Night School (Jack Reacher #21)
It’s 1996, and Reacher is still in the army. In the morning they give him a medal, and in the afternoon they send him back to school. That night he’s off the grid. Out of sight, out of mind.Two other men are in the classroom—an FBI agent and a CIA analyst. Each is a first-rate operator, each is fresh off a big win, and each is wondering what the hell they are doing there.Then they find out: A Jihadist sleeper cell in Hamburg, Germany, has received an unexpected visitor—a Saudi courier, seeking safe haven while waiting to rendezvous with persons unknown. A CIA asset, undercover inside the cell, has overheard the courier whisper a chilling message: “The American wants a hundred million dollars.”For what? And who from? Reacher and his two new friends are told to find the American. Reacher recruits the best soldier he has ever worked with: Sergeant Frances Neagley. Their mission heats up in more ways than one, while always keeping their eyes on the prize: If they don’t get their man, the world will suffer an epic act of terrorism.From Langley to Hamburg, Jalalabad to Kiev, Night School moves like a bullet through a treacherous landscape of double crosses, faked identities, and new and terrible enemies, as Reacher maneuvers inside the game and outside the law.Listening Length: 13 hours and 7 minutes

Night School (Jack Reacher #21) Details

TitleNight School (Jack Reacher #21)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 7th, 2016
PublisherBooks on Tape
ISBN-139780804192972
Rating
GenreThriller, Fiction, Mystery, Crime

Night School (Jack Reacher #21) Review

  • James Thane
    January 1, 1970
    The twenty-first entry in the Jack Reacher series is another flashback to an adventure that occurred while Reacher was still in the army. The year is 1996; Reacher is only thirty-five years old, and he's fresh off a very successful mission for which he has been awarded a medal. But immediately after the ceremony, he's issued new orders to attend a night school course--hardly the reward he was expecting after a job well done. He's now effectively off the rest of the Army's radar, at least for the The twenty-first entry in the Jack Reacher series is another flashback to an adventure that occurred while Reacher was still in the army. The year is 1996; Reacher is only thirty-five years old, and he's fresh off a very successful mission for which he has been awarded a medal. But immediately after the ceremony, he's issued new orders to attend a night school course--hardly the reward he was expecting after a job well done. He's now effectively off the rest of the Army's radar, at least for the time being.Reacher arrives at the facility where the course is supposed to take place only to find two other "students," one from the CIA and the other from the FBI. They too have just come off successful missions and are wondering why they've been consigned to a duty like this. But the three are soon joined by a pair of very senior government officials who explain that they are not actually going back to school. Rather, they've been delegated to work on a very secret mission of extreme urgency.All anyone seems to know at the moment is that a group of jihadists, with a cell in Hamburg, Germany, has offered to spent one hundred million dollars for something that an American proposes to sell to them. No one has any idea who the American is or what he could possibly have that would be worth that much money. But whatever it might be, if the jihadists want it that badly, the exchange has to be very bad news for the United States and probably for the rest of the western world as well.Reacher will recruit his old compatriot, Sergeant Frances Neagley, to work with the team and Reacher and Neagley will spend most of their time in Hamburg, attempting to unravel the mysteries surrounding this transaction. Unlike most of the Reacher novels, Reacher is obviously now back in uniform. He's part of a huge institution and, while fans of the series are used to watching Reacher act as a solitary individual, basically making up his own rules as he goes along, here he is compelled to work as a member of a team. Naturally, though, he will do so in a style that is uniquely his own and that will still enable him to beat the crap out of a lot of bad guys along the way.This is an okay book, but it's not among the better ones in the series. In part this is because of the constraints that the plot places upon Reacher and also because the book has a tendency to bog down in places as Reacher, Neagley and the rest of the team race around Hamburg pursuing a lot of leads that will prove fruitless before they finally get on the right track. Fans of the series will certainly want to read it, but more casual fans of crime fiction who just occasionally check in on Jack Reacher might want to look for one of the other books in the series.
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  • Andrew Smith
    January 1, 1970
    In this prequel, set in the mid nineties, Reacher is still in the Army. He’s a major in the military police and has been drafted into an emergency task force. Intelligence services in Europe have heard something: ‘The American wants a hundred million dollars’. Nobody knows who The American is or what could cost such an exorbitant price, but it’s assumed to be bad news, very bad news. For fans of this series there will be few surprises in the set-up, the cast is small enough to allow readers to b In this prequel, set in the mid nineties, Reacher is still in the Army. He’s a major in the military police and has been drafted into an emergency task force. Intelligence services in Europe have heard something: ‘The American wants a hundred million dollars’. Nobody knows who The American is or what could cost such an exorbitant price, but it’s assumed to be bad news, very bad news. For fans of this series there will be few surprises in the set-up, the cast is small enough to allow readers to become familiar with all the significant players, the geographic area is well defined and all the standard Reacher traits are on display. We see the story unfold, in the course of a few days, from the point of view of the chasers and the chased. And it’s an interesting enough story with a degree of mystery held back until close to the end. That’s all the good news.The not so good news is that it’s a bit slow, a bit plodding. The whole thing lacks the raw tension of the best books in this series. I also found the dénouement itself be be rather anticlimactic. Finally, I listened to this book on audio, read by the normally reliable Jeff Harding, and felt that his portrayal of Reacher (his lines read in a slow, flat monotone) somehow contrived to draw all life out of the character. Having listened to a couple of books from this series I’m now firmly of the opinion that they are better left to the printed page. There’s also a strange element here I haven’t noticed before, in that Child displays a penchant for describing something that didn’t happen and he did this quite frequently. I lost count of the times he stated ‘Reacher said nothing’ and some other characters also said nothing. Also a phone didn’t ring. I’m not sure what this was meant to add but in the end I just found it quite irritating.All in all, I think it’s pretty average fare. It may just be because I’ve been tiring of the format for some time but I was actually quite glad when this one drew to a close. Will I be back? Well I’m afraid the jury’s out on that one.