It's Okay to Laugh
Joining the ranks of Let’s Pretend This Never Happened and Carry On, Warrior, a fierce, hysterically funny memoir that reminds us that comedy equals tragedy plus time.Twentysomething Nora McInerny Purmort bounced from boyfriend to boyfriend and job to job. Then she met Aaron, a charismatic art director and her kindred spirit. They made mix tapes (and pancakes) into the wee hours of the morning. They finished each other's sentences. They just knew. When Aaron was diagnosed with a rare brain cancer, they refused to let it limit their love. They got engaged on Aaron's hospital bed and married after his first surgery. They had a baby when he was on chemo. They shared an amazing summer filled with happiness and laughter. A few months later, Aaron died in Nora's arms in another hospital bed. His wildly creative obituary, which they wrote together, touched the world.Now, Nora shares hysterical, moving, and painfully honest stories about her journey with Aaron. It's OK to Laugh explores universal themes of love, marriage, work, (single) motherhood, and depression through her refreshingly frank viewpoint. A love letter to life, in all of its messy glory, and what it's like to still be kickin', It's OK to Laugh is like a long chat with a close friend over a cup of coffee (or chardonnay).

It's Okay to Laugh Details

TitleIt's Okay to Laugh
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 24th, 2016
PublisherDey Street Books
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Humor, Audiobook

It's Okay to Laugh Review

  • Julio Ojeda-Zapata
    January 1, 1970
    Ralph the Toddler and I crossed paths for the first (and, so far, only) time at a Minneapolis backyard party last summer.The little dude was impossible to miss: He nonchalantly picked up a garden hose, engaged the trigger, and proceeded to spray the adult attendees for several seconds until someone intervened.It was awesome.Now think about an entire book filled with such awesomeness. Such a book exists … by the Mother of Ralph herself, Nora McInerny Purmort.That book has been much anticipated he Ralph the Toddler and I crossed paths for the first (and, so far, only) time at a Minneapolis backyard party last summer.The little dude was impossible to miss: He nonchalantly picked up a garden hose, engaged the trigger, and proceeded to spray the adult attendees for several seconds until someone intervened.It was awesome.Now think about an entire book filled with such awesomeness. Such a book exists … by the Mother of Ralph herself, Nora McInerny Purmort.That book has been much anticipated hereabouts, partly because it’s a follow-up to the local author’s well-known blog, My Husband’s Tumor.That blog chronicled Nora’s love affair with one Aaron Joseph Purmort amid his horrific and ultimately fatal battle with brain cancer.Wacky fun, eh?In Nora’s upcoming memoir, “It’s Okay to Laugh (Crying is Cool Too),” it surprisingly, definitely is.Oh, it’s sad, too. Very, very sad. So are other events in the author’s life, such as the death of her father, and a miscarriage that robbed her of a second kid as her partner succumbed to his illness.The book’s title says it all. At times, you’ll want to cry (and, if you are lucky enough to run into the statuesque writer, give her a hug).But the book is often hilarious. Several times during my stop-everything, in-less-than-a-day devourment of this priceless volume, I threw my head back and guffawed.Gallows humor: It’s my fave.Nora, a novice author, has a nice, light touch that reminds me of Elizabeth Gilbert (and I am referring more to her charming memoir “Committed: A Love Story” than to its prequel, the wildly overhyped “Eat, Pray, Love“).The book covers a lot of ground. It is about Nora as a wife, as a mother, as a daughter, as a sibling (including to a sister, the amazing Meghan McInerny Wilker), and as an inconsolable but sometimes-horny widow.I hesitate to say more about Nora’s book because I do not want to ruin it for you. Just read it. You won’t regret it, even though it is often a total bummer.And, no, Ralph’s hose attack is not in this book … but maybe it will be in the sequel to what is sure to be a nonfiction hit of the year, Nora?
