Give Me a God I Can Relate to
This is the first book by actress, poet, and feminist Blythe Baird. In 2014, she represented Chicago as the youngest competitor at the National Poetry Slam. Her work has been published or featured by The Huffington Post, Write Bloody, EverydayFeminism, Button Poetry, Chicago Literati, Banango Street, and Wicked Banshee, among others.

Give Me a God I Can Relate to Details

TitleGive Me a God I Can Relate to
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 17th, 2015
PublisherWhere Are You Press
ISBN-139781329531406
Rating
GenrePoetry, Feminism, LGBT

Give Me a God I Can Relate to Review

  • Whitney Atkinson
    January 1, 1970
    BLYTHE YOU GORGEOUS HUMAN BEING THIS WAS AMAZING!!I read this right after reading Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur and honestly.. It pales in comparison to this. Trigger warning for anorexia and sexual assault/rape, but Blythe speaks so truthfully in her poems and offers such complex and thought-provoking insights. I adore her usage of metaphors and her writing style is just so gorgeous. I've heard several of her spoken poems and I was worried that I would think she was better at delivering her poems BLYTHE YOU GORGEOUS HUMAN BEING THIS WAS AMAZING!!I read this right after reading Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur and honestly.. It pales in comparison to this. Trigger warning for anorexia and sexual assault/rape, but Blythe speaks so truthfully in her poems and offers such complex and thought-provoking insights. I adore her usage of metaphors and her writing style is just so gorgeous. I've heard several of her spoken poems and I was worried that I would think she was better at delivering her poems verbally than through just the writing, but it shines both ways. I thought this collective was a tad brief and I wish I could have more, but maybe that's bit of a selfish request because I just love her writing. I will always continue to listen and read to anything Blythe publishes, and I highly recommend this if you want some poetry about feminism!
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  • Catherine M
    January 1, 1970
    "When my mother asks if I am gay, I tell her I am sorry.When she asks, How can you possibly love something that looks just like you do?I wonder how long she has hated herself."- Blythe Baird, The Way I Was Taught to Love Part 1 This collection of poetry is beautifully written, thoroughly honest, and touches on many different traumas in a gentle way. There are poems about eating disorders, sexual assault, recovery, feminism, sexual orientation, heartbreak along with so many other topics. Baird "When my mother asks if I am gay, I tell her I am sorry.When she asks, How can you possibly love something that looks just like you do?I wonder how long she has hated herself."- Blythe Baird, The Way I Was Taught to Love Part 1 This collection of poetry is beautifully written, thoroughly honest, and touches on many different traumas in a gentle way. There are poems about eating disorders, sexual assault, recovery, feminism, sexual orientation, heartbreak along with so many other topics. Baird manages to capture the emotion of these subjects so well without them feeling at all contrived. I felt a deep emotional connection to many of these poems and think they would be applicable to such a large variety of people.My favorite poems:If You Are Not Recovering,The Way I Was Taught to Love Part 1-3Theories About the UniverseToo Pissed to Be Sad AnymoreDress CodeInventory of Public School DisappointmentsSkirt Steak GirlsEvolution of Healing
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  • Bree Hill
    January 1, 1970
    "It is the dilemma of the woman who wishes to inform the misogynist, politely.It is the dilemma of the woman who wishes to be heard-Let us give you a formal invitation to be a decent person.Let us give you this reality check with a spoonful of sugar.Let us make this easier for you to hear than it is for us to live."I hate that there isn't more to this collection. It was fantastic! Welcome to writing that discusses eating disorders, being the only girl in a car full of guys being complete Asshole "It is the dilemma of the woman who wishes to inform the misogynist, politely.It is the dilemma of the woman who wishes to be heard-Let us give you a formal invitation to be a decent person.Let us give you this reality check with a spoonful of sugar.Let us make this easier for you to hear than it is for us to live."I hate that there isn't more to this collection. It was fantastic! Welcome to writing that discusses eating disorders, being the only girl in a car full of guys being complete Assholes to women on the street and having to have that conversation that, that behavior is wrong. Welcome to writing that talks about calling the sexual assault victims advocate hotline and falling so hard in love you admit you'll become whatever that person needs you to be and they relay to you that, that is the problem. I am so excited for more from Blythe Baird.
