The Nowhere Girls
Three misfits come together to avenge the rape of a fellow classmate and in the process trigger a change in the misogynist culture at their high school transforming the lives of everyone around them in this searing and timely story.Who are the Nowhere Girls?They’re everygirl. But they start with just three:Grace Salter is the new girl in town, whose family was run out of their former community after her southern Baptist preacher mom turned into a radical liberal after falling off a horse and bumping her head.Rosina Suarez is the queer punk girl in a conservative Mexican immigrant family, who dreams of a life playing music instead of babysitting her gaggle of cousins and waitressing at her uncle’s restaurant.Erin Delillo is obsessed with two things: marine biology and Star Trek: The Next Generation, but they aren’t enough to distract her from her suspicion that she may in fact be an android.When Grace learns that Lucy Moynihan, the former occupant of her new home, was run out of town for having accused the popular guys at school of gang rape, she’s incensed that Lucy never had justice. For their own personal reasons, Rosina and Erin feel equally deeply about Lucy’s tragedy, so they form an anonymous group of girls at Prescott High to resist the sexist culture at their school, which includes boycotting sex of any kind with the male students.Told in alternating perspectives, this groundbreaking novel is an indictment of rape culture and explores with bold honesty the deepest questions about teen girls and sexuality.

The Nowhere Girls Details

TitleThe Nowhere Girls
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 10th, 2017
PublisherSimon Pulse
ISBN-139781481481731
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Feminism, Fiction

The Nowhere Girls Review

  • Emma Giordano
    January 1, 1970
    THIS. DANG. BOOK. Y’ALL. It’s a must read. One of the best YA books published in 2017. It’s so important, especially for young readers, and I cannot recommend it enough.HARD TW: Rape, Sexual AssaultOne of my favorite things about this book is the characters. Grace is the new girl who is fat and a Christian. I’m always so pleased to see books where fat protagonists are able to have a story that’s NOT about their body, but it is just a characteristic of who they are. I was also immensely pleased w THIS. DANG. BOOK. Y’ALL. It’s a must read. One of the best YA books published in 2017. It’s so important, especially for young readers, and I cannot recommend it enough.HARD TW: Rape, Sexual AssaultOne of my favorite things about this book is the characters. Grace is the new girl who is fat and a Christian. I’m always so pleased to see books where fat protagonists are able to have a story that’s NOT about their body, but it is just a characteristic of who they are. I was also immensely pleased with the portrayal of a Christian teen – As I was very into my faith as a teen, I feel Grace is my favorite Christian YA character because her faith plays a constant part in her life but she is also so open-minded and exactly what a Christian should be.Rosina is from a Mexican family who also is interested in women (I don’t believe an actual label is ever placed on her sexuality.) Her character really explores the relationship between latinx family members, the hardship of needing to work as a teen, discrimination as a teen of color, and briefly discusses the struggle of having undocumented family members. Erin is the final core member of The Nowhere Girls and she has Aspberger’s and anxiety. Erin brings up thoughtful discussions about “Autism Moms”, how individuals on the spectrum are viewed as unempathetic and cold, and breaks every untrue stereotype you’ve heard for people with Aspberger’s. I cannot speak for the fat, Mexican, wlw, or Aspberger’s representation and I have yet to find ownvoices reviews for any of these, but I will say I noticed multiple instances where discussions about good rep that take place in the community were executed faithfully in this novel. There are also so many side characters that add to the story and show the complexity of women that I could not help but love.A brief overview of important topics discussed that are covered in The Nowhere Girls are: feminism, rape, rape culture, sexual assault, sexual harassment, victim blaming, the concept of virginity, being sex positive vs. being not ready for sexual behaviors, female masturbation, consent vs. not saying no, the biased court system in sexual assault cases, biased school administration, misogyny, sexism, racism, immigration, ableism, SO MANY GOOD AND IMPORTANT THINGS TO TALK ABOUTThe only two small critiques I had were that firstly, some conversations (only one or two) that happened during The Nowhere Girls meetings felt a smidge too mature for a group of teens (I am not suggesting that teens are incapable of mature conversations of course, but I can best describe it as feeling as if I was watching a TedTalk on women’s issues by an adult professional as opposed to teens describing their viewpoints.) I feel the author’s voice may have overtaken the character’s voices in a few small situations, but then again, these are all important issues to be discussed that teens should know. I am not critiquing the inclusion of these conversations because I think they’re GREAT, but I think the execution was perhaps too sophisticated in some cases – it just didn’t always sound like it was coming from the mouth of an actual teen. Nonetheless, I’m still glad these points were addressed in the novel.My other issue is one small scene where a classmate is talking to Grace about their trans sibling. They use language that suggests that being trans is something you can “decide” which it is clearly not. I took this scene to express the good intentions that some have on these issues, though they may in fact be harboring harmful ideals, but regardless of my interpretation, it wasn’t really addressed in the book. I wish there was a line to make it clearer that Jesse was just ignorant (where Grace could have corrected him) or any explanation as to why it was included. We do have a small perspective of a trans girl in the story (the story switches between Grace, Rosina, and Erin’s perspectives, but also has the perspective of “Us” meaning brief thoughts/actions of various girls around town) and her thoughts expressed a knowledge of at least some trans issues, so I was perplexed to see this line pass through the cracks.Overall, The Nowhere Girls is a fabulous YA contemporary for teens wishing to learn about feminism and rape culture. This is such a wholesome, well-rounded book with expertly-developed characters and important themes discussed. I would highly highly recommend this to any reader; man, woman, non-binary, adult, teen, etc. Please give this immensely important novel the recognition it deserves.
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  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    “The things is,” Rosina says, “people don’t want to hear something that’ll make their lives more difficult, even if it’s the truth. People hate having to change the way they see things. So instead of admitting the world is ugly, they shit on the messenger for telling them about it.” The Nowhere Girls is not your average feminist contemporary. There are several awesome feminist books from this year: I’ve been seeing people hype Moxie by Jen Matieu a ton this year. And while I did like that book “The things is,” Rosina says, “people don’t want to hear something that’ll make their lives more difficult, even if it’s the truth. People hate having to change the way they see things. So instead of admitting the world is ugly, they shit on the messenger for telling them about it.” The Nowhere Girls is not your average feminist contemporary. There are several awesome feminist books from this year: I’ve been seeing people hype Moxie by Jen Matieu a ton this year. And while I did like that book a lot — it’s a great contemporary journey — this book goes far deeper. While books like Moxie offer feminism from the point of view of privileged cishet white women, Nowhere Girls wants you to see deeper than that. This book focuses on three Nowhere Girls.🌺 Grace → self-proclaimed fat girl and the more idealistic of the trio🍀 Erin → smart and sarcastic Aspergers girl who I LOVE🌺 Rosina → a latinx queer girl and literally the Most important to meBut the aspect of this book that stands out to me is the fact that this isn't about these three girls: it is about all the girls. Short "US" chapters give insight into so many different girls - a conservative girl, a closeted trans girl, a cheerleader unsure whether to believe the allegations, two girls kissing, a black girl finding no value in the white-centric feminism of her classmates. It is so, so powerful.It is so, so powerful. Amy Reed does not pull her punches at. all. This is one of those books that made me feel claustrophobic reading it. The author makes her fucking points. She does not shy away from the full truth of rape culture or try to hide things under a veneer of a cute contemporary. And she definitely doesn't erase the fact that not every woman is white and cishet. It's overall a fantastic experience - horrifying, enrapturing, and beautiful. What I loved about this book was the sympathy given to every girl in every point of view. These girls are coming from different backgrounds. These girls are coming from different points of view. They are multifaceted and flawed and none of them have a totally objective view point of view. But that doesn't mean their viewpoints aren't important. It doesn't mean we, as girls, are any less important. We are worth it. We are important. All of us. Literally the only thing I didn't like about this book was one line not being explicitly decried: a line about a character's trans sister that seemed to imply trans people choose to be trans. That was literally it. The feminism is so intersectional and the characters are so developed and this book is so fucking powerful. I cannot recommend enough.Blog | Goodreads | Twitter | Youtube
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  • Jessi ♡
    January 1, 1970
    this book made me hate men more than i already do
  • shady boots | #20gayteen
    January 1, 1970
    Originally I wrote a review that was more like me screaming and ranting frantically about everything wrong with the world, and I was typing so furiously that my fingers are throbbing and my keyboard would probably despise me if it were sentient. But I think I'm gonna scratch all that, because the time you spend reading my review would be better spent reading this book if you haven't yet. Of course, there are plenty of wonderful, qualified reviewers here on this lovely site that will have a prope Originally I wrote a review that was more like me screaming and ranting frantically about everything wrong with the world, and I was typing so furiously that my fingers are throbbing and my keyboard would probably despise me if it were sentient. But I think I'm gonna scratch all that, because the time you spend reading my review would be better spent reading this book if you haven't yet. Of course, there are plenty of wonderful, qualified reviewers here on this lovely site that will have a properly structured, well-thought-out review. If that is what you're looking for, then by all means read one of theirs. I can't stop you. But mine is basically going to just be me BEGGING you to read it if you have yet to. If it's on your TBR right now, literally bump this up to number one. If you've been holding off on it (like I did, which I'm still struggling to forgive myself over) then stop.Please. This is one of the most important books ever written and it deserves your attention.
