is that it is true, making Albert Einstein a less than appealing person, actually pretty cold and calculating. Mileva is treated miserably, having to go off and have their child on her own ; deal with the child's death by herself and robbed of recognition for scientific publications and of the Nobel prize. All of this may be true but it might not be . The author outlines her research which appears to be fairly extensive but yet she says "Similarly, the precise nature of Mileva's contribution to the 1905 theories attributed to Albert is unknown, although no one disputes that, at a minimum, she played the significant part of emotional and intellectual supporter during this critical time. But given how Mileva saw the world and how desperately she must have loved her daughter, isn't it possible that the loss of Lieserl could have inspired Mileva's to create the theory of special relativity? Answering through fiction the seemingly unanswerable questions in Mileva's life - exploring the 'what ifs' - is what makes writing The Other Einstein so interesting to me ." Also, it is not substantiated that the child died but may have been given up for adoption. I mostly read fiction and have no problems accepting stories as they are presented but when doubts are expressed in the author's note about the validity of the premise , I had a hard time with it. I will say that it is interesting from the perspective of how difficult it was for women in universities and especially in the sciences in the late 19th century. This has gotten rave reviews so this is very possibly just me . I may have to think twice before I read another novel of this type. Three stars for the early chapters where we see Mileva's brilliance and determination, her touching relationship with her father , and also for the depiction of the time and a glimpse into the sometimes difficult road of scientific discovery.Thanks to Sourcebooks Landmark and NetGalley for this advance copy.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    I really wanted to like this book.Perhaps it is just me, but I think I hold writers of historical fiction to a different standard than other fiction writers. If a historical fiction writer is creating a story about real people (as opposed to creating fictionalized characters set during a specific era or historic event), then I expect that the big details about that real person's life will be correct. Otherwise, readers can come away with a view of history that is entirely incorrect. (This is one I really wanted to like this book.Perhaps it is just me, but I think I hold writers of historical fiction to a different standard than other fiction writers. If a historical fiction writer is creating a story about real people (as opposed to creating fictionalized characters set during a specific era or historic event), then I expect that the big details about that real person's life will be correct. Otherwise, readers can come away with a view of history that is entirely incorrect. (This is one of the reasons I don't care for Philippa Gregory's work) Benedict's novel carries a story line that isn't consistent with historical research (Her author's note is built on ideas like "maybe," "perhaps," and "we don't know.") Were the allegations true, it would be a whopper. A much more interesting book would have been to follow the true story of Mileva's life -- a brilliant scientist in her own right (the only female studying at the Zurich Polytechnic at the time Einstein was getting his degree) who had to give up her scientific ambitions when she became a mother. Aside from my issues with the book's misrepresentation of the truth (yes! I do know this is fiction) the book was a bit of a slog to read. Far too much time was spent on Albert & Mileva's courtship, before getting to any interest or tension in the book. Thank you to NetGalley and Sourcebooks Landmark for a galley of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Pouting Always
    January 1, 1970
    Mitza Maric has dreams of being more than a wife, a brilliant physics student she plans to pursue a degree in 1896 and is the only female in her classes. Mitza is also disabled and has never expected any man to ever be interested in her and want to marry her. When she meets Albert Einstein though things begin to change and she rethinks the life she has pictured for herself, ending up caught between her ambition and love. The book was well written and I did like Mitza, and I know we've all had th Mitza Maric has dreams of being more than a wife, a brilliant physics student she plans to pursue a degree in 1896 and is the only female in her classes. Mitza is also disabled and has never expected any man to ever be interested in her and want to marry her. When she meets Albert Einstein though things begin to change and she rethinks the life she has pictured for herself, ending up caught between her ambition and love. The book was well written and I did like Mitza, and I know we've all had the representation talk before but really it is cool knowing about women scientists and especially one with a disability. I had never heard of her before though it's not a surprise when her own career became side railed to Einstein's, but I actually don't know much about the time period when women first started being admitted into colleges and being able to contribute in academia, so it was interesting. I did find the book to be really slow though and I got bored through out it again and again. I guess it's mostly because the life of university students isn't all that interesting and like her going back and forth between school and trying to keep her friends and manage her love life wasn't something unusual or fun to read about. I also am not sure about the historical accuracy of the book though the author said she researched it well and it is fiction. Even though it is fiction I don't think the scene where (view spoiler)[ Mitza comes up with relativity (hide spoiler)] was done well at all. I didn't buy it at all. I don't see how death could cause anyone to make a connection like that about time, and the explanation seemed a little iffy. Maybe if we saw more of Mitza sitting around thinking about physics theoretically I would've bought the idea that she came up with it and Einstein stole the idea or I guess took credit or whatever but nah it didn't work for me the way it was done in the book I don't buy it. I can buy Einstein's behaving like a dick though because I always felt like he was kind of a dick. An okay book about someone who maybe could have achieved something if it hadn't been for a man, typical, but nothing spectacular. Mostly because I'd rather not read fictional accounts about what women may have contributed to their husband's works, I wish we could get more nonfiction books about women whose contributions we know about and yeah I could've done without reading this but I'm not like upset I read it, kind of just indifferent to the whole experience.
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  • Suzanne Leopold (Suzy Approved Book Reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    Mileva Maric was the only female student studying physics at a prestigious university in Zurich in 1896. It is here that she met a young student in her class named Albert Einstein. Albert takes an interest in her, and a romantic relationship evolves between them. This book details how their relationship changes over timeWritten in the voice of Mileva, this historical novel is about the difficulties she encountered while married to Einstein. What starts as a young exciting relationship turns into Mileva Maric was the only female student studying physics at a prestigious university in Zurich in 1896. It is here that she met a young student in her class named Albert Einstein. Albert takes an interest in her, and a romantic relationship evolves between them. This book details how their relationship changes over timeWritten in the voice of Mileva, this historical novel is about the difficulties she encountered while married to Einstein. What starts as a young exciting relationship turns into an abusive neglectful one. Mileva sacrificed her own career dreams by catering to the needs of her husband and family. The book delves into how Mileva eventually felt she was living in Einstein’s shadow. It has been speculated that she contributed to the theory of relativity but her named was omitted by Einstein. This is an interesting story of love, loss and science. Readers are spoonfed real history about Einstein while watching this drama unfold. I came away with a better appreciation for the contribution from both of these individuals. Einstein is known as a genius, but as the saying goes, behind every great man is a great woman.I am giving away 2 copies on my blog until 11/12$1.99 on kindle and digital platforms 2/9 https://www.facebook.com/suzyapproved...
