Crash Override
You've heard the stories about the dark side of the internet-hackers, anonymous hoards attacking an unlucky target, and revenge porn-but they remain just that: stories. Surely these things would never happen to you.Zoe Quinn used to feel the same way. Zoe is a video game developer whose ex-boyfriend published a crazed blog post cobbled together from private information, half-truths, and outright fictions, along with a rallying cry to the online hordes to go after her. The hordes answered in the form of a so-called movement known as #gamergate--they hacked her accounts, stole nude photos of her, harassed her family, friends and colleagues, and threatened to rape and murder her. But instead of shrinking into silence as the online mobs wanted her to, she has raised her voice and speaks out against this vicious online culture and for making the internet a safer place for everyone.In the several years since #Gamergate started, Quinn has helped thousands of people with her advocacy and online abuse crisis resource Crash Override Network. From locking down individuals' personal accounts and information to working with tech companies and lawmakers alike to inform policy, she has firsthand knowledge about every angle of online abuse, what powerful institutions are (and aren't) doing about it, and how we can protect our digital spaces and selves--and now she wants to share that information with you.Crash Override offers an up close look inside the controversy, threats, and social and cultural battles that started in the far corners of the internet and have since permeated our online lives. Quinn uses her story--as target and as activist--to provide an accessible, personal, and human look at the ways the internet impacts our lives and culture. Through anecdotes from the eye of the storm to practical advice for keeping yourself and others safe online, Crash Override combines memoir, manifesto, and map to a better future for our online lives.

Crash Override Details

TitleCrash Override
Author
ReleaseSep 5th, 2017
PublisherPublicAffairs
ISBN-139781501135378
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir, Feminism, Games, Video Games, Gaming, Biography

Crash Override Review

  • Sarah Andersen
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up this book because I wanted to know more about Zoe's experience, and was pleasantly surprised to find her devoting a large deal of the book to analyzing the systems that enable online abuse. She is incredibly impressive in the way she not only survived her experience, but documented it, learned about it, and is attempting to turn these systems inside out in an effort to help others. Instead of digging through the book for more fuel for conspiracy theories, perhaps take a radical posit I picked up this book because I wanted to know more about Zoe's experience, and was pleasantly surprised to find her devoting a large deal of the book to analyzing the systems that enable online abuse. She is incredibly impressive in the way she not only survived her experience, but documented it, learned about it, and is attempting to turn these systems inside out in an effort to help others. Instead of digging through the book for more fuel for conspiracy theories, perhaps take a radical position of actually believing her. Zoe is a trailblazer and should be proud of all the work she has done.
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  • Gail
    January 1, 1970
    Quinn has taken the huge bushel basket of lemons she got by being a victim of a vindictive ex and the GamerGate mob and has turned it into lemonade for herself and other victims of online harassment. Here she is brutally honest in her telling of that awful time, and how she has come out the other side to create Crash Override, a group that helps other victims. I got this ARC at Book Expo. Many thanks!
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  • Hanna
    January 1, 1970
    Part memoir, part ode to cyberculture; Quinn shares her experiences as a game developer, professional, and victim of online abuse at the hands of Gamergate. This book was thoughtful and raw. I appreciated Quinn's honesty and solutions-oriented take on the problem that is online abuse. I think this book is important and I think it's something that everyone could benefit from reading. There's a lot to learn, both about tech stuff & online safety, as well as downright humility & compassion. Part memoir, part ode to cyberculture; Quinn shares her experiences as a game developer, professional, and victim of online abuse at the hands of Gamergate. This book was thoughtful and raw. I appreciated Quinn's honesty and solutions-oriented take on the problem that is online abuse. I think this book is important and I think it's something that everyone could benefit from reading. There's a lot to learn, both about tech stuff & online safety, as well as downright humility & compassion. Quinn's voice is important and being amplified at exactly the right time.
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  • Aoife Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing-- deeply personal but very informed. Definitely much more than a memoir it's a practical and knowledgeable guidebook on online harassment and what everyone -- advocates, journalists, non-profits, law enforcement and just regular internet users can be doing better on this issue.
