The Nowhere Girls
Three misfits come together to avenge the rape of a fellow classmate and in the process trigger a change in the misogynist culture at their high school transforming the lives of everyone around them in this searing and timely story.Who are the Nowhere Girls?They’re everygirl. But they start with just three:Grace Salter is the new girl in town, whose family was run out of their former community after her southern Baptist preacher mom turned into a radical liberal after falling off a horse and bumping her head.Rosina Suarez is the queer punk girl in a conservative Mexican immigrant family, who dreams of a life playing music instead of babysitting her gaggle of cousins and waitressing at her uncle’s restaurant.Erin Delillo is obsessed with two things: marine biology and Star Trek: The Next Generation, but they aren’t enough to distract her from her suspicion that she may in fact be an android.When Grace learns that Lucy Moynihan, the former occupant of her new home, was run out of town for having accused the popular guys at school of gang rape, she’s incensed that Lucy never had justice. For their own personal reasons, Rosina and Erin feel equally deeply about Lucy’s tragedy, so they form an anonymous group of girls at Prescott High to resist the sexist culture at their school, which includes boycotting sex of any kind with the male students.Told in alternating perspectives, this groundbreaking novel is an indictment of rape culture and explores with bold honesty the deepest questions about teen girls and sexuality.

The Nowhere Girls Details

TitleThe Nowhere Girls
Author
ReleaseOct 10th, 2017
PublisherSimon Pulse
ISBN-139781481481731
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary

The Nowhere Girls Review

  • Jessi ♡
    January 1, 1970
    this book made me hate men more than i already do
  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    “The things is,” Rosina says, “people don’t want to hear something that’ll make their lives more difficult, even if it’s the truth. People hate having to change the way they see things. So instead of admitting the world is ugly, they shit on the messenger for telling them about it.” I really loved this book so much! The Nowhere Girls is empowering and inspiring, and I am filled with so much love and respect for other women after reading it. We follow misfits Grace Salter, Erin DeLillo, and Ro “The things is,” Rosina says, “people don’t want to hear something that’ll make their lives more difficult, even if it’s the truth. People hate having to change the way they see things. So instead of admitting the world is ugly, they shit on the messenger for telling them about it.” I really loved this book so much! The Nowhere Girls is empowering and inspiring, and I am filled with so much love and respect for other women after reading it. We follow misfits Grace Salter, Erin DeLillo, and Rosina Suarez as they come together to challenge the rape culture that forced a girl to move out of town after accusing three popular students of rape. The Nowhere Girls grows into a movement that changes the lives of the student body as more girls come together and support each other. Things I Liked I really loved Grace Salter, she’s the first main character we’re introduced to and I immediately liked her. She feels incredibly amounts of empathy and truly wants the best for people and for justice and fairness to be realities, but she is prepared to fight for them. Erin DeLillo was another of the main characters and I loved her so SO MUCH. I loved that we got to see a main character with Asperger's. We really get to know her, not just who she is on the spectrum. We see how she views relationships and lives her daily life - what she loves, what she fears. I loved her passion for science (something we do not share, but I could feel how much she loved it). I loved how she talked about how asperger’s presents itself differently in girl and goes overlooked. I love that she challenges the idea that people on the spectrum are emotionless and lack empathy - they just process and confront situations differently. Erin was just awesome and so strong and amazing.Rosina Suarez is so fantastic! She is so unapologetic and brave. I love that she completely lets Erin be herself and supports her - their friendship was fantastic. She is so selfless for her family even when she’s unhappy. She also has a very adorable wlw romance with former cheerleader, Melissa that is so sweet and cute.The friendship that develops between the 3 main girls, Grace, Rosina, and Erin, was awesome and I loved every minute of it. The support that develops from the Nowhere Girls was inspiring and gave you hope that things can get better.I really loved all the unnamed POVs of the Nowhere Girls. They were all clear and distinct, but create a vibrant and unified story of trying to take agency and power in a system that works against them. The group talked about power, choice, double standards, solidarity and we see how girls experiences and beliefs differ - and even see some talking about the white privilege in the group, how they are seen as powerful crusaders not angry black women. The group is a very collaborative movement with no one trying to overshadow others. And I loved seeing girls coming together to support other girls in the only way they knew how. I also liked that we get to see them call out guys for doing nothing as perpetuating rape culture, not just guys who rape, and some guys actually acknowledge this and change.I really loved Grace’s mom! I love that she talked about acceptance for ALL people. Her outlook on faith and religion and the necessity of change was great and really resonated and inspired Grace to do what she felt was right - and take action. Things I Didn’t Like There was an instance of misgendering a character’s trans sibling that felt unnecessary. It seemed like a lazy slip and wasn’t needed.The gross blog of “The Real Men of Prescott” was infuriating! It was filled with rape apologists and misogynistic language and made me want to punch someone in the face. The boys will be boys mentality and the sheer entitlement is enough to make anyone’s blood boil. Thankfully, this book is about challenging all of these beliefs and actions, but it’s hard to read about this and realize people like this actually exist.The Nowhere Girls is such an important book that confronts and challenges rape culture and misogyny, while giving young girls the power of choice and agency. I loved the strong female friendships that develop and the bravery we see from so many characters. This was such a great book and I can’t wait to read more from Amy Reed.Trigger warning for rape and sexual assaultI received a copy of the book from Simon Pulse via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Paige (Illegal in 3 Countries)
    January 1, 1970
