The Road Back to You
Ignorance is bliss except in self-awareness...What you don't know about yourself can hurt you and your relationships―and even keep you in the shallows with God. Do you want help figuring out who you are and why you're stuck in the same ruts? The Enneagram is an ancient personality typing system with an uncanny accuracy in describing how human beings are wired, both positively and negatively. In The Road Back to You Ian Morgan Cron and Suzanne Stabile forge a unique approach―a practical, comprehensive way of accessing Enneagram wisdom and exploring its connections with Christian spirituality for a deeper knowledge of ourselves, compassion for others, and love for God. Witty and filled with stories, this book allows you to peek inside each of the nine Enneagram types, keeping you turning the pages long after you have read the chapter about your own number. Not only will you learn more about yourself, but you will also start to see the world through other people's eyes, understanding how and why people think, feel, and act the way they do. Beginning with changes you can start making today, the wisdom of the Enneagram can help take you further along into who you really are―leading you into places of spiritual discovery you would never have found on your own, and paving the way to the wiser, more compassionate person you want to become.

The Road Back to You Details

TitleThe Road Back to You
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 4th, 2016
PublisherIVP Books
ISBN-139780830846191
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Psychology, Self Help, Christian

The Road Back to You Review

  • Leigh Kramer
    January 1, 1970
    The names Suzanne Stabile and Ian Morgan Cron may or may not mean something to you. When I heard they were writing a book about the Enneagram, I paid attention. Stabile is a well-known Enneagram teacher. I've never been able to attend one of her workshops but I've followed her online for a while. Cron is probably better known as an author and Episcopal priest, although he's done some speaking on the Enneagram in recent years. The combination of Stabile and Cron- her extensive knowledge plus his The names Suzanne Stabile and Ian Morgan Cron may or may not mean something to you. When I heard they were writing a book about the Enneagram, I paid attention. Stabile is a well-known Enneagram teacher. I've never been able to attend one of her workshops but I've followed her online for a while. Cron is probably better known as an author and Episcopal priest, although he's done some speaking on the Enneagram in recent years. The combination of Stabile and Cron- her extensive knowledge plus his gift for the narrative- results in an easy to read and understand resource that will surely help many people identify and better understand their type.The Road Back To You provides an introduction to the Enneagram, my favorite personality type system, and why it's beneficial to figure out your type. They then devote a chapter to each type. As I read, it struck me how truly readable the book was. I'll forever sing the praises of Rohr's The Enneagram and Riso and Hudson's The Wisdom of the Enneagram but they have a more academic, almost clinical tone. Cron includes many examples from his and Suzanne's lives, including their friends and family, and this roots the type descriptions better than other Enneagram resources. His writing style is engaging, though his attempts at humor didn't always work for me, including I must add one specific line in the Type 5 chapter that is ill-advised. This is written from a Christian perspective but for people who care, there are one or two light swear words in it. (This doesn't bother me but I can think of several people in my life for whom it matters.) But overall, Cron is able to depict the types in a way that is personable, gracious, and incising. People should see themselves reflected on the pages. I have two minor complaints. First, Cron references his children's Enneagram types and the examples provided are generally when they are not adults. I'm in the camp that believes our personalities continue to form into our 20s so I'm very wary of typing children and teenagers. They may have the tendencies of a certain type but I don't want to put anyone in a box. (The Enneagram of Parenting does a great job of laying out the fine lines, while also providing guidance.) I think Cron is probably in this camp, too, but I don't want people to read about his children and then start typing their own children. So there's that. Second, each type chapter includes celebrity examples when we have no idea what their type is. It's unfair to caution people against typing/labeling others, than proceeding to do the same thing. In most instances, the celebrities are listed in a bubble at the start of the chapter but there are some actual examples, such as Bill Clinton being a Nine. For the record, that would not have been my guess, which brings me back to my original point. We can have a guess for what a person's type might be but they're the only one who knows their internal motivations- the very thing the Enneagram is built upon. Moving on...I've lost count of how many descriptions I've read of my type (4) so I was not expecting to be so completely and fully pegged when I read these lines: "As you might guess, Fours are prone to melancholy. Like the Old Testament figure Job they can steep in lament. After all, it's hard to be chipper when the now-dated U2 song "Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For" or the Radiohead song "Creep" play like the soundtrack in the movie of your life." (p. 156) How did Cron know what songs I turn to on sad days?! I could not stop laughing. I also really liked this part: "Fours are the most complex of all the types on the Enneagram: what you see is never what you get. There are always more layers of things going on underneath the surface." (p. 158)Finally, I liked the emphasis on how learning about our type is both a benefit for ourselves and for our relationships, as well as our worldview. Throughout the book, the call is to become more aware of how we go through life and what mistakes we continue to make so that we can "get out of your own way and become more of the person God created you to be.'" (p. 17) Figuring out my type has allowed me to have so much more compassion and understanding for myself and others. That's why I continue to encourage people to learn more about the Enneagram. I can't help but imagine a world where we all had this level of compassion and understanding.Disclosure: I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Maxwell