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    I'll say 3.75 stars, rounded up...In penning another of his 'flashback' Reacher novels, Child stirs the pot and leaves series fans divided. Taking the story back to 1997, Reacher still works for the Military Police and is summoned to attend some additional training in the form of an evening class. The course outline is vague and Reacher is sworn to secrecy, but he has nothing to lose, showing up to a classroom where representatives of the CIA and FBI await him. The class is a cover to instil int I'll say 3.75 stars, rounded up...In penning another of his 'flashback' Reacher novels, Child stirs the pot and leaves series fans divided. Taking the story back to 1997, Reacher still works for the Military Police and is summoned to attend some additional training in the form of an evening class. The course outline is vague and Reacher is sworn to secrecy, but he has nothing to lose, showing up to a classroom where representatives of the CIA and FBI await him. The class is a cover to instil inter-agency cooperation on a pending threat that has come out of Germany. A collection of Muslims from various countries, on both sides of the Shia-Shi'ite divide, are living together and talking about a vague event. An Iranian double agent is reporting that the group has been dealing with an American who is willing to sell them something for upwards of $100 million. With no idea as to who the mystery American might be or what he has to offer for such a large sum of money, Reacher is sent to the region to investigate. While liaising with German officials, Reacher learns that the American might be part of the US Military, based on some information that witnesses have garnered. However, others offer information that leads Reacher to wonder if this could be one of the handful of men who went AWOL over the past while. Working on this premise, Reacher uses his systematic thinking that has made him so popular in twenty previous novels and loosely connects the American and the larger plot to events from the Cold War era. The item worth so much could be something that might ignite a new and highly dangerous war, though Reacher is determined not to let that happen. As Reacher races to locate the perpetrator, he must flex his muscle and seduce yet another woman, keys to the recipe of any Jack Reacher thriller, while also ensuring that there is some degree of finality, knowing full well that the world does not end in 1997. What could Reacher have discovered in the years leading up to America's supposed 'War on Terror'? An interesting throwback novel that has some fans bemoaning the end of Lee Child's success as a bestselling author while others applaud this ingenious spin.It was just the other day that I was discussing the idea of long book series with a protagonist that has an 'active' (read: fighting) tendency. How long can a series go on before the body gives out and it becomes somewhat unbelievable. Scot Harvath and Mitch Rapp seem to be able to do it, though the likes of Jason Bourne may have to hang up his shoes soon (this is likely because of an inferior author guiding him through adventures now). When it comes to Jack Reacher, the same might be said, though Lee Child has taken an interesting spin on things, by penning throwback or 'flashback' novels to help the series grow while not taxing the protagonist any further from where he ended during the last present-based novel. Many series fans don't like this, as Reacher is best known for his renegade and vigilante behaviour, which is lost when he still dons the Army uniform. That said, he remains crisp and uses his analytical mind to decipher the most obscure clues. In this novel, the younger Reacher is his sarcastic self, surrounded by an always-new (and somewhat unique) collection of supporting characters. Pulling time-sensitive plots, Child is able to discuss Muslim terrorism in its kernel stage, before it was used by every thriller writer and flogged to the point of becoming less than intriguing. I will agree, somewhat, that the law-abiding Reacher, one serving his country, is not as exciting as the current incarnation of this character, though this novel way by no means a waste. As with any Reacher novel, there has to be that lovely lady that Reacher is able to seduce and a group of men who are begging to have the snot beaten out of them by the calm protagonist. Child is always happy to offer social commentary pulling on various aspects of America's ongoing need to be involved in wars of all types and the apparent disregard for technological protection from one era to another. If I were to say anything else, I might spill the proverbial beans, so I will encourage readers to give this novel a change and look at the silver lining; Lee Child has not signed off on letting Tom Cruise ruin a handful of other Jack Reacher stories in the years to come. Kudos, Mr. Child for this refreshing look at the early Jack Reacher, before the chip on his shoulder became the cross he had to bear. Like/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    Lee Child sure writes great books. And Jack Reacher is a great character. I'm a big fan. Although I've read these books in publication order, I'm not sure it's necessary. With this book, Child goes back to 1996, three years after a bomb went off in the parking garage below a very tall building in New York City. Reacher is Major Reacher, an MP in the U.S. Army. He and two other men from other U.S. government agencies are sent to Night School. I love that Child can write about various periods of R Lee Child sure writes great books. And Jack Reacher is a great character. I'm a big fan. Although I've read these books in publication order, I'm not sure it's necessary. With this book, Child goes back to 1996, three years after a bomb went off in the parking garage below a very tall building in New York City. Reacher is Major Reacher, an MP in the U.S. Army. He and two other men from other U.S. government agencies are sent to Night School. I love that Child can write about various periods of Reacher's life, and not be chronologically correct.No spoilers here. A clandestine someone just learned that The American is asking 100 million U.S. dollars for something. That's the spark, but who's involved and what's for sale that's worth that price? Thus starts the cat-and-mouse game to figure it out.My husband and son are big into military history, especially World War II, and this book gave me an opportunity to discuss that with them and to question them. My son even Googled and showed me pictures. I love that Child took an actual "thing" and wrapped a fictional story around it. Well, I'm assuming it was mostly fictional.In one previous book, I thought Child used too many short, choppy sentences. In this one, he got it right. It's like fast thinking or understanding who you're talking with without them saying very many words. It helps pick up the pace. At times, there is humorous dialogue and other times Child writes a humorous observation. I love that, and I have to read it to my husband because I've laughed out loud.I’m sure all Reacher Creatures will like this one!