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  • megan weisenberger
    January 1, 1970
    This is a beautiful motherfucker of a book that will make you laugh as much as it makes you cry, and will make you want to fiercely hug every single one of your humans to tell them you're so very glad they're in your life. Ten thousand gold stars to Nora for being vulnerable and open and giving their big love the gloriously-written tribute it deserves. <3 <3 <3
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  • Rissa
    January 1, 1970
    Never gonna be a Nora key chain, I understand completely (someone find a carissa anything i dare you). This novel was hilarious and made my life seem well not like a cake walk but less shitty then it actually is. Her father, dead. Her husband, dead. Her soon to be born child, dead. Now i know i just said this book is hilarious and then said her life is screwed up and everyone important in her life died but they way she writes her story made me love this story. Death, love, friendship and all. I Never gonna be a Nora key chain, I understand completely (someone find a carissa anything i dare you). This novel was hilarious and made my life seem well not like a cake walk but less shitty then it actually is. Her father, dead. Her husband, dead. Her soon to be born child, dead. Now i know i just said this book is hilarious and then said her life is screwed up and everyone important in her life died but they way she writes her story made me love this story. Death, love, friendship and all. I listened to this book and i am very glad that i did because listening to memoirs really give you what and how the author wanted you to hear the story. Chapter 26.... LOVE Chapter 29... 😂Chapter 30... 👶 🍼 🍦😄Chapter 32... very motivating Chapter 47... 🤒😌Highly recommend this book!📚Favorite quotes (basically the whole book)"Evicting all the squirrels""The bank is being really picky about me not having a job""Hot young widows club""Reach out to a dead man for a job""Get in the car, drive west, maybe go to culvers""California is in a drought, why do people live here?!""If God does show up i cant really stop him""There is not even an emoji to represent me emotions right now""Im to selfish to care about their grief""No, Dr Mic Dreamy is hot, but dont go for him im not dead yet"Go read this book right now! It will make you laugh, aww and rethink all the crap in your life.
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  • Rebecca Foster
    January 1, 1970
    (3.5) “Being an adult is doing everything before you are ready.” Purmort was hit by a triple whammy of loss: within a matter of weeks of miscarrying her second child, both her father and her husband were dead of cancer. She and Aaron knew what they were up against: after a seizure revealed his Stage IV brain cancer, they got engaged on his hospital bed and went through fertility treatment to have their son, Ralphie. All in all they got three years together, after which the Minneapolis-based auth (3.5) “Being an adult is doing everything before you are ready.” Purmort was hit by a triple whammy of loss: within a matter of weeks of miscarrying her second child, both her father and her husband were dead of cancer. She and Aaron knew what they were up against: after a seizure revealed his Stage IV brain cancer, they got engaged on his hospital bed and went through fertility treatment to have their son, Ralphie. All in all they got three years together, after which the Minneapolis-based author founded what she calls the “Hot Widows Club.” She’s only about my age but, as she puts it, has “been through some shit” and managed to keep going, albeit gracelessly at times.The book is in the form of short essays, a lot like blog entries, with the trio of losses reverberating again and again. I might have preferred a bit more of a narrative – I wearied of open letters and lists – but individually the pieces are well written, treading the fine line between heartbreak and humor. Chapters 26 and 29 are the two stand-outs, I think. The book is best where she eases up on self-deprecating jokes and pop culture references and just tells her story, so much of which resonates with my sister’s experience of losing her own husband to brain cancer. As soon as I finished the book, I ordered her a copy.
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  • Book Riot Community
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up this collection of essays after listening to the first episode of a new podcast from American Public Media, “Terrible, Thanks for Asking.” A couple years ago, McInerny Purmort had a miscarriage, lost her father to cancer, and lost her husband to cancer within just a few months. This book, written after that time, is about grief, family, and survival in the face of really awful life experiences that I found weirdly uplifting and comforting to read during my own season of loss. — Kim U I picked up this collection of essays after listening to the first episode of a new podcast from American Public Media, “Terrible, Thanks for Asking.” A couple years ago, McInerny Purmort had a miscarriage, lost her father to cancer, and lost her husband to cancer within just a few months. This book, written after that time, is about grief, family, and survival in the face of really awful life experiences that I found weirdly uplifting and comforting to read during my own season of loss. — Kim Ukurafrom The Best Books We Read In December 2016: http://bookriot.com/2017/01/03/riot-r...