    Y'all, I just really loved this book. The purposeful choice to make the three narrators come from groups often forgotten by mainstream feminism (aka White Feminism), the subtle way we see intersectionality and racism come into play when the principal immediately decides Rosina is at the heart of the Nowhere Girls just because she's a Latina girl, the valid criticism of the Nowhere Girls movement from periphery narrators,...This book is like sinking into a deep pit of mud as you dig into it, but Y'all, I just really loved this book. The purposeful choice to make the three narrators come from groups often forgotten by mainstream feminism (aka White Feminism), the subtle way we see intersectionality and racism come into play when the principal immediately decides Rosina is at the heart of the Nowhere Girls just because she's a Latina girl, the valid criticism of the Nowhere Girls movement from periphery narrators,...This book is like sinking into a deep pit of mud as you dig into it, but the end sees someone grab your outstretched hand and pull you out just before you go under.That transphobia tho.For the time being, I'm downgrading the rating due to a super transphobic remark made by a guy with a trans brother. That line is never remarked upon and even though the guy is considered Bad for a bit because he's friends with the rapist guys, he redeems himself when some of the rape survivors gather to make a police statement and he offers support. See, the rapists bragged to him about what they did and he wanted to use that knowledge for good. But that's his last appearance in the book.And the transphobia of saying "if I decided I wanted to be a chick" re: transitioning is just ignored??? NO TRANS PERSON "DECIDES" THEY "WANT" TO BE THEIR TRUE GENDER. THEY'VE ALWAYS BEEN THAT GENDER.The rating is either gonna go up or down further depending on whether that line is still in the book come publication day. If it is, this rating is gonna go down a whole damn lot.
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  • May
    January 1, 1970
    MYBODYISREADYTOLOVETHIS
  • Nadine
    January 1, 1970
    Trigger warning: rape and sexual assault The Nowhere Girls is an incredibly important read. It focuses on rape culture in high school through perspectives often ignored, i.e. a girl on the Autism spectrum, a fat girl, and a Mexican lesbian girl. Each of these characters offers a new perspective on a well-known topic. Questions of consent, ability to consent, alcohol, and sexual promiscuity are focused upon heavily, while other topics such as transitioning and women of colour and feminism are tou Trigger warning: rape and sexual assault The Nowhere Girls is an incredibly important read. It focuses on rape culture in high school through perspectives often ignored, i.e. a girl on the Autism spectrum, a fat girl, and a Mexican lesbian girl. Each of these characters offers a new perspective on a well-known topic. Questions of consent, ability to consent, alcohol, and sexual promiscuity are focused upon heavily, while other topics such as transitioning and women of colour and feminism are touched upon briefly. What makes this book stand out from others of its kind is its contribution to the conversation about rape culture and the growing lack of concern towards it. A bunch of girls band together in order to change the growing sexiest movement at their high school by opening a dialogue between themselves and boycotting sex. Their actions upset the status quo without being disrupting yet they're treated like criminals. They take a step outside of the box of acceptable female behavior and all the authority figures try their best to push them back in, even the educated female principal. The formation of the group allows the girls to question consent and its varying forms as well as the power of understanding their own sexuality. The girls debate the efficacy of the sexual boycott and how's it's affecting their own sexual desires and pleasures. Every time the girls got together for a Nowhere Girls meeting, they always spoke about something important like consent, slut shamming, the power of unity among women, and social justice.The ending isn't as satisfying as I would have liked, but the ending is a reflection of real life and how these types of events are very rarely solved or punished severely. Overall, The Nowhere Girls is an important read because it is an exploration of what it’s like to be female in today’s society and how sexuality and race play key roles. It also adds to the conversations happening around rape, rape culture, slut shamming, and so much more.** I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5 starsThe Nowhere Girls is a standalone Young Adult contemporary novel.The book features multiple 3rd person POVs: Grace, Rosina, Erin and Us (lots of POVs mixed in those chapters).Grace Salter is the overweight new girl whose mom is a preacher. Rosina is Mexican and gay and forced to babysitting hand waitress for her family.Erin is super smart but socially a bit awkward. She is on the Asperger's spectrum.This book is about such an important issue. A fellow classmate is raped and nobody bel 3.5/5 starsThe Nowhere Girls is a standalone Young Adult contemporary novel.The book features multiple 3rd person POVs: Grace, Rosina, Erin and Us (lots of POVs mixed in those chapters).Grace Salter is the overweight new girl whose mom is a preacher. Rosina is Mexican and gay and forced to babysitting hand waitress for her family.Erin is super smart but socially a bit awkward. She is on the Asperger's spectrum.This book is about such an important issue. A fellow classmate is raped and nobody believes her. These three young women are so disgusted by the boys at their high school that they form an anonymous group of girls (called The Nowhere Girls).It took me a long time to get into this book. The writing style and the third person narration just made it hard for me to connect with the characters.But the book started getting a lot better for me one third of the way in. The book has such a strong message. And I think that this story was such an important one for the author to tell. I just wish that I could have been invested with the story right from the start.Thanks to Simon Schuster Canada for allowing me to read this book.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    There are times that required suspending my disbelief -- particularly when it came to the way the principal spoke and behaved here, which I think could have been expanded upon to explain more clearly (i.e., protecting the school's reputation might be one avenue of that) -- but overall, a really powerful read about rape culture and how girls worked together to take back their rightful place in their schools and community. It reminded me a little bit of THE LATTE REBELLION in terms of a social mov There are times that required suspending my disbelief -- particularly when it came to the way the principal spoke and behaved here, which I think could have been expanded upon to explain more clearly (i.e., protecting the school's reputation might be one avenue of that) -- but overall, a really powerful read about rape culture and how girls worked together to take back their rightful place in their schools and community. It reminded me a little bit of THE LATTE REBELLION in terms of a social movement getting out of the grasp of the girls who initially began it, and the elements of feminism and working toward a common goal to spark conversation about rape culture will appeal to readers of MOXIE and ALL THE RAGE.
