All the Wind in the World
Sarah Jacqueline Crow and James Holt work in the vast maguey fields that span the bone-dry Southwest, a thirsty, infinite land that is both seductive and fearsome. In this rough, transient landscape, Sarah Jac and James have fallen in love. They’re tough and brave, and they have big dreams. Soon they will save up enough money to go east. But until then, they keep their heads down, their muscles tensed, and above all, their love secret.When a horrible accident forces Sarah Jac and James to start over on a new, possibly cursed ranch called the Real Marvelous, the delicate balance they’ve found begins to give way. And James and Sarah Jac will have to pay a frighteningly high price for their love.

All the Wind in the World Details

TitleAll the Wind in the World
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 10th, 2017
PublisherAlgonquin Young Readers
ISBN-139781616206666
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Fiction

All the Wind in the World Review

  • Bruna Miranda
    January 1, 1970
    AAAAAAAAAAAH QUE LIVRO BOM <3**I received this ARC from NetGalley and Algonquin Young Readers in exchange for an honest review**Sarah Jac and James work in maguey fields. That's been their lives since they left Chicago behind, but the plan has always been to save enough money to go back. After an accident happens in the fields, they jump on a train and head to The Real Marvelous - a mysterious farm that many call 'a cursed land'.The book is never 100% about the scenario but my guest is a dyst AAAAAAAAAAAH QUE LIVRO BOM <3**I received this ARC from NetGalley and Algonquin Young Readers in exchange for an honest review**Sarah Jac and James work in maguey fields. That's been their lives since they left Chicago behind, but the plan has always been to save enough money to go back. After an accident happens in the fields, they jump on a train and head to The Real Marvelous - a mysterious farm that many call 'a cursed land'.The book is never 100% about the scenario but my guest is a dystopian world where the climate changes affected the whole U.S. leaving the land dry and desert. Sarah Jac is the narrator here and she's both simple and incredible. She's tenacious on hiding her love for James (finally a couple I can root for and not roll my eyes!) and being the best maguey cutter in the land. She knows her place, yet she's true to her personality.One of my favourite characters is definitely Leo - from the first moment he meets the MCs there's an aura of "can we trust him?" that kept me tense and interested. Every he said and did was ambiguous and I loved it! I did have a hard time understanding Sarah and James' strategy on creating relationships with the other workers - they often seemed both distant and eager to make connections and I felt lost sometimes on how they felt about the other characters.I really, really liked how the author mixed this dystopian setting, magical-realism (?), suspense and action. Sarah Jac's voice was completely honest and maybe for the first time ever, I wanted the book not to have tied all the knots so I'd have some hope for more stories in this world. A companion perhaps?Great story, cool settings, interesting characters - what's not to love? :)
    more
  • Paulo Ratz
    January 1, 1970
    4,5 estrelasLivro que só vai sair em outubro, mas já tive a oportunidade de ler e preciso dizer que: além dessa capa MARA, o livro é muito legal! É uma coisa meio distopia com fantasia com romance, tudo num só. Fiquei preso do início ao fim. Já fica logo a dica!
    more
  • Madison
    January 1, 1970
    This review is of a few, sneak peek sample chapters.All The Wind In The World promises to be an evocative and powerful novel. After reading just a few chapters I want to know more about the characters and their colourful, detailed world. Why do the characters hide their romance, why is their world so dangerous, what made them leave Chicago to work in the dusty fields of the south? The mix of superstitions and magical realism contrast with the harsh and dusty landscape. There is so much more to l This review is of a few, sneak peek sample chapters.All The Wind In The World promises to be an evocative and powerful novel. After reading just a few chapters I want to know more about the characters and their colourful, detailed world. Why do the characters hide their romance, why is their world so dangerous, what made them leave Chicago to work in the dusty fields of the south? The mix of superstitions and magical realism contrast with the harsh and dusty landscape. There is so much more to learn about their story and I look forward to reading the full book. The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library.