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    This is a deeply felt and not especially well-written memoir. The author deals with the miscarriage of her second child and the death of her husband and father, all within weeks of each other.While no one would gainsay the words of any person who has survived such crippling tragedies, I was struck by her gallows humor. Her father, on his deathbed, asked her to come closer so he could tell her something, and when she gets near, he tells her she was adopted. Evidently his idea of a great dying jok This is a deeply felt and not especially well-written memoir. The author deals with the miscarriage of her second child and the death of her husband and father, all within weeks of each other.While no one would gainsay the words of any person who has survived such crippling tragedies, I was struck by her gallows humor. Her father, on his deathbed, asked her to come closer so he could tell her something, and when she gets near, he tells her she was adopted. Evidently his idea of a great dying joke.The best parts of this book are in the essay in which the author lists the completely inappropriate and just stupid comments that people make to the newly bereaved, such as, “I felt the same way when my dog died.” Or, “You just have to buck up and fight your way through it.” These are well-meaning but blockheaded comments that people make because there really is nothing to say to a wife at her husband’s funeral. But it doesn’t mean you have to say something stupid.Aside from that excellent chapter, the author makes macabre jokes about the tragic things going on. Her husband tells her he’s having a tumor in his brain looked at through an MRI. He says, “The doctor told me it was small.” And she quips back, “Your brain or the tumor?” She seems to have inherited her father’s sense of humor. After her miscarriage, she asks the question: If you lose a baby, and nobody knew about it in the first place, does it make a sound?There are continuous references made to Facebook and situation comedies on TV that perfectly capture how she feels in a certain moment. Given that I have all but abandoned Facebook and have seen perhaps one of the dozen or so of the sitcoms/TV dramas that she cites, I was in the dark on this. She seems saturated with popular culture. It might be a generational thing, but I didn’t watch TV much even as a child.She also has some nicely poetic lines, such as “Grief strips you skinless,” and a great observation about how children think that all grandparents are born at 75.A final quibble, and this may just be the professor and copy editor in me talking: She has no idea of the principal parts of the verbs “to lie” and “to lay.” She’s always laying on the floor or laying in bed.The best thing about the book is she knows how to describe the hell she’s been through, even though it’s often with a wise-guy humor.
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  • Chelsey
    January 1, 1970
    Imagine losing your husband, father and unborn child all in the span of a year when you are 31 years old. Now imagine writing a book about it not long after and still managing to be funny and open about it all. Nora McInerny Purmort is an unapologetic, sassy woman, who went through hell and still made me snort-laugh while reading. She's got a ton of opinions, not all of which I agree with, but I had a hard time putting this down. I really enjoyed this!
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  • Lindsi Gish
    January 1, 1970
    In typical Nora fashion, this lovely collection of essays will have you crying with laughter, then of sadness, then of questioning everything, then from sheer gratitude and light. Over and over again. I will read this 100 times over if it keeps me mindful about love and life, and appreciating and accepting each other while we're here. Because none of us, not one, is here for long.
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  • Sara Mutchler
    January 1, 1970
    I started reading this book on a Tuesday morning, with my coffee. By the time I got halfway through I decided I needed something stronger and so I finished the book on a Friday night, with a glass (or 2) of white wine.If you don’t know the premise of the book, here it is in a nutshell: Nora experienced the loss of her unborn baby, her father, and her husband, all within weeks of each other. This book reads like a series of essays that jumps around a bit but all fits together perfectly in the end I started reading this book on a Tuesday morning, with my coffee. By the time I got halfway through I decided I needed something stronger and so I finished the book on a Friday night, with a glass (or 2) of white wine.If you don’t know the premise of the book, here it is in a nutshell: Nora experienced the loss of her unborn baby, her father, and her husband, all within weeks of each other. This book reads like a series of essays that jumps around a bit but all fits together perfectly in the end. I will say, however, when I read that last page I shouted “NOOO!” because I wasn’t ready to let go of the book. One of my favorite parts came near the end: “The world will keep spinning, and your life will get a little bit better every time you give up on the shit that is taking you away from your one wild and precious life.” Because THIS is what the book was about. Sure, it’s about grief and loss and pain but also love and hope and family and friendship. And not letting the little things drag us down. To remember that quitting is OK. In fact, quitting oftentimes IS the answer. Read this book. You won't regret it. And if you're not liking it once you start? Just quit, because that's ok, too.
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  • Gianina Bellamy
    January 1, 1970
    There is no wrong place to read this book. Unless you’re uncomfortable crying or laughing uncontrollably in public. Then you might want to stay home for this one. The feelings hit early and often, and don't let up until your faith in humanity has been restored.Nora's writing is honest, hilarious and full of life. You won’t want to put it down, but if you do, it’s only because you don’t want the book to end.
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  • Elizabeth Jackson
    January 1, 1970
    AUGH, everyone else loved this...I did not. I just wanted her to calm down and tell her story and all the jumping around and grand pronouncements out of nowhere and the glib life lessons inserted at the end of every chapter drove me nuts. I couldn't connect emotionally with it even though I really wanted to. Probably I'm just a robot who is dead inside.
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  • Kristina
    January 1, 1970
    I have a friend who just had a double mastectomy and when I expressed to her, "My heart hurts for you." Her response back was, "It's okay. I have learned in my life that if we were all to take our problems out and put on the table for all to see, we would gladly keep our own." This book expresses just that idea. Her losses are greater than mine. However, how she felt feels the same. I was glad I read this book. It was good timing for me. She kept it real. And it had a nice balance of funny and s I have a friend who just had a double mastectomy and when I expressed to her, "My heart hurts for you." Her response back was, "It's okay. I have learned in my life that if we were all to take our problems out and put on the table for all to see, we would gladly keep our own." This book expresses just that idea. Her losses are greater than mine. However, how she felt feels the same. I was glad I read this book. It was good timing for me. She kept it real. And it had a nice balance of funny and sad.Woody Swear scale-woody probs wouldn't like the swearing. It's not over he top tho. And in many cases those are the only words to express what she went through.
