Obi-Wan & Anakin
Before their military heroism in the Clone Wars, before their tragic battle on Mustafar, and many decades before their final confrontation on the Death Star, they were Master Obi-Wan Kenobi and his young Padawan, Anakin Skywalker. Now join them a few years into the "chosen one" Anakin's training. Teacher and student have grown closer over time, but it's been a difficult road. And things aren't about to get any easier. In fact, when they are called to a remote planet for assistance, the pair may be pushed to breaking point. As they find themselves stranded on a strange world of primitive technology and deadly natives, will they be able to save themselves? First they must learn who called for help...and why! COLLECTING: OBI-WAN AND ANAKIN 1-5

Obi-Wan & Anakin Details

TitleObi-Wan & Anakin
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 19th, 2016
PublisherMarvel Comics
ISBN078519679X
ISBN-139780785196792
Number of pages120 pages
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Science Fiction, Media Tie In, Star Wars, Fiction, Superheroes, Marvel, Graphic Novels Comics, Comic Book, Space

Obi-Wan & Anakin Review

  • Sam Quixote
    December 11, 2016
    Set between (shudder) The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones, Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi and his Padawan Anakin Skywalker answer a distress call on a mysterious planet - and quickly become embroiled in a bitter conflict between two sides. Yuck, a prequel comic! Well there had to be one for the (misguided) fans of those movies, eh? And what a stinker it is! Yeah there are flashbacks to features of those awful movies which leave an awful taste behind but it’s Charles Soule’s crummy writing th Set between (shudder) The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones, Jedi Master Obi-Wan Kenobi and his Padawan Anakin Skywalker answer a distress call on a mysterious planet - and quickly become embroiled in a bitter conflict between two sides. Yuck, a prequel comic! Well there had to be one for the (misguided) fans of those movies, eh? And what a stinker it is! Yeah there are flashbacks to features of those awful movies which leave an awful taste behind but it’s Charles Soule’s crummy writing that really ruins this book. The story is sooooo boring! I just did not care about these two nothing sides fighting each other in a tech-less world even with the Jedi getting involved and lightsabering their way through one obstacle after another. The flashbacks to Anakin and Palpatine slumming in a Coruscant bar were equally dull. There are little moments throughout that hint of Anakin’s future conversion to the Dark Side but they’re not interesting. It’s amazing how tedious Soule made this book given how colourful, exciting and bursting with potential the Star Wars universe is. Like his work on Shattered Empire, Marco Checchetto’s art is spectacular - easily the best part of this book! Beautiful alien landscapes, amazing action sequences - the book is full of one breathtakingly epic visual after another. Even though I utterly dislike the prequels, I was willing to give this book a chance and would’ve enjoyed it if it were an entertaining story; unfortunately it wasn’t. Obi-Wan & Anakin is a dreary read with slick artwork that doesn’t make up for the lacking script - it’s another rotten Charles Soule comic! Stop giving this guy Star Wars titles to screw up, Marvel!
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  • Holden Johnson
    December 15, 2016
    Excellent series. Couldn't ask more from a 5 Volume comic.Anakin and Obi-Wan show something that everyone from star wars needs to see. Anakin growing up.Something that the prequels didn't do the best job at(disclaimer, I love the prequel trilogies for what they are, faults and all), is portraying Anakin's emotional slide to the dark side. Overall, there are about 6+ hours of footage that can be crammed into the films. Sure the main plot points and events that caused that(for the most part) are t Excellent series. Couldn't ask more from a 5 Volume comic.Anakin and Obi-Wan show something that everyone from star wars needs to see. Anakin growing up.Something that the prequels didn't do the best job at(disclaimer, I love the prequel trilogies for what they are, faults and all), is portraying Anakin's emotional slide to the dark side. Overall, there are about 6+ hours of footage that can be crammed into the films. Sure the main plot points and events that caused that(for the most part) are there, but there was a lot more to it. That is why some of my favorite star wars canon materials involve the bits and pieces of Anakin's life that extend the prequel trilogy.In this series we see more of Palpatine's manipulation, more of Anakin's questions, more of Obi-Wan's grasping attempts to raise someone with so many said questions.We see an awesome new planet, with a very strange culture and race system, as well as some pretty cool combat scenes.Overall, I felt that this was what I want out of Star Wars comics and wish there were more than just 5 issues.