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  • may ➹ (hiatus)
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone needs to read this book.It has SUCH an important and amazing message for women and men (and all in between) and it highlights just exactly why we need feminism in the world today. And it’s told in a beautiful, beautiful way with relatable characters.If you’re a feminist, read this. If you’re not a feminist (you should be), read this. If you’re neutral, read this. Just READ THIS BOOK because it is so so so important, especially in the world today. REASONS TO READ THIS - It tackles rape c Everyone needs to read this book.It has SUCH an important and amazing message for women and men (and all in between) and it highlights just exactly why we need feminism in the world today. And it’s told in a beautiful, beautiful way with relatable characters.If you’re a feminist, read this. If you’re not a feminist (you should be), read this. If you’re neutral, read this. Just READ THIS BOOK because it is so so so important, especially in the world today. REASONS TO READ THIS - It tackles rape culture and shows you just why the world is so messed up. Like, of course, a girl who’s raped by three guys definitely is trying to get attention, and not, idk, MAYBE TRYING TO REPORT THIS AWFUL SICKENING CRIME????? - But not only does it just portray so many horrible assumptions and behaviors towards rape, but it also talks about how even tho some rapists get punished, some get punished less because of the fact that they're white or rich or "don't look like a rapist".- And it ALSO talks about how, while a rapist may go to jail for their actions, the victim will never be the same again, despite the fact that they're getting "justice". Their life is changed forever, and I think that that is just SUCH an important detail that people forget about rape, so I'm happy that this book included it.-- It discusses sexism and views on girls that are absolutely DISGUSTING... in a well-written, realistic. We get to read from the perspective of someone who actually like,, HATES girls and thinks them good for only “f*cking and making meals” (I WAS SO TRIGGERED) and while it’s vile and horrifying that humans think of other humans this way, it’s definitely realistic??? People are saying that sexism doesn’t exist and neither does discrimination against women but ARE YOU BLIND.- This book is honestly so quotable that I wish I could share it all with you, but let’s just say that many many parts of this book made me want to actually literally HURT someone because what was written was true and it SHOULDN’T BE. (Ie. a boy can have as much sex as he wants and doesn’t get called anything, but then a girl does it and she’s called slut and whore.)- IT. IS. REAL. This is the real deal. It tackles REAL topics and talks about REAL things that are happening right now in this world, believe it or not. It seems horrible, it seems unfair, it seems absolutely disgusting—but it is REAL and that is why this book is just so, so powerful.-- Okay, now that I’m done with just the message part of it: There is so much diversity! Grace is “fat”, Rosina is Mexican and lesbian, and Erin has Asperger’s. Like um,, yes?? Where is this diverse cast of main characters in other books???? - LOOK AT THAT PRETTY COVER.- The individual character arcs are amazing. The characters grow SO MUCH throughout the whole book and it’s just beautiful to read about?? Grace becomes more confident in herself despite the size of her body, Rosina learns to embrace herself even tho it may not be the person her family wants her to be, and Erin slowly heals from her own (view spoiler)[rape (hide spoiler)] and lets others in.- NO. GIRL. HATE. Um??? yes??? please??? I mean, there were a few slut-shaming comments thrown around (but it was totally called out), but the girls all bonded over their fight for rights and respect. They were all so supportive of each other and it was just beautiful.- The writing is so pretty?? You can’t imagine HOW EXCITED I was to find out that this was in third person. How often are contemporaries in third person??? There were also multiple POVs that were mostly the main characters’, but then there was also an “Us” chapter, and IT WAS WRITTEN SO LYRICALLY and beautifully?? I just loved it because we got to see into other girls’ perspectives. UGH. I love the writing style. MINOR THINGS - The whole book is really slow-moving, but I think it just feels that way because this is SUCH a heavy topic and it’s just a deep, gritty book. Still, it was pretty hard to just really FOCUS on the book (especially when I got angry at stupid characters and the world). But like I said earlier, it definitely was engaging! Just hard to just, I don’t know, CONCENTRATE on it. - The ending is a… good ending. I don’t want to ruin it, and there's nothing wrong with it, but I just want to say that while it was a good ending, it’s not necessarily realistic. (view spoiler)[So many rape cases go unsolved or abandoned (WHILE THEY SHOULDN’T), and though it’s great that this ended happily for the girls, it is really unlikely that this would happen in real life?? I just wanted to say that in case anyone thought that most rape cases get solved and the victims get justice—they don’t. (hide spoiler)]-- We were introduced to a VERY IMPORTANT CHARACTER in like the last 50 pages?? And this character was vital to the ending of the book??? If it weren’t for the fact that this was so focused on the characters’ growths and journeys, I feel like a lot of this book could’ve been cut, especially since it’s those last pages that are SUPER important. - There was also a really offensive line about trans people. It was said by the brother of a trans guy, and it wasn't called out on??? He said, "If I wanted to be a chick [...]" I think the point of this was to say that "if he wanted to be a girl", his parents wouldn't let him, meanwhile if a daughter wanted to be a male, that'd be accepted -- basically pointing out sexism. But it was really offensive imo because trans people don't "want" to be another gender? They ARE that gender. - There were so many characters that I just got confused sometimes???Bottom line: READ THIS BOOK. It is so so important and beautiful and it’s just something that everyone needs to read?? And even if you don’t like it (you probably will), its pretty cover will make you satisfied enough.Thank you to Simon and Schuster for generously providing me with a review copy! This did not affect my opinion in any way.
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  • ⚔ Silvia ⚓
    January 1, 1970
    Updated May 9th because there was so much going on in this book that my bi ass forgot to mention the f/f romance!This was one of the most powerful YA books I've ever read. It was engaging, empowering, and inclusive. I keep thinking that it could have been more inclusive, but then again the three MCs were an autistic girl, a latina queer girl who gets the girl at the end (YES THIS HAS AN F/F ROMANCE), and a fat girl. And the thing is, this is not a book about the MCs. It's a book about all the gi Updated May 9th because there was so much going on in this book that my bi ass forgot to mention the f/f romance!This was one of the most powerful YA books I've ever read. It was engaging, empowering, and inclusive. I keep thinking that it could have been more inclusive, but then again the three MCs were an autistic girl, a latina queer girl who gets the girl at the end (YES THIS HAS AN F/F ROMANCE), and a fat girl. And the thing is, this is not a book about the MCs. It's a book about all the girls. I loved the "us" chapters that focused on different girls and showed us a lot of different perspectives in regards to the events of the novel, to life experiences, to each girl's relationship with sex, and so on. What never failed to be there was a deep sympathy for every girl, even those who didn't seem "nice".As I don't live in America and I think the way rape culture manifests where I live is very different, it's kind of hard for me to judge whether all of the things showed in this book were realistic and especially if all of those were possible at the same time. But the point is, every single thing was realistic and real and it's happening every single day, and it may manifest in different ways in different countries, but it's still very much an universal phenomenon that this novel tackled in an incredibly raw but also delicate way.I'm so happy that this book exists and that teens can read it. Gift this book to teens, boys and girls and enbies, because it might be the most important book they'll ever read.A LOT OF TRIGGER WARNINGS and these I'm gonna mention probably don't even cover it but: sexual assault (on and off page; graphic), rape culture, violence, self harm, misogyny, transphobia, (past) drug addiction, ableistic language...... listen, I'm not the most qualified person to talk about these so just generally be really careful and if you have some questions you can DM me and I will try to answer the best I can
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  • Grace (BURTSBOOKS)
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely FANTASTIC. This is going straight to my favourites shelf - I cannot wait to recommend this to every single person I possibly can FULL REVIEW TO COME ONCE I SORT OUT A COHERENT WAY TO EXPLAIN HOW MUCH THIS BOOK MEANS TO ME
  • Suzanne
    January 1, 1970
    This. Book. I absolutely loved this book. These female characters and their strength are tremendous. This is one of the best books I have read so far this year. The Me Too movement has sparked so much debate and discussions and I think this is the perfect time for a book like this to be out for reading. It is inspiring and really frustrating at times because of some of the injustice but overall it is just incredible. This is a must read in my opinion. My quick and simple overall (because my fami This. Book. I absolutely loved this book. These female characters and their strength are tremendous. This is one of the best books I have read so far this year. The Me Too movement has sparked so much debate and discussions and I think this is the perfect time for a book like this to be out for reading. It is inspiring and really frustrating at times because of some of the injustice but overall it is just incredible. This is a must read in my opinion. My quick and simple overall (because my family is starving and I have to cook): Amazing. ❤️❤️❤️
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  • Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    A bold, fascinating novel that takes on rape culture and female sexuality, The Nowhere Girls will please fans of gritty YA fiction, similar to that of Courtney Summers and Hannah Moskowitz. The novel follows three young women - Grace Salter, Rosina Suarez, and Erin Delillo - who create an underground feminist club to protest the rape of a former student at their high school, as well as the current overall epidemic of sexual assault. While the book focuses on the actions taken by The Nowhere Girl A bold, fascinating novel that takes on rape culture and female sexuality, The Nowhere Girls will please fans of gritty YA fiction, similar to that of Courtney Summers and Hannah Moskowitz. The novel follows three young women - Grace Salter, Rosina Suarez, and Erin Delillo - who create an underground feminist club to protest the rape of a former student at their high school, as well as the current overall epidemic of sexual assault. While the book focuses on the actions taken by The Nowhere Girls and the consequences they face, each of the three main characters get story arcs as well. Grace contends with being the new girl in town after her southern Baptist preacher mom converts into a radical liberal and moves their family far away from their former community. Rosina struggles to carve out space for herself and her passion for music amidst her conservative Mexican immigrant family who wants her to work all the time. Erin tries to maintain her new relationships while coping with a trauma from her former high school. These three unite with The Nowhere Girls to make a change in the deeply sexist culture of their school, a culture that has stayed silent on the issue of sexual violence for too long.I give The Nowhere Girls four glowing stars as it addresses sexual violence, female sexuality, and diversity in meaningful and frank ways. I applaud Amy Reed for including such important and nuanced ideas about sex, consent, feminism, etc. in this book. The characters contemplate and fend with issues such as how to best fight against rape culture as a group and as individuals, the retribution and silence that authority figures enact on those who speak up, and what it means to please oneself and create pleasure with men while staying true to your values. While doing a wonderful job of portraying female solidarity, Reed highlights how divisions can grow within movements that are not inclusive, by writing brief snippets from the perspectives of a black girl, a trans girl, etc. Her three main characters also have marginalized identities (i.e., Grace is fat, Rosina is queer, Erin has Asperger's) and at least from an initial reading, Reed writes these women with sensitivity, compassion, and strength.I detract one star because Reed took on a lot in this book and it thus felt like some issues got short-changed. In particular, I felt that Rosina's familial conflict could have used more space, and Amber's whole character could have been explored with more depth. I know that as a society we over-glamorize romance as a whole, so I do not just blame Reed for this, but I felt that some of the time devoted to romantic subplots could have been dedicated to fleshing out other issues. In addition, sometimes I got pulled out of the prose because it seemed so focused on getting a message across - but I do not feel too bad about that because the messages here are very necessary.Overall, a great read I would recommend to fans of young-adult contemporary novels. Glad to see that YA as a genre continues to push fiction and literature to address pressing issues like sexual assault and patriarchy. Finally, this book includes graphic descriptions of sexual violence, so some readers may want to watch out for that if that might be triggering to see.