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  • Amanda Oleson
    January 1, 1970
    This book should be on a required reading list for all living humans. It's a beautifully written account of what happens when shit really hits the fan. It will have you laughing on one page, then weeping on the next. Nora's style of writing is utterly human and easy to relate to - it's like you're sitting and having coffee with your best friend, even if you don't know Nora. (If you don't know Nora, consider knowing her. She's amazing.) Her story is one of epic loss and grief, while clearly demon This book should be on a required reading list for all living humans. It's a beautifully written account of what happens when shit really hits the fan. It will have you laughing on one page, then weeping on the next. Nora's style of writing is utterly human and easy to relate to - it's like you're sitting and having coffee with your best friend, even if you don't know Nora. (If you don't know Nora, consider knowing her. She's amazing.) Her story is one of epic loss and grief, while clearly demonstrating her utter resilience in her ability to continue to exist as a beautiful human being, and to go on to do amazing things after such a series of awful tragedy. Her advice is spot-on, and she does an amazing job of showing the world that real, big love stories can exist - they just don't always turn out how you expect. Do yourself a favor, and read this book.
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  • Marika
    January 1, 1970
    Nora's husband is dx with an inoperable brain tumor and then wile he's on chemo they decide to conceive a child. A blurb says this book is a hysterically funny memoir. I never laughed. I don't if it says more about me or the book. I just kept saying to myself...really? Now?Note: I received a free review copy of this book and was not compensated for it.
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  • Laura.125Pages
    January 1, 1970
    This review was originally posted on www.125pages.com It's Okay to Laugh: (Crying Is Cool Too) by Nora McInerny Purmort is a poignant look at young love tempered by the ever present shadow of death. Nora loses a pregnancy, her father and her husband within a six week time frame. What should be an emotional juggernaut is instead a celebration of love, family and strength. Nora and Aaron marry soon after his diagnosis with a rare form of brain cancer and conceive while he is undergoing chemo. The This review was originally posted on www.125pages.com It's Okay to Laugh: (Crying Is Cool Too) by Nora McInerny Purmort is a poignant look at young love tempered by the ever present shadow of death. Nora loses a pregnancy, her father and her husband within a six week time frame. What should be an emotional juggernaut is instead a celebration of love, family and strength. Nora and Aaron marry soon after his diagnosis with a rare form of brain cancer and conceive while he is undergoing chemo. Their love burned bright and what was left behind was a widow and mother with the ability to cry and laugh and rise above her pain.The writing of Nora McInerny Purmort was raw and honest and gave you a true glimpse into her world. It's Okay to Laugh: (Crying Is Cool Too) explores what is left behind after the passing of someone much too young. The heartache and pain but also the joy in his life that was well lived until the end. Nora really reached inside herself to offer up a string of essays on what life looks like before, during and after the death of a spouse from a ravaging disease.While I found myself more on the cry side than the laughter side with this memoir, I still enjoyed the read. Nora McInerny Purmort was open and honest about some very difficult things. Her tone was steady the whole way through It's Okay to Laugh: (Crying Is Cool Too) and I was truly immersed in her world. Not an easy read, this was still a read with true heart and a view on hope that definitely resonated with me. Favorite lines - Grief strips you skinless. Skin is important not just for looks, but because without it, you are just a walking pile of exposed nerve endings. That’s really the only way to describe our family right now, a bunch of skinless freaks brushing up against our memories just to feel the pain. This sucks because we used to be a lot of fun. Have you read It's Okay to Laugh: (Crying Is Cool Too), or added it to your TBR?This book was most likely received free from the publisher/author in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
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  • Ericka Clouther
    January 1, 1970
    This book is wonderful. It's honest, raw, and hilarious. The next thing I'm going to say is going to sound like it's not that hilarious, but I swear it is. In rapid succession she had a miscarriage, her father died, and her husband died of cancer. Having been through something similar with both of my parents dying of cancer (they were in their early 60s, I was in my 30s), I could relate to a lot of her feelings and appreciate the sometimes dark humor. Obviously, that's still totally different th This book is wonderful. It's honest, raw, and hilarious. The next thing I'm going to say is going to sound like it's not that hilarious, but I swear it is. In rapid succession she had a miscarriage, her father died, and her husband died of cancer. Having been through something similar with both of my parents dying of cancer (they were in their early 60s, I was in my 30s), I could relate to a lot of her feelings and appreciate the sometimes dark humor. Obviously, that's still totally different than what she went through, but she has a whole section on how grief is lonely because it's so different for everyone, and yes, that part is also spot on. Reading the book is like having a friend that really gets it go through the bad stuff with you.I might be a little OCD, but the chronology in the book was crazy and I couldn't get a handle on what happened when. I'm still not totally sure when the last part of the book took place chronologically, but for me, that was the only small flaw in this nearly perfect memoir.