    January 1, 1970
    If you are new to and curious about the Enneagram, I think this book is a fantastic way to start digging into it. Cron wonderfully explains each type, giving context to them in many ways (work, childhood, relationships) as well as details the various elements of the Enneagram (wings, stress, security). It was insightful, accessible and entertaining, and has truly opened my eyes to how I see the world in a particular way as well as how other people very unlike me see the world—and that gives me t If you are new to and curious about the Enneagram, I think this book is a fantastic way to start digging into it. Cron wonderfully explains each type, giving context to them in many ways (work, childhood, relationships) as well as details the various elements of the Enneagram (wings, stress, security). It was insightful, accessible and entertaining, and has truly opened my eyes to how I see the world in a particular way as well as how other people very unlike me see the world—and that gives me the ability to reframe my relationships with other people so I am slower to judge, quicker to listen and overall more gracious.On the other hand, if you have absolutely no idea what the Enneagram is, you can take this free test (granted you can also just read about the 9 types and figure out which one you are, but I think the test is a helpful starting place). I'd encourage you to do some research and read up on your type because it's truly changed my life and interactions in such a positive way! #enneagramforlife
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  • Britany
    January 1, 1970
    I kept hearing about the Enneagram, took a quiz and got multiple answers, that's when I decided to go digging...Many of my very favorite podcasts mention the Enneagram and I got curious. This book was a wonderful introduction. There are 9 categories that you can fall into with wings and shades of others. What does this all mean? Cron spends time explaining what a healthy number looks like vs someone struggling with their related deadly sin. I kept trying to think of this as it relates to my clos I kept hearing about the Enneagram, took a quiz and got multiple answers, that's when I decided to go digging...Many of my very favorite podcasts mention the Enneagram and I got curious. This book was a wonderful introduction. There are 9 categories that you can fall into with wings and shades of others. What does this all mean? Cron spends time explaining what a healthy number looks like vs someone struggling with their related deadly sin. I kept trying to think of this as it relates to my closest friends and family members. Changing and adapting my thought process when dealing with conflict and added some new life mantras to help me move forward and own my truest self. I would highly recommend checking this one out if you have any interest in personality and bettering yourself. Slight tinges on religious undertones, but not heavy handed. PS I'm a 3 (Achiever) with the energy/sin of a 9; Which one are you?
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  • Barnabas Piper
    January 1, 1970
    Super helpful and enjoyable introduction to the enneagram. I'd read nothing on it previously other than a couple inline summaries, and this was an accessible and relatable entry into what seems to be a rich and complex thing. It moves quickly, it is concise, it is funny in parts, and it is strikingly insightful.
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  • Ali M.
    January 1, 1970
    Knowing my Myers-Briggs type never did much for me. Knowing my Enneagram number has deepened my self-awareness, given me practical and specific tools for growth, and helped me better understand people who are wired entirely differently than me.Part of what makes this ancient personality typing system so compelling is the fact that your number is not a static description of yourself; it's a spectrum you're constantly engaging with as you learn to recognize the behavioral patterns, coping mechanis Knowing my Myers-Briggs type never did much for me. Knowing my Enneagram number has deepened my self-awareness, given me practical and specific tools for growth, and helped me better understand people who are wired entirely differently than me.Part of what makes this ancient personality typing system so compelling is the fact that your number is not a static description of yourself; it's a spectrum you're constantly engaging with as you learn to recognize the behavioral patterns, coping mechanisms, and ways of seeing the world (both healthy and unhealthy) that are rooted in your number... and how they evolve as you do. The idea that your greatest strength is simply a conquered/integrated version of your greatest weakness—i.e., your struggles and victories emerge from two sides of the same coin—fascinates me, and echoes wisdom found across many spiritual traditions. Meanwhile, reading up on the other numbers tends to inspire a needed dose of compassion for people that might otherwise frustrate and/or mystify you. Since becoming familiar with the nine Enneagram types, I've largely stopped asking the question "How could anyone think that way?" Cron and Stabile don't bother getting into niche Enneagram topics here, like the instincts, subtypes, or levels of development. For that kind of depth, check out any of the more detailed tomes written on the topic by Riso/Hudson or Richard Rohr. Instead, this is an accessible, well-organized primer on the basics—one I know I'll be referencing in abundance, and no doubt handing off to friends and family left and right. (Bonus: It's also laugh-out-loud funny in places.)