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  • Jilly
    January 1, 1970
    I can't get through it. I'm bored. Also, I find it strange when a first-person narration gets all flowery in descriptions because I find it hard to believe that people talk that way in their heads. When I am thinking about the weather outside, I never have thoughts like, "It was dark and stormy with broody clouds and a malevolent fog." I'm more likely to think, "F-ing weather! You suck!" Okay, so I admit I'm not the most quixotic of thinkers. (Word of the day challenge: check!)I would have hange I can't get through it. I'm bored. Also, I find it strange when a first-person narration gets all flowery in descriptions because I find it hard to believe that people talk that way in their heads. When I am thinking about the weather outside, I never have thoughts like, "It was dark and stormy with broody clouds and a malevolent fog." I'm more likely to think, "F-ing weather! You suck!" Okay, so I admit I'm not the most quixotic of thinkers. (Word of the day challenge: check!)I would have hanged myself if I continued reading. BAM!! On fleek with the grammar today, baby!We've been watching the series, Genius, about Einstein and I know that they tried to be as historically accurate as possible when making it. What I have learned is that he wasn't some lovable nutty professor who was a genius, like we all thought. He was a bad husband, selfish man, horrible father, and philandering jerk who also was a genius. So, I guess that reading this book was probably a bad idea to begin with.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    (This review can also be found at: http://theslattern.com/2017/02/17/the...) "What did Watson and Crick discover?...Rosalind Franklin’s notes"HAR HAR. While that might not be 100% true, the history of science is littered with brilliant women whose pioneering contributions were ignored, diminished or plagiarised due to sexism. So this fictionalised biography of Mileva Maric, the physicist wife of Albert Einstein who has been rumoured to have contributed towards his theories on relativity, is ti (This review can also be found at: http://theslattern.com/2017/02/17/the...) "What did Watson and Crick discover?...Rosalind Franklin’s notes"HAR HAR. While that might not be 100% true, the history of science is littered with brilliant women whose pioneering contributions were ignored, diminished or plagiarised due to sexism. So this fictionalised biography of Mileva Maric, the physicist wife of Albert Einstein who has been rumoured to have contributed towards his theories on relativity, is timely. Unfortunately, this book didn’t really do it for me. The first 60% is based around Einstein’s courtship of Maric while they are both physics students at the Swiss Federal Polytechnic in Zurich. Maric is focused on her studies and doesn’t want to be waylaid by romance. But Einstein is doggedly determined. I found the first half of this book really dull. I wasn’t sure what the conflict was meant to be - the book is called The Other Einstein, we know that they eventually get married, why devote so many pages to detailing the minutiae of a courtship when the title tells you how it ends? The pace picked up considerably in the second half, but I still think the first bit could have been significantly edited down. The writing was inelegant and clunky throughout. Some of the sentences were badly constructed and I also thought the dialogue was self-consciously formal and ‘old fashioned’. There were also some jarring errors which would make anyone vaguely scientifically minded wince, eg, steam (from the chimney of a steam train) being described interchangeably as ‘smoke’ and ‘fog’ in the same paragraph.But my main qualm about this book is that the science is totally skimmed over. I thought it was meant to be about a brilliant scientific mind who was lost in her husband’s shadow, and yet I got the sense that the author didn’t have the confidence to actually write about science. There are ways of writing about science in fiction in an inspiring, even beautiful, way; but there was none of that here. There are parts in which Einstein and Maric work feverishly on projects and theories together - and yet the actual concepts they’re working on aren’t even mentioned. The author might as well have written ‘and they did some science’. Not only did this make the book feel a bit flimsy, but I also think it denigrated Maric. What should have been a book about a bright female physicist who (allegedly) contributed to one of the most significant scientific breakthroughs of the 20th century, actually became a book about a woman who made some silly life choices and ended up unhappily married and intellectually stymied. The author’s unwillingness or inability to delve into the science Maric (supposedly) worked on actually detracts from the image of her as a brilliant scientist.Finally, I think the author got a bit drunk on artistic license. Einstein is painted as an absolute bastard and Maric is painted as a complete genius who made MASSIVE contributions to ALL of his theories. In real life, the consensus is that the contributions she made were quite limited, although there are still those that believe her to have done a lot of the maths in the seminal papers published under Einstein’s name. I know it’s a fictionalised account and the author has a right to speculate on what *could* have happened, but I think she goes a bit too far. Einstein comes off extremely badly and I was shocked by the scene in which (view spoiler)[ he hits her (hide spoiler)], which I think was just gratuitous and doesn’t seem to be based on any historical facts. I feel like people will read this and think it's a factual expose, whereas it’s mostly wild speculation and likely to be highly inaccurate. And that, to me, feels a bit unfair. There are stories out there of women who truly did make massive contributions to science and were ignored (see links in first paragraph) and who deserve to be properly memorialised. I'm not sure that this sensationalised book really helps promote that cause. (With thanks to Sourcebooks and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in return for an honest review)
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  • Dannii Elle
    January 1, 1970
    I received this in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. Thank you to the author, Marie Benedict, and the publishers, Sourcebooks Landmark, for this opportunity.This is the fictional account of the life of an actual historical figure. Mileva “Mitza” Marić, in 1896, was the only female studying physics at Zürich university and one of the first females to study science at university level in all of Europe. She left home for more liberal Switzerland to achieve said studies and became a scie I received this in exchange for an honest review from NetGalley. Thank you to the author, Marie Benedict, and the publishers, Sourcebooks Landmark, for this opportunity.This is the fictional account of the life of an actual historical figure. Mileva “Mitza” Marić, in 1896, was the only female studying physics at Zürich university and one of the first females to study science at university level in all of Europe. She left home for more liberal Switzerland to achieve said studies and became a scientific genius in her own right. And yet, her renown today is considerably less than her physicist husband, Albert Einstein. There is much debate over the degree of Albert's famed Theory of Relativity that was, in fact, his wife's own work. This explores not only scientific and marital conflict, but the trials of being a ground-breaking and intelligent women living in a conservative and bourgeois time-period.This novel used Mileva as a spokesperson for a generation of budding intellectual women, who are realizing their independence for the first time, and yet are still largely relegated to the home sphere. They were built for so much more and it is empowering to read, today, how much their fight for equality and their continuation in the face of adversity has impacted our contemporary freedom. If not for women, such as Mileva, our lives today could be quite different. On behalf of women everywhere, who have ever received such treatment, this pained me to read about.This not only concerned the re-imagining of the life of this brilliant women, but was a wonderfully evocative and atmospheric account of nineteenth century Europe. This was a slow-paced novel with in-depth character studies and attention to minute historical and geographical details. It touched on a multitude of societal and cultural customs without seeming to betray or wander too far from the story and it's absolute brilliance lay in the vivid envisioning and conceptualizing of both a time period and an entire generation of people.This tells such an important story in such a graceful, expressive and reminiscent way that it is hard not to get sucked into the story of the life of the great Mileva Einstein.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    After being asked by a friend to read Marie Benedict’s novel about the wife of Albert Einstein, I was eager to give it a try. While no Einstein expert, having read only a few pieces about the scientist, I am always up to learn a little something. Benedict offers an interesting mix of fact and fiction in this succinct piece, which is sure to entertain and educate the reader in equal measure. Mileva “Mitza” Marić made a name for herself, relying on some less stringent admission rules to secure a s After being asked by a friend to read Marie Benedict’s novel about the wife of Albert Einstein, I was eager to give it a try. While no Einstein expert, having read only a few pieces about the scientist, I am always up to learn a little something. Benedict offers an interesting mix of fact and fiction in this succinct piece, which is sure to entertain and educate the reader in equal measure. Mileva “Mitza” Marić made a name for herself, relying on some less stringent admission rules to secure a spot into a Swiss university, where she studied and excelled in Mathematics and Physics. While other men in her class scoffed at her presence, one Albert Einstein took a shining to her. Marić willingly spent time with Einstein, happy to help anyone who would treat her as an equal. A Serbian by birth, Marić found herself stuck in an interesting family dynamic; a mother who wanted her to accept her role as a woman and a father who, aware of a physical anomaly, wanted her to succeed in academics. Marić refused to accept that she would forever be a spinster and welcomed Einstein’s romantic interest, as long as it did not impede her academic pursuits. Einstein and Marić continued to work together, building their passion for science and one another through the years. The tides seemed to change when Marić bore their first child, Lieserl. While Marić was hidden away for the birth and a few months afterwards, Einstein pursued gainful employment, all but ignoring his family. Benedict depicts this strain in the relationship throughout, never more poignantly than explaining how Einstein worked and his wife tended to their daughter, while still holding onto a passion for the world of physics. Tragedy befell the family such that the shattered pieces of their foundation could not be properly assembled again, which proved to be a significant strain on them, though Albert and Mitza continued to work through problems of relativity and other topics of theoretical physics. Expanding on their family, the Einsteins found themselves loving their burgeoning brood, though their