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  • adam (booksss.0k)
    January 1, 1970
    review closer to publication????
  • Madison
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars The Nowhere Girls is an important book. A voice for girls, a book for change. It doesn't pull it's punches. This book is brutal, and sometimes horribly honest and upfront. At first I was slightly unsure about this book, it's message, and where it was going, but by the end I was uplifted and reduced to tears. The Nowhere Girls is a book that provokes discussion that is vital for changing mindsets and empowering young women. Three girls spark revolution at their high school when they cre 4.5 stars The Nowhere Girls is an important book. A voice for girls, a book for change. It doesn't pull it's punches. This book is brutal, and sometimes horribly honest and upfront. At first I was slightly unsure about this book, it's message, and where it was going, but by the end I was uplifted and reduced to tears. The Nowhere Girls is a book that provokes discussion that is vital for changing mindsets and empowering young women. Three girls spark revolution at their high school when they create The Nowhere Girls - a group that protests their school's misogynist culture in defence of one of their previous classmates who was brutally raped.The Nowhere Girls is written in four alternating sections from the perspective of Grace, Rosina and Erin and one from 'Us'. The Us chapters gives a voice to a range of girls, jumping from girl to girl, including the three main characters, as well as other named characters and other girls who remain nameless. Grace is the new girl in town. She feels abandoned and ignored after being rejected by all her old friends. The move has thrust her mother into the spotlight, while Grace feels more alone. When she hears about the girl who used to live in her house, who was brave enough to speak out about her attack but who was then run out of town, Grace knows she must do something. Rosina is an outsider, both in her conservative Mexican family who look down upon her dreams of becoming a punk rock star, and at school, where she feels she will never have the chance to catch the eye of her crush, a popular cheerleader. Rebelling is something she knows how to do, so she joins with Grace in creating the Nowhere Girls, hardly imagining the changes it will spark. Erin too is an outsider. People don't understand her love of marine biology, her dislike of small talk, or her routines. For so long, her differences have defined her, but creating the Nowhere Girls finally unites the girls of Prescott High School. I ranged from absolutely horrified to so proud and touched while reading this book. And the sad thing is, the events and thoughts portrayed in this book are true of the way in which so very many women are treated and the way in which many men think and act. Not all, of course, but many. But the way in which the girls pull together is simply wonderful. I also liked how there were some boys who supported the girls, who too wanted to stand up against the violent culture, and that, sadly realistically, there were some girls and women who stood against the Nowhere Girls. This is an important book and I know that exposing belief systems like the ones discussed in this book is so important. It won't go away if we just ignore it. And discussing it is the first step. But, at first, it wasn't a book I enjoyed reading. Fortunately, I really enjoyed the second half. Everything comes together and ultimately readers are left with a hopeful ending. There was one storyline that wasn't finished, but otherwise it was a really satisfying ending to what is an incredibly powerful book. Recommended for mature readers. See my blog for more details, content advisory and reading age guide. The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library.
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  • Jennifer Mathieu
    January 1, 1970
    Y'all, this book blew my mind. I could not put it down. It is just so full of GIRL LOVE and FEMINIST POWER and I am HERE FOR IT. I especially loved Reed's 3rd person POV which doesn't always work for me in YA but here was pitch perfect. So many complex issues addressed with authenticity and heart. This is the sort of book that could change the life of a teenage girl who reads it. 5 plus stars. I adored it.