    more
  • YA and Wine
    January 1, 1970
    ALL THE WIND IN THE WORLD combines mystery and a hint of magic in a captivating old west setting.I really enjoyed the plot and premise of this novel. The story moves at a very fast pace, and Samantha Mabry has done a truly remarkable job at incorporating magic into a real-world setting in a way that is not only believable but also interesting.The underlying mystery that ensues after an accident takes place on the maguey ranch that Sarah and her cousin James find themselves working is intriguing ALL THE WIND IN THE WORLD combines mystery and a hint of magic in a captivating old west setting.I really enjoyed the plot and premise of this novel. The story moves at a very fast pace, and Samantha Mabry has done a truly remarkable job at incorporating magic into a real-world setting in a way that is not only believable but also interesting.The underlying mystery that ensues after an accident takes place on the maguey ranch that Sarah and her cousin James find themselves working is intriguing and also a bit dark and twisty. At times this novel even takes on the tone of a psychological thriller. Mabry throws some great curveballs at readers, especially toward the end of the novel, that I found fascinating and highly unexpected.While there really is a fantastic cast of characters in this novel, I did not enjoy the main character, Sarah. I can see how her contrary personality lends itself well to the mystery of the novel and does make her an unreliable narrator, but I just didn't enjoy reading through her perspective. James on the other hand, I very much enjoyed as a character. He was very likable and a lot of fun to read about. Unfortunately the fact that they were cousins was a bit off-putting. While I understand that that is something that was once socially acceptable, it doesn't seem to be during this novel, because of the lengths Sarah and James go to hide it. That only serves to heighten the reader's sense of discomfort with the situation. The setting of the novel was quite spectacular. The desert setting really feels like a character in and of itself. It is such a beautiful and threatening presence throughout the entire story and really increased the stakes of the overall plot. The book cover is quite frankly stunning. It's a wonderful depiction of the story itself. I love the color scheme, and the way the text feels so impermanent is a great nod to the uncertain future that Sarah finds herself facing in the novel.While there were a couple of elements that fell flat for me in this story, overall I did enjoy it, and I'm so glad I got the opportunity to read it.*I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.*
    more
  • Alexandra Mills
    January 1, 1970
    Sneak peek of book provided for a Honest ReviewThis story was surprising and intriguing. I've only read the first 50 pages and I want to finish this as soon as it comes out. The two main characters are travelling from plantation to plantation for work and keeping up many secrets as they move. The lies follow them and manifest into each new community they come into. The world in which Marby has built is fascinating and unique especially in this premise. Excited to see where this goes
    more
  • Dahlia
    January 1, 1970
    Welp, I stayed up waaaay too late to finish that, but I could not put it down.
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    What happens when you build your life around a set of lies? What about when you believe them?This is a love story set in rural west Texas, full of magical realism, bees, pain, sadness, and a romantic arc that works exceptionally well. Readers who loved Mabry's first book will enjoy this one, as will readers who love literary stories with that touch of magic, like Laura Ruby's Bone Gap. Lovely prose, a complex and challenging character in both Sarah Jac and in James, and a story that twists and t What happens when you build your life around a set of lies? What about when you believe them?This is a love story set in rural west Texas, full of magical realism, bees, pain, sadness, and a romantic arc that works exceptionally well. Readers who loved Mabry's first book will enjoy this one, as will readers who love literary stories with that touch of magic, like Laura Ruby's Bone Gap. Lovely prose, a complex and challenging character in both Sarah Jac and in James, and a story that twists and turns in fresh, compelling ways.
    more
  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful writing and complex main character, but geez was this depressing. I hated the whole secret relationship aspect as it did nothing but cause emotional damage.
  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    Note: I received an eARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review!I really, really liked this! First of all, I really enjoyed the world that Mabry created. There are enough details to make it interesting, without diving into a deep origin story type scenario. I like that we know the world has changed, that the water is drying up and things are hotter, but we are never given specific reasons why. Sometimes too much detail takes away from the main point of the story, which is N Note: I received an eARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review!I really, really liked this! First of all, I really enjoyed the world that Mabry created. There are enough details to make it interesting, without diving into a deep origin story type scenario. I like that we know the world has changed, that the water is drying up and things are hotter, but we are never given specific reasons why. Sometimes too much detail takes away from the main point of the story, which is NOT the dystopian setting!Our main story centers are our MC, Sarah Jac, and her boyfriend/partner James. They're traveling from farm to farm as work hands, trying to save up enough money to live out a fantasy live that they've been dreaming of. They run into some trouble and have take off at a moments notice, leaving behind their earnings which forces them to start again with nothing. To safe themselves from possible abuse at the hands of other workers, they play off that they're cousins and go the distance in attempting to make the illusion real to others. Sarah pushes James to flirt with and hook up with other girls to help their cover, and it ends up back firing in a big way.I just really loved this. It had some definite Maggie Stiefvater vibes, without being a copycat of her style. I loved the dystopian setting, the mentions of magic as being something harsh and unharnessed, and the way that it showed young love and devotion in a new way. It presented love as something that could ultimately be your down fall above everything else, which isn't something you often see in YA lit. Their need to cover for each other, to take care of each other, pushed James to someone else and almost tore them completely apart. I also really loved how the ending worked out! It was just really well wrapped up, and not everything was sunshiney and good in the end.Kudos to Mabry, and I hope to read more from her in the future!