true passion remained physics. That said, Albert always stood in the limelight, while Mitza slaved away and presented key theories for discussion, only later expounded upon by Albert when he had already made a name for himself. In a story so poignantly titled, Benedict argues effectively that Mileva Marić Einstein may have been the brains behind her husband’s numerous discoveries, in an era where women were seen as less apt and capable. Recommended for those who enjoy learning a great deal during their fiction reading, I can see Benedict has a great handle on the topic and how to present it effectively to readers.Bendict does well to capture the reader’s attention throughout this book, straddling the line between telling a story and recounting the life of a lesser-known historical figure. While it is impossible to deny that Mileva Marić Einstein remained hidden behind her husband’s shadow, one can hope that this book will help dispel the idea that she was solely a supportive spouse. Benedict depicts Madam Einstein as being dedicated to her interests, particularly physics, letting no one and nothing stand in her way. While she may have been raised at a time when she was seen as a second-class citizen, she never let her passion die out, no matter who stood in her way, Benedict portrays this effectively throughout the piece, tossing in some interesting hurdles outside her being a woman. The courting time between the two protagonists is quite heartfelt and Madam Einstein seems not only shocked that a man might love her, but also leery about giving up all her academic opportunities for a man. When women did not usually stand on their own, Mileva Marić broke the mold and strived to be all she could. Strains in the relationship appear throughout the latter portion of the book, particularly as Benedict portrays Albert as too focussed on his work. Can he be faulted for this? In one sense, surely, for he chooses not to spend it with his family and keeps himself occupied with his work and friendships with other men. While no excuse, one must consider that this was a time when ‘hands-on’ fatherhood would not have been common, so Einstein might not have thought to spend time at home or with his family. Still, Benedict depicts him, as well as some of the other male characters found throughout the narrative, to be aloof and disinterested in life before them. The story worked very well, picking up on key elements of Marić’s life before she married Einstein, with the ongoing thread that she did not want her life’s work to be forgotten or attributed solely to her husband. Benedict using powerful descriptions to portray this, leaving the reader to decide for themselves how to synthesise this information. It not only tells a story of the woman behind her husband, but also seeks to develop the argument that Albert Einstein may not have been the sole thinker in that household to churn out groundbreaking ideas. A wonderfully educational piece that offers a punch for the attentive reader. Easy to digest and comprehend without being flighty or flowery.Kudos, Madam Benedict, for a great piece of fiction. I’ll have to keep my eyes open to see what else you have that might be of interest.Like/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...
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  • Susan Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't like this book at all. I hate books that have potentially interesting stories to tell and then just wreck them. It could have been quite edifying as Mileva Maric was Albert Einstein's first wife and a noted scientist in her own right. She was the only female student at an elite university in Zurich in 1896. She lives in a pension with other bright female students. It must have been exciting to be on your own for the first time and discovering there are other people like yourself who li I didn't like this book at all. I hate books that have potentially interesting stories to tell and then just wreck them. It could have been quite edifying as Mileva Maric was Albert Einstein's first wife and a noted scientist in her own right. She was the only female student at an elite university in Zurich in 1896. She lives in a pension with other bright female students. It must have been exciting to be on your own for the first time and discovering there are other people like yourself who like to learn. So we discover any of this? No. The four females are jealous of each other when one of them dates. Are there wonderful conversations between Einstein and Maric? There were but there were so many more talks where he thinks up pet names like Dollie, ragamuffin, beloved sorceress, little escapee. Gag me with a stick. This is nothing more than a glorified romance novel. There are claims that Maric is responsible for some of Einstein's work. It fits into a new theory going around that women were responsible for everything. I think she had input into his work but she was certainly no Marie Curie. As the book goes along she becomes more and more subservient. I found this difficult to believe that a well educated woman would suddenly change to this degree. Also, she had a limp. I think the first 9000 times this was mentioned was sufficient for me to understand that she had a limp that she blamed everything in her life on. Put please quit hitting me over the head with it. I have to admit my bias here. I had just finished a wonderful book that shook me, moved me and made me think. It was a historical fiction too but on such a different level that it was like comparing Charles Dickens to a children's book. But then I'd have to call it historical fiction instead of what it is, a badly written romance novel. There are so many great books and so little time, why would you waste a second on this drivel?
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  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsWhile I wouldn't put this among my favorite historical fiction reads, I did end up enjoying this book about Albert Einstein's first wife, Mileva Marić. While the author's other book, Carnegie's Maid, was really heavy on the fiction side, this book was a better combination of facts and stuff that some researchers have theorized to be true. Without a doubt a fascinating woman who is certainly worthy of more recognition for her brilliant mind.Mileva Marić is not your typical twenty somethi 3.5 starsWhile I wouldn't put this among my favorite historical fiction reads, I did end up enjoying this book about Albert Einstein's first wife, Mileva Marić. While the author's other book, Carnegie's Maid, was really heavy on the fiction side, this book was a better combination of facts and stuff that some researchers have theorized to be true. Without a doubt a fascinating woman who is certainly worthy of more recognition for her brilliant mind.Mileva Marić is not your typical twenty something Serbian woman in the late 1800s. She is the only female studying at Zürich's Polytechnic in a class that features fellow student, Albert Einstein. He takes a romantic interest in her but also is interested in her input while working on his theory of relativity. This book explores what some researchers have come to believe, that Mileva provided much more than just emotional support to her famous husband as she very well could have contributed significantly to Albert Einstein's scientific work. I had much of the same feelings while reading this book as I had when reading The Aviator's Wife which featured Anne Lindbergh, the wife of aviator Charles Lindbergh. Both Anne and Mileva were accomplished in their own right but were overshadowed by their husbands. And the more I learn about the men, the more I find out they were pretty big jerks. It's nice that with historical fiction books like these, the females are finally being recognized for their talents and not just for being the Mrs. in the relationship.The book started off strong as Mileva was an easy person to root for because she was entering a world that was essentially a man's club. I did struggle a bit with boredom after the story reached the halfway mark to the point in which I was wondering if this was going to turn into a dud but thankfully the action picked up again in the last third. I wouldn't say this is a must read and I don't think the author is the strongest historical fiction writer out there but Mileva was a fascinating woman and learning about her, even if some of it was just theories, was fun. I would recommend this book for those who like books about women that were ahead of their time.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Find this and other reviews at: http://flashlightcommentary.blogspot....I feel like the only reader who wasn’t wholly enthralled by Marie Benedict’s The Other Einstein, but if I’m entirely honest, the novel didn’t draw in me as I’d hoped. I give Benedict a lot of credit for highlighting a lesser known individual, but the mechanics of the novel weren’t fully developed and the actual conflict came so late in the narrative that I’d all but given up hope of its delivery.The relationship between Albe Find this and other reviews at: http://flashlightcommentary.blogspot....I feel like the only reader who wasn’t wholly enthralled by Marie Benedict’s The Other Einstein, but if I’m entirely honest, the novel didn’t draw in me as I’d hoped. I give Benedict a lot of credit for highlighting a lesser known individual, but the mechanics of the novel weren’t fully developed and the actual conflict came so late in the narrative that I’d all but given up hope of its delivery.The relationship between Albert and Mileva takes center stage in the narrative, but I never felt it a true partnership. The whole thing felt distinctly one-sided and I often found myself frustrated with Mileva for allowing herself to be so marginalized for so little emotional and/or professional return. I couldn’t understand what Mileva saw in Albert which made Benedict’s emphasis of their union rather awkward. The issue was exacerbated further by Benedict’s interpretation of Albert. The famed scientist is difficult at best, but her portrayal is so far from his cultural legacy that it alienates those with any sort of appreciation for him.Another thing I struggled with was the science behind the story. Both Albert and Mileva are supposed to have been brilliant, but Benedict shies away from the intricacies of their studies and profession. The unfortunate reality is that interest in the novel is vested in the couples’ command of physics, but I didn’t feel that Benedict effectively related those principles to her audience within the context of the narrative. Her characterizations did not carry convincing authority and that fact made their movements difficult to appreciate and credit.Finally, I had trouble with Benedict’s themes. The injustices Mileva faced are extraordinary, but Benedict’s presentation is nothing short of suffocating. Mileva is the innocent victim of social prejudices, sexism, and an abusive husband. Each illustration punctuates her suffering, but the episodes occur with such frequency that I became numb to them and I don’t think that spoke to the author’s intention.I feel Benedict’s story well-meant, but I would have liked to see a more coherent narrative structure, more complex character dynamics, more detailed scientific expositions, and less heavy-handed motifs. The Other Einstein is an ambitious story and one that is more than worth looking into, but Benedict’s effort struck me as rough around the edges and while I would recommend it, I’d caution my fellow readers to take the narrative with a grain of salt.