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  • Sesana
    February 1, 2016
    Hm. There are some serious high points in this book. The art, to start with, is absolutely gorgeous. And entirely unlike anything else that I've seen in the new Star Wars comics. It's far more stylized than the other books have been, and I loved that. The portion of the story set on Coruscant was interesting to see, how Palpatine first came to meddle in Anakin's life. And Soule does a good job of showing the connection between Anakin and Obi-Wan. However, the bulk of the story, set on a planet e Hm. There are some serious high points in this book. The art, to start with, is absolutely gorgeous. And entirely unlike anything else that I've seen in the new Star Wars comics. It's far more stylized than the other books have been, and I loved that. The portion of the story set on Coruscant was interesting to see, how Palpatine first came to meddle in Anakin's life. And Soule does a good job of showing the connection between Anakin and Obi-Wan. However, the bulk of the story, set on a planet entirely ruined by war, just isn't that great. The biggest problem is that it's a story that's been done many times over, and this is not the most interesting take on that basic plot that I've seen. I appreciate that Soule didn't give us definitive answers. What was the war about? Who started it? Whose weapons caused all the devastation we see? At the end of the book, we don't know, and in a very real sense, it doesn't matter. But that's about all the good I can say about that part of the story. So in the end, it's a very pretty book, with some interesting plot points, but it doesn't quite capitalize on the best parts.
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  • Paul
    December 4, 2016
    I'm a big fan of the Obi-Wan and Anakin team; it's actually one of my favourite dynamics in the saga; and I enjoyed this book quite a bit.The only thing I felt let it down a bit was that the planet it takes place on didn't feel very 'Star Wars-y' to me. I know, I know... it's a big galaxy with plenty of room for lots of varied planets, but this one just felt a bit too cyberpunk for my tastes. Still, an OK read.
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  • Anthony
    January 20, 2016
    Solid 3 stars. It's never quite the fun Obi-Wan and Anakin stuff we get in The Clone Wars. There's too much steampunk stuff going on as well. The high points are the flashbacks to coruscant with Palpatine and some other familiar faces.
  • Brandon St Mark
    July 4, 2016
    Actual rating: 4.5 stars.I have no idea why this is rated as low as it is, and why a lot of people I've hear talk about this book say it was a let down. I think it helps to show how strong the bonds between Anakin and Obi-Wan and Anakin and Sheev (the Chancellor) are respectively.I wish Disney would go back and do more stories like this before the original trilogy rather than just ignoring the prequels. Where the prequel's great? No. Are they really all that bad? Again, no. They are certainly di Actual rating: 4.5 stars.I have no idea why this is rated as low as it is, and why a lot of people I've hear talk about this book say it was a let down. I think it helps to show how strong the bonds between Anakin and Obi-Wan and Anakin and Sheev (the Chancellor) are respectively.I wish Disney would go back and do more stories like this before the original trilogy rather than just ignoring the prequels. Where the prequel's great? No. Are they really all that bad? Again, no. They are certainly different than the originals, but not really any less good or bad. Just different.If they (Disney) were to produce some more content like this that show or mention Anakin's trouble with the dark side/his emotions more and how Sheev plays on them and how the Jedi exacerbate it, it would help to show why Anakin fell even better. If they were to show Obi-Wan interacting with Owen (Luke's uncle and Anakin's step-brother), it would help deal with the inconsistencies between the two trilogies. I know that's probably asking to much (both of Disney to even try it and for most fans to accept it), but I wish Disney would just try more. This run was really fun, and I hope they make more like it and less than the Chewie and Lando series (which to me seem boring af and un-need) or Shatter Empire (which was also boring af)
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  • Austin Zook
    August 15, 2016