    more
  • Amy Leigh
    January 1, 1970
    The maguey harvest. Sarah and her lover James and responsible for part of the labor only telling time by the sounds of train whistles throughout the day. Moving down endless rows of agave plants harvesting the hearts for things like tequila. James and Sarah must keep their relationship a secret, frequently calling each other cousins but why? They travel from plantation to plantation harvesting in the grueling desert conditions of a futuristic United States. The lies they keep only intensify thei The maguey harvest. Sarah and her lover James and responsible for part of the labor only telling time by the sounds of train whistles throughout the day. Moving down endless rows of agave plants harvesting the hearts for things like tequila. James and Sarah must keep their relationship a secret, frequently calling each other cousins but why? They travel from plantation to plantation harvesting in the grueling desert conditions of a futuristic United States. The lies they keep only intensify their already stressful situation building mystery and intrigue. They escape a blightful situation on a train to Texas for survival to a place that is supposedly cursed hoping for a new start. I'm looking forward to further character and story development and learning more about this futuristic era of mysticism in the full-length novel.ARC of the first few chapters.
    more
  • Sandie, Teen Lit Rocks
    January 1, 1970
    I am a big fan of magical realism and fell hard for Mabry's debut novel. I still think she's a wonderful writer, but I was not a fan of the story in this book. It just left a lot of plot holes unfilled and a couple of major characters felt painfully underdeveloped. The world-building also felt a bit off. Still, there were some beautifully written, evocative passages, and I don't regret reading it. I just hope her next book is more like her first than this sophomore effort.
    more
  • Amanda (MetalPhantasmReads)
    January 1, 1970
    **4.5 stars**I read the SNEAK PEEK on NetGalley only. Very magical and ominous. Full thoughts for the sample will be in a compilation blog post on May 22, 2017. This review will be also be updated when I read the full length novel. This is one to look out for!
    more
  • Estelle
    January 1, 1970
    Super swept away by this one.That prose! Beautiful and heartbreaking all at the same time.
  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed the vivid world-building and writing but the main character made me grit my teeth in frustration for approximately 80% of the book.
  • Karyn Silverman
    January 1, 1970
    Not perfect - there's a lot of world building I'm not sure about - but the writing is lush and the chAracters problematic and the story fascinating. Worth a closer look.
  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    Mabry’s lyrical style was hypnotic and I found myself drawn into the vivid and dark world she created.At the same time, I often found myself wrenched from that world by inconsistent characters and issues with the fantastic elements of the story as well as certain plot devices.The Good:Vivid setting and astounding imagery, lyrical and dreamlike. I found myself captivated by the way Mabry intertwined Sarah Jac’s cynical wit with the raw beauty and wonder of the desert.There were so many great one- Mabry’s lyrical style was hypnotic and I found myself drawn into the vivid and dark world she created.At the same time, I often found myself wrenched from that world by inconsistent characters and issues with the fantastic elements of the story as well as certain plot devices.The Good:Vivid setting and astounding imagery, lyrical and dreamlike. I found myself captivated by the way Mabry intertwined Sarah Jac’s cynical wit with the raw beauty and wonder of the desert.There were so many great one-liners and phrases that stuck with me. SJ and James’ little mantras reminded me in some ways of Six of Crows.Basically, the writing is awesome.Leo was an awesome character and I kind of just want a book about him.I liked the bittersweet message and the open-ended ending. It was wrapped up but still not a clear happily ever after. The Bad:Sarah Jac and James’ characters felt very underdeveloped and inconsistent to me. James in particular did not seem to respond to circumstances the same way twice. (For instance, he chastises Sarah Jac for attempting to help people and then later grins at her for doing the same thing simply because it works out well.) It was unclear how much of his actions were the result of a spell, or if a spell even existed. While this uncertainty works in many magical realism stories, in this one it just felt confusing. I think it was necessary to include James’ perspective and would have added a lot to the story.Sarah was a bit unreliable as well, but I chalked that up to her inner conflict. Still, it bothered me how wanting to help others was established as part of her character–conflicting with the rules of the world she found herself in–and yet she was also perfectly willing to hurt people for material gain or simply because she felt hurt or angry. Her actions with Belle at the end of the book seemed especially ridiculous and out of character. Further depth was necessary into her motivations.Overall, that’s my main complaint. Many aspects of the story felt rushed or incomplete. For example, if the story