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  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    tbh, before I read this book, I figured at least writing a review would be quick. I was well aware of what Quinn had been put through, and I was worried that saying anything critical at all would help the haters hate some more, so I figured I would be saying something like "yay standing up against bullies", "boo to misogyny" and that would be it.I couldn't have been more wrong.Because this book is GOOD, and perhaps more importantly, it comes at a time when there are a bunch of conversations we a tbh, before I read this book, I figured at least writing a review would be quick. I was well aware of what Quinn had been put through, and I was worried that saying anything critical at all would help the haters hate some more, so I figured I would be saying something like "yay standing up against bullies", "boo to misogyny" and that would be it.I couldn't have been more wrong.Because this book is GOOD, and perhaps more importantly, it comes at a time when there are a bunch of conversations we as a society need to have, and it raises all of these issues in smart, analytical, hectic, informed and passionate ways. It goes way beyond Quinn's own experience and into the messy questions facing anyone who cares about the world going to crap.The first half of the book is interesting, horrific (as anyone with even a passing familiarity with GG would expect) and anger-making, but it is in the second half that is most worth reading. Through the lens of online-organised hate crime (my words, not Quinn's), Quinn raises pretty much every major issue that progressive communities are grappling with in the face of the rise of the alt-right/neo-nazi brigade.The book, like Quinn, is far from perfect, and swoops between very-strong strengths and irritating weaknesses. Quinn fires off analysis with impressive and often invigorating smarts, but the approach is scatter-gun and contradictions appear without synthesis at times. Her writing is wonderfully comedic, and Quinn packs a great turn of phrase, but the editing feels sloppy at times and grammatical errors slip through more often than they should. Like many gaming designers, Quinn is best at analysing and deconstructing systems, and is clearly motivated by getting something working, and solving problems through activities she can control and manage. In the book, she is tackling something without solutions that neatly fit that approach. You get the sense of the different angles she has come at the problem from, but also of a weary frustration at the underlying sense of not making a difference despite her smarts, hard work and persistence. The book bounces a bit between immediate actions to assist, and bigger systemic issues that her analysis is wonderful on, but solutions thinner on the ground. You certainly get a sense of just how damn good she is at what she does, both in game design and in Crash Override, but you also get a sense of what the latter has taken out of her as she has made a difference to thousands but not, to quote her quoting a Baroness, healed the wound at the centre of it all. And the thing that makes this book so pertinent right now is that the wound is bigger than games and online harassment: without GG, it is arguable that Trump wouldn't have happened. While in the end, the rabid mob who participated in GG didn't stop the evolution of game diversity, they did succeed in mobilising a wider community around a set of ideas most of us thought had long been eradicated. Breitbart was catapulted into a much bigger community by GG. Milo Yiannopoulos and Steve Bannon became overnight stars, from which they built a powerful base. This isn't just misogyny, it's a cocktail of white supremacy; homophobia; trans-hatred; Islamaphobia; and multiple other anti-diversity violence.So the first really attention grabbing part of the book for me dealt with the issues swirling around identity politics and intersectionality. Quinn charges headlong into this conversation, which anyone involved in supporting diversity is grappling with. She points out strongly in the book, that while the most prominent victims of GG were cis white women, the perpetrators had been targeting African-American women for years, and trans women for even longer.As @Blackamazon, @so_treu and @thetrudz and many, many other Black women pointed out, misogynist trolls are White supremacist/racist trolls are #GamerGate trolls, and they practiced—cut their teeth, if you will—on trans and Black women. Quinn hands her narrative to other activists for sections of the book, arguing any real solutions to defeating hate have to be led by those who are most targeted by it, who mostly don't look like her. This is a context which is often missing from these conversations - it is the right who have a unified ideology of hate. I realised, reading some of the sections from Shafiqah Hudson, that this is the real argument for centering the experiences of those most under attack. It is only that way we built a response as unified as the neo-nazis are. White Feminism, or any other movement, which tackles only a specific manifestation of this ideology, divides and weakens both the understanding and the resistance to what is going on. Those at the heart - the 'intersection' - of the abuse generally have a better critique, and are seldom able to express it. Quinn is particularly critical of viewing online abuse as just a problem for women: pointing out that many of the victims have been non-white men, and that the constellation of identities comes into play.It is worth acknowledging that you don't have to read books by white cis women to learn about this, but Quinn does navigate this space with an awareness of the contradiction, and a determination to use the platform that she has been given.Quinn also does include material on the difficult topic of calling out, which I've rarely read put better: If you’re still figuring all this stuff out (and god, who isn’t?), it’s important that you understand that you’re gonna fuck it up. I’m gonna fuck it up. We’re all gonna fuck it up. It’s key to learn how to apologize and grow from your fuckups without making them someone else’s problem. This can be hard to hear, and you might feel defensive, but try to listen. Another powerful element to the book - and one which is remarkable really given her ordeal - is Quinn's strong orientation to acknowledging areas of grey and a commitment to what buzz-speakers call "safe to fail" culture. You can see here that being able to see this complexity did Quinn no favours as a target: she has