    Well played, Marvel. Well played.This is a beautifully drawn examination of Anakin and Obi-Wan's relationship during the period between The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones, wherein they visit a (supposedly) dead planet that's transmitted an ancient Jedi distress call, only to find that it's not quite as dead as everyone was led to believe. There are two warring factions (imaginatively named the "open" and "closed") who each blame the other for the world's destruction, and a whole host of Well played, Marvel. Well played.This is a beautifully drawn examination of Anakin and Obi-Wan's relationship during the period between The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones, wherein they visit a (supposedly) dead planet that's transmitted an ancient Jedi distress call, only to find that it's not quite as dead as everyone was led to believe. There are two warring factions (imaginatively named the "open" and "closed") who each blame the other for the world's destruction, and a whole host of creepy creatures running around on the planet's poisoned surface. Interspersed throughout the volume are snippets of the events leading up to the titular duo's assignment--wherein Anakin is a less-than-perfect padawan ( What?! ) and gets to spend some time with Palpatine.At the start of the volume we find out, pretty quickly, that Anakin is entertaining the idea of leaving the Jedi Order because it's not the right fit for him (which is the understatement of the century), and has even gone so far as to hand his lightsaber over to Obi-Wan, as he will no longer be needing it. That lasts about eight seconds, before Obi-Wan returns the lightsaber to him and Anakin just meanders about from point to point, fixing mechanical things and almost plunging this already broken world into even further disarray.Obi-Wan was the standout of this entry. The beloved classic character was masterfully captured through his dialogue, physicality, and actions. He behaved the way a Jedi should behave, always seeking to do right and pushing for nonviolence. He's a legend-in-the-making here and, even without the "he's Obi-fucking-Wan Kenobi" factor, it's easy to see why Anakin idolizes him. There are moments where the graphic novel reaches for the philosophical and contemplates the value of systems to govern action and thought. Early on, Anakin criticizes the system that prevented the Republic from helping the world he and Obi-Wan are on, simply because it didn't have any resources they needed. As the novel continues, and we learn more about the conflict between the open and closed, the story shifts its focus so that it also encompasses feuds where the line between right and wrong have been obscured by the passage of time, along with the reason for the fighting.In spite of their less-than-inspired names, the open and closed make for a decent backdrop for the events occurring and themes explored in this volume. Their pointless, age-old feud makes for a nice vehicle to showcase various lessons Obi-Wan wants Anakin to learn, especially at the end, when Obi-Wan manipulates the system that keeps the Jedi in check to his advantage so the Republic will put a stop to the conflict between the open and closed (I won't spoil exactly how).As I said, the art is gorgeous. We get to see a lot of really great stuff here--a ruined world, battling gunships, horrific creatures, and awe-inspiring war machines--and we get to see it in vivid, atmospheric detail. Intimate moments draw you in and make you feel for the characters; more grandiose moments pull back and allow you to immerse yourself in the awe that comes from witnessing something new and cool and perfectly Star Wars play out in front of you.This is a really great graphic novel, one of the best to come out of the Marvel acquisition of the Star Wars IP from Dark Horse. If they can maintain this quality and blend of art and storytelling, I can't wait to see what's next in a galaxy far, far away.
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  • Travis Duke
    October 11, 2016
    (2.5) A side story that doesn't bring anything new to the table. Its a soft spot because who doesn't want to learn more about the Obi-wan and Anakin relationship but aside from Anakin questioning his Jedi future (also nothing we didnt know really) there isn't any tasty details like in the new Vader series of main line star wars series. I hate to admit this but its Disney filler. I had read this was a weaker series and so far I would agree especially compared to the other strong one i mentioned a (2.5) A side story that doesn't bring anything new to the table. Its a soft spot because who doesn't want to learn more about the Obi-wan and Anakin relationship but aside from Anakin questioning his Jedi future (also nothing we didnt know really) there isn't any tasty details like in the new Vader series of main line star wars series. I hate to admit this but its Disney filler. I had read this was a weaker series and so far I would agree especially compared to the other strong one i mentioned above. The story revolves around The two jedi following a distress call to a far off planet. The story is OK its not great and if your looking for new details about stars wars you won't find any here really. I will read book 2 but i don't have high hopes.
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  • Robert
    March 11, 2017
    Nice art, if a bit murky in places, and an earnest examination of the Master-Padawan relationship between Good ole Ani and Obi before everything went to Mustafar...I'll agree with some other reviews here in that the planet wracked by the conflict between the Open and the Closed didn't feel too Star Wars-y, more like a pastiche of Mad Max and Gulliver's Travels!I'll probably give the next volume a try, though, if I can find it.