was intended to fall into the realm of magical realism, it could have used more allegorical development. It felt too grounded for magical realism, while at the same time not fully embracing fantasy. An easy fix would have been to add more foreshadowing or small scenes showing that magic exists or might exist in this world. For most of the book, it was established that this was simply future America, and magic was not introduced as a topic of consideration until later. Could have been better woven in.Another issue: James and Sarah’s “need” to pretend to be cousins. This really took me out of the story. At first, it was because nothing of the stakes had been discussed, no reasoning for why this might be necessary. I assumed there must be a good reason, but the one eventually given didn’t really seem good enough. Again, the issue was not woven in with any foreshadowing or showing and was simply told to the reader at a point in the story where it felt too late. Mabry created a world where she simply stated that people are jealous and mean and can’t be trusted but did little to explain why it was so.The world was described in such a way that it seemed that Sarah Jac and James had no choice other than to come out west and pretend, but at the same time they were described as having jobs back home. At one point and alternative route–to join the caravan group–arises and is never seriously considered. They also have the option to simply leave at many points and don’t. It was perhaps implied that this had something to do with a curse but, again, the fantastic elements were not fully formed enough to make this clear and without a realistic reason for them to stay, I don’t think it falls into the unreality of magical realism.Overall:I enjoyed the story. It was fast-paced and I wanted to keep reading, despite numerous question marks along the way. In the end, I was somewhat satisfied but still slightly annoyed/confused.Honestly, I didn’t like the main characters and I felt this story had a lot of unrealized potential. Nevertheless, the writing was beautiful and it was very unique and refreshing.
    more
  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    I loved loved loved loved Samantha Mabry's debut novel A Fierce and Subtle Poison. Seriously, I loved it a lot. I read it over the course of a day, and a slow reader with a shot attention span like me never finishes a book in a day unless it's really, really appealing. It's a modern YA retelling of Hawthorne's Rappaccini's Daughter set in Puerto Rico. It's awesome, you should read it. So when I was innocently browsing around Powell's and caught sight of an ARC of Mabry's newest book, All The Win I loved loved loved loved Samantha Mabry's debut novel A Fierce and Subtle Poison. Seriously, I loved it a lot. I read it over the course of a day, and a slow reader with a shot attention span like me never finishes a book in a day unless it's really, really appealing. It's a modern YA retelling of Hawthorne's Rappaccini's Daughter set in Puerto Rico. It's awesome, you should read it. So when I was innocently browsing around Powell's and caught sight of an ARC of Mabry's newest book, All The Wind in the World, I snatched it up as quickly as possible. Because: she wrote another book holy crap I need it give it to me now.However, I should learn never to come into anything with super-high expectations, because it is inevitable that they may be some disappointment. I didn't like All the Wind in the World as much as I did A Fierce and Subtle Poison. But that doesn't mean this book was bad. Quite the opposite, in fact, this book is really good - well-written and compulsively readable - it just didn't click with me the way A Fierce and Subtle Poison did. Anyway, while A Fierce and Subtle Poison is a retelling set in the lush, tropical Puerto Rico, All the Wind in the World takes place in the desert. Not that the desert can't be a cool setting, but...eh, I'm not over-fond of the desert. Most of my state is desert, and I try to avoid it as much as I can. Either way: All the Wind in the World takes place in what I think is a 20-minutes-into-the-future America where, with climate change, most of America has become a windswept desert. Maguey (Agave) is one of the few things that grows very well anymore, and people live in Dust Bowl like camps around farms, making pennies a day harvesting the Maguey in order to make mezcal, tequila, pulque, etc. It's so Dust Bowl like that I kept getting confused about the time period this was supposed to be set in - it could easily have been set in the 1920s or 1930s, except we do get a few details that make it clear that this is very much set in the future. Sarah Jacqueline and her boyfriend, James, travel from farm to farm, scraping together as much as they can, dreaming of someday going East. Oh, and Sarah and James must never reveal that they're lovers. They go around pretending to be cousins. Because...reasons? Because the world is awful? I don't know, this was one aspect of the story that sort of put me off - on the one hand it makes sense that having a partner would pose a problem, people would exploit your connection...but wouldn't they do the same for family, too? Like, yeah people would threaten to hurt your boyfriend/girlfriend/partner, but if it's obvious you're close to your "cousin", wouldn't they exploit that as well? Anyway. After some terrible stuff goes down