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  • Emer
    January 1, 1970
    Graffiti started showing up on her locker, the strangest of which was “Slut” and “Whore,” since she was, and is, still very much a virgin. That’s just what you call girls when you want to shame them” This was a spur of the moment buddy read with Gabby when she sent me a link to read this for free on Riveted (it's free to read until the end of this month) and I liked the blurb, she liked the blurb and god knows she and I like to talk our butts off about feminism (in books and in the world at lar Graffiti started showing up on her locker, the strangest of which was “Slut” and “Whore,” since she was, and is, still very much a virgin. That’s just what you call girls when you want to shame them” This was a spur of the moment buddy read with Gabby when she sent me a link to read this for free on Riveted (it's free to read until the end of this month) and I liked the blurb, she liked the blurb and god knows she and I like to talk our butts off about feminism (in books and in the world at large) so we read this together and discussed it every step of the way so really I should just screenshot our messages instead of trying to write a review...Anyway. I'm super conflicted. Because I love this. I do. The feminist message is fabulous. It really tries to be as all an encompassing, intersectional feminist message as it can. There are characters from different racial backgrounds, class, different sexual preferences, it's LGBTQIA, different ethnicities, there's a character with autism, different religious beliefs... Like that's brilliant. It's incredibly diverse and inclusive when it comes to the female characters. But like I feel kinda weird about the representation of the male characters. Like I do feel as if you could come away from this book thinking that all men are bastards and have zero respect for women and just want us to stay in the kitchen and fulfil their sexual needs. Just a little more light and shade with some of the teenage boys please. And then there are the adult figures in the book...Like okay. Is my version of reality so far removed from where this is set in the USA that I found the actions (view spoiler)[of the principal in particular (hide spoiler)] to be almost pantomime villain-esque??? I could buy the (view spoiler)[prejudiced, corrupted cop (hide spoiler)] but anything to do with the school and the actions taken against The Nowhere Girls movement just did not make sense to me. (view spoiler)[Yes The Nowhere Girls named and shamed the boys that raped Lucy in their first email where legally they probably shouldn't but the reactions seemed insane to me. A ban on girls congregating together on school grounds??? The use of the word Hate Group??? The fact that local media picked up on the story and couched it against the teenagers without someone else, another media outlet, talking about the story and the men's blog???? No one from the school bringing in people to talk about relationships between the girls and boys? No one to come in and talk about freedom of expression but in a way that doesn't slander others? No one to come in and talk about their sexual activity??? See. It was just so heightened. So amped up that it became too fantastical to me. If you told me it was a dystopian novel then I would have readily bought it. But it's contemporary set and just I guess, a million miles away from the school system that I was educated in. My school system wouldn't have engaged with the media for something like this. There would have been talks in class. Girls wouldn't have been targeted as terrorists like these were. The school authorities wouldn't have backed their methods per se but by heck they would have explored the cause and the reasons. "The thing is,” Rosina says, “people don’t want to hear something that’ll make their lives more difficult, even if it’s the truth. People hate having to change the way they see things. So instead of admitting the world is ugly, they shit on the messenger for telling them about it.”But that's the thing with books. They aren't about our personal experience so maybe I'm being unduly harsh. Like the quote says maybe the world is uglier than I think???? I don't know... Just a little more subtlety perhaps. (hide spoiler)]Let's get on to the good points. This really does explain rape culture. Like it's brilliant at it. There are so many fabulous parts of this book that will make you punch the air and go YES!!! You will know instinctively what the girls are talking about. You will understand how they feel. You will be sickened and disgusted by the blog posts that you will read in this book from the male misogynist's viewpoint... Misogynist is too nice a word. Those blog posts pretty much encourage rape and are designed to chill the reader to their bones so be aware. This book is VERY triggering for anyone who has been affected by any sort of behaviour relating to sexual assault and rape. There's a description of a rape... And it's not hugely graphic but my god did it make me cry. I felt the pain of that girl leap from the pages. It was utterly destroying to me to read... But also utterly necessary to be read about. There's also a description of another sexual assault that chilled me to my core... In fact there are many descriptions. Some so brief and justified by the victim as saying well I didn't vocalise the word no so it wasn't assault. It wasn't rape... I cry. And I think these passages throughout the book are vital to read about. Vital to us to understand that consent is more than a person vocalising the word no. It's about respect between two (or more) people, it's about asking, it's about not expecting, not demanding, it's about reading body language... Sex needs to be both the physical act but also a conversation. And this might not be a conversation of words. But it's a conversation of looking at your partner's eyes, a conversation of reading how their body is reacting, it's about pausing for two seconds to ask are you okay? It's just more than listening to your own body's needs and desires. It's being aware that how sex at that minute is for you might not be the same for your partner and about making sure you are both on the same page. It's open and frank discussion between men and women. It's teaching teenagers (and adults who didn't get that sex ed in school) that it's okay to say no and it's also okay to say yes. So I loved this book for how it looked at sex from that standpoint. There were so many different voices and opinions in this book that it gives great pause for thought and forces the reader to think about how they feel about sex. And what they understand about consent and it really exposes some of our deepest prejudices too. Amber is the character that I probably loved the most. Her storyline is in many respects deeply unfulfilling but her honesty and how she is treated will break your heart. "Amber knows she must make a decision. To fight or not to fight.She is so tired. She thinks today was not a good day to try to not be herself.She thinks, It doesn’t count as rape if I give up.She thinks, Different rules apply to different girls. Someone like me doesn’t get to say no." Amber is the girl truly slut shamed by society and... I can't cos *spoilers* but I cry for her so much. But I'm just not happy with her complete lack of character growth and how she was basically shat upon by the storyline by indulging a bunch of harmful tropes in the climax of her story arc. A few more things I want to say. I've seen in many reviews people feel disappointed by a particular passage I’m sure it’d be way different if it was the other way around, Jesse says. If I decided I wanted to be a chick? No way my parents would change churches to support me and call me by my new name. My dad would kick my ass if I wanted to be a girl. It took a little time, but now he’s totally cool with having another son. Like how girls can wear pants, but dudes wouldn’t be caught dead in a dress? Total double standard, you know? Not that I want to wear a dress or anything. Lots of reviews have focused on that word "wanted" ....If I decided I wanted to be a chick and believe that it's insensitive to trans because being transgender isn't a want it's just who you are. Reviewers are saying that Grace should have corrected him saying expressly that. And like I don't know. It didn't bother me when I initially read if. Like I didn't pick up on it until I read other people's reviews. I just took what Jesse meant about the double standard. This was my initial interpretation of that paragraph and maybe I'm way off base but I just thought I'd throw in my two cents. I mean you are transgender, there's no choosing to be, you just are. And it must be super hard realising all that and having to tell people. So as a teen trans person you have a desire to 'want' to live as the person you feel you are inside, the person you truly know yourself to be. To me the wanting is because Jesse's brother had a desire to live his true life and I think maybe that's what Jess meant. And all that Jesse is saying is that if he felt he was a female and wanted to be allowed to live as a girl cos it was true to him then his dad would have been more uncomfortable than how it was with his once sister becoming his brother. Because the thing here is that both siblings are underage right? So they have to live under their parents house, their rules. So they may want something but need their parents' permission and acceptance to do as such??? I could be very wrong. Because I know next to nothing about being trans. So I'm not saying that the sentence doesn't cause hurt but maybe this is what was meant by it? However, because it is ambiguous and because so many of us, myself included, don't know enough about being transgender then I do believe it was a questionable use of the word 'wanted'. And just because you don't intend to cause hurt or offence with your word choice as an author doesn't mean that the hurt and offence didn't happen. So ultimately it was a bad choice of words to use and I am glad that a lot of reviews have flagged it up because it gets us all thinking and talking. There was also a choice of wording that both myself and Gabby both didn't like in the book when the word "blackmail" was used as a flippant remark when one girl was coming forward to the police about an incident of sexual assault. “Hey! You will never believe this! I convinced (view spoiler)[Lisa (hide spoiler)] to talk to the cops about being on (view spoiler)[Spencer’s (hide spoiler)] list.”