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  • Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    The Nowhere Girls is a battle cry, an ode, a bittersweet mourning, and a rage-inducing awakening. This book is more than necessary, it should be required reading for everyone, regardless of age, gender, or political leanings. Here’s the thing, The Nowhere Girls reads a little Perks of Being a Wallflower meets The Breakfast Club mixed with profound, contemporary questions about society and feminism. At times it feels like your run-of-the-mill coming of age story split in various POVs and as someo The Nowhere Girls is a battle cry, an ode, a bittersweet mourning, and a rage-inducing awakening. This book is more than necessary, it should be required reading for everyone, regardless of age, gender, or political leanings. Here’s the thing, The Nowhere Girls reads a little Perks of Being a Wallflower meets The Breakfast Club mixed with profound, contemporary questions about society and feminism. At times it feels like your run-of-the-mill coming of age story split in various POVs and as someone who generally loathes coming of age, it lagged for me, despite the eye-opening questions and they way it made me think (which is what marks great, life-changing books for me). I couldn’t really connect with any of the characters, which with so many POVs and an US POV that had the voices of several girls, it’s puzzling that none of them resonated with me. Not that the characters weren’t defined. They were more than multi-dimensional, they practically screamed from the pages with their unique and interesting personalities and their determination to succeed. I absolutely dislike the synopsis for this book. It makes the story seem like something it’s not-a revenge plot or some weird, let’s get back ALL THE MALES story. This is far from that. It’s an exploration of what it means to be female in our society and then breaks that down further into all the ways that sexuality, race, and choice intersect with that. Here is a list of the many important and critical pieces of what it means to be female that this book discusses in its short number of pages:No means no. Why we think that if you’re dating someone and they force you that it’s not rape. How saying yes is a choice and it can be an empowering one. That girls should not be afraid of their sexuality or that they enjoy sex. The double standard of “boys will be boys” but a girl who actively explores her sexuality and enjoys being sexual is a slut. Trans girls and whether they feel they have or can find a place in feminist culture. Transitioning girls and the same sort of questions. How girls who are known “sluts” are ignored when they “cry rape,” how women are treated differently and their allegations taken less seriously if they’re a certain “type” of girl or from the wrong “side of the tracks.”Differing perspectives on virginity. Why a sex strike is problematic. Why we think that if we’re drunk and we say no and are ignored, that it’s our “fault.” The many many reasons that women fail to report their assault.The many levels of fear women face every single day that men do not ever consider. Why we feel the need to pass judgment on other girls. Small town mentality. Privilege and “getting away with it.” And many, many more. I can’t even count the number of times I found myself nodding at the scenarios discussed, all the many feelings and experiences females go through in every encounter they have with males and even other girls. So much of this book made me remember and reflect and that is the reason WHY I put a trigger warning on this apart from the constant references to rapes and assaults and the feelings associated with these events well after they occurred (because how can anyone forget? This is another thing that’s discussed). I was also so angry after I read this. Angry that women have to deal with any of this stuff. Angry that men think they have the right. Angry at all the misogynistic, horrible, and derogatory ways that women are looked at as possessions or to be used and discarded. It’s sickening. Read more here: https://youngadultbookmadness.wordpre...
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  • Mari Yeung
    January 1, 1970
    Beautiful beautiful cover!!The blurb sounds so cool.
  • Jessie
    January 1, 1970
    Quotations were taken from an uncorrected proof and may be modified or removed in the final text.Trigger Warning: RapeI want to add a disclaimer that I am a white cisgender heterosexual woman. I am not autistic. I am not an immigrant. I have not been raped. I cannot speak to the accuracy with which these topics are portrayed. I'm excited to hear from other readers if they feel these topics were described accurately and respectfully.* * *This book was powerful. It made me feel validated, that the Quotations were taken from an uncorrected proof and may be modified or removed in the final text.Trigger Warning: RapeI want to add a disclaimer that I am a white cisgender heterosexual woman. I am not autistic. I am not an immigrant. I have not been raped. I cannot speak to the accuracy with which these topics are portrayed. I'm excited to hear from other readers if they feel these topics were described accurately and respectfully.* * *This book was powerful. It made me feel validated, that the sexism I experience is real and is wrong. It made me feel empowered to do something about it. But also sad that it was necessary, and humbled by the experiences others go through that I will never truly understand. I felt I left with a better understanding of other women and the different ways they experience sex, rape culture, and feminism. This book doesn't tell you what's right or what the correct way to fight is; it shows you what different people experience and encourages you to support other women in their own choices.ErinMom always reminds her how lucky she is to be so bright; few Aspies are so exceptional, so special. As if they need to be. As if that's the only way to be forgiven for the rest of what they are.Erin has Asperger's. She schedules her day to the minute and doesn't let her foods touch and speaks what she's thinking. She loves science, especially biology. She loves Star Trek. She doesn't break rules.I can't speak to how accurate the author portrays Asperger's, but I really enjoyed reading Erin's chapters. It does a great job of showing the struggle of mental illness. The exhaustion of dealing with everyone who just wants you to act "normal". The amount of work you put in only for everyone to think you're not trying hard enough.RosinaIt's not like there's a union for underage, under-the-table employees of a family