never been afraid to take risks, and has scant talent or interest in hiding risky decisions, mistakes and things she now regrets, providing plenty of fodder for sensationalist headlines and distortions. As a contributor to change, though, it is an imperative value. In one of the most courageous things I've seen someone put in writing, Quinn talks about how her teenage self could easily have supported online abuse. She looks at the dynamics of being an outsider, and how mobs can reward abuse with warm fuzzies, creating a strange situation where people get affirmation and acceptance by ever-escalating violence against those outside the group. We need a culturewide solution because individual change is difficult when online abuse is frequently a group activity. It’s harder to hear the voices of the people you’ve hurt over the dozens of others cheering you on ... the mob is a place to belong and find acceptance; it just happens to be built on someone else’s suffering. I could just keep summarising - less wittily - her points here, but it is one of the sections that most needs to be heard right now. Quinn raises the implications of this for change - knowing that expressing dissent to crappy ideas to your friends and family who think differently is more significant than umpteen posting to those who agree with you. She challenges the idea that mob shaming is ever a good thing - and here she started to shift some of my own assumptions in ways I need to let sit. How do you build resistance without isolation? If your systems don't work at all, are there ways of using democratic processes without mob ignorant justice? How does this work with collective mass action? HOw do you get humans to work together in groups without persecuting outsiders?It is here, in the discussion of the role of the community, that Quinn comes closest to an articulated solution. She points out that:The single best predictor of a better outcome that I’ve seen in my casework isn’t a useful response from big tech companies, or criminal charges being filed, or even the abuser moving on from being a dog turd with a clown nose on it—it’s community support.This of course, leads to the final part of what the book made me want to talk about. Quinn's material on law enforcement, and its role, is valuable reading not only on the topic of cyberbullying, but to anyone grappling with hate crime, and activism against it. Quinn's own experience is very pertinent here: her use of law enforcement ultimately assisted in perpetuating her abuse - firstly simply because her abusers got more information from police reports, including the name of her boyfriend, who was promptly fired after a mob attack on his employer; secondly because her ex used the restraining order process to stay in her life and attack her, until she, against his wishes, terminated the process (this will be familiar to DV and rape victims the world over). Tactically, she views legal processes as a dead end for victims of online hate, and is highly wary of calls for higher penalties, or stronger laws (while she is equally passionate about empowering victims to make these decisions for themselves, and for support for those decisions). As with other crimes, those most likely to be targeted are also those most likely to face police abuse and harrasment. Much online abuse is also part of bog standard domestic violence (Quinn's own case included) and this conversation is part of a broader discussion around how to deal with DV.Well, for those who are still reading, I got a lot out of this book. It is an important contribution to an ongoing discussion from a smart, funny, analytical and TMI-honest game developer. A lot of people will want to read this as an act of solidarity, and I hope, like me, they take some thinking points out of it. I hope Quinn continues in this space in some way, she feels like part of a solution.
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  • Brandon Forsyth
    January 1, 1970
    Zoë Quinn has written an important book, but not necessarily a great one. There's a lot of insight here into both her personal experience and the issue of online assault, but I think I learned more and had a better time with Jon Ronson's SO YOU'VE BEEN PUBLICLY SHAMED. Ms. Quinn's is an important voice, and I'm glad she's speaking out, but it does feel a little dry.
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  • Thibaut Nicodème
    January 1, 1970
    I don't really read nonfiction a lot, but I gotta support Ms Quinn for…obvious reasons.
  • skullface
    January 1, 1970
    Audible narration and production: no complaints. I always prefer to “read” personal nonfiction in the author's voice. Could have benefitted from some tighter editing (name mispronunciation, grammar), but not distracting. The first half is a memoir surrounding the rise and fall of GG and its impact on the author. The abuse the author suffered is fucking awful and the fall out continues today, as you'll likely see in comments of this review. Quinn's enemies are so dedicated to hating her that my a Audible narration and production: no complaints. I always prefer to “read” personal nonfiction in the author's voice. Could have benefitted from some tighter editing (name mispronunciation, grammar), but not distracting. The first half is a memoir surrounding the rise and fall of GG and its impact on the author. The abuse the author suffered is fucking awful and the fall out continues today, as you'll likely see in comments of this review. Quinn's enemies are so dedicated to hating her that my auto-tweet for Goodreads progress was met with replies from people searching her name to smear her further. If that's not proof her story is worth telling, I don't know what is. However, I can't imagine anyone without prior knowledge of GG finding this part of the book interesting or worth reading. There isn't quite enough history or self-reflection to make it a recommendable memoir on its own. It also blows GG out of proportion in relation to the Entire Internet caring about it — while the discussions with tech orgs and the UN were notable, no one who didn't already know it was happening was paying attention. I'd be interested in hearing a full life memoir of Quinn's decades out, and if the garbage she went through ended up changing privacy and protection in social media. The second half of the book is a reference guide for dealing with abuse online. It doesn't read like an advertisement for Quinn's organization of the same name, but contains actionable advice to follow if you, someone you love, or someone you hardly know is suffering from a targeted hate campaign.