“Really?” Oh my God.”“She says she thinks she can convince (view spoiler)[Abby (hide spoiler)] to do it too,” Melissa says.“It just takes one person to be brave. Then others will follow her lead.”“Yeah, well, I think (view spoiler)[Lisa’s (hide spoiler)] thinking more like blackmail. But whatever, that’s between the two of them.” People already have a negative viewpoint of women coming forward to report incidents of sexual assault and rape so if we could not maybe perpetuate that idea that women are only after money etc by flippantly throwing in a tasteless joke about blackmail being the only reason this particular character in the book would go to the police then that would be great. Thanks. Lastly the ending... (view spoiler)[To me it felt rushed. It felt almost convenient. Too neat too tidy. This book was a very slow developer and to have it suddenly end like that didn't work for me. I didn't love the introduction of Cheyenne as a character. Because this book had a whole host of voices throughout I guess I thought the story would climax around one of them. And I guess it did in a way... Yeah I'm a mess. I don't know what I'm saying except it felt rushed and under-developed which just really unfavourably contrasted with the slow build up. And that whole scene in the police station was utterly farcical. It was almost like it wanted to be a triumphant court case victory??? I don't know... It just felt like the author wanted these rapists to get their comeuppance in a ridiculously over the top fashion so that when we had that final chapter from Lucy's PoV and she made reference to how frequently rapists get away that statement from her lost its impact because of the circus at the police station. (hide spoiler)]Over all I did like this book even if I also found it to be problematic . I had an enjoyable time reading and discussing it with Gabby so if anyone is wondering what to buddy read with a friend then definitely think about reading this book. There's a lot of great stuff going on and it's certainly a book I would recommend. However, to me it just could have been executed with a little more subtlety regarding both the male characters and the authority characters. And maybe then it would have been a higher rated book from me. This is a line that Gabby said to me earlier today: You shouldn't come out of a book thinking that you hate all men/distrust them all and that feminism is selective and ultimately that's how I'm feeling. I'm feeling disappointed in this book because of its masses of potential but instead it chose to create needless drama instead of sticking closer to harsh realities. I should rate this two stars. It deserves it But it did try hard to be inclusive and to spread a positive message so I'm torn. Somewhere between two and three stars.
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  • chandler ainsley ❁
    January 1, 1970
    maybe I’m too old and cynical for thisI want to preface this review by saying that I’m glad this book exists and that it’s a really important read that will really help people. At 23 though, it just didn’t resonate with me as much as I would have liked.I think that was due to 2 main issues. Firstly, I felt the rapists in this book were a little over the top. It’s so easy to immediately get disgusted with complete pigs so it made little sense to me how the rapists got away with their actions. Por maybe I’m too old and cynical for thisI want to preface this review by saying that I’m glad this book exists and that it’s a really important read that will really help people. At 23 though, it just didn’t resonate with me as much as I would have liked.I think that was due to 2 main issues. Firstly, I felt the rapists in this book were a little over the top. It’s so easy to immediately get disgusted with complete pigs so it made little sense to me how the rapists got away with their actions. Portraying them as greasy low lifes felt over the top and ineffective. I think it would have been more interesting to combat the more subtle sexism and justifications for rape that seem to be rampant in this day & age rather than to recycle tired townie has been rapists as the stars of the show. I know that probably sounds like an odd critique but I prefer dimension to my characters, even the horrible ones.And then my other issue was the third person omniscient writing. It made it so hard to relate to these characters or care about them. I did appreciate something different about each of the 3 girls but by the end of the story I really didn’t care what happened to any of them.Did I like anything??? Yes. I thought it was an innovative plot that I haven’t seen before and I loved that women uplifted each other. The second to last chapter of this book had be tearing up because of it. I love love LOVED the sapphic relationship, the acceptance of autism, and having a religious character who wasn’t portrayed as an outcast/weirdo.And I also think the varying perspectives on sexuality and sexual experiences that were discussed in this book were so well done and needed. Girls that are high school aged should know how important consent is, what their bodies do, and how they should conceptualize themselves.Overall mixed feelings but i would definitely recommend this to high school aged people.
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  • ambsreads
    January 1, 1970
    THIS REVIEW IS ALSO ON MY BLOGM I N I   R E V I E WI tried to work out how to write this as a full-length review, however, I was stumped every time I went to start or tried to work out what I wanted to write; here I am doing a mini review which may become longer than anticipated.The Nowhere Girls was a book that I was scared to read. I really didn’t know what was going to happen throughout. However, I am left in tears. I have tears rolling down my face, as I realise how many girls aren’t believe THIS REVIEW IS ALSO ON MY BLOGM I N I   R E V I E WI tried to work out how to write this as a full-length review, however, I was stumped every time I went to start or tried to work out what I wanted to write; here I am doing a mini review which may become longer than anticipated.The Nowhere Girls was a book that I was scared to read. I really didn’t know what was going to happen throughout. However, I am left in tears. I have tears rolling down my face, as I realise how many girls aren’t believed when they come forward with their cases of sexual assault or rape. In the light of the #MeToo campaign that trended on Twitter recently, I think books like this are even more important. They’re eye-opening and conversation starters. They’re vital to this changing generation as we make our selves aware of what is right and wrong.This particular book follows a format of focusing on different people. For a large part, it focuses on Erin, Rosina, and Grace, three girls who become unlikely friends and founders of The Nowhere Girls. With Grace only new to the town and living in the home of a girl who was run out of town after (accurately) accusing three males of rape Grace is desperate to make a change. The three girls do this and they do it in a way that shakes the small town of Prescott.The other POV’s are ‘Us’ which follows many girls, switching between and sometimes not even naming them. It may be them during sexual encounters or just their thought process. I really found these chapters to be a powerful addition to this book. The remaining chapters that aren’t ‘us’ or the three main characters are random characters throughout the story. Some girls get their own chapter and some are some painfully gut-wrenching I just wanted to reach into the pages of the book and help them.The Nowhere Girls touches on so many important topics and includes so many important elements. There is an extremely diverse cast featured throughout well and it seems the author used own voices beta readers to make sure her representation was correct. I can’t speak on that personally, but the acknowledgements do acknowledge this.I was so completely involved in this book from the first chapter. I was made to feel repeatedly uncomfortable by the content and the graphic nature as we dive into the horrors of sexual assault and what means no. The way other girls treat each other is also highlighted in this book, as the group The Nowhere Girls tries to eliminate girl hate. It was refreshing to read a group of empowering young girls.Overall, this is one of the most powerful books of 2017 in my opinion and definitely an important book that touches on the rape culture of our world.