at a farm in New Mexico, Sarah and James escape on a train to Texas, to a ranch called The Real Marvelous. There's something weird up with The Real Marvelous. People say it's cursed. There's deadly swarms of bees, storms and rumors of witchcraft and other crazy stuff. Though they're a big part of the story, we never really get to know the family of the owner of The Real Marvelous - the Gonzales family. I wish we could've seen the story from their point of view, or perhaps taken a break from Sarah's POV and gone to James's, Bell's or Farrah's, but Sarah is our narrator from beginning to end, so we only ever see everything through her eyes. As a result, some of the supporting cast seem fairly flat. It's also never really clear if what's happening is actually something magical, or if it's all in the characters' heads.Narrative limitations aside, Mabry is a great writer, and I definitely look forward to reading more of her stuff. I finished All The Wind in the World at breakneck speed (a day and a half) and that only ever happens when a book is enjoyable enough that it holds my attention. Definitely recommend for YA fans. Also, it took me a long time to realize that maguey and agave were the same thing. I need to learn more about desert plants. But I don't wanna go to the desert...I like the rain and trees and such...
    more
  • Michelle Lancaster
    January 1, 1970
    YA FICTIONSamantha MabryAll the Wind in the WorldAlgonquin Young ReadersHardcover, 978-1-6162-0666-6, (also available as an e-book and on Audible), 288 pgs., $17.95October 10, 2017 With the implosion of the cities, Sarah Jac and James become jimadors, migrant workers harvesting maguey (also known as the century plant) on the ranches of the Southwestern United States in the not-too-distant future. An environmental cataclysm has devastated the country west of the Mississippi River. In conditions t YA FICTIONSamantha MabryAll the Wind in the WorldAlgonquin Young ReadersHardcover, 978-1-6162-0666-6, (also available as an e-book and on Audible), 288 pgs., $17.95October 10, 2017 With the implosion of the cities, Sarah Jac and James become jimadors, migrant workers harvesting maguey (also known as the century plant) on the ranches of the Southwestern United States in the not-too-distant future. An environmental cataclysm has devastated the country west of the Mississippi River. In conditions that put the Dust Bowl of the 1930s to shame, maguey, which produces a liquid that, “when distilled, becomes pulque, mescal, or, if you are rich, tequila as clear as a tear,” is one of the few crops still viable. Blueberries are extinct, and people literally go crazy from the heat. The jimadors are at the mercy of the ranch foremen, and a terrible accident sends Sarah Jac and James running for their lives.The fugitives wash up at the Real Marvelous, a ranch outside Valentine, Texas, which the jimadors believe to be cursed. “There could be something wrong here, in this very dirt,” Sarah Jac thinks, and “all that wrongness might be just about to bubble up, ooze from hacked maguey, or seep skyward through the deep, dry cracks in the ground.” A couple forged in extremity, Sarah Jac and James plan to save enough money to escape to the east, “toward the ocean … and pick fruit off trees and dive into cold breaking waves.” But when one of their cons seems to work too well, Sarah Jac and James must overcome her recklessness and his temptation to survive.All the Wind in the World, the new novel from Dallas’s Samantha Mabry, has just been longlisted for the 2017 National Book Award in Young People’s Literature. Mabry’s dystopian world, reminiscent of both John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath and Claire Vaye Watkins’s Gold Fame Citrus, is steeped in the native magic of the Southwest. Darkly atmospheric, the climactic conditions inspire superstition—a regression into attempts to appease the gods, seeking a savior and a scapegoat.Mabry creates complex characters we want to root for, and when they disappoint us the hurt is visceral. Sarah Jac and James, as well as friends and foes, prophets and witches, are no longer children. Forced to grow up too soon, their endurance requires what Sarah Jac calls “hard hearts,” because “desperate people turn, like an apple gone to rot from the inside out.” How to separate caution from paranoia when survival depends upon trust and necessary vulnerability?“The desert … seems so simple and boring, but really it’s full of secrets,” Sarah Jac tells us. In All the Wind in the World, the desert is a character, and so is the wind, which, “when it hits the right speed, sounds like a string section playing in a minor key.” Dust storms, “hazy, rust-colored curtain[s] extending from the ground to the sky,” roar, and “plow into you, burrow into the folds of your clothing, and stick in the spaces between your teeth.” Mabry’s metaphors sing; her descriptions haunt.Mabry’s fast-paced plot is straightforward and uncluttered, but packs plenty of twists. The immediacy of Sarah Jac’s first-person narration is powerful and absorbing. The climax is a shocking act of desperation that makes a mostly satisfying ending possible, if only for a very few. As with all things in All the Wind in the World, it’s unsentimental and complicated, and a resonant warning of possible futures without the “luxury of expectations.”Originally published in Lone Star Literary Life.