business run like they're still in some village in Mexico where kids don't go to school past sixth grade.Rosina seems to both hate how people treat her because of her race, as well as hate her own heritage. As the oldest girl in a large Mexican family, she's expected to babysit the kids and work in the family restaurant. She hates that no matter how much work she puts in, she is accused of not caring about the family at even the smallest hint of having her own wants.Rosina is gay. She hates how men often take her sexual orientation as a challenge. But she has the biggest crush on one of the school cheerleaders and it is just the sweetest and most adorable thing to read.GraceShe matters so little that her friends back in Adeline could just throw her away. She is no one. She is nothing. A girl no one sees. A girl no one remembers.Grace is the new student. Due to her mother's change of faith to a more liberal view of Christianity, Grace lost all her friends in her old Baptist community. She worries that she's invisible, replaceable. If it was so easy for her friends to shun her, did she even matter? Grace takes a religious view on feminism, trying to do what's right as she believes Jesus would, while also creating a place for herself in her new school.The Girls of Prescott HighMaybe at Stanford girls are allowed to be more than one thing. Since everyone there has to be smart by default, maybe it's something you get to stop trying to prove all the time ... What would that be like, ... to not have to choose between pretty and smart?Besides the main characters, the author gives a voice to the background characters, to the trans girls and non-binary teens, to the girls who made it through rehab, the girls who want to go to med school, the girls who are insecure about their weight. And because the author presents so many voices, we hear many different opinions about the events in the book. There are girls who love sex and girls who think it's a chore. Girls who are saving themselves for marriage. Girls who don't believe rape culture exists and girls who think all men are animals. Girls who were raped but no one believes them. Girls who don't want to call what happened to them rape. Girls who want to fight back but can't because when Black girls fight back they're seen as dangerous. The author doesn't tell you what to believe. She shows you the different beliefs and helps you understand them.What I Didn't LikeThere's an awkward conversation where a boy talks about his "sister--I mean my brother" who transitioned two years ago (surely two years is long enough to be getting the words right). He complains about the double standard, that it's okay for his brother to transition to male but if he tried transitioning to female, his parents would never accept it. Your brother transitions and all you have to say about it is how it's not fair that you couldn't transition if you wanted to, even though you don't want to?More Reviews at Bookaphobia
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  • Jamie (Books and Ladders)
    January 1, 1970
    Full review to come closer to release date. But so good. So powerful.
  • Kelly Hager
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved this book. It was so smart and I seriously cheered so hard for Erin, Rosina and Grace. I love the way they all evolve throughout the novel (especially the fact that Erin falls for a guy--and she's autistic, which I also love, because how unusual is it that we see autistic people in relationships? I think this is the first story where I've seen that).I also love the fact that it's initially a trio of women but it becomes so many different girls. Also, it's not really vigilantis I absolutely loved this book. It was so smart and I seriously cheered so hard for Erin, Rosina and Grace. I love the way they all evolve throughout the novel (especially the fact that Erin falls for a guy--and she's autistic, which I also love, because how unusual is it that we see autistic people in relationships? I think this is the first story where I've seen that).I also love the fact that it's initially a trio of women but it becomes so many different girls. Also, it's not really vigilantism--it's more of a protest, but it's not very violent.Recommended.
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  • Amber Smith
    January 1, 1970
    THE NOWHERE GIRLS cuts to straight to the core of rape culture—fully exploring its destructive nature through a cast of girls who find their voices, and their strength, as they unite in a quest for justice. With rare insight and profound authenticity, Amy Reed has crafted a masterfully fierce, stirring, and deeply empowering story of hope and courage.*I received an advance copy*
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  • Alex
    January 1, 1970
    I received a digital ARC of this book from Edelweiss.I would give this 4.5 stars.Honestly. All I can say is wow. I loved this book. I loved all the varying points of view the story came from. This was an extreme eye opener on the things still going on in high schools. Things I have forgotten about, that this book made me rehash about my own personal experiences. I was hurt, uplifted, disgusted, filled with hope, and a whole range of other emotions. It would take me awhile to get through them all I received a digital ARC of this book from Edelweiss.I would give this 4.5 stars.Honestly. All I can say is wow. I loved this book. I loved all the varying points of view the story came from. This was an extreme eye opener on the things still going on in high schools. Things I have forgotten about, that this book made me rehash about my own personal experiences. I was hurt, uplifted, disgusted, filled with hope, and a whole range of other emotions. It would take me awhile to get through them all. I'm not from a small town, so I have a hard time believing that the principal of the school would behave this way and threaten deportation over a couple of posters, and take threats from a deputy sheriff, but what do I know.I don't know anyone with autism/aspergers or much about autism in general, so I'm not sure how accurate the authors portrayal of the character was, but I found her to be my favorite in the story (and now I'm fascinated by tube worms and ocean life). All I can say is that it was nice to gain insight from all 3 of the main characters, and watching young women uplift each other instead of tearing each other down.The blog the guy does makes me sick to my stomach, and I feel like I need to shower a lot just from reading one blurb, and punch him in the face..repeatedly. I've never read any of Reeds other books, but I will definitely do so now.