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  • Kristie
    January 1, 1970
    This was an engaging story about Mileva “Mitza” Marić, Albert Einstein’s first wife. Going into this, I knew nothing about Ms. Marić and very little about Mr. Einstein’s personal life. It seems as though some of Albert Einstein’s work is surrounded in controversy. There is speculation that his first wife helped with his research, however the question is how much help was she? Some say she was simply supportive, others say she partnered with him or worked out the math for him, yet others propose This was an engaging story about Mileva “Mitza” Marić, Albert Einstein’s first wife. Going into this, I knew nothing about Ms. Marić and very little about Mr. Einstein’s personal life. It seems as though some of Albert Einstein’s work is surrounded in controversy. There is speculation that his first wife helped with his research, however the question is how much help was she? Some say she was simply supportive, others say she partnered with him or worked out the math for him, yet others propose that some of the work was actually hers. Was she a victim of the blatant sexism of the time? It seems we may never know the truth behind how much of the research was completed by Mileva Marić, but this author took a very interesting view into the marriage and work of the couple. It was fascinating to be brought into the mind of a brilliant and driven woman living in the late 1800s and early 1900s.It is important to note that this is a work of fiction and Albert Einstein is not presented as a brilliant scientist and loving husband and father. Quite the opposite. However, this is only one viewpoint and one author’s fictional representation of what may have been. It should in no way be taken as a biography and in my mind I thought of Albert Einstein as a fictional character while reading. I was easily absorbed in this story and really enjoyed it for its entertainment value. I found the author’s writing style to be very engaging. I will be looking forward to more by Marie Benedict.Thank you to NetGalley and Sourcebooks Landmark for a free electronic copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Initial review: Excellent story! Albert Einstein is not seen in a positive light in this book at all. I was quite surprised by the story and unaware of this bit of history. It would be interesting to see how much of this story was accurate, as much of it was imagined by the author. Full review to follow.
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  • Mariah Roze
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a teacher and every year we are given a free copy of a book. The purpose is to read the book and then display it in your classroom and encourage students to read it. This year The Other Einstein was the book I received and all my coworkers that participated LOVED this book, so we have decided to meet up before the next school year and have a book club meeting just to discuss this book.This book was fantastic! I learned so much about Einstein's first wife and her brilliant mind. And all the b I'm a teacher and every year we are given a free copy of a book. The purpose is to read the book and then display it in your classroom and encourage students to read it. This year The Other Einstein was the book I received and all my coworkers that participated LOVED this book, so we have decided to meet up before the next school year and have a book club meeting just to discuss this book.This book was fantastic! I learned so much about Einstein's first wife and her brilliant mind. And all the barricades she had to go through during that time period because she was a women and had an unsupportive husband. I highly suggest this book to everyone!!"His first wife, Mileva “Mitza” Marić, was more than the devoted mother of their three children—she was also a brilliant physicist in her own right, and her contributions to the special theory of relativity have been hotly debated for more than a century. In 1896, the extraordinarily gifted Mileva is the only woman studying physics at an elite school in Zürich. There, she falls for charismatic fellow student Albert Einstein, who promises to treat her as an equal in both love and science. But as Albert’s fame grows, so too does Mileva’s worry that her light will be lost in her husband’s shadow forever."
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars.Even before her marriage to Einstein, Mileva Maric was an interesting woman. For a woman in 1896 to attend a polytechnic institute was an anomaly. Benedict does a great job of setting time and place; of making you understand the prejudice. However, this quickly falls more into a romance novel. Way too much about Mr. Einstein and her feelings about him. It is interesting to watch as her friends drift away despite their “pledge”. The first part of the book also is very dry. Despite all t 3.5 Stars.Even before her marriage to Einstein, Mileva Maric was an interesting woman. For a woman in 1896 to attend a polytechnic institute was an anomaly. Benedict does a great job of setting time and place; of making you understand the prejudice. However, this quickly falls more into a romance novel. Way too much about Mr. Einstein and her feelings about him. It is interesting to watch as her friends drift away despite their “pledge”. The first part of the book also is very dry. Despite all the talk of love and longing, I had trouble feeling any emotion. Einstein comes across as a bit of an ass from the get go. Moody, self centered, even when they were students he expected her to do as he asked, even when it meant risking her reputation. Not until after their parenthood and marriage, did the book come alive for me. At that point, Einstein is more than a bit of an ass, he is a full out jerk. I will never think of him in the same light again. As others have questioned, I have no idea how much of the premise of this book is true. Maric is painted as being smarter than Einstein. So how much of his work was a collaboration? Kudos to Benedict for making the scientific ideas easy to understand for us non-geniuses. I am rating this book a 3.5. Three for the first half and 4 for the second. My thanks to netgalley and Sourcebooks Landmark for an advance copy of this book.