    more
  • Megan Lyons
    January 1, 1970
    3 1/2 starsSo I really enjoyed this. It was different than anything I have read before, which is a huge bonus for me. It takes place in a dystopic future, where much of US has become desert, and alcohol has become a huge staple, due to the lack of readily available water. However, it feels almost historical in that society has changed, and digressed to the point where the economy has crashed so point people are making only 40 cents a day and there doesn’t seem to be any real law and order, or go 3 1/2 starsSo I really enjoyed this. It was different than anything I have read before, which is a huge bonus for me. It takes place in a dystopic future, where much of US has become desert, and alcohol has become a huge staple, due to the lack of readily available water. However, it feels almost historical in that society has changed, and digressed to the point where the economy has crashed so point people are making only 40 cents a day and there doesn’t seem to be any real law and order, or government involvement. It has a weird wild west vibe, and the work the protagonist does feels akin to serfdom, though the structure is different, the feel is the same. Then, there is magical realism throughout. It was very genre bending. It also didn’t have the usual feel of a YA book, where the protagonist is a hero, or even a compelling antihero. Sarah Jaq was neither of these things. I felt for her, but she was in no way a hero. She did a lot of things that were dark, and wrong, but was presented in an unapologetic light. The romance too, was not the pure, fairy tale kind that seem to pepper most YA books. It too was complicated, and a bit dark as well. It was just very different from the other YA out there, and I’m not sure who its audience will be, besides people like me who are always looking for something different from the usual fare. The vague plot description won’t help. I almost expected it to be a sort of homesteading/survival against the elements book (I love that kind of thing; I have since my mom read my the “Little House on the Prairie” series when I was in kindergarten). So I don’t think this will be very commercially viable. It did not leave me feeling happy; I felt vaguely unsettled throughout. However, it is a strange, unique book for readers like me who are always looking for something a bit different.*I received an advanced reader copy of this book from Indigo Books and Music Inc. in exchange for an honest review*
    more
  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced reading copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.The future presented in this novel is a believable future-- water gone, food scarce, world dried up. It feels real and possible because it is a future that Mabry laces with our present: all throughout the book there are places, things, ideas, and languages that have all come from our current times, but most of them have been altered. I can see our world becoming the one that Mabry creates. I can I received an advanced reading copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.The future presented in this novel is a believable future-- water gone, food scarce, world dried up. It feels real and possible because it is a future that Mabry laces with our present: all throughout the book there are places, things, ideas, and languages that have all come from our current times, but most of them have been altered. I can see our world becoming the one that Mabry creates. I can follow the threads that she weaves from our time to Sarah Jac's, which is probably why the undercurrent of magic and mysticism in this credible future feels so jarring and powerful. This book makes the future out to be like the wild, turbulent old west, but built on modern ruins, containing traces of supernatural.I didn't like this book for the first third or so. I didn't understand what Sarah Jac and James were doing, and why. Why they felt it was so necessary to keep their love secret, to hurt and con other people. I disliked them for these choices, because the necessity of the choices was not made clear enough to me. I felt like Sarah Jac was the villain of the story. But as the book progressed, as her plans unravel, I felt more compassion for her. By the end I liked her character. And I love the beautiful, poetic lines sprinkled throughout this story, and I love the world that Mabry creates, and I love the mystery of the Real Marvelous. I read the last half of this book in just a few hours as I was so curious to uncover the mystery of the cousins, the prophet, and the witch.