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  • Ahmad Sharabiani
    January 1, 1970
    Night School (Jack Reacher, #21), Lee ChildNight School is a 2016 novel by Lee Child. This is the twenty-first book in the Jack Reacher series. It is written in the third person. It’s 1996, and Reacher is still in the army. In the morning they give him a medal, and in the afternoon they send him back to school. That night he’s off the grid. Out of sight, out of mind.تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز چهاردهم ماه دسامبر سال 2017 میلادیعنوان: مدرسه شبانه (سری جک ریچر #21)؛با روایت سوم شخص نگاشته شده است و نخ Night School (Jack Reacher, #21), Lee ChildNight School is a 2016 novel by Lee Child. This is the twenty-first book in the Jack Reacher series. It is written in the third person. It’s 1996, and Reacher is still in the army. In the morning they give him a medal, and in the afternoon they send him back to school. That night he’s off the grid. Out of sight, out of mind.تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز چهاردهم ماه دسامبر سال 2017 میلادیعنوان: مدرسه شبانه (سری جک ریچر #21)؛با روایت سوم شخص نگاشته شده است و نخستین بار در سال 2016 میلادی منتشر شده است. جک ریچر هنوز در ارتش است و ...؛ ا. شربیانی
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  • Joanne Harris
    January 1, 1970
    I've been following Lee Child's books from the start, and they are always enjoyable, as well as being competent, readable and well-crafted; but recently I've started to feel as if this particular goldmine has been mostly exhausted. I totally see what the author has been trying to do in the past two or three books- to create different scenarios - but I'm not sure the best way of doing this is to go back into Reacher's past. A man is the sum of his life's experience, and the younger Reacher seems I've been following Lee Child's books from the start, and they are always enjoyable, as well as being competent, readable and well-crafted; but recently I've started to feel as if this particular goldmine has been mostly exhausted. I totally see what the author has been trying to do in the past two or three books- to create different scenarios - but I'm not sure the best way of doing this is to go back into Reacher's past. A man is the sum of his life's experience, and the younger Reacher seems suspiciously identical to the post-Army Reacher: still as laconic, as cool, as vaguely insubordinate, as irresistible to women as ever. He ticks all the boxes, of course, and many readers will like that. But I would have liked to see a different, less self-assured Reacher: something to indicate how he has changed since those earlier Army days. Instead I found myself forgetting for long periods of time that this was an Army story. The re-introduction of Neagley was a welcome addition: but as for the new love interest, she seemed so insubstantial as to be almost a caricature. Not the author's fault, I suspect - this is now too strong a franchise for him to venture too far from the formula - but I'd love to see what Lee Child could achieve if separated from Reacher. A book about Neagley? I'd read that. And yes, perhaps it's time...
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    3.5★sAfter receiving a medal in the morning, Major Jack Reacher along with two others, FBI and CIA, were buried deeply in a highly secure establishment they called Night School. But it wasn’t a school. 1996 and the hierarchy had heard something big was going down. The message that had been overheard; “the American wants a hundred million dollars” was chilling – they needed to discover what could possibly have enough value to warrant that figure…Sergeant Frances Neagley joined the team, and befor 3.5★sAfter receiving a medal in the morning, Major Jack Reacher along with two others, FBI and CIA, were buried deeply in a highly secure establishment they called Night School. But it wasn’t a school. 1996 and the hierarchy had heard something big was going down. The message that had been overheard; “the American wants a hundred million dollars” was chilling – they needed to discover what could possibly have enough value to warrant that figure…Sergeant Frances Neagley joined the team, and before long she and Reacher were in Hamburg trying to track clues. One step forward, two steps back – their frustration was mounting. Could they find the messenger? Or would they find the American first? Mistakes were made – what would be the outcome?Night School by Lee Child didn’t feel to me to be in the same league as previous Reacher novels. The pace seemed slow, and I wasn’t riveted – in fact I didn’t have any problem putting it down. The sentences were short and choppy and there was a lot of repetition. I think maybe it was too military for me and a long way from where the author usually bases his Reacher novels. But I’ll still be reading the next Reacher novel, and I still recommend this one to fans of the thriller genre (and Jack Reacher of course!)
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  • Yatharth K
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 77% I know! 77% is too late to give up, but I had to. I couldn't care to read anymore. It wasn't interesting a bit. The reason I got to 77% was because, Lee Child's writing is very smooth with short and clear sentences, the dialogues are sometimes witty, the descriptions are sometimes interesting, but this particular book had nothing else.Let me first start first with why you shouldn't read this book:1. No clear stakes: Well, the conflict is as good as the villain, and in this story, bel DNF at 77% I know! 77% is too late to give up, but I had to. I couldn't care to read anymore. It wasn't interesting a bit. The reason I got to 77% was because, Lee Child's writing is very smooth with short and clear sentences, the dialogues are sometimes witty, the descriptions are sometimes interesting, but this particular book had nothing else.Let me first start first with why you shouldn't read this book:1. No clear stakes: Well, the conflict is as good as the villain, and in this story, believe me, the biggest villain is circumstance, bureaucracy and conflict of national interests. In a different kind of book these obstacles may be valid, even interesting, but not in Jack Reacher story. As repeated readers know, he need people or group of people to outwit and out-punch, here there are none. Also, we don't know much about main antagonist's plan to hate him with all the fury, I mean, he does bad things but it's within the acceptable limit of bad guys. In other words he isn't shockingly evil, not someone who must receive Jack Reacher's 'one punch' of death instead of regular punishment. 2. Page filler description of mundane: I hate it when there's too much of it. We don't need to know every step of Reacher doing breakfast, it's not an flowchart or an operation manual. I believe it was done to compensate for lack of story and fill the required number of pages.3. Forced Sex Scene: I know, I thought this can only happen in B-Movies, but nope, Lee Child wants to make sure that the protagonist get some ;) I also noticed that Lee Child took his sweet time describing the act, which is new because earlier he was like 'they did it'. Now it's like one and half page of softcore erotica(He doesn't go full explicit like say Sidney Sheldon) 4. Arrogantly oversmart This may be just me, but while I like intelligent characters, Jack Reacher is predictably oversmart i.e you know he will figure out things by himself while everyone else will act like dumbfucks doing what they are told. At no point of time it feels like Reacher is wrong or struggling to get the right idea. And on top of that his confidence seems more like arrogance than something supported by logic. 5. Chest thumping nationalism I have the feeling that this book was written with American(USA) readers in mind as there are many instances of American rubbing in Germany's defeat in WW and belittling them . I am neither from Germany nor USA but I still feel it wasn't on comfortable side of nationalism.Now, if you have read this much, I'll tell you why you should read this book:You are a Jack Reacher fan, love quick and easy time killers. That's all.In summary, it isn't a difficult book to read. It's just not interesting enough with weak conflict and page filler non-story related stuff. As a Jack Reacher fan, you may skip this one and try his next.