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  • Jilly Hanson
    January 1, 1970
    I needed this book at this point in my life. It helped me feel not like a freak or stupid for feelings I had/still have after losing so many people to whom I was close to in the past. It does make me anxious about losing the man I love, but it also makes me appreciate him even more than I already do, and to live life to the fullest as I possibly can. Because I only get one time around. So, yes. Definitely recommend this book if you've have terrible loss, or know someone who has experienced terri I needed this book at this point in my life. It helped me feel not like a freak or stupid for feelings I had/still have after losing so many people to whom I was close to in the past. It does make me anxious about losing the man I love, but it also makes me appreciate him even more than I already do, and to live life to the fullest as I possibly can. Because I only get one time around. So, yes. Definitely recommend this book if you've have terrible loss, or know someone who has experienced terrible loss. Because if I ever hear "They're in a better place" again after losing someone, I will literally kill that person who said it.
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  • Stacie
    January 1, 1970
    Loved every page with laughter and tears. Witty, charming and so real.
  • David Gallaher
    January 1, 1970
    It's Okay to Laugh: (Crying Is Cool Too) [REVIEW] I’ve known Nora McInerny Purmort for a long time*. As co-workers, we would pal around the office, hang out by the coffee maker, and occasionally gossip. You know — the shit people typically do when they work in confined spaces together 40 some hours a week. Back then, she was sharp, witty, and goofy-in-all-the-right-ways. [She was also the first person to ever tell me about Facebook] After I quit advertising and long after Nora moved out of New Y It's Okay to Laugh: (Crying Is Cool Too) [REVIEW] I’ve known Nora McInerny Purmort for a long time*. As co-workers, we would pal around the office, hang out by the coffee maker, and occasionally gossip. You know — the shit people typically do when they work in confined spaces together 40 some hours a week. Back then, she was sharp, witty, and goofy-in-all-the-right-ways. [She was also the first person to ever tell me about Facebook] After I quit advertising and long after Nora moved out of New York, I’d still randomly see her pop up on the streets of New York. She’d say flattering things to her friends about me. She’d talk about how ‘cool’ I was for quitting my job and for writing comics full time. She said very nice things, very kind things, and very encouraging things that made me blush. She was cool like that. She still is. So, flash forward a bunch of years… and here I am reviewing an advanced copy of HER new book: It's Okay to Laugh (Crying Is Cool Too). Completely unprompted, I had nice things to say about it. Also, you should buy it when it hits stores on May 24th.———“Bad stuff is just like good stuff: it just happens”It's Okay to Laugh recounts the loss of Nora’s husband, the death of her father and the miscarriage of her second child all in the span of weeks. With infinite grace, irresistible prose and enduring honesty, Nora transforms what would be a heart-breaking memoir into a life-affirming anthem. A natural storyteller, Nora’s words will make you laugh and cry all in the same paragraph, often in the same sentence. Her spell-binding essays on depression, cancer, death, motherhood, and familyhood have a gust of self-determination, even in the face of harrowing adversity. With a cheerful pragmatism that one might find in the works of Anne Lamott or Elizabeth Gilbert, Nora captures the highs and lows of simply living one’s life — pointing out that life is harder than it looks for everyone, but in the end, things are going to be okay, sorta. Losing someone you love isn’t easy. Reading this book won’t make it easier. This isn’t a Guide Book for Grief. It won’t magically heal the hole in your heart. What it will do though is offer you profound empathy, companionship, and friendship. With radiant generosity, It’s Okay to Laugh is love letter to life and a profound reminder that we are not alone in this world… even when we feel like we are. ———* Before Twitter was a thing; before Tumblr was founded.