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  • Taylor Cole
    January 1, 1970
    Maybe it's because I came to this book already equipped with a basic working knowledge of the enneagram, but I found The Road Back to You to be a bit more helpful in my understanding of the enneagram than Richard Rohr's book (The Enneagram: A Christian Perspective), which was my introduction to the enneagram and a major source of guidance for many others (and which, frankly, left me a little confused). Ian and Suzanne's writing made the characteristics of each number much more clear to me, and I Maybe it's because I came to this book already equipped with a basic working knowledge of the enneagram, but I found The Road Back to You to be a bit more helpful in my understanding of the enneagram than Richard Rohr's book (The Enneagram: A Christian Perspective), which was my introduction to the enneagram and a major source of guidance for many others (and which, frankly, left me a little confused). Ian and Suzanne's writing made the characteristics of each number much more clear to me, and I appreciated the fact that they tried to avoid stereotyping the numbers. I also enjoyed the introductory stories in each chapter—cute, funny, and insightful. Will definitely be recommending this book to friends who are curious about the enneagram—and to those upon whom I force my own enneagram curiosity. :)
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  • Bob
    January 1, 1970
    Summary: Describes the Enneagram and each of the nine types, and how these may be helpful in Self-discovery, uncovering one's true self and experiencing spiritual growth.John Calvin, and many others have observed that knowledge of God and knowledge of self often go hand in hand. Often, what we do not know or knowledge that has been colored by the wounds of our upbringing deflect us from knowing God and ourselves truly. One of the tools that has been found increasingly helpful by many spiritual d Summary: Describes the Enneagram and each of the nine types, and how these may be helpful in Self-discovery, uncovering one's true self and experiencing spiritual growth.John Calvin, and many others have observed that knowledge of God and knowledge of self often go hand in hand. Often, what we do not know or knowledge that has been colored by the wounds of our upbringing deflect us from knowing God and ourselves truly. One of the tools that has been found increasingly helpful by many spiritual directors and others who work with spiritual formation is the Enneagram. It's roots go back to a fourth century Christian mystic, Evagrius, who developed a system based on the seven deadly sins, plus an overarching sin of self-love. G.I. Gurdjieff first developed the Enneagram figure and two personality psychologists, Oscar Ichazo and Claudio Naranjo developed the modern theory that underlies the Enneagram. It was introduced into spiritual formation circles by Catholic retreat leader Richard Rohr and several other Jesuit priests.Ian Morgan Cron and Suzanne Stabile provide a readable and witty introduction to the Enneagram with chapters on each of the nine types. They begin by giving some of the background of the Enneagram and list each of the nine types and the corresponding deadly sin each type is most susceptible to. They areThe Perfectionist (Anger)The Helper (Pride)The Performer (Deceit)The Romantic (Envy)The Investigator (Avarice)The Loyalist (Fear)The Enthusiast (Gluttony)The Challenger (Lust)The Peacemaker (Sloth)They explain that these come in three triads of three: Anger or Gut: 8, 9, 1 ; Feeling or Heart 2, 3, 4; and Fear or Head: 5, 6, 7. Also each type is modified by one or both of their wings (the types adjacent to them) and have a type the gravitate to under stress and when they are secure. Sound a little confusing? Cron and Stabile walk us through all this both in introduction and the survey of each type.Starting with the Anger or Gut triad and Type 8, they devote a chapter to each type, beginning with a list of 20 points of what it is like to be that type, describing the type in its healthy, average, and unhealthy expressions, and talk about its deadly sin. Then they give a more detailed description, talk about the type as a child, in their relationships and at work. Then they explore how the "wings" and the types they tend toward when feeling stressed or secure shape the expression of their type. They conclude with what spiritual transformation looks like for the type and ten steps for each type to take in transformation.Throughout, they give examples of the type from people they know (including themselves and their families) as well as famous individuals (I discovered that Oliver Sacks, Albert Einstein, Stephen Hawking, Bill Gates, and Dietrich Bonhoeffer were/are likely the same type as I am--except they are all far more intelligent!). I found myself laughing as they describe the different types, until I got to my own, where I found myself alternately saying "yes" and "ouch!"Like other writers like Richard Rohr, they don't offer a test to find your