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a difficult one to read and an even more difficult one to rate. I'm not sure what I'd been expecting, but it wasn't this. I love it purely for its attempt to shed light on Mileva Maric's untold story - a story which just breaks my heart, honestly. The book isn't the most well written or the most engaging, and despite feeling extremely angry, frustrated, and sad while reading it, I am glad that I read it.One thing I did get caught up on was wondering about the historical accuracy, w This book was a difficult one to read and an even more difficult one to rate. I'm not sure what I'd been expecting, but it wasn't this. I love it purely for its attempt to shed light on Mileva Maric's untold story - a story which just breaks my heart, honestly. The book isn't the most well written or the most engaging, and despite feeling extremely angry, frustrated, and sad while reading it, I am glad that I read it.One thing I did get caught up on was wondering about the historical accuracy, which usually isn't a big problem for me in historical fiction, but without knowing just how much creative liberty the author took with this story...I don't know. Reading this definitely made me feel a certain kind of way about Einstein, and not knowing whether it's totally justified bugs me lol
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  • BAM The Bibliomaniac
    January 1, 1970
    AUDIO READ #200 of 2018Dear Albert Einstein,You're a total misogynistic asshole. Unless this author created most of this book, which the author's note at the end of the book makes me wonder. Then my apologies. Regards,Confused historical fiction fan
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I seem to be on a run for disappointing reads right now. This book was offered as an Overdrive special read and I signed up thinking it must be quite good to make the cut. I’m afraid I over-estimated the criteria for selection.This book seemed to have great wasted potential to me. I knew nothing of the first Mrs. Einstein, and having read this book I dare say I know nothing of her now. I got no sense that this novel was based on any known fact, and I do dislike books that purport to recount hist I seem to be on a run for disappointing reads right now. This book was offered as an Overdrive special read and I signed up thinking it must be quite good to make the cut. I’m afraid I over-estimated the criteria for selection.This book seemed to have great wasted potential to me. I knew nothing of the first Mrs. Einstein, and having read this book I dare say I know nothing of her now. I got no sense that this novel was based on any known fact, and I do dislike books that purport to recount history when they are dealing with only supposition. Was she the person who first comprehended the theory of relativity? Did he steal it from her? Was Einstein as cold and perverse as some events in this book would make him seem? Did he feel love for this woman? For any woman? He obviously made love to her, but perhaps it was my inability to picture Albert Einstein as a lover that hampered this read early on for me. The amorous parts (which were mightily overdone with cooing) were almost humorous, the cruelty parts were over the top as well. Perhaps it was my total inability to relate to or care about either Albert or Mitza that finally made this read more frustrating than pleasing. Whatever the reason, I failed to appreciate this book.One minor fact that did interest me. According to this author Einstein’s son Tete became mentally ill. I have always wondered how close the edge is between extreme brilliance and mental illness. It would be fascinating to know if it was in Tete’s genes.
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  • Carlos
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars for this one. I enjoyed this book because i learned about an aspect of Albert Eninstein life that it is almost never portrayed. Up to this point i had read that Einstein was married at one point but never stopped to think about who he was married to during that time. It was also nice to see the story through the eyes of a woman written by a woman (i mistrust books that are told in a woman's point of view written by men or the other way around as well) . Nevertheless i felt that the aut 3.5 stars for this one. I enjoyed this book because i learned about an aspect of Albert Eninstein life that it is almost never portrayed. Up to this point i had read that Einstein was married at one point but never stopped to think about who he was married to during that time. It was also nice to see the story through the eyes of a woman written by a woman (i mistrust books that are told in a woman's point of view written by men or the other way around as well) . Nevertheless i felt that the author allowed herself too much of a creative license to basically alter the characters she was written about, Because she portrays Einstein in way that it is a bit damaging to his prestige if indeed this happened, but as the author says herself at the end of the book , it is all mostly made up. Recommend it if you are in search of light read, just keep in mind that this is a work of fiction.
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  • tasha
    January 1, 1970
    A very engaging story about Albert Einstein's very smart and much dismissed wife and partner, Mileva Maric. I never heard of her and reading this story brought her to life. My ideas of Albert Einstein have changed as well. It's a read that had me looking on wiki/internet for more info and images. I love when a book causes me to do that.Thanks to the publisher and netgalley for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jenni Ogden
    January 1, 1970
    I began with warm anticipation this novel loosely ‘based’ on what little is known about Einstein’s first wife, Mileva Einstein, and her relationship with one of the greatest scientists in history. There are a number of novels published in this popular ‘genre’ about the woman behind the famous man, some very good. Marie Benedict’s take on the Einstein story began with promise as the two students, Albert and Mileva, began their friendship, their sharing of a passion for science and mathematics (Mi I began with warm anticipation this novel loosely ‘based’ on what little is known about Einstein’s first wife, Mileva Einstein, and her relationship with one of the greatest scientists in history. There are a number of novels published in this popular ‘genre’ about the woman behind the famous man, some very good. Marie Benedict’s take on the Einstein story began with promise as the two students, Albert and Mileva, began their friendship, their sharing of a passion for science and mathematics (Mileva’s field), and the blossoming of their love. Einstein came across as delightful and eccentric, and unlike many men of his time, not a man who discriminated against intelligent women; quite the reverse in fact. However, in the novel their apparently equal relationship quickly deteriorated when Albert did not include Mileva’s name on his first important papers, in spite of the ‘fact’ that he and Mileva had worked on them together, and indeed that Mileva had contributed more than Albert. The real facts are that although there has been speculation that she might have contributed something to these papers, the resounding and most parsimonious conclusion is that she did not and could not contribute in any significant way, in the sense that there is little evidence that she had the mind and training to think through concepts as unique as these. This is not to say she wasn’t a highly intelligent woman and mathematician, and that her gifts weren’t put on hold by Einstein’s rise to the top, and the beliefs of the day that a woman’s place is in the home, especially once children are born. That is almost certainly true. However there are few people of either sex who could hold a candle to Einstein’s intellectual achievements. So even although this is a novel, I think it strays too far in this respect. The innocemt reader will definitely get the impression that Mileva was robbed of her right as an author on these papers (and of the Novbel prize later). Albert Einstein is far too giant a figure to sacrifice in this way, even in fiction.However, this is not as serious a speculation as the depiction of Einstein’s treatment of Mileva, as the years went by and he became more famous and she withdrew into the world of motherhood and looking after the home and Einstein. Albert’s increasingly humiliating treatment of Mileva is shocking, and a reader who forgets that this is fiction would be hard put not to revise any positive or even neutral views they previously had of the man who, along with Darwin, is probably the best known scientist the world has ever known. As far as I know there is no evidence for this dark change in Einstein’s personality and treatment of his wife. Indeed it doesn’t fit with what we do know of Einstein from writings of his friends and so on. Of course it could be true, or partly true; we will never know. Certainly there are plenty of instances of powerful men treating their wives badly in private and yet outside the marriage everyone thinks he is wonderful. It is a fact that Einstein had an affair with his cousin and later married her. It is also a fact that he signed a divorce agreement giving all of the prize money of his forthcoming Nobel Prize to Mileva to support her and their two sons (whom he continued to love and spend time with). Neither of these facts suggest the extreme behaviour he displayed towards Mileva in this fictional portrayal. Again my issue is that Einstein is not a fictional character, and to denigrate him like this, even in fiction, is going too far. The author in her notes at the back does make clear that the facts at her disposal are largely the places the couple lived and Einstein worked, and when, rather than anything more personal. Perhaps the author’s notes should be at the beginning and not the end, so the reader goes into the story knowing this really is Fiction with a very large ‘F’. The writing was straight forward enough, but did little to make the characters, especially the older Mileva (and certainly not the older Albert!), likeable. Not once did I feel the sting of unshed rears, even in scenes made for an emotional response from the reader. Intellectual responses—anger at Einstein’s behaviour for example, or annoyance at Mileva’s strange decisions, yes, but not empathy for the characters. Although as a fictional story it began with promise, it dragged in the middle and the ending was simply a fizzling out. This was a story that cried out for skillful writing about science, given that Mileva was apparently a woman who was passionate about it. Benedict’s theme was clearly first about Mileva’s disastrous relationship with a powerful man, but no woman with her apparent knowledge of science (a woman who in this novel believed she should be a co-author of Nobel-prize-winning ideas!) would think (or not thnk) about science in the way portrayed here. Benedict made an attemot to bring Einstein’s ideas into the story here and there, but it was clumsy, and clearly the writer had little understanding of the concepts she was attempting to summarize. (She admits her lack of science background in her author’s notes, but this perhaps suggests that either she should have co-written the novel with (or have it edited by) a science writer with a good knowledge of Einstein’s work, or that she should have chosen another subject). The novels “Loving Frank” by Nancy Horan, ‘The Aviator’s Wife” by Melanie Benjamin and “The Paris Wife” by Paula McLain seem to me to be excellent examples of novels based on difficult relationships of women with famous men, where each author’s research or knowledge of the intellectual skills or artistry of the male (and the involvement of the partner with ther work) is written in a believable way. This is not a positive review, and I’m sorry for that. I wouldn’t have written one at all given that I didn’t find it especially engaging, except for the fact that it is as much about Albert Einstein, and indeed who wrote his papers, as about the little known Mileva. I think other readers should be alert to the extensive speculation behind this novel, and understand that there is little if no evidence to support the other side of Albert Einstein as he is portrayed here. Thank you to Netgalley who provided an advance readers' copy of this novel.