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  • Manda
    January 1, 1970
    I had never heard of Nora McInerny Purmort prior to receiving this advance copy of her memoir to review. For those of you who also aren’t familiar with Nora’s story, she also writes a blog titled My Husband’s Tumor that gained national attention for it’s honest and endearing writing during her husband’s battle with cancer (glioblastoma to be more exact - and terrifying). After her husband passed away, she quit her full-time job and started writing what would become It’s Okay to Laugh: Crying Is I had never heard of Nora McInerny Purmort prior to receiving this advance copy of her memoir to review. For those of you who also aren’t familiar with Nora’s story, she also writes a blog titled My Husband’s Tumor that gained national attention for it’s honest and endearing writing during her husband’s battle with cancer (glioblastoma to be more exact - and terrifying). After her husband passed away, she quit her full-time job and started writing what would become It’s Okay to Laugh: Crying Is Cool Too. The book is best summarized by Nora’s own description on her blog: “It’s not a cancer story, it’s a love story. With some cancer.” Her writing is heart-wrenching and beautiful and real. I laughed and cried while reading about her life and love, and she’s just as relatable as your friend or coworker. There’s a chapter where she mentions that strangers have come up to her in the street and hugged her after recognizing her from her blog, and after reading along with those people about her life, I have to admit that I would probably also be one of those people. She writes about numerous very personal and private battles (her husband’s cancer, her own miscarriage, her father’s death also by cancer) in a way that gives the reader complete insight into how she’s feeling about those events, even years after they’ve occurred. Her blog is much of the same open and honest writing. Her strength and honesty in the aftermath of a tragedy too immense for me to even fully grasp is truly inspiring, but she writes about it all while still making you laugh about other trivial aspects of her life and relationships. Nora, if I am ever so lucky as to cross paths with you in real life, I apologize in advance if I become one of those strangers who want to hug you. Your writing style and storytelling in the book and on your blog clearly just make people want to be your friends. I haven’t enjoyed a book about such a sad topic in a very long time (maybe never), so I can’t recommend Nora’s book enough. You will laugh, and as the title suggests, you will probably also be teary-eyed at times, but I can promise you that you won’t regret reading this one.*Disclaimer* I received an advance copy of this book from the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Ok - I think partially why I loved this book is because of the New York and Minnesota connections. They both just felt like such familiar worlds (and the author and I are of the same generation, like one that understands how hot Casper the ghost is) that I couldn't help but appreciate the detail of it all.
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  • Mary Norris
    January 1, 1970
    This book is like reminiscing with a good friend over glasses of wine. Nora has weaved stories of unbelievable heartbreak with relatable stories of growing up and finding independence. The result is a book that very elegantly details the harsh balance of the joys and heartbreak of the lived experience.
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  • April
    January 1, 1970
    It’s funny, raw, and immensely readable. I am certainly looking forward to whatever is next from Purmort. Read my full review here
  • Janna Dorman
    January 1, 1970
    I am obsessed with Nora McInerny. I listen to her podcast, Terrible, Thanks for Asking. I follow her on Twitter and Instagram. I live in Minneapolis and am constantly keeping my eye out for this tall, blonde-haired lady who's experienced more grief in six weeks than I have in my entire life. This book made me feel a lot of emotions, which are depicted appropriately in the book's title. While I haven't experienced major grief, this memoir put into perspective how lucky I am. Multiple times I set I am obsessed with Nora McInerny. I listen to her podcast, Terrible, Thanks for Asking. I follow her on Twitter and Instagram. I live in Minneapolis and am constantly keeping my eye out for this tall, blonde-haired lady who's experienced more grief in six weeks than I have in my entire life. This book made me feel a lot of emotions, which are depicted appropriately in the book's title. While I haven't experienced major grief, this memoir put into perspective how lucky I am. Multiple times I set this book down, looked up and around at my life, and found myself immensely grateful. The flow of the stories and how they related together didn't always make sense, but it didn't hinder me from reading this in two sittings. I personally like her podcast more, but this was another way for me to get to know Nora before I "randomly" run into her and bathe her in praises.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I love Nora. I want to be her best friend. Her podcast lead me to her book, and a life of loss (starting with losing both parents before I turned 13) lead me to her podcast. It was destiny we meet each other (although perhaps more destiny on my side seeing as she doesn’t know I exist ...yet). Her humour and compassion in light of all her own tragedy has taken on a life of its own... she’s managed to create a community of women who support each other through the rocky parts of life. (This was obv I love Nora. I want to be her best friend. Her podcast lead me to her book, and a life of loss (starting with losing both parents before I turned 13) lead me to her podcast. It was destiny we meet each other (although perhaps more destiny on my side seeing as she doesn’t know I exist ...yet). Her humour and compassion in light of all her own tragedy has taken on a life of its own... she’s managed to create a community of women who support each other through the rocky parts of life. (This was obviously an audiobook pick... I love her voice. You need to listen to her podcast, even if you don't want to commit to the book! Just do it. )
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  • April
    January 1, 1970
    Great memoir on grief and pain, with humor and swearing!