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  • Phrynne
    January 1, 1970
    Something different from the norm for this series as Lee Child takes Reacher back into his past and back into uniform. I liked it especially as we see a different side of Jack as well - more brain and a bit less brawn than usual!Of course he still single handedly takes on half a dozen men at a time and comes out not even breathing heavily. Where would we be if he could not do that? However he also has to spend a lot of time planning, strategizing and outguessing the enemy and he does it well.Nic Something different from the norm for this series as Lee Child takes Reacher back into his past and back into uniform. I liked it especially as we see a different side of Jack as well - more brain and a bit less brawn than usual!Of course he still single handedly takes on half a dozen men at a time and comes out not even breathing heavily. Where would we be if he could not do that? However he also has to spend a lot of time planning, strategizing and outguessing the enemy and he does it well.Nice too to spend time again with the younger Jack Reacher. He seemed to be in a very good place at 35, calm, confident and with a good support base of close friends to call on. Of course he also scores a relationship with a beautiful woman which ends as usual with the book.Not as action packed or fast paced as his usual novels but still very readable and a refreshing change:)
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  • Manuel Antão
    January 1, 1970
    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Bubble Gum Fun or On How Davy Crockett Plays a Stupid Part: “Night School” by Lee Child The way I read the Jack Reacher novels is for their underpants. Because Jack doesn't own clothes he isn't wearing, it means I can know how long he's been wearing the same set of underpants. I’ve been told he changes every three days, which to my way of thinking is still not often enough, to say the least (I change them daily…lol), but in some of the If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Bubble Gum Fun or On How Davy Crockett Plays a Stupid Part: “Night School” by Lee Child The way I read the Jack Reacher novels is for their underpants. Because Jack doesn't own clothes he isn't wearing, it means I can know how long he's been wearing the same set of underpants. I’ve been told he changes every three days, which to my way of thinking is still not often enough, to say the least (I change them daily…lol), but in some of the novels it's a lot, lot longer than that. I don’t know how the other characters don’t notice this, or if they do, they’re afraid he’ll punch them in the face. If underpants are a bit too intimate for you, we can do socks, and Jack does an awful lot of running, jumping, falling. He must change them very often. And he might carry a toothbrush but there's no dental floss or mouthwash, no deodorant stick or spray. I think you'll find that about ten books ago he got a job digging swimming pools. Off the top of my head I can't remember whether he used a spade or just his bare hands. Or maybe his fold up toothbrush. And, yes, in my mind, Jack Reacher's sweat always smells of Old Spice. If you're into Old Spice Men, read the rest of the review elsewhere. If you can't stand the smell, stay well clear of it. 
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  • Susan Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    For his 20th book, Lee Child takes us back to 1996 when Reacher was a major in the U.S. Army. After receiving a medal, Reacher is hustled off to a "training school" which translates into being lost in the system. There is a suspected crisis and the National Security County (NCS) is forming a team of the Army, FBI and CIA to combat it. This is pre- Internet days when about 10% of the population used it. It is amazing how we were able to function. Reacher brings his sergeant and flies to Hamburg t For his 20th book, Lee Child takes us back to 1996 when Reacher was a major in the U.S. Army. After receiving a medal, Reacher is hustled off to a "training school" which translates into being lost in the system. There is a suspected crisis and the National Security County (NCS) is forming a team of the Army, FBI and CIA to combat it. This is pre- Internet days when about 10% of the population used it. It is amazing how we were able to function. Reacher brings his sergeant and flies to Hamburg to assess the potential danger. He's just not good at sitting in a situation room discussing the problem to death. He wants the action. As they start to unwind the problem, they discover it's a bigger deal than they ever thought. He joins force with the German Chief of Detectives. Griezman, and starts untangling a very ugly problem. There is a strong right wing German group and Arabs and a planted confidential informant. As the story breezes along , the pages go faster and faster as you just have to discover what's going to happen next. It's really one of the most entertaining Reacher books I have read in awhile. I love the scene where Reacher and his female sergeant take on a gang of Neo-Nazis. When the story is retold, the victims say Reacher had a back-up of 12 men. So what didn't I like? This book depended so much on coincidences and things falling in Reacher's lap. Reacher was supposedly making educated guesses but really? There was just too much of things working out miraculously. The other is that I think Child wrote this with an eye to making a movie. It really sounded so much more like a movie script than a book. It puts my teeth on edge as I am still upset with Tom Cruise playing 6'5" 250 pound Reacher. Really?