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  • Abi
    January 1, 1970
    This was a beautiful collection of poems. I love Blythe Baird's blunt, honest voice and her amazing truths about being female. I found her poem "Pocket-sized Feminist" on YouTube, and after watching every slam poem she had on YouTube I decided to pick up this book. My favourite poem was definitely 'Theories About The Universe' because it shocked me so much. It at first seemed such an innocent poem and then this changed so drastically. I would definitely recommend reading this book in the order t This was a beautiful collection of poems. I love Blythe Baird's blunt, honest voice and her amazing truths about being female. I found her poem "Pocket-sized Feminist" on YouTube, and after watching every slam poem she had on YouTube I decided to pick up this book. My favourite poem was definitely 'Theories About The Universe' because it shocked me so much. It at first seemed such an innocent poem and then this changed so drastically. I would definitely recommend reading this book in the order they are laid out in, because you kind of learn more about her in each poem and it kind of develops as you progress through each poem. There were some poems that I wasn't that keen on, but that's not to say they were bad, they just didn't have such a big impact on me personally. However, she has changed my view on poetry and I will definitely pick up anything else she releases in the future.
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  • Ona Salvat
    January 1, 1970
    I first found Blair on Button Poetry, with her poem Girl Code 101 which I found (and still find) brilliant. I even felt compelled to message her (on Google+ I believe) to let her know how it hit home and I would still consider it one of my favourite poems, in fact I almost know it by heart just by sheer repetition of watching it over and over. So buying this book just made sense. And honestly it didn't disappoint. This is one of those books that I want to have always at hand and also one that I I first found Blair on Button Poetry, with her poem Girl Code 101 which I found (and still find) brilliant. I even felt compelled to message her (on Google+ I believe) to let her know how it hit home and I would still consider it one of my favourite poems, in fact I almost know it by heart just by sheer repetition of watching it over and over. So buying this book just made sense. And honestly it didn't disappoint. This is one of those books that I want to have always at hand and also one that I want to share with every one of my most loved friends because I think it treats with what it's like to be us (a girl and a teenage simultaneously) delightfully. Just beautiful and inspiring.
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  • Lily
    January 1, 1970
    5 well deserved stars! I wish I could give this 30 stars. I have trouble finding poetry that resonates with me, and I tend to not like modern day poetry. However, this book of poetry is absolutely fantastic. This is the first time I’ve ever found a poetry book that I wanted to annotate and make notes in— IT IS JUST THAT GOOD. I highly recommend this to everyone.
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  • Amy Firman
    January 1, 1970
    I love how brutally honest her writing is. You can feel it hit you as you read it. I would read a few pages at a time then put it down, it is just so powerful. This is a great collection of poems and I will be sure to pick up any future releases.
  • Lizzy Seitz
    January 1, 1970
    5.0 out of 5 starsReally enjoyed this! So many wonderfully written poems
  • Bejka
    January 1, 1970
    made me cry, made me angry, made me empowered. just made me feel all the feels.
  • annika
    January 1, 1970
    I have so much love for this poetry collection.
  • Ana ☾
    January 1, 1970
    3.5I knew the author from some slammed poetry videos that I watched some years ago and since then I have been very excited to read this book, I'm so happy I have finally done it.
  • Emily Skye
    January 1, 1970
    “You threatened me not to write this, but I am a force of nature and you will never tell me what to do again”Give Me a God I Can Relate To Is slam poet Blythe Baird’s debut collection.The collection is largely a critique of society that examines the world through the lens of intersectional feminism that delves into rape culture and misogyny, as well as eating disorders, family relationships, and being part of the lgbtq community.This collection is beautiful in the way a forest fire is beautiful. “You threatened me not to write this, but I am a force of nature and you will never tell me what to do again”Give Me a God I Can Relate To Is slam poet Blythe Baird’s debut collection.The collection is largely a critique of society that examines the world through the lens of intersectional feminism that delves into rape culture and misogyny, as well as eating disorders, family relationships, and being part of the lgbtq community.This collection is beautiful in the way a forest fire is beautiful. The language isn’t overly flowery, but each poem is written with blunt and powerful honesty that forces you to face what she is saying, even if it “isn’t something we like to discuss”. Each line grabs you by the shoulders and looks you straight in the eye, and there’s no way not to listen. The honesty of the collection is also what makes it so relatable, even if you’ve never been where she’s been or if you turn a blind eye at the things she’s writing about, you’ve seen it and heard it and there is no way to erase that from who you are. Even though this is a collection of page poems they read like spoken word, which can be attributed to her history as a slam poet. Her honesty and passion carries throughout the collection, thus giving it one of the strongest voices I’ve ever encountered in a collection of poetry. Each line is laced with emotion and power, the kind that doesn’t care what you think because she’s calling it like she sees it, and it’s magnificent.Overall, Blythe has managed to beautifully capture what it’s like to be a girl growing up today as well as deliver critiques on the very bedrock of society, all while giving advice and offering insights that are wise beyond her years. Whether you’re interested in feminism, on the hunt for a book that will make you think, or simply enjoy poetry this collection is for you.