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  • Carey
    January 1, 1970
    The second this came out I found and got a copy. The prose is rather stilted and annoying. The subject, such as it is, Is one woman's spin on events that she was at the fringe of at best. She asserts that she was the victim of bullying online, and I believe that part BUT- the nude pictures she says were posted of her were not stolen- they were commercially available. She asserts she is a games designer, and technically that is true. However aside from a crowdsource that she never delivered promi The second this came out I found and got a copy. The prose is rather stilted and annoying. The subject, such as it is, Is one woman's spin on events that she was at the fringe of at best. She asserts that she was the victim of bullying online, and I believe that part BUT- the nude pictures she says were posted of her were not stolen- they were commercially available. She asserts she is a games designer, and technically that is true. However aside from a crowdsource that she never delivered promised game, and a "choose your own adventure" game called depression quest (which she made free after Robin Williams death in a way that screams attention seeking) She ISN'T actually the cornerstone famous face of any gaming anything. Apparently she is working on a FMV game at this time that is based on a not funny internet meme that has gone the way of the dodo at the time of this review. When the first chapter of any book starts with blaming her ex for everything BY NAME (which is easily found online because that's her whole point) I have to wonder at what part of this is supposed to make me feel for the author. Technically speaking she is bullying him back, only in a print form. And since this book is being foisted as being some sort of guidebook to how to deal with online hate, I see that as being the penultimate in hypocrisy. Ms. Quinn's internet drama around Gamergate ended 2-3 years ago. This book is her trying to extend her so-called fame for another 15 minutes. Anyone that, like myself, reads this book and finds it actually hard to read, hypocritical, in some cases character assassination bordering on libel, tread carefully. You will most likely be discounted as a "Gater" which I am not. Familiar? Yes. Hateful? not really. If you are reading this book because you wish to learn what Gamergate was all about? Don't bother- It is just one woman's opinion of it and apparently it was all about her (research says otherwise). If you are looking to read about good ideas on how to handle online bullying? This books very existence negates the message by the end of the first chapter. How is it not bullying someone to put them on blast in the first 3 pages? By Name? You could have said a vengeful ex-boyfriend and the point would be made. However, if you wish to know the author of this book by reading it, I think that you will see a lot of her, unintentionally. She forgets that there is a thing called google, and while a lot of results might back her up for being bullied, there is a lot of good information that she outright lied (I.E her commercially leaked nudes, no proof under FIA of police reports of death threats, etc). Her games are few and not really well received even accounting for hacks and trolling. It is like hearing a guy that changed his sparkplugs once saying that he worked as a NASCAR mechanic. I have no opinion on her morals. What she does with her body and her life are hers. But if you are trying to spin the idea that you were labeled a "slut" or anything RIGHT AFTER you admit you were going to move to a foreign country with a guy you met a week ago, it DOES tend to color the narrative for those that DO judge such things. For those that would believe you were in it for the free ride, etc. Thats just the first chapter. There is not really any way for a lot of things she asserts in her bloated book (could really have been shortened about 100 pages at least) to be confirmed for real, and I can accept that part. But some of it is outright libelous and most of it screams hypocrisy.I don't feel this book enlightened me on any point she is trying to make, whatever that point may be.
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  • Greg Bates
    January 1, 1970
    Zoe Quinn didn't need to do any of this.She could have just written down what happened, spit some insults at the vilest of the vile manchildren who caused it, and cashed a check. She didn't have to draw a straight line from the hordes of unbelievably hateful GamerGaters to the richest tech companies on Earth. She didn't have to call out everyone's favorite liberal, LGBT-friendly personalities as sociopathic monsters who'd rather let the world burn than hurt the bottom line. She didn't have to to Zoe Quinn didn't need to do any of this.She could have just written down what happened, spit some insults at the vilest of the vile manchildren who caused it, and cashed a check. She didn't have to draw a straight line from the hordes of unbelievably hateful GamerGaters to the richest tech companies on Earth. She didn't have to call out everyone's favorite liberal, LGBT-friendly personalities as sociopathic monsters who'd rather let the world burn than hurt the bottom line. She didn't have to toss every fancy new Silicon Valley partnership her newly-minted fame gave her out the window by pointing out how they literally made money off the destruction of her life. And she sure as shit didn't need to explain, in prose as clear and simple as it is heartbreaking, how all of this occurred first as farce and then tragedy: how the same shitheads who chased GamerGate dollars sanded the words off their nametags and replaced them with ALT-RIGHT, and how all of us helped create a climate where a pussy-grabbing game show host could become the most powerful man on the planet.But she did. And God bless her for it.P.S. Laughing my ass off at some of the reviews on here. Still spouting your conspiracy theories in TYOOL 2017? Get a fucking life, nerds.
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  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    I picked this book up at Hachette's BEA table this year from a friend who was working at Quinn's booth. Sadly, (or perhaps it's luckily in her eyes) I had no idea who she was. I didn't have a clue what GamerGate was until reading the Introduction of this book. I asked my fiancé about it and his response was "Put the book down now. It was ridiculous." So of course I kept reading. Quinn's story is horrifying, plain and simple. The fact that she, and so many other people have gone through what she I picked this book up at Hachette's BEA table this year from a friend who was working at Quinn's booth. Sadly, (or perhaps it's luckily in her eyes) I had no idea who she was. I didn't have a clue what GamerGate was until reading the Introduction of this book. I asked my fiancé about it and his response was "Put the book down now. It was ridiculous." So of course I kept reading. Quinn's story is horrifying, plain and simple. The fact that she, and so many other people have gone through what she has gone through, and continue to go through is appalling. The details of what can or cannot be handled by law enforcement and the courts is equally frightening. Quinn shines a bright light on an issues that doesn't get enough attention as it should. However, about two-thirds of the way through, this memoir transforms into more of a self-help book for those who have gone through the same thing she has. I found it really difficult to stay interested in the remainder of the book because of this. Reading a memoir, to me, is always interesting. You're getting a sneak peak of someone else's life other than your own, what's not to like? Reading a self-help book on a topic that just doesn't relate to you is a snooze fest. I read until the very end of the book but I 100% was not paying attention to what was going on. I know MAYBE one person who has been harassed online and unfortunately I know the harasser better than I do the one who was being harassed. It blew over in a week and that was that. It was nowhere near this level, there was no hacking involved. It was just a lot of bashing of an ex girlfriend and the guy she cheated with. Was it terrible? Absolutely. Did the last third of this book help me to help her and any future people who will be bullied online? Meh. It's great that Quinn has put herself out there again and is sharing her experiences and her expertise on the subject but I don't know that she'll really find a market with this. I do hope she does but it's difficult to say. Side note, I sincerely hope the group of people who gave this book a 1 star rating without a review were super lazy and not goons who are trying to sabotage a Goodreads page, although I suspect the latter.