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  • Zazu
    January 1, 1970
    Holy. Shit.This is a goddamn manifesto for all the women who have ever been assaulted, who have ever been oppressed by the knowledge of their powerlessness, for all women regardless of religion, language, race, or ability, for women who are called sluts, for women who are called prudes, for girls who everyone sees as boys, for those who do better forgetting, for those who'd rather scream.This is the book I wish all teens could have read; it's a shame Amy Reed wasn't born earlier so this book cou Holy. Shit.This is a goddamn manifesto for all the women who have ever been assaulted, who have ever been oppressed by the knowledge of their powerlessness, for all women regardless of religion, language, race, or ability, for women who are called sluts, for women who are called prudes, for girls who everyone sees as boys, for those who do better forgetting, for those who'd rather scream.This is the book I wish all teens could have read; it's a shame Amy Reed wasn't born earlier so this book could have existed for longer. This is also, however, the book adults, parents, people in places of power need to read just as much, if not more.It's also, somehow, a hell of a good story, created by excellent writing skills, culminating in an un-put-down-able page-turner.Long story short:Want to read a good book? Read this.Want to learn something? Read this.Want to feel like you're not alone? Read this.Want to feel like you've been punched in the face? Read this.Read. This.--just one more Nowhere GirlPS- Amy Reed, thanks for Rosina. And not italicizing the Spanish. And not getting it wrong.
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  • Lauren R.
    January 1, 1970
    Oh my god, so good. So many emotions. I wanted to scream and cry and throw my iPad across the room. That was incredibly powerful, relatable, and important. So many diverse characters and stories intertwined. I'm so inspired and heartbroken at the same time right now.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    Review book so can't discuss but I am dying to discuss it with someone.
  • Rae (RaeAnn)
    January 1, 1970
    Review closer to publication
  • Laina SpareTime
    January 1, 1970
    I am DNFing, at least for now, at page 56. I find the third person present tense annoying, and I think the more I read, the more I'm going to hate this. I suspect the autism rep is problematic, the fat rep is TERRIBLE, and I suspect it's incredibly erasing of nonbinary identities and ace-spec identities.I'm just gonna link to my twitter thread because... yeah. I can't. https://twitter.com/lainasparetime/st...
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  • Erin Jackson
    January 1, 1970
    This is a the story that I needed when I was younger. The type of thing that puts words to what you can and can not say. Young women everywhere should read this novel and know they are not alone.
  • Tiffani Smith
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free in a Goodreads giveaway, in exchange for an honest review. Holy crap this book is phenomenal! I couldn't put it down, I was walking around reading it while cleaning my house, that's how good it is! This book tackles some tough issues that you don't often see authors take on, but this author did and she did one hell of a job! This book starts is done from the point of view of three main girls Grace, Rosina and Erin. All three are very different people and not your ty I received this book for free in a Goodreads giveaway, in exchange for an honest review. Holy crap this book is phenomenal! I couldn't put it down, I was walking around reading it while cleaning my house, that's how good it is! This book tackles some tough issues that you don't often see authors take on, but this author did and she did one hell of a job! This book starts is done from the point of view of three main girls Grace, Rosina and Erin. All three are very different people and not your typical main character types which is another great thing about this book, it's so diverse. Grace is religious (her mom is a pastor at their church), slightly chubby, plain girl. Rosina is Latino with a huge family who takes advantage of her and she is also a lesbian. Erin (the character who I liked the most) has Aspergers but she is described as model skinny with a shaved head who has no filter when she talks. The book opens with Grace moving to a new town after her family is shunned from the last place they lived. The house they move into, a girl named Lucy use to live there and she was also shunned and run out of town. Lucy claimed that 3 of the most popular guys in school gang raped her and no one believed her. Once Grace finds this out she decides that the girls of the school need to do something to prevent this from happening again to anyone ever again. The start the Nowhere Girls, a group of girls that can band together and help each other through the things they've been through and hopefully get justice for Lucy.Along the way, they all go through some difficult situations and come through stronger. This is a book that all girls should read, the fact that it brings rape culture into the forefront and talks about how many people get away with it even if there is evidence proving they did it. Yes it has feminist tones, yes there is some underlying religious themes, yes it talks about rape but it is all done very well, extremely well. The author handles these subjects in a very respectful manner and not once do you feel like the author is pushing an agenda. The only thing that I can say negative about the book is that the website pages that are white printed on black are almost impossible to read. While they don't play a major part in the story they do help by adding extra context. So not being able to read them is kind of disappointing.