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  • Kristy
    January 1, 1970
    Grace and her family have just moved to a new town after her Baptist preacher mother has a spiritual experience and their small Kentucky town decides she is far too progressive for their community. Grace is shunned and the family basically flees for more open-minded pastures. Erin is a beautiful girl who loves science and Star Trek: The Next Generation. She also has Asperger's and a secret. Rosina is a lesbian struggling to be herself within the confines of her conservative Mexican family. She d Grace and her family have just moved to a new town after her Baptist preacher mother has a spiritual experience and their small Kentucky town decides she is far too progressive for their community. Grace is shunned and the family basically flees for more open-minded pastures. Erin is a beautiful girl who loves science and Star Trek: The Next Generation. She also has Asperger's and a secret. Rosina is a lesbian struggling to be herself within the confines of her conservative Mexican family. She dreams only of playing music and escaping her town, instead of taking care of her gaggle of cousins and working in her uncle's restaurant. Grace soon learns that the former occupant of her new house was Lucy Moynihan, who accused some popular boys of rape. Lucy wasn't believed, had a breakdown, and left town. While she's never been one to stand up for anything before, this angers Grace in a way she cannot fully describe. Erin and Rosina empathize with Lucy's situation, too. So the three find themselves an unlikely trio, and they do something even more unlikely: they form a secret group, made up entirely of girls, to protest the horrible culture at their school--a culture that condones things like rape and mistreatment of women. The group quickly takes off and the three girls realize that the group--and this cause--is far bigger than themselves. This is an incredibly timely, wonderfully descriptive, and well-written novel that encapsulates the struggle felt by teenagers and young women in dealing with sexual assault, rape, and violence against women. There's a definite trigger for sexual assault/rape, so do avoid this novel if that is an issue for you. This book can certainly be painful to read, but it's an amazing read and incredibly powerful, as well. The theme of boys and men getting away with horrible things in their towns seems so popular of late in books I've been reading. That could mean that The Nowhere Girls is repetitive, but it's not at all. It's a wonderful additional to this topic, which is a discouraging one and quite representative of how things are in our current society. For me, the strength of this novel came with its characters and its brutal honesty. I really loved the three main characters, especially Erin, and just felt for all three girls. This is the first book I've read by Amy Reed (but won't be the last), and I was so impressed by her writing. The girls pop off the pages. The novel is written from the perspective of Grace, Erin, and Rosina, as well as Lucy and "Us"--a section that depicts the state of things from various high school females. Reed gives us a fairly diverse cast, including Rosina, whose family are Mexican immigrants; a character with autism in Erin; and several LGBTQIA characters. And, of course, it's wonderful to have so many female perspectives represented. We also get a few glimpses of some of the boys via excerpts from a despicable blog, which is quite effective in its own right. As I said, so much of the strength of this book comes from its honesty. It doesn't shy away from the fact that the female teens are dealing with some very harsh realities in relation to sex, and it makes it clear how much they truly have to deal with. There are some extremely powerful moments in this novel (there's a chapter that occurs with some of the girls in a model home, and it's just wow. Amazing). It lays so much bare about what high school girls truly must go through. I found the brutal and realistic look at women and sex refreshing--albeit terrifying and heartbreaking. Rape, sexual assault, the power of sex, the way these women use sex to relate to each other and to boys--it's all there, and the result is heartbreaking, sad, powerful, and yes, sometimes hopeful. A few times, I wasn't sure if I always believed how the authority figures dealt with the girls and their group, but, truly, it's probably a realistic portrayal of small town America. The ending was also a little neat, but still worked in the context of this novel. I kept thinking how much I'd like my daughters to read this book when they're older, because there is so much here: so many talking points and truths and so many wonderful and strong women among all the sadness. In the end, this was a slow-moving book at times, but it was so well-written and a very powerful read. The characters are so strong, and you truly become part of their world as you read. I feel as if this is a must-read for female teens, and it's just so timely now in our culture, where the news brings more sexual assault talk each evening. There is something about this book that will leave you with hope, despite the horrors, and that's so important right now. Definitely a worthwhile read. I received a copy of this novel from the publisher and Edelweiss (thank you!) in return for an unbiased review; it is available everywhere as of 10/10/2017. Blog ~ Twitter ~ Facebook ~ Google+ ~ Instagram
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  • Danielle (Life of a Literary Nerd)
    January 1, 1970
    “The things is,” Rosina says, “people don’t want to hear something that’ll make their lives more difficult, even if it’s the truth. People hate having to change the way they see things. So instead of admitting the world is ugly, they shit on the messenger for telling them about it.” I really loved this book so much! The Nowhere Girls is empowering and inspiring, and I am filled with so much love and respect for other women after reading it. We follow misfits Grace Salter, Erin DeLillo, and Ro “The things is,” Rosina says, “people don’t want to hear something that’ll make their lives more difficult, even if it’s the truth. People hate having to change the way they see things. So instead of admitting the world is ugly, they shit on the messenger for telling them about it.” I really loved this book so much! The Nowhere Girls is empowering and inspiring, and I am filled with so much love and respect for other women after reading it. We follow misfits Grace Salter, Erin DeLillo, and Rosina Suarez as they come together to challenge the rape culture that forced a girl to move out of town after accusing three popular students of rape. The Nowhere Girls grows into a movement that changes the lives of the student body as more girls come together and support each other. Things I Liked I really loved Grace Salter, she’s the first main character we’re introduced to and I immediately liked her. She feels incredibly amounts of empathy and truly wants the best for people and for justice and fairness to be realities, but she is prepared to fight for them. Erin DeLillo was another of the main characters and I loved her so SO MUCH. I loved that we got to see a main character with Asperger's. We really get to know her, not just who she is on the spectrum. We see how she views relationships and lives her daily life - what she loves, what she fears. I loved her passion for science (something we do not share, but I could feel how much she loved it). I loved how she talked about how asperger’s presents itself differently in girl and goes overlooked. I love that she challenges the idea that people on the spectrum are emotionless and lack empathy - they just process and confront situations differently. Erin was just awesome and so strong and amazing.Rosina Suarez is so fantastic! She is so unapologetic and brave. I love that she completely lets Erin be herself and supports her - their friendship was fantastic. She is so selfless for her family even when she’s unhappy. She also has a very adorable wlw romance with former cheerleader, Melissa that is so sweet and cute.The friendship that develops between the 3 main girls, Grace, Rosina, and Erin, was awesome and I loved every minute of it. The support that develops from the Nowhere Girls was inspiring and gave you hope that things can get better.I really loved all the unnamed POVs of the Nowhere Girls. They were all clear and distinct, but create a vibrant and unified story of trying to take agency and power in a system that works against them. The group talked about power, choice, double standards, solidarity and we see how girls experiences and beliefs differ - and even see some talking about the white privilege in the group, how they are seen as powerful crusaders not angry black women. The group is a very collaborative movement with no one trying to overshadow others. And I loved seeing girls coming together to support other girls in the only way they knew how. I also liked that we get to see them call out guys for doing nothing as perpetuating rape culture, not just guys who rape, and some guys actually acknowledge this and change.I really loved Grace’s mom! I love that she talked about acceptance for ALL people. Her outlook on faith and religion and the necessity of change was great and really resonated and inspired Grace to do what she felt was right - and take action. Things I Didn’t Like There was an instance of misgendering a character’s trans sibling that felt unnecessary. It seemed like a lazy slip and wasn’t needed.The gross blog of “The Real Men of Prescott” was infuriating! It was filled with rape apologists and misogynistic language and made me want to punch someone in the face. The boys will be boys mentality and the sheer entitlement is enough to make anyone’s blood boil. Thankfully, this book is about challenging all of these beliefs and actions, but it’s hard to read about this and realize people like this actually exist.The Nowhere Girls is such an important book that confronts and challenges rape culture and misogyny, while giving young girls the power of choice and agency. I loved the strong female friendships that develop and the bravery we see from so many characters. This was such a great book and I can’t wait to read more from Amy Reed.Trigger warning for rape and sexual assaultI received a copy of the book from Simon Pulse via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Mari
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsThis book was so powerful and hard-hitting and I wish more people would read it. I especially wish boys and men would read it.The entire book criticizes how society depicts and treats women and I was so damn pleased with all the critics I read. I was also disgusted and horrified by sexist men and rapists’s thought here included. They were so real and disturbing, and the knowledge that there are real men thinking these things just makes me want to cry and throw up. It also makes me want 3.5 starsThis book was so powerful and hard-hitting and I wish more people would read it. I especially wish boys and men would read it.The entire book criticizes how society depicts and treats women and I was so damn pleased with all the critics I read. I was also disgusted and horrified by sexist men and rapists’s thought here included. They were so real and disturbing, and the knowledge that there are real men thinking these things just makes me want to cry and throw up. It also makes me want to found my own Nowhere Girls movement to see them all in jail for the rest of their sick and pathetic lives.I had never read a book with a main character that has Asperger’s, but I can say without a doubt that she was my absolute favorite and that I want to read more books with this type of characters.Honestly this book was so freaking diverse. If you want to read diverse books and you feel like you’ve read all of them and don’t know where to look anymore, pick this one up.Critically this book would deserve 5 unconditional stars but since I rate books based on my enjoyment I can’t not consider the fact that I was a bit bored most of the time (maybe because there wasn’t a precise plot?), and that I didn’t connect with the characters because of the writing style. In my opinion, the third person just didn’t work to deliver the personal feelings of the entire cast of characters.But that’s more of a it’s-not-you-it’s-me situation.