  • Cindy Roesel
    January 1, 1970
    Nora McInerny Purmort, author of IT’S OKAY TO LAUGH (CRYING IS COOL TOO) wants you to know her memoir is “not a cancer story, it’s a love story. With some cancer.”After bouncing around dating losers, twenty-seven-year-old Nora McInerny Purmort, finally met the perfect guy, Aaron. He was an art director and comic-book nerd, who made her laugh all the time. The only problem? He developed a rare form of brain cancer, glioblastoma, to be precise. Well, that could have screwed up their dating life, b Nora McInerny Purmort, author of IT’S OKAY TO LAUGH (CRYING IS COOL TOO) wants you to know her memoir is “not a cancer story, it’s a love story. With some cancer.”After bouncing around dating losers, twenty-seven-year-old Nora McInerny Purmort, finally met the perfect guy, Aaron. He was an art director and comic-book nerd, who made her laugh all the time. The only problem? He developed a rare form of brain cancer, glioblastoma, to be precise. Well, that could have screwed up their dating life, but Nora and Aaron refused to let a little thing like that get in the way of their love! No way! They got engaged, while on chemo had a baby boy and started fighting the battle of their lives.Nora started a blog called “My Husband’s Tumor,” where she shared every heart-wrenching moment of their journey. It eventually became this memoir, IT’S OKAY TO LAUGH (CRYING IS COOL TOO) (DeySt.Books). Nora and Aaron were able to pack five decades of marriage into the three years they were blessed with. While in hospice, lying in Nora’s arms, Aaron revealed that he was Spider-Man and his son would have to carry on his crime-fighting ways and kick cancer’s ass.This book is pitched as a “hilarious memoir that’ll have you laughing out loud.” I chuckled here and there, but I guess I’m different. This book isn’t a downer, but I didn’t break-out into belly laughs. I did read it with respect for Nora’s vulnerability and her decision to honestly share such a personal story. My guess is the marketing department pushed for the “funny angle” to give it broader appeal; that wasn’t necessary. Then again, perhaps it was Nora’s idea to keep a bit of distance and protect herself. Either way, IT’S OKAY TO LAUGH (CRYING IS COOL TOO) is relevant, without any marketing tricks.The takeaway for me after reading Nora’s memoir, is gratitude. It’s for me to be thankful for every moment I’m alive, because it could be over in a heartbeat. Embrace the people I care about, look them in the eyes and repeatedly tell them, “I love you.”“Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.” Ferris BuellerAdd to Goodreads badgePurchase LinksHarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & NobleNora McInerny Purmort APAbout Nora McInerny PurmortNora McInerny Purmort was voted Most Humorous by the Annunciation Catholic School Class of 1998. It was mostly downhill after that, but she did get to spend three glorious years married to Aaron Joseph Purmort (aka Spider-Man). Her work has appeared on Cosmopolitan.com, Elle.com, and the Huffington Post, and in the Star Tribune. She lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, with her son, Ralph. They really like it there.Find out more about Nora at her website, and connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.tlc logoThanks to TLC Book Tours http://www.tlcbooktours.com and Dey St. Books, we have one copy of IT’S OKAY TO LAUGH (CRYING IS COOL TOO) to give away. Just tell us one thing you’re really grateful for. I’m incredibly grateful for the ability to read, write and speak, which I almost lost not too long ago. We’ll pick a winner next Monday, June 6th. Have a great Holiday week!