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  • Carolina Herrera
    January 1, 1970
    TRIGGER WARNING for the entire book. I feel like this should be very very clear before anyone picks up the book, and I honestly wish there was a trigger warning smack dab on the cover of the book.That being said- This book was absolutely phenomenal. But, it was also brutal. In all honesty, if a book like this is going to be marketed at teenagers, I think there needs to be more dialogue around it. This book took me by absolutely surprise, in both good ways and... less than good ways? It was a suc TRIGGER WARNING for the entire book. I feel like this should be very very clear before anyone picks up the book, and I honestly wish there was a trigger warning smack dab on the cover of the book.That being said- This book was absolutely phenomenal. But, it was also brutal. In all honesty, if a book like this is going to be marketed at teenagers, I think there needs to be more dialogue around it. This book took me by absolutely surprise, in both good ways and... less than good ways? It was a sucker punch to the gut, is what I'm saying. And if kids are going to be reading this, there need to be safe adults that can discuss these themes with them. I actually struggled with my rating, since I don't know if I would feel comfortable recommending this book to any 14 year old (age based on the fact that the book says it's for 14 and up), but in the end I felt the message was so important that I had to rate this book highly.This book deals with sexism and misogyny, rape culture and rape, and mental health. Also, how all of these topics interact. I possibly could have done without the snippets of the rape-culture promoting blog that was spread throughout the book. It was used for the purpose of highlighting just how bad misogynistic mentality can be, and just how disgusting some people can be when they talk about women. But I wonder- were these snippets necessary? Could the author have addressed that issue without using the voice of a rapist character? Perhaps they were necessary, though, because maybe there is no truer way to get the message of how prevalent rape culture is in our society than by showing the words of rape culture promoters/ rapists themselves? Or is that giving them too strong a voice? I really don't know.This book raised more questions than answers for me. It left me thinking. It made me angry. It made me sad. It made me happy. It made me proud. This book will absolutely take you on an emotional roller coaster and it will leave you wrecked from the inside out. It's one of the most important books I've read this year, albeit one of the most emotionally difficult reads as well.
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  • Darla
    January 1, 1970
    A big thanks to Simon & Schuster and Edelweiss for an ARC of this fascinating book. I was a bit hesitant to begin reading it as it is such weighty subject matter. What I found, though, is that I could not help falling in love with the three misfits who started the Nowhere Girls movement: Grace, Rosina and Erin.My favorite character was definitely Grace as her discovery of the messages in Lucy's old bedroom motivated her to do something. Once she teamed up with Rosina and Erin, the movement i A big thanks to Simon & Schuster and Edelweiss for an ARC of this fascinating book. I was a bit hesitant to begin reading it as it is such weighty subject matter. What I found, though, is that I could not help falling in love with the three misfits who started the Nowhere Girls movement: Grace, Rosina and Erin.My favorite character was definitely Grace as her discovery of the messages in Lucy's old bedroom motivated her to do something. Once she teamed up with Rosina and Erin, the movement is born. What is beautiful about this book is how different these three girls are, yet they work together as a team--loving each other despite their individual quirks. As the movement grows, we see girls of varied ethnicities, religion and interests joining together for justice.This book is a great reminder of how women/girls can so easily divide against one another when support is most needed. The ending of this book is well worth the journey. Highly recommended for older girls who see a need for change.As a Christian wife and mother of three young men, I really appreciated how Reed included so many different POVs in this book -- some without names. We see Grace living out her faith and praying to God for guidance. I would contend that she was named Grace to show God's grace in Prescott through the efforts of the Nowhere Girls. God does care for the downtrodden and broken. We see this time after time throughout His Word(Psalm 10:17-18), but He uses all of us to accomplish deliverance for those in trouble. There is a scene in the book where Krista and Trista are at a wedding and when they hear the pastor expounding on Ephesians 5, they roll their eyes. What we truly need, though, are more folks who believe in the vision of Ephesians 5 and I Corinthians 13 to love one another -- in marriages, families, friendships, churches, neighborhoods, schools and communities. We need the fruits of the spirit (Galatians 5:22-23) manifested in our actions toward one another. In a nutshell, we Christians need to live out the Gospel and transform our communities. Thanks be to God for His indescribable gift! (II Cor 9:15)
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  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    Powerful. Inspiring. Important. Taking three girls' POV stories and mixing them with anonymous and semi-anonymous thoughts from other girls in town, Nowhere Girls tackles rape culture in a fascinating and important way. I loved reading this book. It was not always easy, but these conversations shouldn't be. The powerful message that we are stronger together and that everyone has a different point of view on similar topics was executed wonderfully. I can't speak to the realism of many things in t Powerful. Inspiring. Important. Taking three girls' POV stories and mixing them with anonymous and semi-anonymous thoughts from other girls in town, Nowhere Girls tackles rape culture in a fascinating and important way. I loved reading this book. It was not always easy, but these conversations shouldn't be. The powerful message that we are stronger together and that everyone has a different point of view on similar topics was executed wonderfully. I can't speak to the realism of many things in this book, but I felt educated on so many different points of view and felt hopeful at the end. Grace's mom is a pastor. She was recently kicked out of their southern church and has moved the family to Oregon. Grace feels like her parents are distant from her, focused on her mom's career. I am not religious, but I loved how Grace's faith was handled in this book. It was beautifully written.Rosina, as described on the back of the book, is "a queer punk girl in a conservative Mexican immigrant family." Rosina wants a life past her very traditional family. She writes music that she keeps to herself, but in general is not afraid to rebel and be who she is. But inside she is afraid. Rosina's story is also beautifully written. She knows she wants more but is afraid to lose her family. Erin is on the spectrum. She plans her day minute by minute, loves talking about fish and the ocean, and idolizes Data from Star Trek TNG. Again, a wonderfully written point of view. Erin is dealing with her own secrets, and history, even as she approaches new territory for herself and pushes herself to do what she knows is the right thing.When Grace discovers that the former owner of her new room, Lucy, was raped and run out of town, she knows she needs to do something. Together with Rosina and Erin, they form an anonymous group and invite the girls' of their high school to gather and talk about the situation. The ultimate goal is to find a way to get justice for Lucy... along the way the girls have important conversations, disagreements, and learn things about themselves and their friends.