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  • Robert Kingett
    January 1, 1970
    The audio version is read by the author and while I usually advocate for authors to read their own work for the audio book, it would have been nice if some voice training could have taken place before recording. The author’s vocal fry is very distracting and it takes away from the writing. An audio technique I enjoyed, and I wish other audio publishers did this, was they had a variety of other narrators read quoted tweets and emails and embedded comments.This book appears to be two books in one. The audio version is read by the author and while I usually advocate for authors to read their own work for the audio book, it would have been nice if some voice training could have taken place before recording. The author’s vocal fry is very distracting and it takes away from the writing. An audio technique I enjoyed, and I wish other audio publishers did this, was they had a variety of other narrators read quoted tweets and emails and embedded comments.This book appears to be two books in one. It is a divide between memoir and society and technology industry critique.The writing is okay. I can tell the process of writing this book was therapeutic and meaningful to the author but they wrote it in a way that will appeal to folks who are within internet culture. Outsiders will understand that she was abused but, simply put, they won’t care after they close the book, which is a huge shame because the telling of the story is an important case study to tackling online harassment. Very few people will understand that doxing, for example, can lead to more horrific acts to the target. Zoe does not do a good job of explaining to regular internet users why they should care. Zoe tries to, but it seemed as if it were advice for people who are already in this world, exclusively. It also centers on her story with sprinkles of others tossed in there, almost as an afterthought.The first half, comprising of the memoir portion, is honest and horrifying. Zoe clearly conveys the magnitude of abuse she received but it seemed really rushed and it felt like I was reading scattered thoughts that were later cleaned up by an editor. Still, that shouldn’t take away from the magnitude of her situation. She presents it honestly and clearly.The latter part of the book was way more thought out and better written than the memoir portion. It’s a fascinating look at what cyber law could be and posits, even, what it should be. Zoe, however, presents herself as the exclusive advocate in this area and doesn't talk about other’s efforts to better online communities. She presents her grassroots organization as the pioneer in tackling this problem exclusively. There's a lot of things people, law makers, journalists, engineers, and otherwise, should pay attention to in this latter part but perhaps through a more well thought out source. The author presents her reach and knowledge as someone unique to the topic and, thus, an expert. the tone drifts into finality territory however. While I understand that this is a memoir, her pull on the industry is not vast enough to present a definitive solution plan for the subject she’s critiquing.The book is okay. I've seen better written books. It's not supposed to be the best written memoir ever though. Sadly, this book will touch a few outsiders of the gaming and tech industry but not enough to spark a conversation. I, myself, will probably forget about the book after I listen to another memoir. It was insightful and very thought provoking while it lasted.
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  • Nunya
    January 1, 1970
    Complete Waste of Time and MoneyGiving this blog-in-book-form 2 stars only because it does highlight the abuses people endure when they are targeted by the hate machine.  No one should be subjected to that abuse.The second star is because this book reminded me why I read everything with a critical eye and do my own research in addition to information presented.The fact is that Ms. Quinn made statements without presenting any evidence, which is a huge red flag. For example, she claims that TERFs Complete Waste of Time and MoneyGiving this blog-in-book-form 2 stars only because it does highlight the abuses people endure when they are targeted by the hate machine.  No one should be subjected to that abuse.The second star is because this book reminded me why I read everything with a critical eye and do my own research in addition to information presented.The fact is that Ms. Quinn made statements without presenting any evidence, which is a huge red flag. For example, she claims that TERFs (trans exclusionary radical feminists) harass, threaten and dox transwomen.  However, evidence points to THE OPPOSITE.  Search Jeremiah "I punch TERFs" Byrne just as one example. Search the myriad of cases highlighting legitimate female concerns over transwomen invading female spaces (restrooms, changing rooms, etc). Hell, search the slur itself and you'll find example after example of rape threats, death threats and abuse against radical feminists by the Identity Politics mob.  If Ms. Quinn was being objective and intellectally responsible, she would have done a quick search herself to discover this. I mean, she seems to know her way around the internet.  Ms. Quinn's slander against radical feminists is irresponsible, uneducated and self-serving. She is in a position to reach many ears - she has a voice. Quinn is a target of mob harassment herself, why on Earth would she set up another group of vulnerable people for the exact same harassment??  So, if Quinn is willing to slander one group of people to serve her purposes, this leads me to believe she lied about more.  Yes, many of her claims are easily verifiable, but many are rather questionable. I found myself reading The Ex's account of thier breakup and I found it far more genuine. The man she labels as her abuser in this book was clearly the abused!  I was a victim of narcissistic abuse, and as I read his account, I felt sick to my stomach.  That in no way, shape or form excuses his sequential actions, as what he put her through was criminal. And I am not implying Ms. Quinn has NPD, but she is definitely not the model of moral lofiness she presents herself as. So she loses 2 stars for intellectual dishonesty and irresponsibility.Additionally, her book loses another star because it is just poorly written. I was looking forward to reading this book but when I actually dug in I was bored to tears.  I found my mind constantly drifting off and I noticed I kept checking book completion percentage.  I just wanted it to be over with so I could read  something else.  I know I could have put it down, but I paid for this, so I'm gonna finish it!This book reads like an unsophisticated blog. Boring, and it appears like it was rushed and half-assed.  Definitely not worth the  $15.99 charged.Conclusion - Quinn does address an important problem with regards to internet mob harassment.  I give her credit for that.  I also give her sympathy for the hell she undoubtedly went through and is still going through.  However, when this memoir is observed through the lens of objectivity, it is boring, self-serving, dishonest and puerile.  Save your money.