    more
  • Tyler Hixson
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the pieces of this book. I liked the danger of James and Sarah Jac's romance and how it was constantly under siege.I liked the desolate world-building, the harshness of the desert in which the story takes place.I liked the sparse prose, the no-nonsense structuring of the story.I liked how the story doesn't end all nice and neat.I liked/respected/felt feelings toward all of the characters. Despite the relative lack of development of most of the characters, in fact, the lack of development I liked the pieces of this book. I liked the danger of James and Sarah Jac's romance and how it was constantly under siege.I liked the desolate world-building, the harshness of the desert in which the story takes place.I liked the sparse prose, the no-nonsense structuring of the story.I liked how the story doesn't end all nice and neat.I liked/respected/felt feelings toward all of the characters. Despite the relative lack of development of most of the characters, in fact, the lack of development fits the mold of the story.Despite all of this, I finished All the Wind in the World and was like, meh, alright. And it frustrates me that this is how I feel about this book, cause I really haven't read anything like it before. A touch of magical realism, a desolate alt-America in which global warming has caused desert to overtake half of the United States ("from the Mississippi to the Pacific") and the economy is driven by farming maguay to make alcohol, a romance story in which love doesn't necessarily conquer all, treachery and murder—I LOVE ALL THESE THINGS. But I don't love this book. I like it. And I can't put my finger on why I simply like it. Reading. One of the more frustrating of leisure activities at times.
    more
  • Dedra
    January 1, 1970
    I was provided an advance copy of this novel from the publisher.I was thrilled to receive an advance copy of Samantha Mabry's new novel. I so enjoyed her first novel, A Fierce and Subtle Poison. It is one that has definitely stayed with me. But I have to say, I think I liked her second novel even more than the first. Mabry knows how to weave a magical tale. Her characters are beautifully flawed, and her settings, descriptively haunting, become equally as important as the characters. I'm not sure I was provided an advance copy of this novel from the publisher.I was thrilled to receive an advance copy of Samantha Mabry's new novel. I so enjoyed her first novel, A Fierce and Subtle Poison. It is one that has definitely stayed with me. But I have to say, I think I liked her second novel even more than the first. Mabry knows how to weave a magical tale. Her characters are beautifully flawed, and her settings, descriptively haunting, become equally as important as the characters. I'm not sure if it was because I spent some time in New Mexico this past summer, but her descriptions of the desert-the dry wind, the hot days and cool nights, the red desert sand-all come alive and create a refreshingly unforgettable story.
    more
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    (In full disclosure, I received an ARC of All the Wind in the World from the publisher, but this review is my honest opinion of the book--and I will buy the book for our library.)I loved Mabry's first book--and the lush setting the first one is the complete opposite of this one. Set in an unforgiving version of the southwest (that has spread to the west, in this undefined time period), the setting is as important as the main character. It is deadly and a constant foreboding presence, looming ove (In full disclosure, I received an ARC of All the Wind in the World from the publisher, but this review is my honest opinion of the book--and I will buy the book for our library.)I loved Mabry's first book--and the lush setting the first one is the complete opposite of this one. Set in an unforgiving version of the southwest (that has spread to the west, in this undefined time period), the setting is as important as the main character. It is deadly and a constant foreboding presence, looming over the characters. It's about love in a time of survival--love that must be kept secret--until a series of unexplainable events force their hand.The language in this is beautiful; the story of survival, raw.