type. Rather, here is what they recommend:"If while reading a description you begin to feel squeamish because it's captured your inner world in a way only someone who hacked into the server where you back up your personality could know about, then you are probably zeroing in on your number. When I first read my number I felt humiliated. It's not pleasant to be the rat in a dark kitchen who is so focused on devouring crumbs that he doesn't hear the stealthy homeowners approaching and therefore doesn't have time to take cover before they suddenly switch on the light and catch the rat in the act with a bagel in its mouth. On the other hand I felt consoled. I didn't know there were other rats like me. So if this happens, don't despair. Remember each number has its assets and liabilities, blessings and blights. The embarrassment will pass, but in the words of novelist David Foster Wallace, 'The truth will set you free, but not until it's done with you.' "That gives you a pretty fair picture of what you are in for, both in terms of writing and your experience as you read this book. The one thing worse than knowing this stuff about ourselves is for it to be present in our lives and to not know it. Knowing helps us pursue paths of growth along the lines of who we are rather than who we aren't. And it helps us to be gentler with all those other types, whose unique predicament parallels our own. Most of all, it begins to help us understand the depths of the grace of God that meets each of us uniquely and in the depths of our own deadly sins. If you are ready for and hungry for that kind of knowledge, then this book is a good place to begin.
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  • Charlsa
    January 1, 1970
    I discovered this book by listening to Anne Bogel's #whatshouldireadnext podcast, episode #141. She and Ian Morgan Cron were talking about the Enneagram #s of various authors and characters in books. I had already taken to test to determine my Enneagram type, but I still wasn't sure. I listened to the audiobook first, narrated by the author, then purchased the book. I needed to go through it in detail. This book really helped me to narrow down my type. I like that he shared the h isotry of the E I discovered this book by listening to Anne Bogel's #whatshouldireadnext podcast, episode #141. She and Ian Morgan Cron were talking about the Enneagram #s of various authors and characters in books. I had already taken to test to determine my Enneagram type, but I still wasn't sure. I listened to the audiobook first, narrated by the author, then purchased the book. I needed to go through it in detail. This book really helped me to narrow down my type. I like that he shared the h isotry of the Ennegram. He explains it and gives examples that shows the reader that it isn't just your actions by the motive behind your actions that determines your type. I'll be referring to this book often.
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  • Erin *Help I’m Reading and I Can’t Get Up*
    January 1, 1970
    One of the most accessible, readable books on the Enneagram I've encountered.
  • Carol Ann
    January 1, 1970
    "There are others [personality typing systems] that describe and encourage you to embrace who you are, which isn't very helpful if who you are is a jerk." This is wonderful introduction to the Enneagram Personality Typing System. The authors break down a complicated subject into a clear, concise, and entertaining guide to self-discovery. The authors tell it like it is and provide relatable and often humorous examples.As I read through the different personality types searching for myself, it seem "There are others [personality typing systems] that describe and encourage you to embrace who you are, which isn't very helpful if who you are is a jerk." This is wonderful introduction to the Enneagram Personality Typing System. The authors break down a complicated subject into a clear, concise, and entertaining guide to self-discovery. The authors tell it like it is and provide relatable and often humorous examples.As I read through the different personality types searching for myself, it seemed at first that all of them held pieces of me. But then I came to the chapter that powerfully resonated with me. How did it make me feel? Relieved. Understood and accepted. Liberated. Empowered. It explained why I see the world the way I do, why I do what I do, that I am not alone, and provided manageable tips to save me from my self-defeating self and move toward my wiser more compassionate self. What I like best about this typing system is that it removes judgement from the equation and focuses on the motivation behind the behavior. But it doesn't stop there. Accountability is addressed, too. "...once you know your Enneagram number it takes away any excuse you might have for not changing." When we learn to recognize behaviors and understand the root of them, doors will open to healthier communication and relationships. This book leads you to the glorious, attainable path of becoming your best self.