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  • Neil Coulter
    November 19, 2016
    The prequel era is by far my least favorite Star Wars setting--the movies really ruined the stories that I'd looked forward to for most of my life. I don't enjoy the relationship between Obi-Wan and Anakin, and so it's predictable the this graphic novel was going to be a hard sell for me. Setting it in the time between Episodes 1 and 2 was actually a really good choice. Though I didn't love the story, I liked it more than I expected. It reminded me a little bit of the Kanan graphic novel, which The prequel era is by far my least favorite Star Wars setting--the movies really ruined the stories that I'd looked forward to for most of my life. I don't enjoy the relationship between Obi-Wan and Anakin, and so it's predictable the this graphic novel was going to be a hard sell for me. Setting it in the time between Episodes 1 and 2 was actually a really good choice. Though I didn't love the story, I liked it more than I expected. It reminded me a little bit of the Kanan graphic novel, which I also liked.The geography, action, and side characters are as forgettable as any Star Wars graphic novel, but there are intriguing indications of the two protagonists' attitudes toward the Republic and the Jedi Order. Palpatine appears in an ongoing flashback story, and his character is about as un-subtle as it is in the movies, which is a disappointment. Star Wars really needed (and still needs) writers who can handle political intrigue. James Luceno and Alexander Freed come the closest, and I'm glad they're being given more important assignments related to Rogue One.All in all, a decent Star Wars story, and probably the quickest graphic novel read of all the new canon so far. Worth checking out from the library. :)
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  • Loup Coudray
    June 9, 2016
    Definitely the best Marvel Star Wars comics i have read yet.The action takes place in a period that had rarely been treated in the expanded universe (between episodes I and II... what a nice change from the traditional Clone Wars!).Anakin & Obi-Wan's characters are really respected, all their actions and reactions are convincing from what we know of them in the movies -maybe Anakin is a bit too mature in this comic book, but it's ok. The small 'flashback' part of Anakin with Palpatine is rea Definitely the best Marvel Star Wars comics i have read yet.The action takes place in a period that had rarely been treated in the expanded universe (between episodes I and II... what a nice change from the traditional Clone Wars!).Anakin & Obi-Wan's characters are really respected, all their actions and reactions are convincing from what we know of them in the movies -maybe Anakin is a bit too mature in this comic book, but it's ok. The small 'flashback' part of Anakin with Palpatine is really fine as well, making Anakin's mind slightly change in a very credible way.And the art is really cool as well, i hope Checchetto will be doing some more Star Wars soon!
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  • Hannah
    October 14, 2016
    3.75 Stars!!
  • Lance Shadow
    June 9, 2016
    For the new line of Marvel Star Wars Comics, Obi Wan and Anakin is treading unexplored ground. Yes, I know the original iteration of the expanded universe explored this time period extensively (heck, what time period DIDN'T the EU explore?). Up until this point, aside from Darth Maul: Son of Dathomir, which was the last Star Wars comic and the only officially canonical one published by Dark Horse Comics, all of the new comics have centered on the original trilogy. Even the earliest comic chrono For the new line of Marvel Star Wars Comics, Obi Wan and Anakin is treading unexplored ground. Yes, I know the original iteration of the expanded universe explored this time period extensively (heck, what time period DIDN'T the EU explore?). Up until this point, aside from Darth Maul: Son of Dathomir, which was the last Star Wars comic and the only officially canonical one published by Dark Horse Comics, all of the new comics have centered on the original trilogy. Even the earliest comic chronologically, Star Wars: Kanan takes place after the prequels, and is meant to tie in with Star Wars Rebels, which happens to tie in with the original trilogy rather than the prequels. This is our first canonical look into the ten year time period between The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones. Unfortunately, much like the first two prequel movies it is sandwitched between, it's dull. It's by no means awful and I give credit to Charles Soule for trying to breath life into this lackluster time in Star Wars History, but the best adjective I can give to the attempt is "underwhelming". THE STORY: Obi Wan Kenobi and Anakin Skywalker are sent to Carnelion IV, a planet at the edge of the galaxy after the jedi receive a distress call. The pair go to investigate and stumble upon a brutal conflict between two tribes, the Open and the Closed (wow those are some stupid names). The two jedi attempt to defuse the situation as they search for the source of the distress signal. During all this, we get flashbacks to the jedi temple on Coruscant as Anakin contemplates leaving the order.THE BAD: The story arc is as dull as.... the first two star wars prequel movies (so... does that mean the Soule gets style points for getting the feel accurate...?). Ok, it wasn't THAT bad, but it definitely was not very interesting. There