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  • Bam
    January 1, 1970
    In The Other Einstein, Marie Benedict says she "aims to tell the story of a brilliant woman whose light has been lost in Albert's enormous shadow." Mileva Maric (Serbian, 1875-1948) is an extraordinarily talented female student studying physics at Zurich Polytechnic where she meets young Einstein in class. He charms her, promising a bohemian life of shared scientific investigation which eventually wins her over, but an unexpected pregnancy is not in his plans. In this fictionalized account, Mile In The Other Einstein, Marie Benedict says she "aims to tell the story of a brilliant woman whose light has been lost in Albert's enormous shadow." Mileva Maric (Serbian, 1875-1948) is an extraordinarily talented female student studying physics at Zurich Polytechnic where she meets young Einstein in class. He charms her, promising a bohemian life of shared scientific investigation which eventually wins her over, but an unexpected pregnancy is not in his plans. In this fictionalized account, Mileva goes home to her wealthy parents to have the baby. Albert never sees the child; he wants Mileva to return alone so his reputation won't be ruined. She leaves the child with her parents where it later dies from scarlet fever. Albert and Mileva are finally married in 1903. Instead of a bohemian lifestyle, she finds herself in the very traditional role of housewife and mother to the two sons she bears him. Her hopes for sharing in his scientific achievements are soon dashed as time and time again, Albert fails to give her credit for her work and ideas in his published papers. Einstein's treatment of his wife is contrasted with the relationship between Peter and Marie Curie in which Peter fostered Marie's career from the start and gave her full credit for the research, experiments and theories she had originated. Einstein was also one of Madame Curie's champions, curiously enough. I enjoyed the early parts of the story the best where we see the young Mileva being encouraged by her father to pursue her studies, blazing a path at university where few woman had gone before. What would she have achieved if she had never met Einstein? I've always admired the famous man but now perhaps a little less. Recommended for readers who enjoy speculation about 'the woman behind the famous man' such as The Paris Wife or Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald.An arc of this book was provided by the publisher and author through NetGalley. Many thanks for the opportunity.Chosen as a #big-library-read for June, 2017.
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  • Darlene
    January 1, 1970
    I have been reading various discussions about this book, 'The Other Einstein' by Marie Benedict. For some reason, there seems to be a number of people who are confused about the very nature of this book; so I thought I should begin by pointing out the obvious… 'The Other Einstein' is a novel, a work of historical fiction. From everything I observed when looking at the book, neither the author nor the publisher claim it is a work of non-fiction or a biography. Note: This novel is centered around I have been reading various discussions about this book, 'The Other Einstein' by Marie Benedict. For some reason, there seems to be a number of people who are confused about the very nature of this book; so I thought I should begin by pointing out the obvious… 'The Other Einstein' is a novel, a work of historical fiction. From everything I observed when looking at the book, neither the author nor the publisher claim it is a work of non-fiction or a biography. Note: This novel is centered around several historical facts which are in fact provable….. * Albert Einstein and his first wife, Mileva Maric, met in 1896 while they were both students in the Department of Mathematics and Physics at the Zurich Polytechnic Institute in Switzerland. Mileve Maric was the only female studying physics at the Zurich Polytechnic Institute at that time. * Albert Einstein and Mileva Maric began 'courting', fell in love and when Mileva Became pregnant, the two married in 1903. Mileva never completed her education. What became of the Einsteins' first child is a bit of a mystery…. some believe she was adopted and others say she died of scarlet fever. The Einsteins went on to have two more children… two sons. * Over the years, Albert Einstein and Mileva Maric became estranged and the couple ultimately divorced in 1919. * Albert Einstein won the Nobel Prize for his contribution to Theoretical Physics … in particular, his discovery of the law of photoelectric effect in 1921 (NOT for his theory of relativity). He signed over the Nobel Prize money to Mileva who used the award to care for the couple's two sons. This novel was written from the point of view of Mileva Maric. Mileva (affectionately called "Mitza" by her family) was part of a well-to-do Serbian family. Mitza's father was always her biggest supporter and had made it his mission to encourage her intellectual development. It was because of her father's love and support that Mitza was on her way to Switzerland to study physics and mathematics. Being the only woman admitted to the Department, she was either viewed disapprovingly or completely ignored by her professors; but Mitza persevered and eventually won the respect of her male classmates and even a few professors. Most especially, she caught the eye of Albert Einstein who pursued her persistently and unabashedly and the two fell in love… despite Mileva's dogged determination to fulfill her goal of becoming a physics professor. But before Mileva could complete her course of study, she became pregnant; and although she attempted to sit for her final examinations, she did not pass and never completed her education. She and Albert married and he obtained work in the patent office but tragically, their daughter succumbed to scarlet fever. Mitza was never the same.. she was cloaked in sadness. Throughout the years, Albert and Mitza collaborated and co-authored a number of scholarly papers.. although her name never appeared in print. This became a source of increasing frustration for Mitza. Albert increasingly became more famous and sought after by the institutions of higher learning and Mitza had been relegated to live in Albert's huge shadow. … caring for the couple's two children and running the household. Over the years, Mitza realized that her dream of teaching physics to other bright, ambitious young women AND a REAL partnership with Albert, had slowly evaporated. Mitza's sense of betrayal by Albert continued to grow and the marriage.. which had been strained for years… quickly unraveled and the two divorced. Mitza and her two sons returned to Switzerland, leaving Albert behind in Berlin. If you are a fan of Albert Einstein… not just as a physicist but as a man, you might not enjoy this story. Einstein is not portrayed in this novel in a flattering light. He is portrayed as frequently manipulative in his actions toward Mitza… he solicits her help in working out mathematical equations for work on his theory; promises her a full partnership and guarantees that she will receive credit for her contributions.. but that never happens. When Mitza begins to pull away from him because of what she views as his betrayal, he betrays her in yet another way… by carrying on affairs with other women. All of this is not necessarily true but it DOES have the desired effect of somehow diminishing Albert Einstein in the reader's eyes. This novel, in the end, was mildly interesting. The premise was a good one. Not much is really known for sure about Mileva Maric. I liked the author's idea of imagining Mileva's story… HER story in her OWN words regarding her life and her relationship with the renowned Albert Einstein. Mileva's story was a story like MANY women's stories throughout history.. the knowledge that upon marrying and having children, their own dreams and aspirations would have to be postponed or deferred indefinitely or perhaps forever, Unfortunately, where this story simply did not work for me was the complete change in Mileva Maric's personality and character after she married Albert and had children. I found it incredible that this woman… one who had had the courage, intelligence and drive to travel on her own from Serbia to Switzerland to enroll in a course of study which had been dominated completely by males.. could so easily and passively give up on herself and her goals and simply acquiesce to everything Albert wanted. To me, THAT Mikeva Maric would NOT have been so easily charmed or placated by Albert's promises and assurances. In the end, the character of Mileva Maric as created by Marie Benedict did not ring true to me. If you wish to read a comprehensive and beautifully written account of Albert Einstein's life…. including the years of his life he shared with Mileva Maric… I suggest you read 'Einstein: His Life and Universe" written by Walter Isaacson. In addition, at the end of this book the author provides another source which you may find interesting. Princeton University has digitized and made available many of Albert Einstein's papers online. They may be viewed at: http://einsteinpapers.press.princeton...