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  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    I respect Quinn as a creator and an online personality; that said, I'm not sure this book is for me. A lot of it is spent on the basics of internet hate and intersectionality, and while I get that this is clearly important to a lay audience, I could do without it.I was a bit (though not completely) surprised at her portrait of institutional inertia and even hostility in terms of shutting down abuse.What I found most interesting is the answer to the question I always ask: how does she keep living I respect Quinn as a creator and an online personality; that said, I'm not sure this book is for me. A lot of it is spent on the basics of internet hate and intersectionality, and while I get that this is clearly important to a lay audience, I could do without it.I was a bit (though not completely) surprised at her portrait of institutional inertia and even hostility in terms of shutting down abuse.What I found most interesting is the answer to the question I always ask: how does she keep living a normal-ish life? And the answer is important: (1) she kind of doesn't and (2) she has learned about harassment and weaponized that knowledge to help other people fight it. It's inspiring, or whatever. But my favorite part was the empathy. She acknowledges her own distant past as an internet garbage-person, and our whole generation was once internet garbage-people. Her goal is to protect, but her method is to understand and persuade. There's a timely focus on sincere and direct communication that's shocking and heartening.
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  • Zach
    January 1, 1970
    A brief history of GamerGate, followed by a deep and detailed analysis of the social, legal and technical gaps that make abuse such a staggering problem online. This book carefully weighs emotion, compassion, and the experiences of other people to provide an incredible story as well as a hopeful path forward.
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve been reading about Zoe Quinn and her attackers since before Adam Baldwin coined “GamerGate,” before the “ethics in journalism” justification was tacked on, and I’ve been eagerly waiting for this book to answer one big question: how do you go on when that many people decide to devote their lives to ruining yours?Zoe Quinn answers that, honestly and with humor, and then makes the book even better by listing the work she’s done to help others targeted online, the uphill fight to get the tech g I’ve been reading about Zoe Quinn and her attackers since before Adam Baldwin coined “GamerGate,” before the “ethics in journalism” justification was tacked on, and I’ve been eagerly waiting for this book to answer one big question: how do you go on when that many people decide to devote their lives to ruining yours?Zoe Quinn answers that, honestly and with humor, and then makes the book even better by listing the work she’s done to help others targeted online, the uphill fight to get the tech giants to go anything about the problem, and the steps you can take to reduce your own security holes. Should be required reading for anyone who goes online.
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  • HobbitFromPA
    January 1, 1970
    Of course I knew about this as it started online, it was hard not to see something about it if you are game fan or tech enthusiast. I fear with the current political climate things like this will just get worse. I was furious through a lot of the book at the damage these scum of the earth did to Zoe and others talked about. The humour she shows in the face of hateful onslaught is how I try to look at most things when possible.
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  • Sean Massa
    January 1, 1970
    Zoe explains more about what happened to her, the origins and operations of Crash Override, and gives really great advice for how to help people experiencing online abuse. This is an important book in the ongoing discussions around the online culture wars and online abuse.
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    I could go on at length about how much I loved this book, how I'm ordering my own personal copy as we speak, and how I want to mail all of my old sociology professors a copy as well, but I'll spare you all from that tedium.I will say, my favorite thing about this book is how Quinn masterfully "passed the mic" to marginalized folks who have also been victims on online abuse and harassment. Whenever I read a critical nonfiction piece- whether a book or a study- I always want to know who holds the I could go on at length about how much I loved this book, how I'm ordering my own personal copy as we speak, and how I want to mail all of my old sociology professors a copy as well, but I'll spare you all from that tedium.I will say, my favorite thing about this book is how Quinn masterfully "passed the mic" to marginalized folks who have also been victims on online abuse and harassment. Whenever I read a critical nonfiction piece- whether a book or a study- I always want to know who holds the knowledge, which voices make up data, and who is getting left behind in the process of science and analysis. Throughout writing this memoir, Quinn aptly recognizes her own privilege as a white woman, but also voices that as a queer person, a sex worker, and someone working through mental health, she is in a "relatively privileged" position and not an extremely privileged one as white woman often are. By highlighting the intersections of class, race, gender, and ability, Quinn lends so much more information to this analysis and does so in the best and most honest way possible- letting people in those margins speak on their own to their own experience.And one more favorite thing (I'm honestly really limiting myself here by ONLY talking about two favorite things so count your lucky stars, people)- Quinn's analysis of who to turn to for help. Following her amplification of marginalized experiences with online abuse and harassment, Quinn also addresses how not everyone who goes to the police or the court system for help receives help. By unpacking the intersections of the American justice system with race, gender, and privilege, Quinn helps her audience understand that beacons of justice for some are not far-reaching for all and may even do more harm than good.I love this book. It speaks to me as another nerdy, Internet dweller who's been harassed more times than I can count simply for existing in the same space as men on the Internet, or a game store, or a video game stream. While it hurts to read about Gamergate, I feel so empowered reading Quinn's memoir and inspired by her honesty, resiliency, and power."Suffer us witches to live."