is nothing that distinguishes the Open and the Closed (seriously, how uninspired can those names have gotten?). They just follow the two mortal enemy tribes trope. This comic series is like The Great Divide was to Avatar: The Last Airbender. Not only is the setup exactly the same, but it also shares the distinction of being one very lackluster story in a sea of great ones. The side characters are forgettable. Most of this comes from the fact that these two warring nations that are at each other's throats despite having no real reason to be. We never learn why these two nations hate each other so much, all we get is that they accuse each other of starting the war, that the planet has been devastated, and that a scavenger named Sera is trying to collect relics from the past to end it all (another reused plot element from The Great Divide....). Even then, Grecker and Mother Pran are both bland. Kolara is a little bit more interesting, but even she's basically a kid version of the cute girl archetype we got in Nakari Kellen from Heir to the Jedi (Goodness, why does so much inspiration for this comic come seem to come from some of the weakest elements of amazing fictional worlds??)The writing ends up being rather weak. Look, I know this is tie in media and we can't expect very much tension or suspense because we know the outcome. Obi Wan and Anakin are not going to be killed by the Open and the Closed (seriously, I don't remember the names of those tribes from The Great Divide but they had much more creative names than this!), we know Anakin is not going to leave the Jedi Order, but make it interesting, or at least entertaining. Either way, I couldn't help but notice how out of nowhere it seemed when Anakin decided he wanted to leave the order. It's honestly like how Anakin's dark side turn felt in Revenge of the Sith- you understood why, but it didn't feel natural. Also, the final issue in this series was awful. It was quite rushed and felt very lazy. I think it would have been more effective if it was more earned, but it really wasn't. THE GOOD: It's a shame that this comic series turned out as lackluster as it did because it had potential. First off, the art is breathtaking. Marco Checchetto is now my new favorite comic artist and his efforts save this comic. From the awesome looking jedi robes to the heavily detailed and wonderfully rendered faces of the characters, I got much more emotion of these people than I should have given the circumstances. The devastated planet of Carnelion IV is beautiful to look at and when there is a big action scene it feels like a brilliant spectacle as they frequently place the scenes in big panels that take up the whole two pages.Aside from the hasty decision that Anakin made, I think his arc on Coruscant started out pretty interesting. We get to see the beginnings of his dark tendencies and the turmoil he goes through in a way that was done much better than it was in the films. Soule does a great job breathing new life into the child version of Anakin that is so much more interesting and believable than either portrayal from Menace or Clones. Heck, I'd say this version is arguably better than Sith. Obi wan is stoic and idealistic as ever and gets some good dialogue. And Palpatine's interesting here, as he gets some good lines too.THE VERDICT: I feel really stupid for realizing that the same writer for Obi Wan and Anakin was also the writer that gave us the absolutely amazing Lando comic first and it just makes this one all the more disappointing. If you combine the storyline of "The Great Divide" (famously the worst episode of Avatar the Last Airbender by far), throw in the underwhelming love interest from Heir to the Jedi (the worst novel in the new canon that I have read) and maker her a pre-teen, and have it take place in between The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones (the worst of the star wars movies by wide margin), just throw in some gorgeous art to make it palatable and you would get something like Obi Wan and Anakin. The Obi Wan and Anakin Comic book series has some good things in it, but it was mostly boring. The mission on Carnelion IV is dull and the side characters surrounding it are forgettable. Even the flashbacks on Coruscant become bland by the end. If you want some pretty images from Marco Checchetto just go find a copy, flip through it, and put it back on the shelf. All in all, I'm not a prequel hater. I actually like the lore from the era even though it was done poorly in Lucas' prequel trilogy. The novelizations of the prequels are all worth reading, with Matthew Stover's novelization of Revenge of the Sith being among the greatest and most brilliant jewels when it comes to Star Wars tie in media. I also really liked both TV shows that centered around the Clone Wars as well as Christie Golden's Dark Disciple. For me, the prequels are bad because they are badly made movies with dated CGI visual effects, dialogue that almost always ranges from boring to atrocious, almost universally wooden acting, and mostly bland characterization. Revenge of the Sith has enough good things to be watchable but it still sucks compared to the Original Trilogy and The Force Awakens. I think the era itself has potential for great stories and characters as seen by the examples I listed above. I'm just bashing the prequels here to add some humor to make this review more entertaining, because I'd much rather have you read my review and get some laughs than bore yourself to sleep from reading the actual comic.