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  • Bam
    January 1, 1970
    *3.5 stars. I needed a break from some pretty heavy reading and a new Jack Reacher story was just the ticket. The twenty-first book in the series takes the reader back to 1996. Jack has just been given a medal by the US Army for a job well done and is told that his next assignment will be to return to school for a course entitled 'Impact of Recent Forensic Innovation on Inter-Agency Cooperation.' Of course that is a smoke screen for an important top-secret mission involving the National Security *3.5 stars. I needed a break from some pretty heavy reading and a new Jack Reacher story was just the ticket. The twenty-first book in the series takes the reader back to 1996. Jack has just been given a medal by the US Army for a job well done and is told that his next assignment will be to return to school for a course entitled 'Impact of Recent Forensic Innovation on Inter-Agency Cooperation.' Of course that is a smoke screen for an important top-secret mission involving the National Security Council, CIA and FBI...and fate of the world as we know it. The men are told that there is a jihadist sleeper cell group operating in Hamburg, Germany, consisting of four men in their twenties--three Saudis and one Iranian--whose mission has been to embed themselves in the West and await instructions. The Iranian is a double agent and has alerted his American handler that they have had a visitor, a messenger who had come to rendezvous with an American, to receive an opening gambit in a sale. When the messenger returns to their apartment, he is excited by the message he has received and spills the beans--the American wants $100 million dollars for the item he wishes to sell. It is the job of this elite team the NSC has put together, including Reacher and side-kick Neagley, to figure out who is this person and what is he selling? And of course try to stop him. This thriller is an interesting police procedural with the usual Reacher story formula--beating up gangs of attackers nearly single-handedly, sleeping with the one beautiful woman involved in the case, using his remarkable instincts to pull a rabbit out his hat as far as clues go. Plenty of twists and turns keep the plot moving along nicely and delivers a satisfying ending. Interesting quote from the ultimate 'bad guy' (considering the current political climate in America and Europe): "They want their country back. I'll make sure they get the country they deserve. Strong again. With purity of purpose. All pulling together in the same direction. No more dead wood. No more outside interference. Nothing of that kind will be tolerated. Germany will be for Germans."My husband's usual review of these kinds of books is simple: "It was good! The good guys win; the bad guys lose." And so it goes...
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  • Dee Haddrill
    January 1, 1970
    Jack Reacher is undeniably one of my top 5 fictional heroes (which is why I'm so unhappy about the movie casting, but I digress). Night School gives us a look into one of Reacher's Army service adventures, and is as awesome a book as always.
  • Jason Merchant
    January 1, 1970
    Night School is certainly one of the weakest and most poorly plotted of the usually enjoyable Jack Reacher series. Set in 1996, with most of the action taking place in Hamburg, it is a mediocre overseas police procedural with Reacher heading a small, secret team trying to track down an American who is about to be paid $100 million for something. The plot is full of implausibilities (view spoiler)[(a German police chief helping drive Reacher and his team around, a series of wonderful coincidences Night School is certainly one of the weakest and most poorly plotted of the usually enjoyable Jack Reacher series. Set in 1996, with most of the action taking place in Hamburg, it is a mediocre overseas police procedural with Reacher heading a small, secret team trying to track down an American who is about to be paid $100 million for something. The plot is full of implausibilities (view spoiler)[(a German police chief helping drive Reacher and his team around, a series of wonderful coincidences, ten 1950s-era "backpack" nuclear devices accidentally left behind by US forces in Germany (!), the full-on neo-Nazi scene [1996 is too early for this to be a thing in Hamburg, in the west], an Iranian in a Sunni terrorist cell [Iran is Shiite], one of Reacher's team successfully explaining to skeptical German warehouse workers that they're doing an audit on the orders of Brazilian military police--in German!, the unexplained disappearance of Captain Griezman at the shoe warehouse [just when they need a German speaker], etc.), and worse, this book makes Reacher into a cold-blooded murderer. He executes a man who Reacher speculatively compares to a young Hitler, but who seems mostly a small-time, big-idea macher and dreamer. As much as we might be enthralled by Reacher's situational ethics that has stood him in relatively good stead through the series, this execution (conveniently, all the other main characters have stepped out of the room for the nonce, including the German captain, who pops back up to give them a ride home or something) puts Reacher clearly beyond the pale. (hide spoiler)] The book is marred by Child's unfamiliarity with the spy terrain: there are tons of implausible interagency things, a way too helpful CIA station chief, poorly rendered German (the intended "Yellow Farm" is given as the ungrammatical "Gelb Bauernhof"--exactly what looking up "yellow" and "farm" in a dictionary and sticking the words together would give you, innocent of any knowledge of German grammar, in particular adjectival endings--even Google translate does a little better job [though still ungrammatical]), and other infelicities: a German bartender in a neo-Nazi bar would pick up a phone to rat out the leader of the neo-Nazi movement to an American who gave him a few extra bucks the last couple of months? Ridiculous. Finally, like many monolingual spy writers, Child's foreign characters miraculously speak flawless idiomatic English, including cops. As good as educated Germans' English is, it's not this perfect. Also, someone please hire an editor who knows American English and can correct for Child's occasional British English: Reacher sometimes says things that sound fine in British English, but strike the American ear as not quite native, e.g., "I'd like to say we've got all day, but I'm not sure about that. Maybe we haven't." (p. 291, where an American would probably prefer "Maybe we don't.")This one is a definite pass, sadly. Bring back the US-based, non-police-procedural, loner crime-solver and all-around tough guy intervener Reacher, and leave this hackeneyed, Army-embedded, saluting, out-of-his-element-in-a-foreign-land Reacher for the wannabe spy-thriller writers.
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  • Adam
    January 1, 1970
    Got an advanced copy from Goodreads Giveaways. Wow! This is a great one, definitely in my top five of Reacher novels. Reacher is in the Army. A major in the MPs in 1996. He's sent to "school", but, being that it's Reacher, nothing is as ordinary as it seems. From there the action continues to build, as do the stakes. Like I said, I've read all the Reacher books and this is one of the best. Really glad I got a copy early, but now I have to wait even longer until the next one!
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  • Abram
    January 1, 1970
    My rating: 4.4/5Night School has everything that you would expect from a Jack Reacher novel. It was fun and fast. It was stylish and.... simple(?) who knows?!But It was really good. I actually liked this one better than most of the other Jack reacher novels. This one has more simple story but at the same time it's entertaining. I started it and after some pages.. that's it. The novel ended. Blimey!