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  • K.M. Weiland
    January 1, 1970
    Sound basics of the Enneagram. I feel like it’s obviously just a starting place, but it helped me find my own surprising number and opened my eyes to some areas of personal understanding and growth I hadn’t previously considered.
  • Karyssa
    January 1, 1970
    Some of my family members introduced me to this book. I had never heard of it before, and they were going to read it and then discuss it together. Once I found out it was about personality types, I really wanted to get in on the discussion. So I bought the book so that I would be able to contribute to the conversation.Even if we don't end up discussing it, I'm really glad that I got the book. I really enjoyed it, and it's very interesting how the Enneagram works. Most of my friends (who are into Some of my family members introduced me to this book. I had never heard of it before, and they were going to read it and then discuss it together. Once I found out it was about personality types, I really wanted to get in on the discussion. So I bought the book so that I would be able to contribute to the conversation.Even if we don't end up discussing it, I'm really glad that I got the book. I really enjoyed it, and it's very interesting how the Enneagram works. Most of my friends (who are into personality types stuff) really like the Myers-Briggs, and I like it too, but I think I kinda like the Enneagram more.This would have gotten five stars, but there were a few times when not-so-nice words were used. And the author said some things (that didn't really have to do with the Enneagram per se) that I just didn't agree with.But, overall, this was a really good book and if you're interested in personality type tests, then maybe give this one a try. :)
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  • Claire Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    I’m a believer .. so eye-opening & spot-on.
  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    This book was written with lots of compassion, humor, and insight. It would be a good introduction to the Enneagram or a good supplement for those who are already familiar--it does a better job than most of reflecting on being in community with different Enneagram types.
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  • Blythe
    January 1, 1970
    I’m not sure how to rate this book, as I don’t read this genre often; I read this for my bookclub. That said, for what it is, I really loved it. It’s super insightful and helpful, and I loved his pastoral perspective—the focus on our identity in Christ, his celebration of our personalities reflecting aspects of who God is, and his advice on how each number struggles and how we can love them. Easy to read. I highly recommend for someone wanting to learn more about the Enneagram from a Christian p I’m not sure how to rate this book, as I don’t read this genre often; I read this for my bookclub. That said, for what it is, I really loved it. It’s super insightful and helpful, and I loved his pastoral perspective—the focus on our identity in Christ, his celebration of our personalities reflecting aspects of who God is, and his advice on how each number struggles and how we can love them. Easy to read. I highly recommend for someone wanting to learn more about the Enneagram from a Christian perspective!
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to this book and when I was about 3/4 of the way through it, I hopped online and ordered a copy of it. Definitely a book I want to own and know I will find myself coming back to to help refresh my understanding of the enneagram. I've heard from several people who have thoroughly studied and read about the enneagram that this is a great book for beginners, and I'd have to say that's true. It was a quick listen that had me thoroughly engaged as he explored and combed out the differences I listened to this book and when I was about 3/4 of the way through it, I hopped online and ordered a copy of it. Definitely a book I want to own and know I will find myself coming back to to help refresh my understanding of the enneagram. I've heard from several people who have thoroughly studied and read about the enneagram that this is a great book for beginners, and I'd have to say that's true. It was a quick listen that had me thoroughly engaged as he explored and combed out the differences of the nine types.
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  • Aliza Latta
    January 1, 1970
    I love this book. I have recommended it to everyone as a guide for deeper understanding into the Enneagram. I read it front to back, but now use it more as a guide and pull it out often to look up certain types. Ian’s narration is funny and very helpful — always pointing towards transformation. I found this book extremely helpful in my own Enneagram journey.
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  • Lindsay Franklin
    January 1, 1970
    A good primer on Enneagram from a Christian perspective.
  • Jill Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    Personality type fascinates me. I knew some about the Enneagram before reading this but this book helped me want to understand people better in order to love them well.
  • Chrystal
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. The enneagram has opened up so much to think on. I have learned so much about myself and have so much more to learn. I love that this book takes the approach of the enneagram through the lens of the Gospel. I think I've figured out my number (a 6) but I'm not still not certain (which I think is pretty characteristic of a 6!) I would love to dig deeper with an enneagram class. I also love how this book helps you see each number's strength and weakness, where you tend to go in stress and wher Wow. The enneagram has opened up so much to think on. I have learned so much about myself and have so much more to learn. I love that this book takes the approach of the enneagram through the lens of the Gospel. I think I've figured out my number (a 6) but I'm not still not certain (which I think is pretty characteristic of a 6!) I would love to dig deeper with an enneagram class. I also love how this book helps you see each number's strength and weakness, where you tend to go in stress and where you tend to go in security. I highly recommend this if you want to learn more about yourself and others and learn to have more compassion for those who behave differently from you.