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  • Paige (Illegal in 3 Countries)
    January 1, 1970
    See more of my reviews on The YA Kitten! My copy was an ARC I got from the publisher via Edelweiss.Y’all, by the time you read this, I’ve been sitting on this review since June 2017. It’s been killing me to not publish this sooner. Maybe it caught me at the right time or maybe it’s just that good, but The Nowhere Girls struck me right in my feminist heart at a time I really needed it to keep going. It’s not an emotionally easy book to read, as you might expect from any book with rape and sexism See more of my reviews on The YA Kitten! My copy was an ARC I got from the publisher via Edelweiss.Y’all, by the time you read this, I’ve been sitting on this review since June 2017. It’s been killing me to not publish this sooner. Maybe it caught me at the right time or maybe it’s just that good, but The Nowhere Girls struck me right in my feminist heart at a time I really needed it to keep going. It’s not an emotionally easy book to read, as you might expect from any book with rape and sexism at its center, but it’s a fantastic read for the modern teenage activist.Our three narrators lend the book a weight often missing from similarly themed books through their representation of groups often neglected by mainstream feminism: fat women (Grace), queer women of color (Rosina), and disabled/neurodivergent women (Erin). After years of the school’s football players–especially one jerk named Spencer–getting away with sexual assault and harassment, what becomes a movement girls across the county know about starts with one event: Grace moving to itty bitty Prescott from Seattle. She happens to move into the home that once housed a high school pariah named Lucy.Once, before Grace arrived, three football players raped Lucy. After the event, those three and then others harassed her and harangued her until she couldn’t take it anymore–and she wasn’t the only one to suffer at the boys’ hands. When Grace finds Lucy’s desperate words carved on the walls of her new home and learns what happened to her, she’s determined to do something. With the help of her new friend Rosina, who’s also furious about Lucy’s fate, and Erin, they start a movement simply called The Nowhere Girls. What starts with a handful of girls who get meeting info from an email inflames an entire town in scandal.All they do is make it publicly known the boys will not be getting any sex until they start showing the girls some respect. It’s a big, grandstanding act that doesn’t actively do anything to fight the rampant sexism in town. White feminism material? Absolutely. But the boys and even the school administrators are so infuriated by the mere idea of resistance that change happens.(Almost the exact thing happened to me in elementary school: I made it be known I’d put a note like “I feel like crying when you bully me. Will you please stop bullying me?” in my fourth grade bully’s valentine but forgot to actually do it. She was so mad at me she wrote a nasty note in the valentine she gave me, which got her a referral. Sometimes, you don’t have to do anything but talk.)But like I said, it’s an entirely fair criticism to look at the Nowhere Girls and call what they’re doing white feminism. The book actually include short perspectives from a trans girl named Adele and an unnamed black girl who voice valid criticism of the movement. The schoolgirls who attend the Nowhere Girls meetings are overwhelmingly white and cis; they mostly sit around talking instead of doing anything.And like I said, the mere existence of their resistance is what brings about change! It’s so odd to see such a White Feminism way of changing things do so well in regards to intersectional feminism and I love it.But make no mistake, The Nowhere Girls is not a book for those triggered by sexism, sexual abuse/assault, and racism. See, one of our three narrators has her own history of sexual abuse in her past. We also get snippets from an MRA/pickup artist blog run by one of Lucy’s rapists and it is nasty. I was prepared and can regularly stomach the vile diatribes spotlighted on We Hunted the Mammoth, the blog excerpts are still nasty enough to choke you. They have a purpose, but you’ll still want to be prepared.And the racism? Well, the principal quickly decides Rosina is the mastermind behind the Nowhere Girls. Though she’s partially correct, her choice of suspect comes solely from racism. Because Rosina is the Angry Latina Girl in a very white town, she most be behind it, right? She goes as far as threatening Rosina with expulsion and exposure of her grandmother’s immigration status as well as lying to Rosina’s mother about her being on drugs. Those are not the acts of a fair principal and they’re also not that surprising. Despite being a woman herself, the principal commits to complicity with the system with every move she makes against Rosina, the queer girl of color.Sadly, I can’t remark on the quality of Erin’s character and how her Asperger’s is written. I don’t know enough Aspies to be a fair judge and don’t know if Reed has an Aspie reader for the book. Someone else who knows better will have to take on that job.If you haven’t already figured it out, The Nowhere Girls is one dark book. Reading it is like sinking slowly into a massive hole filled with mud. Right when you’re about to go under, a hand reaches out to you and pulls you out. The crushing despair most of the book put into me lifted more and more the closer I got to the end until it felt like the world was good and just again. Is it a bit of a fantasy? Yeah, I can see that criticism and call it valid too. But for those of us who will never get justice for one reason or another, it feels good.The one blemish on the otherwise great The Nowhere Girls: transphobia. Early on in the book, a character in Jesse says a very transphobic thing while trying to be the good brother of a trans boy. His quote: “If I decided I wanted to be a chick.”No one DECIDES they WANT to be a different gender. Trans people are born the gender they are but get designated the wrong gender. I get the intent of the passage–it’s in the context of explaining that if he were, say, Jessie Camp instead of Jesse Camp, he would have a much harder time due to transmisogyny–but the phrasing is so, so important. Just change it to “if I were a trans girl” or something similar that doesn’t imply being trans is a choice.Anyway, nothing is ever said about it. He turns out to be friends with one of Lucy’s rapists, but then he’s kinda redeemed when he tries to help the girls report Spencer for rape. After that, he fades into the background.Honestly, I want to call Erin, Grace, and Rosina the Angels of Prescott, not the Nowhere Girls. Their admittedly passive activism on behalf of a girl who is far away from them puts Spencer’s victims on the road to getting justice. And we do get a peek at how Lucy is doing at the very end, by the way. That sweet touch at the end of such a dark book makes everything feel worthwhile.For the love of God, just steel yourself and read this book if the sexual abuse/assault, racism, and sexism won’t be too much for you. I’ve gone on for a thousand words and could go on for a thousand more, but it boils down to this book is good.
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  • Beatrice (beatriceinbookland)
    January 1, 1970
    "Silence does not mean yes."The world needs more books like this one.It deals with so many different and important topics, I can't even begin to list them.For example, we have three protagonists:- Grace, a chubby and religious girl- Rosina, she's mexican, she likes girls and she's completely at ease with her sexuality- Erin, autistic and super smartBut there are so many more girls, all different and going through their own problems.But, as you can see, I did give this book 3 stars. That's becaus "Silence does not mean yes."The world needs more books like this one.It deals with so many different and important topics, I can't even begin to list them.For example, we have three protagonists:- Grace, a chubby and religious girl- Rosina, she's mexican, she likes girls and she's completely at ease with her sexuality- Erin, autistic and super smartBut there are so many more girls, all different and going through their own problems.But, as you can see, I did give this book 3 stars. That's because imo it lacked two things that every book needs to have in order for me to enjoy it: an easy-to-go-through writing style and characters I deeply care about.I read the book in Italian so it may have been the translation's fault, but I found myself skipping paragraphs that were way too dense and easily avoidable. As for the characters, I did care for them in the sense that I wanted them to have a happy ending, but at the same time I just know I'm going to forget all about them in a few weeks.
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  • Jennifer Mathieu
    January 1, 1970
    Y'all, this book blew my mind. I could not put it down. It is just so full of GIRL LOVE and FEMINIST POWER and I am HERE FOR IT. I especially loved Reed's 3rd person POV which doesn't always work for me in YA but here was pitch perfect. So many complex issues addressed with authenticity and heart. This is the sort of book that could change the life of a teenage girl who reads it. 5 plus stars. I adored it.
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  • Kathryn
    January 1, 1970
    RTC...
  • ☽ MaryJane ✨
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so...heavy. It tackles a very ugly topic, in a very beautiful way. It brings up all the ugly conversations about rape culture that no one wants to have, but that everyone needs to have. This book has a diverse cast of characters, which allows for a large variation of opinions for the content discussed. This allows the characters to discuss a lot of the different arguments and opinions on the subject without it feeling forced. Not only does the diverse cast allow for so many angle This book was so...heavy. It tackles a very ugly topic, in a very beautiful way. It brings up all the ugly conversations about rape culture that no one wants to have, but that everyone needs to have. This book has a diverse cast of characters, which allows for a large variation of opinions for the content discussed. This allows the characters to discuss a lot of the different arguments and opinions on the subject without it feeling forced. Not only does the diverse cast allow for so many angles on the discussion, but it also helps demonstrate that what happens in this story is real and it can happen to anyone. The Nowhere Girls is loosely based on a lot of the controversial cases that prompt discussion about rape culture in todays society. Because of this there are a lot of realistic parallels to things that most readers have already been exposed to through the media. This makes the content a bit uncomfortable because readers are unable to just throw blinders on and live in this fictional world. While this makes the book a bit uncomfortable to read, I think this is also the book's best quality. This book was incredibly well written. I loved every character, I could understand WHY they felt some type of way in certain situations - even when I didn't agree with the opinions (ie: 90% of the dudes and adults in this) the realistic nature of this book let me see WHY they said certain things or acted a certain way. Everything about this book had me wanting to binge it just so that I could pick it up and read it again and again. Nothing is held back from this story, its ugly (in a good way), it gets into your head and under your skin, it pushes boundaries and makes you uncomfortable. But more than that, this story is so empowering. We don't just see the ugly side of this story, we also see the side that is full of hope and female empowerment. We see characters face their demons even when every single person around them is denying everything they are saying. We see incredible female friendships and relationships, we see support and power and so much strength. This story is a difficult read but it is worth the read. The message here is one that everyone should have to read.
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  • Taniksha
    January 1, 1970
    Let's just hope it'll be a good one.