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  • Connie G
    January 1, 1970
    Mileva Maric, an intelligent classmate of Albert Einstein when they were both physics students at Zurich Polytechnic, was the first Mrs Einstein. It was very unusual for women to be educated at a university at that time, especially in the male-dominated field of physics, but her father recognized her special talents. The book covers the years from their meeting in 1896 until their divorce in 1914. Albert Einstein is portrayed as an unfaithful husband who was insensitive to Mileva's emotional nee Mileva Maric, an intelligent classmate of Albert Einstein when they were both physics students at Zurich Polytechnic, was the first Mrs Einstein. It was very unusual for women to be educated at a university at that time, especially in the male-dominated field of physics, but her father recognized her special talents. The book covers the years from their meeting in 1896 until their divorce in 1914. Albert Einstein is portrayed as an unfaithful husband who was insensitive to Mileva's emotional needs. After the first few years of their marriage, Albert offered little support for her wish for a vibrant intellectual life. While her brilliant husband was free to spend his time furthering his career, Mileva was busy as a mother and homemaker. This was probably fairly normal for the early 20th Century, with Marie Curie shown as an exception. The book had an excellent portrayal of women in that era, and the problems faced by women who wanted a career in addition to marriage with children.The book is fictional, and the author states in her notes that "the precise nature of Mileva's contribution to the 1905 theories attributed to Albert is unknown..." The story shows Mileva in a very significant role, especially in the creation of the theory of special relativity. However, Albert did not list her as a co-author of the papers. Did Mileva deserve credit, or is this just plot device? Readers will have to answer that question for themselves.
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  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed reading THE OTHER EINSTEIN and agree with some of the quotes on the front and back covers of this book. "A compelling tale of a brilliant, unorthodox young woman's ambitions and challenges that has the reader rooting for our heroine from the very first pages." - Kathleen Tessaro, best selling author of Elegance and The Perfume Collector "Phenomenal and heartbreaking." - Erika Robuck, national bestselling author of Hemingway's Girl"Could the theory of relativity actually have been conce I enjoyed reading THE OTHER EINSTEIN and agree with some of the quotes on the front and back covers of this book. "A compelling tale of a brilliant, unorthodox young woman's ambitions and challenges that has the reader rooting for our heroine from the very first pages." - Kathleen Tessaro, best selling author of Elegance and The Perfume Collector "Phenomenal and heartbreaking." - Erika Robuck, national bestselling author of Hemingway's Girl"Could the theory of relativity actually have been conceived by 'the other Einstein'? In this fascinating and thoughtful novel, we learn that this is more than possible." - B.A. Shapiro, New York Times best selling author of The Art Forger and The MuralistIn 1896 the gifted Mileva "Mitza" is the only female studying physics at an elite school in Zurich. She studied and worked hard and was eventually accepted by her male classmates and professors. She had a brilliant mathematical mind. I liked her character and it was heart warming to read about her close relationship with her Papa. I liked Papa, Mama, Mitza's friend Helene, but only liked Albert Einstein at the beginning of this fictional story. The true colours of his character start to show as he gains notoriety, and I no longer find him quirky, mischievous and romantic. Kudos to Marie Benedict for playing with my emotions and feelings for Mr. Einstein! He becomes selfish, devious, unfeeling, uncaring, two-faced, even cruel and horrible.My rating for this book could be higher, but I am troubled by the premise that it is a historical novel about Albert Einstein's first wife. The bar for historical books requires more authenticity than found here. I usually try to just go where the author takes me in a book that is purely fictional. The Author's Note states that she took necessary liberties for fictional purposes. I realize that the story is about Mileva Maric. However, was Albert really like that? Did he skip lots of classes? Was he a liar? Was he a wife beater? Did Lieserl die or was she adopted? Did Albert refuse to see or even acknowledge Lieserl? These are questions I ask, when I know this is about certain individuals who actually lived.3.5 stars
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  • Vikki
    January 1, 1970
    For me, this was an easy read. The main character, Mitza Maric was very relatable and the story was engaging. Mitza was a physic student at the same university and in the same program and classes as Albert Einstein. She started out as friends with Einstein but it gradually turned into more. Unfortunately, Einstein who at the beginning of their relationship treated her as an equal in mind and spirit and wanted a bohemian lifestyle together where they worked on the big physics theories of the time For me, this was an easy read. The main character, Mitza Maric was very relatable and the story was engaging. Mitza was a physic student at the same university and in the same program and classes as Albert Einstein. She started out as friends with Einstein but it gradually turned into more. Unfortunately, Einstein who at the beginning of their relationship treated her as an equal in mind and spirit and wanted a bohemian lifestyle together where they worked on the big physics theories of the times changed when she became pregnant out of wedlock. He seemed to care more about his reputation than about her and the baby, would not visit her or the baby and did not marry her until almost 2 years after the baby was born but never saw the child or allowed the child to live with them. He definitely seemed to lack empathy and was very self-absorbed especially after the death of his first child who he never even saw. Mitza's studies suffered due to her relationship with Einstein and the unplanned pregnancy and she ended up failing her final exams and not getting her degree. The life she wanted was pretty much ruined by Albert Einstein and she had to bend to Einstein's wishes and demands to get him to marry her to legitimize her child and save her reputation and give her children a father. She seemed very trapped by society's views on gender roles and social norm of the time. The more Einstein's reputation and fame grew the less time and respect he gave to his wife and family. The theories that she and Einstein worked on together only ended up with his name on them. This book is a work of fiction but the author did base the ideas and plot of the story from the letters the Einsteins wrote to each other and their friends and colleagues so there is no definitive proof that Mitza did collaborate or actually came up with any of Einstein's theories and deserves credit. But there is proof that Albert Einstein was not much of a people person and did have expectations that Mitza would be a housewife and not an equal towards the end of their relationship. I did not know anything about Albert or Mitza Einstein's life but this book encouraged me to read and research more about them and the controversies surrounding them and their relationship. Albert Einstein was put up on a pedestal by the world for his groundbreaking theories that changed science forever but he was a very flawed human being who I wanted to strangle many times while reading this book.. I gave this book 4 out of 5 stars on Goodreads. I received a free advanced copy of this book from NetGalley for review consideration.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    This is a thoughtfully written book about the woman behind the man, Mileva Einstein, Albert Einstein’s first wife. I’ve read other such books such as Zelda and the Paris Wife, accomplished wives that get lost in their husbands’ shadows, a typical sign of their sexist times and I was hoping this one would be just as captivating. It certainly was for me. I had never given thought to Einstein’s wife’s existence so want to thank Marie Benedict for telling Mileva’s fascinating story, even if she does This is a thoughtfully written book about the woman behind the man, Mileva Einstein, Albert Einstein’s first wife. I’ve read other such books such as Zelda and the Paris Wife, accomplished wives that get lost in their husbands’ shadows, a typical sign of their sexist times and I was hoping this one would be just as captivating. It certainly was for me. I had never given thought to Einstein’s wife’s existence so want to thank Marie Benedict for telling Mileva’s fascinating story, even if she does speculate at times. There is no doubt that Mileva was extraordinary – a woman ahead of her time, a brilliant physicist who made contributions to science. The couple’s relationship is fascinating and shows a very dark side of Einstein that I was not expecting. Thanks to Marie Benedict for providing her interesting perspective into the relationship and personalities of Mileva and Albert.