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  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    For the fans of the Jack Reacher novels (Of which I am big one), the latest story takes place in 1996 when Reacher is still in the army. Wasn’t sure how I would feel about that, but turns out it is as good as those that take place in the present. Reacher is sent to school, but in reality he and two others (one from the FBI and the other CIA) are really part of a secret mission to find out what US property or Intel is being sold for millions of dollars. With some assistance, Reacher figures out t For the fans of the Jack Reacher novels (Of which I am big one), the latest story takes place in 1996 when Reacher is still in the army. Wasn’t sure how I would feel about that, but turns out it is as good as those that take place in the present. Reacher is sent to school, but in reality he and two others (one from the FBI and the other CIA) are really part of a secret mission to find out what US property or Intel is being sold for millions of dollars. With some assistance, Reacher figures out that whatever is happening is happening in Germany. Another fast-paced, nerve-wracking, suspenseful story from Lee Child. He continues to thrill this reader!
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  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    The 21st book in the Jack Reacher series is a step back in time. It is 1996 and Reacher is still in the Army. The story opens with his being awarded the Legion of Merit. Immediately following the ceremony he is given new orders. Ostensibly he is being sent to school. With two other students. One is with the CIA and the other is with the FBI. Each fresh off a big win. Shortly after arriving at "school" they learn the real mission. There is a Jihadist sleeper cell in Hamburg, Germany with an under The 21st book in the Jack Reacher series is a step back in time. It is 1996 and Reacher is still in the Army. The story opens with his being awarded the Legion of Merit. Immediately following the ceremony he is given new orders. Ostensibly he is being sent to school. With two other students. One is with the CIA and the other is with the FBI. Each fresh off a big win. Shortly after arriving at "school" they learn the real mission. There is a Jihadist sleeper cell in Hamburg, Germany with an undercover agent for the CIA who has overheard something that needs to be investigated. The message? “The American wants a hundred million dollars.”. What is he selling? And who is buying? Reacher recruits Sergeant Frances Neagley to assist in the mission to find the American and the answers to these questions. This is before 9/11 but terrorism is not unknown. There was the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993 and in 1983 the bombing of the Marine barracks in Beirut. Whatever this is about for a hundred million dollars it has to be big.A Jack Reacher story is usually an enjoyable story. Some are better than others. This one I think is somewhere in the middle. It is not the best one in the series but it is certainly not the worse of the lot. There are the usual fights where Reacher is facing multiple opponents simultaneously and comes out victorious. 3 - 1, 6 - 1, it doesn't matter. Reacher never loses. In this story at any rate he can thank Neagley. She is an interesting character and I'm thinking might be an interesting lead character. If you are to believe Lee Child Neo-Nazism and anti-American sentiment is alive. I don't recall seeing this myself when I was stationed in Germany. Overall this was a fun read. Good guys vs bad guys. Can they stop the terror plot? I don't think there is any surprises here. Not with Jack Reacher assigned to the mission.
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  • The Pfaeffle Journal (Diane)
    January 1, 1970
    Jack Reacher stories are always interesting because Reacher is always Reacher. The book takes Reacher back to 1996 while he was still in the Army. Interesting plot but I have read a couple of books with this type of plot so I rated a little lower because of the lack of originality.
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  • Skip
    January 1, 1970
    In a prequel set in 1996, Jack Reacher is sent to "school" along with two others, one is FBI and one is CIA, reporting only to the head of the NSA, his deputy, and the President. An Iranian mole for the Americans reports that some American is selling something worth $100 million to terrorists. Each student grabs their most trusted colleague, which for Reacher is Sergeant Frances Neagley, who has reappeared in the most recent books. Things develop slowly, and Reacher has to wait 100 pages (maybe In a prequel set in 1996, Jack Reacher is sent to "school" along with two others, one is FBI and one is CIA, reporting only to the head of the NSA, his deputy, and the President. An Iranian mole for the Americans reports that some American is selling something worth $100 million to terrorists. Each student grabs their most trusted colleague, which for Reacher is Sergeant Frances Neagley, who has reappeared in the most recent books. Things develop slowly, and Reacher has to wait 100 pages (maybe more?) to beat up his first victims. The highlight of the book may be the working relationship Reacher builds with the German detective as they seek to avert disaster.
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  • Matthew
    January 1, 1970
    Did Lee Child even write this? Seriously. Reacher was dramatically different in this book compared to previous books.
  • Pat
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a huge Jack Reacher fan so naturally I loved this book.What I particularly like (others might find it annoying) is how Reacher applies logic and reasoning to a puzzle to work out the most likely scenario. I almost find it endearing - tragic, I know. But I just love following his thought processes.This book is another that delves into Reacher's past while he was still an MP in the army. He is to work with FBI and CIA agents to stop a suspected terror plot but there is absolutely no informatio I'm a huge Jack Reacher fan so naturally I loved this book.What I particularly like (others might find it annoying) is how Reacher applies logic and reasoning to a puzzle to work out the most likely scenario. I almost find it endearing - tragic, I know. But I just love following his thought processes.This book is another that delves into Reacher's past while he was still an MP in the army. He is to work with FBI and CIA agents to stop a suspected terror plot but there is absolutely no information about the threat or the target. This is what they are supposed to work out. Long story short, Reacher teams up with Neagley and they do their stuff leaving the other agencies to eat their dust. It was just a lot of fun. Lee Child is a bit like McDonalds - you know exactly what you're going to get. And he always delivers.I'll be keenly awaiting the next Reacher book now.
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    3.5-This is a well-plotted mystery and worthy entry in the Jack Reacher series. My personal preference for the character are the atmospheric stories where, as an ex-military loner, he wanders into trouble in unlikely places in the US, in this series prequel he's on more or less of a European spy mission while still in the Army. On the whole, though, I found it a better than average read as is the case with most of Lee Child's books.