  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    TW: Rape “Grace’s breath catches in her throat as she stares at the words, as she reads the pain of a stranger who must have lived and breathed and slept in this room. Was their bed in this very same place? Did their body carve out this position in space where Grace’s body lies now?How intimate these tiny words are. How alone a person must feel to cry out to someone they can’t see.” What a surprisingly impressive novel! I went into this book not knowing much, but this presented so many important TW: Rape “Grace’s breath catches in her throat as she stares at the words, as she reads the pain of a stranger who must have lived and breathed and slept in this room. Was their bed in this very same place? Did their body carve out this position in space where Grace’s body lies now?How intimate these tiny words are. How alone a person must feel to cry out to someone they can’t see.” What a surprisingly impressive novel! I went into this book not knowing much, but this presented so many important messages in a thoughtful, respectable way. 4 ½ starsThis story follows three girls attending an average high school in Oregon. However, as one girl, Grace, begins to uncover the story of a girl who had to leave the school after being raped, the three girls decide to start a group called the Nowhere Girls to achieve justice and take down the rape culture rampant in their school. “There was a time when, like so many girls, she was obsessed with princesses, a time when she believed in the power of beauty and grace and sweetness. She believed in princes. She believed in being saved.She’s not so sure she believes anything now.” This could so easily have felt too heavy handed or like things I may have heard before having read books dealing with feminism and rape culture before. Instead, this novel takes things that need to be talked about and makes them feel natural in the story. The frank talks about sex and sexuality between the girls were so refreshing to read.Not to mention, the writing is fantastic, and this is coming from someone who usually hates third person present tense. It just works perfectly here, as the story shows the perspectives of many girls from many backgrounds outside of the three main.The story does a fantastic job of depicting diverse viewpoints by showing girls of all walks of life. One main character is Christian, another is on the spectrum/aspergers, and another is Latina and a lesbian. There are many more diverse minor characters, which mostly were dealt with well and didn’t feel shoehorned in. The diverse aspects felt well researched, and many stereotypes were examined, such as cheerleaders and “sluts”, and were shown to be much more.The way the story talked about rape never felt insensitive, and instead focused on showing the different viewpoints from the very different girls when it came to the subject. What resulted felt like a thoughtful exploration of feminism and rape culture.The female friendship is such a standout in this story. It’s crazy that it’s 2017 and it’s still rare to see good female friendships, but here we are. Erin, Grace, and Rosina’s friend group, which eventually expands to become the Nowhere Girls, was so empowering to read. I’ll never get tired of books where women support each other! “People don’t want to hear something that’ll make their lives more difficult, even if it’s the truth. People hate having to change the way they see things. So instead of admitting the world is ugly, they shit on the messenger for telling them about it.” This is a very needed story, one I think many will get a lot out of if they give it a chance. Some themes may seem familiar if you read in this genre often, but the way it was presented made the story feel fresh and kept me turning pages.One of my favorite novels I’ve read this year, and I have no doubt it will stick with me. I’m already planning to loan it out, because I know this book will challenge some people to really think about things differently. As long as you’re comfortable with the content, I would recommend this to anyone who enjoys contemporaries dealing with hard subjects.
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  • Miranda (MrsLeif's Two Fangs About It)
    January 1, 1970
    The Nowhere Girls was such an important and empowering book with brave female characters. THIS IS A BOOK THAT EVERYONE NEEDS TO READ!!! There were so many relevant and important topics in this book including; rape culture, the treatment of women, and feminism. THIS BOOK GAVE ME SUCH GIRL POWER VIBES AND I WAS LIVING FOR IT. GIRLS WERE SUPPORTING GIRLS AND THEY WERE WORKING TOGETHER TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE. The girls in this book created a movement to bring justice for women, and it was wonderful. T The Nowhere Girls was such an important and empowering book with brave female characters. THIS IS A BOOK THAT EVERYONE NEEDS TO READ!!! There were so many relevant and important topics in this book including; rape culture, the treatment of women, and feminism. THIS BOOK GAVE ME SUCH GIRL POWER VIBES AND I WAS LIVING FOR IT. GIRLS WERE SUPPORTING GIRLS AND THEY WERE WORKING TOGETHER TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE. The girls in this book created a movement to bring justice for women, and it was wonderful. This book discusses rape quite a bit, so there are definitely trigger warnings for that. The Nowhere Girls really showcased how rape is handled in this day and age. I have no personal experience with the topic but based on the stories I have heard, this book seemed to handle this aspect in a very real and honest way. This book touched on the common issue of the idea that when women are coming forward and saying they were raped, they are just using that as a cry for attention. THAT DRIVES ME CRAZY AND I WAS SO GLAD THAT THIS BOOK TOUCHED ON THAT SUBJECT. The book talked about privileged men getting away with rape and how THAT IS NOT OKAY! It also discussed how deeply rape effects the victim. This book really showed how the victim doesn't simply forget the incident and move on. It showed how this sticks with the victim for a very long time. I will say that there was one comment made in regards to a trans character in this book that made me a little uncomfortable. I felt like it was an unnecessary comment that could have been left out of the book. It was only one instant, but I still wish it wouldn't have been there. I also will say that this was a slow moving book. I was invested in the story the entire time, but it was a tad bit slower paced than I would have liked.The three main characters were all such unique and well-developed characters. Grace was such an understanding and kind person. She truly wanted the best for everyone and it warmed my heart to see how far she would go for people. Rosina was an extremely supportive, selfless, and strong girl. SHE LITERALLY SUPPORTED ALL THE GIRLS AND IT WAS SO ADORABLE. Erin was a strong, passionate, and dynamic character. I loved the development of her character and how she took down stereotypes for people who are on the spectrum. I don't have any personal experience with Asperger's, but I thought the author did a good job at representing it. Grace, Rosina, and Erin had such a supportive and powerful friendship. I loved how important their friendship was to the story. I also loved how diverse the characters were in this book. IT WAS SERIOUSLY WONDERFUL!The Nowhere Girls was an important book that takes on rape culture and misogyny. This book showed the importance of supporting each other, giving women a choice, and for fighting for a better world. The Nowhere Girls is a book I would recommend to EVERYONE. 4 / 5 Fangs *This ebook was given to me in exchange for an honest review. * MrsLeif's Two Fangs About ItFacebookTwitter
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  • Shan(Littleirishbookcat)
    January 1, 1970
    They’re no words for how amazing this book was. I loved it so much!
  • Tiffany Miss.Fiction
    January 1, 1970
    Full review coming soonI finished this book in an ocean of tears. So touching, empathic, powerful and raw story!Thank you Amy Reed
  • Lia
    January 1, 1970
    The Nowhere Girls is the story of three girls, three outsiders that don’t fit in. But it’s also about every girl in a way. Throughout the story you get peeks into the life of other girls, girls that experience love, sexual harassment, and feminism in different ways. This is one of the things I loved most about the book. It was inclusive and not just about how one or three people experienced these things, but how many people have different views, experiences and thoughts on the topic. “Silence do The Nowhere Girls is the story of three girls, three outsiders that don’t fit in. But it’s also about every girl in a way. Throughout the story you get peeks into the life of other girls, girls that experience love, sexual harassment, and feminism in different ways. This is one of the things I loved most about the book. It was inclusive and not just about how one or three people experienced these things, but how many people have different views, experiences and thoughts on the topic. “Silence does not mean yes. No can be thought and felt but never said. it can be screamed silently on the inside. It can be in the wordless stone of a clenched fist, fingernails digging into palm. Her lips sealed. Her eyes closed. His body just taking, never asking, never taught to question silence.”Throughout the story, the three girls, Grace, new in town and daughter and Christian, Erin, autistic and obsessed with Star Trek, and Rosina, gay and Mexican, start a movement to revenge the rape of Lucy, a girl who moved away last year after she wasn’t believed about her rape. What makes this story so strong was the friendships between these three girls, but also the friendships between all the other girls that join them. There is so much girl power in this book! My favourite character is hard to pick because I loved all three of the main characters, however, I might love Erin just a bit more than the others. I loved how these three girls are all so different but work so well together. Both they and their families are remarkably different and I loved seeing the different ways they interacted with their family."The three girls converge on the front porch and, without speaking, stand facing one another.“Did you know the triangle is the strongest geometric shape in nature?” Erin says.They meet one another’s eyes, one by one by one. They breathe. They swallow. They turn towards the door. Grace presses the button of the doorbell. They hold their breath and wait."I am head over heels in love with Amy Reeds writing style! Her way of writing is just so simple, beautiful and vivid. I have made so many markings in my book, I lost count of the sentences and paragraphs I loved.The story itself is so important. It is about rape culture and sexism and so many aspects of it. I have read a few books about feminism and battling sexism but this has to be a favourite, it brought feminism to a new level. A level you could relate to in so many ways. It felt so real! I’ve spent many hours thinking this book over and rethinking all the things that happened and how they could happen to anyone.“Sometimes the not crying hurts worse than the crying.”I am giving this book 5 stars because not only was the story amazing, the message, the characters and the writing were as well. This book is so important to the society we live in nowadays and beside that it’s also beautifully written. It’s fun and emotional, and gave me all the feels! I highly recommend picking this book up!
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    *4.5*I really liked this book and I think it’s an important one to read.It deals with a lot of different topics such as rape culture, feminism, consent, justice. These are topics that need to be talked about, now more than ever.I think the author did a wonderful job in telling this story with such care and empathy.I also really liked how the chapters were structured, even though I loved the three main characters’ perspectives, I found it really interesting to read the “us” chapters. I personally *4.5*I really liked this book and I think it’s an important one to read.It deals with a lot of different topics such as rape culture, feminism, consent, justice. These are topics that need to be talked about, now more than ever.I think the author did a wonderful job in telling this story with such care and empathy.I also really liked how the chapters were structured, even though I loved the three main characters’ perspectives, I found it really interesting to read the “us” chapters. I personally think that the only flaw was the ending, it was just a bit rushed, other than that it was all perfectly written. But anyway, I will definitely read Amy Reed’s other books.