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  • Tiara Lynn
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book. Far more than a memoir, Quinn does an outstanding job of diagnosing the triggers that lure weak, impressionable (mostly) men into internet mob culture, as well as outlining the path that personal internet terrorism follows. It's a science now (as predictable as the pathetic deluge of one-star reviews), and she's cracked the code through living it. But this largely isn't a book about Quinn. Her story provides a backdrop to the story of Crash Override and their activism I really enjoyed this book. Far more than a memoir, Quinn does an outstanding job of diagnosing the triggers that lure weak, impressionable (mostly) men into internet mob culture, as well as outlining the path that personal internet terrorism follows. It's a science now (as predictable as the pathetic deluge of one-star reviews), and she's cracked the code through living it. But this largely isn't a book about Quinn. Her story provides a backdrop to the story of Crash Override and their activism work, as well as a primer on how we can be responsible consumers and participants of social media. She explains, through her words and those from marginalized voices, how we can actively fight against internet mobs effectively, and how we can do it without retraumatizing their victims. She elevates the voices of others in a really effective way and I found myself learning a lot about how to talk about the sad souls who perpetuate this kind of garbage, and the bastards who watch it happening and refuse to step in. PROTIP: Juxtapose this book with reporting about how international terrorist groups use social media to give yourself nightmares for days.
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  • Michael
    January 1, 1970
    As someone who watched the escapades of GG unfold, I was in shock and horror at how gross and disgusting everything played out with Zoe and others. Reading this I see how much worse it really was than what I saw and read about online. I like that the book wasn't a "woe is me" look back on things. She puts out there who she is, how it affected her, and how she used it to help others, and learn from others who experienced the same and many times much worse in more marginalized communities. Her bre As someone who watched the escapades of GG unfold, I was in shock and horror at how gross and disgusting everything played out with Zoe and others. Reading this I see how much worse it really was than what I saw and read about online. I like that the book wasn't a "woe is me" look back on things. She puts out there who she is, how it affected her, and how she used it to help others, and learn from others who experienced the same and many times much worse in more marginalized communities. Her breakdowns of what is wrong with combating online abuse and hate within tech, government, and press I knew about on the surface. Reading about how little many of these companies and other entities care was downright disheartening. She also gives great tips on how to find help for yourself should you be on the receiving end, and also to those who may be in a position to help others.As she talked about her internet history, she even made me think about some of my younger internet days and some of the less savory things I've done in my own internet past that dates back over 25 years now.
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  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very boring book and I struggled with it but the second part focused more on how to deal with online harrassment is really good and deserves the two stars. I didn't like how the author decided to use a section of this book to throw "TERFs" under the bus. So, you're against online harassment but you're okay spreading lies about radical feminists being hateful bigots who tell trans people to kill themselves and doxx them on a daily basis when it's actually the opposite of that that's ha This was a very boring book and I struggled with it but the second part focused more on how to deal with online harrassment is really good and deserves the two stars. I didn't like how the author decided to use a section of this book to throw "TERFs" under the bus. So, you're against online harassment but you're okay spreading lies about radical feminists being hateful bigots who tell trans people to kill themselves and doxx them on a daily basis when it's actually the opposite of that that's happening? Hmmmkay.Besides all of that, I'm glad the author checked her privilege (god I hate that wording but it's the only one that fits in this scenario) throughout the book and reminded herself (and her privileged readers) that while what she went through was horrifying, marginalized people have been harrassed for years, on and off the interne.All in, it was an okay book and one I'm glad I read it. Still boring, though.(Am I the one that cringed whenever she brought up Alex [her non-demonic ex]? Like, I'm glad you have a such great friend and that he turned out to be an actual Good Guy, unlike your other demonic ex, but I really couldn't care less about how he held or cared for you during the hard times. No offence.)