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  • Aaron
    December 29, 2016
    It's tough to really judge this as a Star Wars story, what with it being set between The Phantom Menace and The Clone Wars, and kind of reeking of the faux-importance and empty philosophizing Lucas did with the Jedi in those movies. There's just as much of that here, and it's just BREATHTAKINGLY boring. Having Obi-Wan continually try to impress upon Anakin that Jedi always attempt to avoid fights and killing things, while Anakin argues that maybe sometimes it's justified, is just useless in the It's tough to really judge this as a Star Wars story, what with it being set between The Phantom Menace and The Clone Wars, and kind of reeking of the faux-importance and empty philosophizing Lucas did with the Jedi in those movies. There's just as much of that here, and it's just BREATHTAKINGLY boring. Having Obi-Wan continually try to impress upon Anakin that Jedi always attempt to avoid fights and killing things, while Anakin argues that maybe sometimes it's justified, is just useless in the Star Wars universe. We know that people in these Star WARS (it's right there in the title) are going to have to make sacrifices and do things they otherwise would find morally reprehensible. But just having these two boring dudes talk about it is so pointless. It's a fictional universe! I don't care about their fictional morals! Give me a damn space battle, please.If Soule or Marvel felt like actually testing the boundaries of the Jedi, and challenging their constant moral superiority (which is always shown to be "right"), this might be a story worth exploring. Instead, we just get a bunch of preaching and then two factions we've never heard of on a planet we've never heard of battling over some ancient conflict we've never heard of. Nothing about this feels new or interesting, so I have to wonder why Marvel even bothered. Why resurrect the much-despised prequel time period if you're not going to try to breathe some life into it, rather than retreading the same very lame ground?The only really redeeming quality of this book is the art, which has been pretty great on all of Marvel's Star Wars comics. The action scenes (few though they are) really shine here, and give you a nice wake-up call from the snoozefests on either side of them.I'd say don't bother with this one unless you, like me, feel a compulsive need to read every Marvel Star Wars comic that is ever released. This is definitely the worst of the bunch so far.
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    July 15, 2016
    [Read as single issues]The post-Phantom Menace, pre-Attack of the Clones era of Star Wars seems to be a touchy subject, mostly because the majority of people are happy to believe that those films didn't exist. Charles Soule and Marco Checchetto, two of Marvel's top talents, tackle this head on with this story that explores Obi-Wan and Anakin's relationship as they try to settle a war between two factions on an alien planet, with flashbacks to Anakin's Jedi training and first interactions with Ch [Read as single issues]The post-Phantom Menace, pre-Attack of the Clones era of Star Wars seems to be a touchy subject, mostly because the majority of people are happy to believe that those films didn't exist. Charles Soule and Marco Checchetto, two of Marvel's top talents, tackle this head on with this story that explores Obi-Wan and Anakin's relationship as they try to settle a war between two factions on an alien planet, with flashbacks to Anakin's Jedi training and first interactions with Chancellor Palpatine.This is probably an issue too long for the amount of story involved, and the main story isn't that compelling to start with; the flashbacks and Anakin's moral quandaries are much more interesting, and seeing Palpatine's hooks beginning to grip Anakin early on is fun to see.To be fair, you could read this series without words (although that's a disservice to Charles Soule, who does his best with what's basically inflexible storytelling potential, since both Obi-Wan and Anakin are set on a path during this time period that can't be changed), because Marco Checchetto's artwork is drop-dead gorgeous. The snow-drenched planet that the series takes place on is rendered in painstaking detail, and his lightsaber choreography is amazing. Everyone Checchetto draws is attractive, and there never seems to be a rushed panel or misstep. Come for the art, enjoy the story, but you pretty much know what you're going to get before you open this one.