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  • Monnie
    January 1, 1970
    There's a bit of a different feel to this one, the 21st, I believe, in the author's popular Jack Reacher series. That's probably because it takes place back in 1996, when Reacher is still in the army. He's got pretty much the same swagger, mental and physical capabilities, but he seems a little less, well, for want of a better word, exciting. Put another way, except for the obvious physical size differential, at times I actually could envision Tom Cruise in the movie role this time around.The st There's a bit of a different feel to this one, the 21st, I believe, in the author's popular Jack Reacher series. That's probably because it takes place back in 1996, when Reacher is still in the army. He's got pretty much the same swagger, mental and physical capabilities, but he seems a little less, well, for want of a better word, exciting. Put another way, except for the obvious physical size differential, at times I actually could envision Tom Cruise in the movie role this time around.The story, though, is no less interesting - even if it does happen when computers aren't yet the norm and the Internet is not much more than a gleam in Al Gore's eye. It begins as Reacher is getting another medal - one that will be kept secret and in that sense is rather meaningless. After the ceremony, he's surprised at being ordered immediately to "night school," which turns out to be something else entirely - the start of a clandestine operation. In the classroom are two other men, one from the FBI and the other from the CIA. Then, they learn the reason they're there: A CIA spy who has infiltrated a Middle-Eastern sleeper cell in Hamburg, Germany, has passed on a message that "The American wants a hundred million dollars."That's an almost unheard-of sum of money, setting off alarm bells as to what's being bought and sold and by whom. To help, Reacher reels in an extremely competent soldier and friend, Sgt. Frances Neagley. From the start, their investigation must be conducted in utmost secrecy - with less than a handful of individuals aware of what they're doing (one of whom is the President of the United States). Other characters enter the mix as needed, some of whom have motives that aren't exactly in line with the goals of Reacher and his team.Along with a plain old good story, Reacher shows flashes of the character he will become in later books: A man who loves his country enough to die for it, but who at the same time is willing to deviate from standard practices when getting the job done requires thinking outside government-issue boxes. As always, it took me a few chapters to get used to the short, almost jabbing sentences (or, more accurately, sentence fragments - always like fingernails on a blackboard to a grammar freak like me). But also as always, the story grabbed hold of all my senses and I quickly got into the rapid flow of things. All in all, another winner for the author - although I do hope he brings Reacher back to the here and now in the next one. Guess I just like my guys with a little more maturity under their shoulder holsters.
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  • Jean
    January 1, 1970
    This is book 21 of the Jack Reacher series. In this book, Lee Child has Reacher step back in time to 1996; Reacher is still in the Army. Major Reacher has just received the Legion of Honor Medal. He earned this for action in the Balkans.Reacher is sent to Germany to Night School, which is a tiny interagency group of American operatives. Reacher represents the Army Military Police; there is an F. B. I. agent and a CIA operative also in the group. They have been watching a Saudi Cell in Hamburg. T This is book 21 of the Jack Reacher series. In this book, Lee Child has Reacher step back in time to 1996; Reacher is still in the Army. Major Reacher has just received the Legion of Honor Medal. He earned this for action in the Balkans.Reacher is sent to Germany to Night School, which is a tiny interagency group of American operatives. Reacher represents the Army Military Police; there is an F. B. I. agent and a CIA operative also in the group. They have been watching a Saudi Cell in Hamburg. They know an American who is AWOL from the Army is trying to sell the Saudis $100 million worth of something. They have to find out what it is and stop the transaction. Reacher is teamed up with Sgt. Frances Neagley again. Over the years Neagley appears off and on in books of the series.The book is well written. Child was a T.V. screenwriter and has a way of moving the action and keeping the reader’s attention. Child has made a major change in Reacher for this book. He is working as part of a team, whereas, the civilian Reacher is a solitary wanderer. This should not be too much of a surprise as the military is all about team work and Reacher was a career officer.The story is about spies, terrorism and counter-terrorism; all of this is in the age before nine-eleven. We get to see a different side of Reacher: one who analyzes data, make critical decisions, deploys resources and supervises staff. Of course, he is also still great at hand to hand combat. Child has had another book where Reacher is back in the Army. It does add some more depth to the Reacher character.Dick Hill does an excellent job narrating the story. Hill is a multi-award winning audiobook narrators and is one of the few who has won the Golden Voice Award.
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  • Jeanette
    January 1, 1970
    This flashback Reacher is comparable to one of those dinners you make the first time that originates from a practiced and old favorite recipe book that you have owned for 10 years. And it's one of the two recipes that you have never tried previously but have used all the 3 or 5 ingredient standard favorites from that same wore recipe book numerous times. So now you try the "hard" one. And it's the one you haven't made because it has so many different and hard to find ingredients. 12 at least, an This flashback Reacher is comparable to one of those dinners you make the first time that originates from a practiced and old favorite recipe book that you have owned for 10 years. And it's one of the two recipes that you have never tried previously but have used all the 3 or 5 ingredient standard favorites from that same wore recipe book numerous times. So now you try the "hard" one. And it's the one you haven't made because it has so many different and hard to find ingredients. 12 at least, and three of them you have to get at a specialty store on top of it. And you do finish it with all the scratch ingredients listed in a perfectly ordered manner. And yet when you taste it, and you DO like it? Well it just isn't as good as the one on page 3 of the recipe book that held 5 fresh ingredients in terrific fast combination and took you a third of the time to make.In other words, it's a decent read. But it is 4 or 5 sided with so many multiples of characters that the Reacher and friends' personalities and nuance get rather buried. For me, that aspect of Reacher's core and solitary perceptions, an awareness of strangers, reactions to "normal" and genuine Reacherness are NOT central in this book. And in those best Reacher books it always is. I like Reacher in age much, much more.And I remember the 1950's and doubt the Davy Crockett miniature possibility. But I'm still glad I read it.