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  • Elke (BEroyal)
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my god. This book. I don't know what to say. This is so powerful, so important, so heartbreaking and yet hopeful. So real and raw and timely. And also really fucking hard to read. I just finished and feel like I still need to release a breath that I did know I was holding. Holding for the entire duration of me reading this book. Holy shit. The power and strength of this book and these girls, it gave me chills, and some parts gave me goosebumps. And the imagery of the fire, the rage, the spark Oh my god. This book. I don't know what to say. This is so powerful, so important, so heartbreaking and yet hopeful. So real and raw and timely. And also really fucking hard to read. I just finished and feel like I still need to release a breath that I did know I was holding. Holding for the entire duration of me reading this book. Holy shit. The power and strength of this book and these girls, it gave me chills, and some parts gave me goosebumps. And the imagery of the fire, the rage, the spark and power makes me want to reread "The witch doesn't burn" so badly. There is so much hope and strength in seeing other girls be strong and powerful and it simultaneously makes my heart break we have to be and proud to be one of them."It is all the girls, all their voices, calling out as loud as they can. They burn through darkness. They brand the night."This is an incredibly heavy book, but if you're able to, please read it. Trigger warnings include but are not limited to rape, sexual assault, attempted rape, violence, sexism, emotional abuse, victim blaming, slut shaming and bullying.I'm grateful for this book and that I could read it. I'm grateful it was so diverse. That of the three main characters, one was a queer Mexican girl, one girl was fat and the other had autism. That there was a variety of girls, with their own life and problems, that there were chapters labelled as "us" and we got to see so many faces. That there was a closeted trans girl. Someone who used drugs. A prep. A jock. Brown and black girls (even though the majority were white). Different financial and family backgrounds. Different hopes and dreams and fears.I'm also really grateful that some girls had some issues of their own to work through. That some participated in victim blaming, slut shaming or other things. I do think there would have been a lot of power in having all of these called out and/or corrected, but it was realistic that some girls grew beyond these notions and some girls didn't.And that it was clear that even though they tried to be inclusive, they couldn't reach everyone and had blind spots. The black girl who found them too white-centric. Amber. The closeted trans girl they didn't know of but also didn't make clear would be welcome."All these girls who would normally never mix. Others. More. Everyone.The nowhere girls are here. They are everywhere."The writing style was also really great. Some sentences carried so much power, both because of the message and because of the words that were chosen. I can't wait to get a physical copy to tab my favourite quotes."Girls walk through the hallway a little taller. They meet one another's eyes, share smiles with girls they never would have thought to acknowledge before. They keep their secret, and it burns like sunlight in their chests."I do want to make a note to point out I don't think this book is free from all criticism:I would have liked the acknowledgement that guys also get raped. That sometimes girls rape people. That there are genders beyond the binary. That girls of colour face a lot more risk. (On that last one I wholeheartedly recommend the article White Trauma: How YA Books About Rape Ignore Girls of Color.)It was made clear that "freak" wasn't okay to use, but did use other ableist slurs, in conversation and description, that weren't called out.TW transphobia: at one point a male character said "If I wanted to be a chick [...]" when talking about his trans brother and the book didn't point out that trans people are their gender. That the brother is a guy, and didn't decide to want to be one. This book tried really hard to be intersectional and already did great, but it could have been better.(Also a note about the ending: it was good and hopeful and I needed that, but a lot of stories like this don't end that way. And not everywhere all girls come together to protect one another (especially true when the girl who needs defending or protection is a woman of colour and we as white people need to do better))TW: rape (multiple recollections and instances), attempted rape, sexual assault, sexual violence, rape culture, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, violence, sexism, racism, misogyny, victim blaming, slut shaming, homophobia, transphobia, ableism, mentions of substance abuse, sex, self-harm.
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  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    These day, very few books make me stay up all night, enthralled and horrified and absolutely invested in what is happening on the page. After all, I am a college student with neither enough sleep nor time. Some books still do. The Nowhere Girls is one of this books. The Nowhere Girls does what only truly good fiction does. It made me have a visceral reaction. I read about how helpless Erin felt and how small all the girls in the novel felt because of these boys who are allowed to walk around and These day, very few books make me stay up all night, enthralled and horrified and absolutely invested in what is happening on the page. After all, I am a college student with neither enough sleep nor time. Some books still do. The Nowhere Girls is one of this books. The Nowhere Girls does what only truly good fiction does. It made me have a visceral reaction. I read about how helpless Erin felt and how small all the girls in the novel felt because of these boys who are allowed to walk around and hurt women in their school without consequences, and I cried. I read the words written on the Real Men of Prescott blog, and I felt like I was going to throw up. During the principal's conversation with Rosina, I felt like my blood was boiling. I felt every page of The Nowhere Girls so intensely because it is so true. Every single word in this book, every single sentence, is so honest and raw and painful that it hurts me. It should hurt me. It should hurt all of us. It is hard not to read The Nowhere Girls and think about the current abundance of men being outed for rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment. This book is so relevant right now. Even though it came out in October and therefore Amy Reed couldn't have known when she was writing this book how fitting it would be for 2017, it feels like it could only be a book written right now. Reed expertly examines and condemns rape culture, pointing out truths that all girls know in their hearts but that our society just haven't seemed to grasp yet. It also deals with the different emotions and feeling of survivors: how they feel, how they think they're supposed to feel, and how the system treats them. Additionally, Reed explores the complexity of feminism: how it looks different from girl to girl, how it can struggle to be inclusive and intersectional, and what the misconceptions surrounding it are. She does this through the narration of three main characters: Grace, Rosina, and Erin. Grace is the new girl in town, the overweight daughter of a pastor who was kicked out of their old church and town when she started to preach a more progressive version of Christianity. Rosina is the daughter of a hardworking Mexican daughter, a girl who loves punk music and other girls and wants nothing more to escape her family's oppressive expectations. Erin is a girl with Asperger's syndrome who loves Star Trek: Next Generation and marine biology and clings to her routine because she does not want to deal with what has happened to her. It also features an Us narration that is a combination of all three girls and others named and unnamed: Amber, the school "slut"; a girl with her boyfriend; Adele, a transgender girl who is not yet out; another unnamed girl who does not understand feminism and feels that it excludes pro-life and more conservative girls, a black girl who laughs at the group of white girls being broken up at school and knows that the consequences for standing up to the system for brown girls would be vastly different, and other girls who are a part of the Nowhere Girls. Every topic Reed explores in this novel is explored with extraordinary consideration, thought, and empathy, paying attention to the complexity of these issues. What I thought was particularly effective about The Nowhere Girls is how it portrays the ugliness of men who buy into rape culture, who want hurt women and see them as objects to be conquered and not people. Reed does this by including posts from the Real Men of Prescott blog the girls reference that some of the boys of the town have contributed to and supported. These posts made me want to throw up. They are full of sexist and misogynistic language and toxic ideas of masculinity, and I felt the girls' fear and disgust reading these as if it was my own. I was so disgusted because it was true in a way that will never stop hurting me. There are men who believe these things and men who act on them. I wanted to wrap every single girl in this novel up in a hug (or in Erin's case a smile and an offer to listen to her talk about fish) and tell them I love them, that they are valuable, and that I believe them. That I will always believe them. I rooted so hard for them because these aren't just characters. Girls like Grace, Rosina, Erin, and the other Nowhere Girls are everywhere. All women struggle with their struggles in some form or another. I wanted to see Spencer and Eric and Ennis go down for what they did. I wanted justice for the girls they hurt as fiercely as I wanted it for the Stanford rape victim, as fiercely as I want it for the girls raped at college campuses across the country or any girl who is hurt like this. I could write a ten page paper about everything I love about this book. I could go on forever. Instead, I will simply say that everyone, every single person on the planet, should read The Nowhere Girls. It is the best book I've read this year, and it will remain in my top ten forever.
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  • Samuele
    January 1, 1970
    I totally loved this book!It was very deep and I really liked how the author has managed all the different storylines. She has created so many different personalities throughout the chapters that it seems like a piece of world has been pushed in these tiny pages. The three main characters were also well designed, with their own thoughts and doubts, but the "Us" chapters are the ones that made the big difference.This isn’t just a simple book, this is THE book that everyone should read once in the I totally loved this book!It was very deep and I really liked how the author has managed all the different storylines. She has created so many different personalities throughout the chapters that it seems like a piece of world has been pushed in these tiny pages. The three main characters were also well designed, with their own thoughts and doubts, but the "Us" chapters are the ones that made the big difference.This isn’t just a simple book, this is THE book that everyone should read once in their life, girls AND boys. Amy Reed deals with many topics that aren’t easy to talk about, but she did an outstanding work. It teaches many things about feminism, rape, sexism and other things that we should root for and ban from our society forever.Thank you, for creating this amazing book. And please, stop reading this review and go buy your own copy!
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