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  • ☘Tara Sheehan☘
    January 1, 1970
    First off, this book has some DEEP triggers so don’t read this if you get easily offended and it might make you become a man hater if you aren’t already one. This is a brutal, difficult story to get through but it’s an important voice for those who feel like they don’t have one.It’s not one you will necessarily ‘enjoy’ reading, it’s not the kind you sit down one sunny afternoon with the hope of just passing the time. It’s one you read with purpose, to learn, to understand and hopefully will walk First off, this book has some DEEP triggers so don’t read this if you get easily offended and it might make you become a man hater if you aren’t already one. This is a brutal, difficult story to get through but it’s an important voice for those who feel like they don’t have one.It’s not one you will necessarily ‘enjoy’ reading, it’s not the kind you sit down one sunny afternoon with the hope of just passing the time. It’s one you read with purpose, to learn, to understand and hopefully will walk away from wanting to be part of the solution rather than the problem.We have multiple narrators giving us their view on how things played out and providing lessons on feminism, racism, rape culture and how we define sexuality in the modern age particularly when it comes to teens. Thankfully you get a decent amount of diversity so the views and issues are painted in a variety of contexts to give us a fuller picture of how different sets of people experience the same thing.Since this is a book about rape there are characters you are going to hate, there are those who your heart will break for, and there are those who you champion. Some strong female characters are provided to show the power that comes when they can work together.Your heart will break at times for what women are put through, how horrible it is when our own gender stands against basic rights that affects us all, anger at how men are treated as all powerful and the extent those in society will go to silence the dissenting voices who demand something as simple as the right to not have their bodies violated.The issues this brings up are important to discuss and hopefully will provoke more people to stand up, speak out and bring about change.
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  • Tori Frost
    January 1, 1970
    This was a hard read, but a worthwhile one. Needless to say, rape is discussed a lot in this book, and some of the abuse is on-screen. I would caution readers (and especially parents) to be aware of the content before beginning the book.I was nervous about having three (and, eventually, many) perspective characters from such different backgrounds would result in some cringe-worthy moments, but every character felt well-rounded and written with care. The discussion of assault, violence, rape cult This was a hard read, but a worthwhile one. Needless to say, rape is discussed a lot in this book, and some of the abuse is on-screen. I would caution readers (and especially parents) to be aware of the content before beginning the book.I was nervous about having three (and, eventually, many) perspective characters from such different backgrounds would result in some cringe-worthy moments, but every character felt well-rounded and written with care. The discussion of assault, violence, rape culture, and misogyny was close-to-home and multifaceted. I was especially pleased to see so many different secondary characters included and to see they way their different backgrounds affected their viewpoints. It is definitely an intersectional read, although there are a few secondary characters I wish could have been more prominent. The thing that really pushes it to five stars instead of four is just how raw and bold the emotions are -- every time I set the book down, my heart was pounding with anger and pride for these characters and, of course, for what girls and women face every day around the world and how much they overcome. Again, this was a hard read, but it was one of my favorites of the year so far.
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  • Jennie Shaw
    January 1, 1970
    4.5There's a concern with commercial fiction that authors shouldn't lead with themes--that heavy handed messages must be pared down and subtly inserted into the plot. Well, THE NOWHERE GIRLS raises two middle fingers to that sentiment and I AM HERE FOR IT. This book blew my mind. The third-person narration was perfection, one particular narrator captured my attention right away and I had the most emotional reactions when it was her turn to continue the story. I've worked as a rape crisis counsel 4.5There's a concern with commercial fiction that authors shouldn't lead with themes--that heavy handed messages must be pared down and subtly inserted into the plot. Well, THE NOWHERE GIRLS raises two middle fingers to that sentiment and I AM HERE FOR IT. This book blew my mind. The third-person narration was perfection, one particular narrator captured my attention right away and I had the most emotional reactions when it was her turn to continue the story. I've worked as a rape crisis counsellor before and the one thing that irked me were the group settings. I won't go into detail because spoilers suck, but those scenes yanked me out of the book because they were stiff and a little too contrived. This is a messy issue that has so many points that need to be brought to the surface and THE NOWHERE GIRLS certainly delivers, but as a work of fiction and storytelling, there were slight problems in certain areas. It doesn't matter, though. THE NOWHERE GIRLS is a must-read for EVERYONE. It's empowering and a call to action. Don't assume this book is a vigilante-style tale. It's not. It's thoughtful, full of wisdom and collective experiences and ultimately uplifting. A remarkable feat, imho. Huge thanks to Simon & Schuster Canada for sending me an ARC!
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