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  • Deanna
    January 1, 1970
    Updated: upped this book to a five. We can't stop talking abt it and rereading. It has given us so much clarity!! If you're a personality type junkie I highly recommend. There's a bunch of podcasts abt this book right now too that you can listen if you're more inclined that way. (Entreleadership and story brand) I've never felt more called out on my personality type. It's just been so good for us and we've had so many "a-ha's". --------Pretty fascinating!! We took the free tests online. Definite Updated: upped this book to a five. We can't stop talking abt it and rereading. It has given us so much clarity!! If you're a personality type junkie I highly recommend. There's a bunch of podcasts abt this book right now too that you can listen if you're more inclined that way. (Entreleadership and story brand) I've never felt more called out on my personality type. It's just been so good for us and we've had so many "a-ha's". --------Pretty fascinating!! We took the free tests online. Definitely nailed our personalities! It was pretty hysterical-well for the one not getting read about that is. ; )
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  • Sarah Wells
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this introduction to the enneagram and its overview of the nine personality types. Clear and entertaining, each chapter provided informative and entertaining explanations of each type's nuances as well as calls to action and development for each type to understand how they operate best and what they should watch out for. For those who love personality types and understanding other people better, this is a great choice.
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  • Michele
    January 1, 1970
    I listened to audiobook on audible, and the author was a great narrator. I think I'll listen to parts of this again and again. It would be nice to have the hard copy for reference, though. This knowledge will actually change the way perceive myself and others. Hopefully, it will also influence my actions as I seek to become healthier.
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  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    This is an extremely accessible and enjoyable introduction to the enneagram as a tool for personal and spiritual growth. Ian Cron, the author, narrates and is extremely easy and pleasant to listen to!
  • Aaron West
    January 1, 1970
    If you’re like me (a private Christian liberal-arts grad), you’ve at some point, recently or otherwise, heard of the Enneagram. More than a personality test, and less than a prescriptive cookie cutter of your every action and thought, the Enneagram has (more or less) been developed over the course of hundreds of years by everyone from cloisters of Desert Fathers to Richard Rohr in his seemingly infinite wisdom, himself.The enneagram is the name of a nine-pointed star, and when it comes to THE En If you’re like me (a private Christian liberal-arts grad), you’ve at some point, recently or otherwise, heard of the Enneagram. More than a personality test, and less than a prescriptive cookie cutter of your every action and thought, the Enneagram has (more or less) been developed over the course of hundreds of years by everyone from cloisters of Desert Fathers to Richard Rohr in his seemingly infinite wisdom, himself.The enneagram is the name of a nine-pointed star, and when it comes to THE Enneagram, a system in which a number resides at the end of each point, 1-9. Each number signifies a different type of personality, complete with motivations for actions, tell-tale behaviors, performance in relationships and at work, and other such insights, as well as how these numbers relate to, and act as, one another.Throughout the book, Ian Morgan Cron delves in to each type, and provides the spiritual applications that are useful in dealing with the wounding message each number has internalized and believed since supposed childhood. And that’s what’s most useful about this book; it lays out a path to spiritual healing after providing information that, while leading the reader to say “Oh, my, that’s me,” also convicts each to act on what they learn. The book is coauthored by Suzanne Stabile, though Ian Cron writes the words and only alludes to her experiences throughout. The downfalls of the book are the seemingly general behaviors and ideas that could apply to ~many~ people being claimed as beholden to a certain number. But, as I was continually reminded by my more Enneagram-literate friends, it is about motivation rather than outward expression. What motivates each number to act is at the core of what the Enneagram explores. And even so, Cron states that each number can express themselves in an infinite combination of ways. I give the book the high end of three stars. The writing is accessible, interesting, and spiritually engaging. It isn’t anchored with psychological science or Myers-Briggs-type predestination. But it’s not supposed to be. It’s really about reflection, and so it acts as a great introduction to the Enneagram in general.To quote Ian Cron himself: “To be clear, I am not a foamy-mouthed Enneagram zealot. I do not stand uncomfortably close to people at cocktail parties and tell them I was able to guess their Enneagram number based on their choice of footwear. People who do that are an evil begging to be overcome. But even if I’m not a fanatic, I am a grateful student. To borrow a quote from the British mathematician George Box, ‘All models are wrong, but some are useful.’ That’s how I see the Enneagram. It is not infallible or inerrant. It is not the be-all and end-all of Christian spirituality. At best, it is an imprecise model of personality...but it’s very useful.”