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  • Jim C
    August 20, 2016
    This is a collection that takes place in between Episode I and Episode II. In this one, the main plot is the Jedi receives a distress call from a planet. Obi-Wan and Anakin are sent to check it out. The minor plot is the reader gets a flashback of Anakin contemplating about leaving the Jedi order and Senator Palpatine starts taking an interest in Anakin.This was a decent collection. The highlight was the artwork. The artwork was gorgeous especially the full page panels. I liked how the artwork w This is a collection that takes place in between Episode I and Episode II. In this one, the main plot is the Jedi receives a distress call from a planet. Obi-Wan and Anakin are sent to check it out. The minor plot is the reader gets a flashback of Anakin contemplating about leaving the Jedi order and Senator Palpatine starts taking an interest in Anakin.This was a decent collection. The highlight was the artwork. The artwork was gorgeous especially the full page panels. I liked how the artwork was light in tone and it showed so much detail and beauty. I actually liked the secondary plot better than the primary plot as we get the beginnings of Palpatine manipulating Anakin. Unfortunately we did not get an in depth look at this plot. The main plot never really interested me. This plot involved steampunk and I am not a fan of this genre. Maybe I was turned off right away because of this but I was never interested in the conflict and I thought the ending was a little too convenient. I kept on wishing we would get back to Anakin and Palpatine.Like I said this was a decent collection and it is worth a look at because of the illustrations. The story is hit-or-miss but I did like the look into how far Obi-Wan would go for his padawan.
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  • Alex Sarll
    December 13, 2016
    Marvel's Star Wars comics make the bold but perhaps ill-advised move to head back to the era of the prequels, when Vader was still almost as much of an annoying little prick as his grandson turned out to be. Mercifully, he's not too bad here, and the backstory filling out Palpatine's seduction of the angry young padawan is nicely handled. Alas, the main story just drops him and Kenobi into the fairly generic SF setting of a war that's been going on for so long it has poisoned its world and becom Marvel's Star Wars comics make the bold but perhaps ill-advised move to head back to the era of the prequels, when Vader was still almost as much of an annoying little prick as his grandson turned out to be. Mercifully, he's not too bad here, and the backstory filling out Palpatine's seduction of the angry young padawan is nicely handled. Alas, the main story just drops him and Kenobi into the fairly generic SF setting of a war that's been going on for so long it has poisoned its world and become self-perpetuating, as seen (among many, many other places) in 2000AD mainstay Rogue Trooper. And I was never much of a fan of Rogue Trooper.
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  • victoria.p
    April 25, 2016
    Read in individual digital issues.The art is decent though I found it hard to parse the fight scenes. Otherwise, it's okay? Obi-Wan was pretty. Palpatine was creepy. Everybody made choices they thought were good but which turned out poorly in the long-term. So, you know, Star Wars. *hands*
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  • Robert
    September 14, 2016
    Disappointing. The contrast of the main story with the flashbacks was nice, but the main story was also terrible - generic, undefined enemies with no proper background or setting, and a terrible ratio of words to art combine with a dull gray palette to lull the reader to sleep.
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  • Charlotte (Buried in Books)
    November 5, 2016
    Harmless enough. Artwork is good, but the story is a bit thin.It bounces backwards and forwards in time - showing Palpatine attempting to get Anakin to leave the order. Playing on his need to fix things. He very nearly succeeds. But Obi-Wan won't give up on him - not yet.
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  • Jerry
    August 6, 2016
    More excellent space opera comics from Marvel!(Well, aside from the occasional profanity and freaky images...)