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  • Sydney
    January 1, 1970
    This was an incredibly intimate and vulnerable book so it is hard to write a negative review of it without it seeming like a personal attack on Nora. This one star feels like kicking someone who is already down but I am not going to change my honest review because of potential hurt feelings. Nora admits to reading comment sections about herself and taking them personally. So, Nora, if you are reading this, I'm really sorry that you lost your husband and father and had a miscarriage. Death fuckin This was an incredibly intimate and vulnerable book so it is hard to write a negative review of it without it seeming like a personal attack on Nora. This one star feels like kicking someone who is already down but I am not going to change my honest review because of potential hurt feelings. Nora admits to reading comment sections about herself and taking them personally. So, Nora, if you are reading this, I'm really sorry that you lost your husband and father and had a miscarriage. Death fucking sucks. It really, really does and my heart goes out to you. Me hating your book has nothing to do with disliking you personally. Hell, I don't know you as a person, I am only judging this book on its literary merits. (And I am not even saying I have good taste.)The pace and tone of the book drove me nuts. It skipped all over the place. It was repetitive. It was whiny. It was judgmental. "My husband died of CANCER. I wore my retainer when I was hungover. I am tall. My dad died 6 weeks before my husband died of CANCER. My mother drives me nuts. I am a widow who wears a retainer. I watched Real Housewives while wearing my retainer while my husband died of CANCER and we were too tall for the hospital bed. My dad died. I lost my baby, but not to CANCER. You should laugh because I wore my retainer even when my baby died and mothers, am I right? " Imagine that for about 40 chapters and you don't really need to read the book. I would say that problem with the book, including why it is written in such a disjointed and rehashed style, stems from the stage of grief Nora was in when she wrote it. When your life is shipwrecked by loss you're skinned alive and drowning but people are there with wine, hugs, and bereavement leave. There is an understanding to both reach out and give you a wide berth. However, as the weeks turn to months the world keeps moving and people expect you to start forging your way forward too. This hurts. This is the worst. Everything is still so raw but the casseroles have stopped coming and the bills need to be paid. You are still consumed with your pain and it seems impossible to care about meetings and showers and groceries when it all seems so trite in comparison. There is nothing else to do, you have to pull yourself out of your pain and go on. This whole book is an exercise in digging one's heels in and refusing to take that next step. It's self-indulgent. It felt like a long begging for attention; a plea to have people stay with her in sadness and stop the world. There wasn't enough time for growth and perspective and there was too much time for an honest rawness of emotion. The book came out emotionally crippled, using really unfunny jokes as a form of self defense as she went over, and over, and over the same things. At one point in the novel, Nora says that several months after Aaron died she began telling her friends that she had signed up for Match.com. She hadn't, she just told people that to see their reaction saying something like, "I don't know why I said that. It wasn't funny. Maybe I just wanted to see their reactions." This entire novel feels like that.
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  • Kristyn - Reading to Unwind
    January 1, 1970
    This book is an amazing memoir, I couldn't put it down I had to keep reading till the end. Nora writes with humor, which I think makes the story move along as well as makes it readable without balling your eyes out because honestly she has dealt with some horrible losses that could paralyze some peoples lives. Everyone takes loss differently and grieves differently her approach is one with humor that might allow her to get through this period in her life.I didn't know of Nora's story prior to r This book is an amazing memoir, I couldn't put it down I had to keep reading till the end. Nora writes with humor, which I think makes the story move along as well as makes it readable without balling your eyes out because honestly she has dealt with some horrible losses that could paralyze some peoples lives. Everyone takes loss differently and grieves differently her approach is one with humor that might allow her to get through this period in her life.I didn't know of Nora's story prior to reading this book I had just read the synopsis on Edelweiss and requested the book. I am so glad that I got approved and was able to read this book. The story follows Nora's life through the different stages. I loved how brutally honest she is in the book, her writing style makes you want to continue reading. Also, the book is not really in a particular order we get events and details of her life not in the order they occurred. I loved this because I think towards the end she personally got deeper on the issues and brought the reader in to wanting to read more.I loved how Nora gave the attitude of it is ok for you not to have your life in order during the grieving process and each day you are just trying to figure out how to get through the day. Another part of the book that I loved was she didn't leave details out. I felt like I got the whole picture of her life before and after her miscarriage, father's death, and husband's death. She gave the reader the chance to see her whole life and not feel like you were missing out on something that happened. Also, I give Nora a large amount of credit, she not only is grieving, but is still raising her son and being a single mother. She never really complained in the book and felt bad for herself, she just kept writing and working on herself. She took the approach to grieving that one could hope to take as it hurts everyday, but you will get through this.I suggest this as an anytime read. I read it on a longer plane ride and I was very happy since I am not sure I would have been able to put the book down. The chapters are short so you can easily pick this book up at any time and read a chapter. The book to me was very emotional to read so be prepared to go up and down through your emotions. I received this from an Edelweiss ARC Request for the purpose of providing an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
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  • Becky Loader
    January 1, 1970
    Purmort has written a memoir of her husband's battle with a brain tumor and their marriage. Their love is apparent, and their decision to make the most of the time they have is touching. I was bothered by Purmort's style. She is young and speaks with the cadence and slang of the young. I was also bothered by the incredible amount of grammatical errors in the text. Do editors not correct grammar anymore? Is it OK to use grammatical errors when you are writing a rather casual memoir with lots of s Purmort has written a memoir of her husband's battle with a brain tumor and their marriage. Their love is apparent, and their decision to make the most of the time they have is touching. I was bothered by Purmort's style. She is young and speaks with the cadence and slang of the young. I was also bothered by the incredible amount of grammatical errors in the text. Do editors not correct grammar anymore? Is it OK to use grammatical errors when you are writing a rather casual memoir with lots of smart alecky references and use of the f*** word? I feel very old and conservative. I am going to go read a little Shakespeare.
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