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  • Carmen Marie
    January 1, 1970
    As someone who finds personality typing fascinating, I am more steeped in Myers-Briggs. Over the past few years, I have heard more about the Enneagram personality typing system and how it differs from Myers-Briggs. There's a lot of info to take in here as it is an introduction to the Enneagram's nine types. Instead of breaking one's personality down to four different letters as Myers-Briggs does, the Enneagram takes the personality as a whole encompassing both strengths and the major weaknesses. As someone who finds personality typing fascinating, I am more steeped in Myers-Briggs. Over the past few years, I have heard more about the Enneagram personality typing system and how it differs from Myers-Briggs. There's a lot of info to take in here as it is an introduction to the Enneagram's nine types. Instead of breaking one's personality down to four different letters as Myers-Briggs does, the Enneagram takes the personality as a whole encompassing both strengths and the major weaknesses. The Enneagram reveals what's riding beneath the surface or what motivates each of the nine personality types. I have a suspicion of what number I might be, but it would take way more reading and research. I have only dipped my toe into this ancient typology system. I am curious to learn more, but I admit, it's a totally different way to understand personality than what I am used to. Cron's introduction has given me a lot to think about especially in light of what I think I already know about myself.
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  • LuAnn Adams
    January 1, 1970
    Reading this book is like holding up a mirror with magnification. You don’t always like what the magnification reveals. Especially at first. However, once you get past the initial jolt, it is cathartic, enlightening and challenging. It not only helps you better understand yourself and others but can help catapult you to the next level of avoiding your own traps, increasing empathy, and deepening your understanding of God. The biggest drawback of the book is that it provides much less for those t Reading this book is like holding up a mirror with magnification. You don’t always like what the magnification reveals. Especially at first. However, once you get past the initial jolt, it is cathartic, enlightening and challenging. It not only helps you better understand yourself and others but can help catapult you to the next level of avoiding your own traps, increasing empathy, and deepening your understanding of God. The biggest drawback of the book is that it provides much less for those that fall into a type with a very strong secondary type (“wing”).
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  • Beth Anne
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was an excellent introduction into the idea of the Enneagram and learning about the different ways that people look at the world. So many conflicts arise because two people look at the same thing and see different things. Communication break downs, relationship expectations, and work ethics and business skills all can be helped by learning to understand our differences and give compassion and grace to ourself and others. I loved the practicality of this book. Each chapter ent thro I thought this was an excellent introduction into the idea of the Enneagram and learning about the different ways that people look at the world. So many conflicts arise because two people look at the same thing and see different things. Communication break downs, relationship expectations, and work ethics and business skills all can be helped by learning to understand our differences and give compassion and grace to ourself and others. I loved the practicality of this book. Each chapter ent through one of the nine types, specifically focusing on what it looks like to see the world this way, how we all benefit from people of that type, how that type typically struggles spiritually and how they can take steps to grow. This is not any sort of magic pill or mantra; in fact the author’s says if this book doesn’t work for you than just put it down! I saw a lot of grace in what was written and a heart to help others. “Every number on the Enneagram teaches us something about the nature and character God who made us. Inside each number is a hidden gift that reveals something about gods heart. So when you are tempted to prosecute yourself for the flaws in your own character, remember that each type is at its core a sign post pointing us to travel toward an embrace of aspect of God‘s character that we need.”
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  • Kaytee Cobb
    January 1, 1970
    this was a GREAT read/listen. I felt it was the most succinct and approachable guide to the Enneagram that I've read By Far. I guess that could be because each time I've learned and retained a bit more about it, but I really felt like Cron EMBODIED what it means to be each type and really talked about what it looks like in day to day life so much better than many others have done. highly recommended for personality geeks like me!
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  • Katie Stuckenschneider
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn’t put this down - I feel like it should be mandatory reading. If you care about people, have to work with people, or even slightly interested in learning about yourself I would highly recommend. I found it relieving, practical, and eye opening in thinking about who God made to be. Even more than that, I appreciated the methodical, practical descriptions of other personalities and am prayerful it changes my interactions (and reactions) with others.
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