  • Andy Hickman
    November 27, 2016
    “Obi-Wan & Anakin” by Charles Soule, Marco Checchetto (Illustrations) (#1) “Obi-Wan & Anakin” by Charles SouleMace Windu referring to Anakin, “His education is … complicated. He came to us later than we would ordinarily have liked.Obi-wan took on an extremely difficult task when he accepted Anakin as his padawan.”(#2) “Obi-Wan & Anakin” by Charles SouleKolara and Mother Pran are of the “Open” clan and Grecker is of the “closed” clan.The Jedi are referred to as 'Sky Gifts' and the val “Obi-Wan & Anakin” by Charles Soule, Marco Checchetto (Illustrations) (#1) “Obi-Wan & Anakin” by Charles SouleMace Windu referring to Anakin, “His education is … complicated. He came to us later than we would ordinarily have liked.Obi-wan took on an extremely difficult task when he accepted Anakin as his padawan.”(#2) “Obi-Wan & Anakin” by Charles SouleKolara and Mother Pran are of the “Open” clan and Grecker is of the “closed” clan.The Jedi are referred to as 'Sky Gifts' and the valley monsters as 'corpse-leeches' !!“Skill is the child of patience.” - Obi-wan“This far down in the lower levels where the sky is unseen, down here, the sun is a myth.”(#3) “Obi-Wan & Anakin” by Charles Soule“Yes, we Jedi have great power. But we spend a great deal of time teaching our people how to use that power wisely. It requires patience.” - Obi-wan(#4) “Obi-Wan & Anakin” by Charles SouleSera the scavenger.(#5) “Obi-Wan & Anakin” by Charles SouleFortress of the scavenger is a shrine to the world that was.“Being a Jedi is not just about power, or light-sabers, or even skill with the Force. It is about connection. Being part of something bigger.” - Obi-wan
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  • Chelsea Gouin
    January 25, 2017
    3.5 solid stars! This was a nice look at those lost adventures between Episode I and II (or maybe II and III?) Anyway, Obi-Wan & Anakin chronicle an adventure with the young padawan as he contemplates whether or not he wishes to stay with the Jedi Order. There is a small shred of doubt as the Senator Palpatine takes an interest in Skywalker, showing him the underbelly of the city and the corruption within the senate. This volume, a one-shot adventure told in 6 issues, shows an adventure to a 3.5 solid stars! This was a nice look at those lost adventures between Episode I and II (or maybe II and III?) Anyway, Obi-Wan & Anakin chronicle an adventure with the young padawan as he contemplates whether or not he wishes to stay with the Jedi Order. There is a small shred of doubt as the Senator Palpatine takes an interest in Skywalker, showing him the underbelly of the city and the corruption within the senate. This volume, a one-shot adventure told in 6 issues, shows an adventure to a planet torn apart by war. Anakin shows his struggle between the Jedi-Way and the easy way. Obi-Wan gives us some bad ass fighting scenes as well. It was a cool collection and ended too shortly. The art work was decent and the story fast-paced and solid. Would recommend.
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  • Korey Pasch
    February 26, 2017
    Jedi, lightsabers, airships, and mechs. It's an eclectic mix but I enjoyed it. The comic explores some of Anakin's training and early relationships with Mace Windu and Sheev Palpatine. An entertaining and incredibly illustrated read, kudos to Marco Checchetto. The art alone is worth the price of admission. Overall, a great addition to the canon and universe.
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  • Jessamyn Leigh
    November 16, 2016
    The only look we've had at Anakin as a young padawan, this did a good job setting up his dynamics with his two masters: Obi-Wan and Palpatine (who had nearly as much page time as Obi.) I was not a huge fan of the art and or the world most of the story was set on, but I enjoyed the character building.
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  • Frank
    January 15, 2017
    A very good story that deepens my understanding of the relationship between these two iconic characters!
  • Ellie
    February 15, 2017
    Pretty good, a good read for Star Wars fans but nothing out of this world amazing.
  • Scotty
    February 25, 2017
    Enjoyable Star Wars story of when Anakin was still a young Padawan. I really wish there were more stories involving these two. It was a good, short, fun read.
  • Chriszav
    December 14, 2016
    Before the clone wars. Start of training
  • Ash
    February 10, 2017
    The last few panels!! Gahh holy shit! Man, I love Obi-Wan.
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