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  • Guts
    January 1, 1970
    Mandatory reading for understanding online abuse I'm glad this book isn't just a memoir. The focus on intersectionality in online abuse issue, emphasizing marginalised people's voices in this books is great and appreciated. As someone who's from a marginalised group myself, it's great to see the book trying to encourage people to think about the issue of online abuse in a bigger scale and not just in the Western context. Chapters regarding infosec, how to deal with online abuse and how to help t Mandatory reading for understanding online abuse I'm glad this book isn't just a memoir. The focus on intersectionality in online abuse issue, emphasizing marginalised people's voices in this books is great and appreciated. As someone who's from a marginalised group myself, it's great to see the book trying to encourage people to think about the issue of online abuse in a bigger scale and not just in the Western context. Chapters regarding infosec, how to deal with online abuse and how to help those who are abused without making it worse for them, are very important reading that everyone should read it imo.The author's game "Depression Quest" has helped me understanding my depression and what I went through in life. So I'm happy to see, from this book, that she's working on games again. Really looking forward to her future work.
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  • petfish
    January 1, 1970
    Should be required reading. I approached the book with some trepidation; I've suffered abuse offline and on, and definitely some points were painful to read. Still, with the exception of a few breaks to play soothing video games, I barely put this book down.Quinn carefully details how to survive, avoid, combat, and help others with abuse while telling her own story. She has included the stories and experiences of other targets of online harassment so that her own experience as a queer white cisw Should be required reading. I approached the book with some trepidation; I've suffered abuse offline and on, and definitely some points were painful to read. Still, with the exception of a few breaks to play soothing video games, I barely put this book down.Quinn carefully details how to survive, avoid, combat, and help others with abuse while telling her own story. She has included the stories and experiences of other targets of online harassment so that her own experience as a queer white ciswoman isn't the only narrative, because it is different for those of us with more complex identities. She also spends a good amount of time dissecting the systems and behaviors that enable and persist online harassment, suggesting ways these systems can be improved.
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  • Amanda Perkins
    January 1, 1970
    Quick and engaging listen. I wasn't quite sure what to expect, but I was pleasantly surprised to find an interesting analysis of internet culture tied into current American politics along with her memoir of the events and her opinion on what has to change (both systems and people). I wasn't expecting this to be as thoughtful as it is. She's definitely given me some things to think about with my own online security, as well as good tips on how to be more useful to anyone who is being subjected to Quick and engaging listen. I wasn't quite sure what to expect, but I was pleasantly surprised to find an interesting analysis of internet culture tied into current American politics along with her memoir of the events and her opinion on what has to change (both systems and people). I wasn't expecting this to be as thoughtful as it is. She's definitely given me some things to think about with my own online security, as well as good tips on how to be more useful to anyone who is being subjected to abuse without adding to the problem. Increasingly, our "internet" lives and "real" lives are one and the same, and so much of the advice on how to deal with it is outdated and impractical.
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  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    I knew this memoir would be depressing in its portrayal of Gamergate and the implications for broader politics. I didn't know Quinn would manage to make it so humorous too. The advice section is a bit basic, but technology changes too quickly for a print book. I think the self-defense chapter provided an adequate primer on using a password manager and checking privacy settings. More important is the book's call to arms that encourages people to become part of community response solutions, rather I knew this memoir would be depressing in its portrayal of Gamergate and the implications for broader politics. I didn't know Quinn would manage to make it so humorous too. The advice section is a bit basic, but technology changes too quickly for a print book. I think the self-defense chapter provided an adequate primer on using a password manager and checking privacy settings. More important is the book's call to arms that encourages people to become part of community response solutions, rather than relying on formal abuse reports to tech companies or slow legal action that could take years and trigger backlash and further abuse.
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  • April Franklin
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a longtime reader of Kotaku and I remember being appalled in 2014 as Gamergate unfolded. It's good to see that Zoe Quinn seems to be doing well now. She knows firsthand just how hateful the internet can get, and her memoir is full of suggestions for how to protect others from going through the same harassment she experienced. That makes it sound very serious and dry, and parts of it are when she's explaining a policy, but there are also parts that are more of a personal memoir and even some I'm a longtime reader of Kotaku and I remember being appalled in 2014 as Gamergate unfolded. It's good to see that Zoe Quinn seems to be doing well now. She knows firsthand just how hateful the internet can get, and her memoir is full of suggestions for how to protect others from going through the same harassment she experienced. That makes it sound very serious and dry, and parts of it are when she's explaining a policy, but there are also parts that are more of a personal memoir and even some funny parts. A thought-provoking and enjoyable read.
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  • Cynthia Valoren
    January 1, 1970
    Zoe is nearly the same age as me and their experience with early internet mirrors mine in ways that kind of shocked me. They go in detail about everything that happened and a good portion of the book was what to do moving forward. I'm glad Zoe is not one who wants to change the internet and the free speech that is allowed but find ways to hold the individuals accountable for what has happened as our current system really failed them.
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  • Jess
    January 1, 1970
    I'm really glad she wrote this book, and there's a lot of good stuff in here. As a professional editor, I think it could've been tighter in a lot of places, drawing out other parts of the story. But there need to be more books like this, so it's worth the read.
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  • rob
    January 1, 1970
    I'm glad I bought this book. The chapters where she discusses how we can make the internet safer for ourselves and keep it a functional place for everyone were worth the price alone. And reading about her experience in the craziness of Gamergate was instructive and interesting.
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