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  • Richard Derus
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 3.5* of fiveMy review is live now. #WomensHistoryMonth is the time to remember a deliberately forgotten woman's role in #physics. Mileva Einstein's role in the four papers published in the Miracle Year of 1905 can't be know for certain, no one still alive was in any of those rooms where husband and wife spoke, but letters discovered in the 1980s strongly suggest she was a key player in the thinking Einstein did.Sourcebooks and Marie Benedict get loud kudos for shining more light on her s Rating: 3.5* of fiveMy review is live now. #WomensHistoryMonth is the time to remember a deliberately forgotten woman's role in #physics. Mileva Einstein's role in the four papers published in the Miracle Year of 1905 can't be know for certain, no one still alive was in any of those rooms where husband and wife spoke, but letters discovered in the 1980s strongly suggest she was a key player in the thinking Einstein did.Sourcebooks and Marie Benedict get loud kudos for shining more light on her stage.
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  • Mareli Thalwitzer
    January 1, 1970
    For the original review, please follow http://marelithalkink.blogspot.co.za/...First of all, a big thank you to Netgalley, Sourcebooks Landmark and the author, Marie Benedict for presenting me with an early copy of this marvelous novel. Quite similar to Marie Benedict, I started this novel with even less than "commonplace understanding" of Albert Einstein. Of course I know what he looked like and he is very famous for something called "E=MC2". Never really bothered to read up on his personal lif For the original review, please follow http://marelithalkink.blogspot.co.za/...First of all, a big thank you to Netgalley, Sourcebooks Landmark and the author, Marie Benedict for presenting me with an early copy of this marvelous novel. Quite similar to Marie Benedict, I started this novel with even less than "commonplace understanding" of Albert Einstein. Of course I know what he looked like and he is very famous for something called "E=MC2". Never really bothered to read up on his personal life. I knew he was married and somehow remembered that he had children, but I have never heard of Mileva Marić. How terribly sad. When I received my copy of The Other Einstein, I went visiting my good old friend, Google, immediately. (note: As you know, I love books that are infinitely google-able, The Other Einstein sure is!) Who was the lovely lady and clever physicist who will only be remembered as Albert Einstein's first wife? What role might she have played in the great scientist's discoveries? In The Other Einstein Marie Benedict introduces us to Mileva, a fascinating scientist in her own right and not just a footnote in the famous Albert Einstein's story. Not as unknown as I presumed her to be either. When a stack of love letters between Albert and Mileva were discovered in the 1980's, Mileva and her role in Albert's theories were the center of much debate in the physics community. These letters, written between 1897 and 1903 when Albert and Mileva were still university students, hinted at a number of collaborative work between the couple. I really enjoyed the way Marie Benedict colored in these rather blank pages. How much of it is fact and how much is fiction, really doesn't concern me at all. I think every reader can decide for him- or herself if they want to enjoy this story with a nice cup of tea or with a few grains of salt."The purpose of The Other Einstein is not to diminish Albert Einstein's contribution to humanity and science, but to share the humanity behind his scientific contributions. The Other Einstein aims to tell the story of a brilliant woman whose light has been lost in Albert's enormous shadow.- Marie Benedict"This was an enjoyable read with good writing and the focus was mostly on Mileva and her struggles and accomplishments and not on the science itself. Mileva was torn between family life and science and this was particularly well portrayed. I will vouch for The Other Einstein and will recommend you enjoy this one with a nice cup of tea.
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  • Erin Dunn
    January 1, 1970
    http://angelerin.blogspot.com/2016/09...Thank you to NetGalley for providing a free ebook copy of The Other Einstein By: Marie Benedict in exchange for an honest review. Short Review Summary: I wanted to know more about Mileva and her love of science. Before I heard of The Other Einstein, I had no idea who Mileva was. I didn't even know that Albert Einstein had a wife. So when I read the summary for this book I was really ecstatic to learn more about Mileva. I wanted to know who she was as a per http://angelerin.blogspot.com/2016/09...Thank you to NetGalley for providing a free ebook copy of The Other Einstein By: Marie Benedict in exchange for an honest review. Short Review Summary: I wanted to know more about Mileva and her love of science. Before I heard of The Other Einstein, I had no idea who Mileva was. I didn't even know that Albert Einstein had a wife. So when I read the summary for this book I was really ecstatic to learn more about Mileva. I wanted to know who she was as a person and what her contributions (if any) are to science while being swept up in a fictional story. Sadly, this book was not at all what I expected. #MilevaWho?I started off really enjoying the beginning of this book. I wasn't loving it, but I was liking it. I couldn't wait to find out more about Mileva and if she contributed anything to the field of science herself or if she assisted Albert Einstein at all. Instead the book is more about her and Albert's courtship. I feel like Mileva's brilliance is very overshadowed by the romance with Albert. I started to lose interest as the book went on and then a little before the halfway point I started to get really annoyed. Here we have Mileva, a woman who was outshined by her husband, and I was hoping this book would let her shine a bit. Too bad the book is still too focused on Einstein and their romance. #TooMuchAlbertOverall I had to DNF The Other Einstein due to these issues. I did like the friendships between Mileva and the other scholarly ladies in the book, but that alone couldn't save the book for me. Basically, I really needed more Mileva in the story. Maybe things would have gotten better if I kept going, but if it hasn't happened by about the halfway point then I can't expect it to. Also if the writing isn't drawing me in by that point, then I have to be done. #IFeelGoodAboutDNFingItI can't recommend this one, but perhaps it's better if you really know first what you're in for. Also, maybe I just need to see if there's a nonfiction book about Mileva instead. #MaybeSomeoneElseWillLikeIt
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  • Shomeret
    January 1, 1970
    I received my copy of The Other Einstein by Marie Benedict from Net Galley. So now I'm wading into the really interesting controversy surrounding Einstein's first wife with this honest review.Historical fiction deals with what isn't part of the historical record. How did Einstein treat his wife when they weren't in public? Did Mileva contribute to Einstein's scientific work? These are questions that are open to speculation. No one can really claim to know the truth about them. Marie Benedict has I received my copy of The Other Einstein by Marie Benedict from Net Galley. So now I'm wading into the really interesting controversy surrounding Einstein's first wife with this honest review.Historical fiction deals with what isn't part of the historical record. How did Einstein treat his wife when they weren't in public? Did Mileva contribute to Einstein's scientific work? These are questions that are open to speculation. No one can really claim to know the truth about them. Marie Benedict has as much right to an opinion as anyone else. She did the research and came to a conclusion that isn't at all palatable for supporters of Albert Einstein.Benedict's version of Mileva isn't a feminist icon. She made choices that I wouldn't have made in her circumstances. In fact, Marie Curie appears briefly in this novel. This great woman scientist tells Mileva that the only differences between them are the choices they made and the men they married. Madame Curie's husband dedicated his life to supporting her career. Benedict portrays Einstein as having deliberately undermined Mileva. I wanted her Mileva to be stronger.For me, the value of The Other Einstein is learning of Mileva Marić's existence. Whatever the truth might be about her, she deserves to be known rather than buried in obscurity. Now anyone who has read this book can examine what is known about her, and make their own decisions about what they believe concerning the issues that Benedict has raised.For the blog tour version of this review with the tour wide giveaway see http://wwwbookbabe.blogspot.com/2016/...The giveaway only lasts until December 1st. So if you are viewing this post after that date, you may prefer to view my complete review at http://shomeretmasked.blogspot.com/20...
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