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  • Bill Lynas
    January 1, 1970
    Let's face it, Lee Child's Jack Reacher books tend to follow a fairly tried & trusted formula. However, the formaula seems to work as the books are always bestsellers....& here I am reading book 21 in the series, having read all the others that preceeded it. Still, it's nice to see Child shake the formula up just a little bit, with a story set twenty years ago that takes place mostly in Germany instead of the USA. Night Schhol is, for me, one of the best entries in the series & I'm p Let's face it, Lee Child's Jack Reacher books tend to follow a fairly tried & trusted formula. However, the formaula seems to work as the books are always bestsellers....& here I am reading book 21 in the series, having read all the others that preceeded it. Still, it's nice to see Child shake the formula up just a little bit, with a story set twenty years ago that takes place mostly in Germany instead of the USA. Night Schhol is, for me, one of the best entries in the series & I'm pleased to see that I still find these books so enjoyable. But, you know what ? I still hope he returns to the old formula for the next novel!
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  • John Wiltshire
    January 1, 1970
    I've read the whole Jack Reacher series, so have been waiting eagerly for this one. Sometimes a series as long as this can go off the boil. I give Lee Child huge kudos for deciding to visit Reacher's earlier life, when he was still serving in the army. Plenty of scope for some fascinating new story arcs.I started this last night, and so far it's hypnotically good. I can see it not appealing to everyone, however: it's so pared to the bone that reading it cuts. I don't think I could point to one u I've read the whole Jack Reacher series, so have been waiting eagerly for this one. Sometimes a series as long as this can go off the boil. I give Lee Child huge kudos for deciding to visit Reacher's earlier life, when he was still serving in the army. Plenty of scope for some fascinating new story arcs.I started this last night, and so far it's hypnotically good. I can see it not appealing to everyone, however: it's so pared to the bone that reading it cuts. I don't think I could point to one unnecessary word so far. It's almost staccato, words peppering the reader like buckshot. It's Reacher personality brought to life in a writing style. If you're new to the series, you're going to find the technique so dry you might be tempted to dismiss this as lazy writing by the author. It's not. This is a masterclass in how to craft a plot without extraneous waffle. How to stay true to your character.And what can I say about the character of Jack Reacher? You have to love him. Although I really wouldn't want to share a long car journey with him. See, Child has established all these little quirks, which devoted fans love, such as Reacher not ever carrying baggage, despite worldwide, constant travel. He carries a toothbrush only, and when he needs new clothes, he finds an outlet, buys new and trashes the old. So...no deodorant and frequent four-day old shirts in hot climes? Yeah, you get the car journey thing. It's so daft it's almost funny, but this is Reacher and you have to go along with the manic ride once you get on this particular roller coaster. I'll update when done...Finished. The action didn't let up and it's a 'can't put down' book the whole way through. Sure, you have to suspend disbelief on many occasions. How Reacher and his team reach conclusions is hysterically funny most of the time: conjecture taken to the max. But it's all part of the fun. This book could stand alone and be read by someone who isn't familiar with the Reacher series, but I don't think you'd become a lifelong fan if you did it that way. The book is clearly written for those who are in on the jokes, the quirks, the foibles of this man. Without his backstory I think you'd find this incredibly lacking, both in character description and depth. Reacher fans, however, will eat this up, as I did.
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  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    After a successful job Reacher has to go back to school and his first assignment from the teacher is to find out why a terrorist organisation will pay a 100 million dollar for an unknown item and who is the seller. So basically your favorite needle in haystack. And not so much a scholing but a high priority job for the military major Reacher and he and Frances Neagley and a few spooks are let loose in this prequel episode of the Reacher tales set in 1996.As always Child delivers a nice tale and After a successful job Reacher has to go back to school and his first assignment from the teacher is to find out why a terrorist organisation will pay a 100 million dollar for an unknown item and who is the seller. So basically your favorite needle in haystack. And not so much a scholing but a high priority job for the military major Reacher and he and Frances Neagley and a few spooks are let loose in this prequel episode of the Reacher tales set in 1996.As always Child delivers a nice tale and Reachers' expertise does bring them to Germany where the answer of the riddle lies in the cold-war past. And it would have been amiss if Reacher would not find som neonazi's that ask for conflict and gets that handed to them as well.Overall not the best and not the worst of the Reacher series and it is a show of Lee childs' cleverness that he chosen to occasionally do a prequel episode with the possibility to deliver a military thriller.A decent book that delivers and Reachers' company is always a pleasure.
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    NIGHT SCHOOL has a boring and laborious start, so much so that I put it down several times, having no interest in it. But then, I thought the beginning of Reacher's story is usually slow and methodical, as Lee Child sets up the exposition. So, I picked it up again and am so glad I did! The story line races along as the mystery unfolds and is enthralling as the mystery is developed and solved. The plot is unique ( how does Mr. Child think of these unusual stories?) The characters, as always, are NIGHT SCHOOL has a boring and laborious start, so much so that I put it down several times, having no interest in it. But then, I thought the beginning of Reacher's story is usually slow and methodical, as Lee Child sets up the exposition. So, I picked it up again and am so glad I did! The story line races along as the mystery unfolds and is enthralling as the mystery is developed and solved. The plot is unique ( how does Mr. Child think of these unusual stories?) The characters, as always, are dynamic. The voice of Reacher is so very well executed; it is so enjoyable to "hear" his voice not only in dialogue, but especially in his thought processes, and finally, in his actions. It all rang true to Reacher's style and character. The climax is spectacularly suspenseful, and the denouement is satisfying ( except for the fact it marks the end of another great Reacher episode!) Mr. Child hits it out of the ballpark - again! This particular novel in is definitely among my favorites in this series!
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