    more
  • julia ☆ [owls reads]
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to read the first 3 chapters of All the Wind in the World. :)It is a story set in rural Texas, with a stiffing atmosphere that works perfectly with the rural setting. Marby's writing is beautiful, translating pain and sadness to the page. The little glimpses of magical realism also make for a pretty intriguing world-building, as we are slowly introduced to this new world. There is also a romance arc, which carries over through the first few chapters.Overall, All the Wind in th I was lucky enough to read the first 3 chapters of All the Wind in the World. :)It is a story set in rural Texas, with a stiffing atmosphere that works perfectly with the rural setting. Marby's writing is beautiful, translating pain and sadness to the page. The little glimpses of magical realism also make for a pretty intriguing world-building, as we are slowly introduced to this new world. There is also a romance arc, which carries over through the first few chapters.Overall, All the Wind in the World has an interesting beginning. It introduces the characters and the setting, delivers curious concepts, and manages not to give too much away.Sneak Peek provided via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Annette Hughes
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! I love post apocalyptic stories, particularly those featuring strong women, so was eager to try Samantha Mabry's novel about a pair of migrant workers in the new deserts of the USA. This more than fulfilled my expectations--an instantly vivid world with dry dust-filled days of manual labor, the teasing, drawn out stories of how SarahJac and James came together and why they claim to be cousins, and the horrifying but hypnotizing myths around the campfire at night--is there a witch or a curse Wow! I love post apocalyptic stories, particularly those featuring strong women, so was eager to try Samantha Mabry's novel about a pair of migrant workers in the new deserts of the USA. This more than fulfilled my expectations--an instantly vivid world with dry dust-filled days of manual labor, the teasing, drawn out stories of how SarahJac and James came together and why they claim to be cousins, and the horrifying but hypnotizing myths around the campfire at night--is there a witch or a curse at the Real Marvelous ranch or is it just another hard-luck job gone bad? The interplay between the lovers, the rich ranch family, the prophetess and the perhaps too-friendly Leo creates an irresistible tension right through this un-put-downable book. Wow!
    more
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Sarah Jac and James have left Chicago and troubled memories to hop trains out west and work as farmhands. They have an ultimate plan to go back, but when something terrible happens, they are suddenly on the run, hiding in plain sight, and have to sacrifice more than they expected. Mabry is a talented writer and the story is compelling, but I'm a little mystified as to how this book made the longlist for the National Book Award. I think there are better books with magical realism and better books Sarah Jac and James have left Chicago and troubled memories to hop trains out west and work as farmhands. They have an ultimate plan to go back, but when something terrible happens, they are suddenly on the run, hiding in plain sight, and have to sacrifice more than they expected. Mabry is a talented writer and the story is compelling, but I'm a little mystified as to how this book made the longlist for the National Book Award. I think there are better books with magical realism and better books about how hard life can be in the desert. Entertaining, but not as powerful as it should be for an award winner. Review from galley.
    more
  • Jane
    January 1, 1970
    This book kept me engaged and not wanting to put it down the whole way. I know from what narrator Sarah Jac shares of her past, that she's done a lot of things that are less than admirable. And, during the course of the book, she does more. But I couldn't help empathizing with her and rooting for her. Mabry's novel is set in a sad, futuristic U.S., in which climate changes have left the country so blighted that maguey is the only profitable crop. Sarah Jac and her boyfriend James are two of many This book kept me engaged and not wanting to put it down the whole way. I know from what narrator Sarah Jac shares of her past, that she's done a lot of things that are less than admirable. And, during the course of the book, she does more. But I couldn't help empathizing with her and rooting for her. Mabry's novel is set in a sad, futuristic U.S., in which climate changes have left the country so blighted that maguey is the only profitable crop. Sarah Jac and her boyfriend James are two of many who jump trains, moving from one maguey ranch to another, hoping to save enough money to move on to a better life.
    more
  • Mel Anie
    January 1, 1970
    eArc provided by Netgalley in exchange for an honest review Rating: 4.0 Stars I've read a sneak a peak of All the Wind in the World . Basing my opinion on 3 chapters I've noticed several things about this book:* Magical, but harsh and dangerous world;* Female protagonist;* Action moves to Valentine, Texas;* Elements of romance;* Curses and ghosts (based on experiences and tales told by other characters);* Huge variety of emotions.I'm looking forward to reading the full version of this book.
    more
  • kristinsbooks
    January 1, 1970
    Keep on mind my three stars are ONLY for the first three chapters. I have not read anymore than that. So three stars for three chapters seems very good. I think this book has a lot of secrets to be figured out and some past that is going to be dug up. I like the characters from what I have seen, I think Sarah jac is strong and willful. The world building is very good, paints the picture perfectly. I am excited to read the rest of this book!!
    more
  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    The vagueness of the description for the book and the mysteriousness of an opening to the story that I never could quite grasp led me to DNF the book and skip to the end. I'm still not quite sure what I was supposed to be reading and it doesn't seem to be something monumental, so if I'm wrong, great, but I don't think I'm missing anything by not reading it through. Not sure teens will have the patience either.
    more
Write a review