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  • Helen
    January 1, 1970
    This is a really blunt, honest, but heartfelt collection of poems. I discovered Blythe on Youtube after her work was posted on Button Poetry several times, and felt an intense connection with her poems 'When The Fat Girl Gets Skinny' and 'Relapse,' which resonated very strongly with me as someone who has suffered from an eating disorder. I also really admire her poems about misogny, which contain some really powerful messages. Blythe's poetry is pretty accessible even for those who don't read mu This is a really blunt, honest, but heartfelt collection of poems. I discovered Blythe on Youtube after her work was posted on Button Poetry several times, and felt an intense connection with her poems 'When The Fat Girl Gets Skinny' and 'Relapse,' which resonated very strongly with me as someone who has suffered from an eating disorder. I also really admire her poems about misogny, which contain some really powerful messages. Blythe's poetry is pretty accessible even for those who don't read much poetry, as it doesn't sugar-coat things or decorate them with flowery metaphors. She says it like it is, and I feel like anyone who's experienced sexual harrassment, coming out, or disordered eating could relate to her work. Not all of her poems hit me as hard as the first two I mentioned, but I found that many of them relatable in some ways and they were all interesting to read. You get a really good sense of Blythe's journey and personality through this collection, and I would fully recommend this - but look her up on Youtube as well, trust me. The poems are amazing, but she breathes even more life into them through the spoken word, I found them even more powerful when she performed them.
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  • Isaura
    January 1, 1970
    This was one of the books I bought on an Amazon binge after finishing Rupi Kaur's Milk and Honey, and the first one I read. Absolute beauty of a book. Some of my fave bits:"We are the girls taught to surviveby using our bodies as Swiss Army knives;""Give me a God I can relate to. Commandments from a voiceboth soft and powerful.""...How can you possibly lovesomething that looks just like you do?I wonder how long she has hated herself.""Sent home. Eleven years old. Violation to the dress code. Ski This was one of the books I bought on an Amazon binge after finishing Rupi Kaur's Milk and Honey, and the first one I read. Absolute beauty of a book. Some of my fave bits:"We are the girls taught to surviveby using our bodies as Swiss Army knives;""Give me a God I can relate to. Commandments from a voiceboth soft and powerful.""...How can you possibly lovesomething that looks just like you do?I wonder how long she has hated herself.""Sent home. Eleven years old. Violation to the dress code. Skirt not enough. You: too much.""...Come back to the city it was easiest to breathe in."Among many, many other gems
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  • Courteney Fisher
    January 1, 1970
    So so so good! I read this in two sittings! It was an impulse buy, I'd only read girl code 101 before buying it. Definitely would recommend this especially people who enjoy darker themes such as anorexia, self issues and assault. My favourite poems however are the ones about sexuality because they don't hide behind figurative language they're powerful and honest.
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  • Luna Valentine
    January 1, 1970
    so good. so haunting and so good. i actually bookmarked pages this time around.
  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    Curse you, Internet connection! I wrote a very eloquent, long review about how much I enjoyed Give Me a God I Can Relate To. However, when I went to save it my Internet connection failed me. I am under the weather and exhausted so I'll just give you the highlights of the review I wrote. 1. You should be reading Blythe Baird if you aren't already. Hell, you can listen to her perform on YouTube if reading poetry isn't your thing. 2. Baird is not afraid to tackle any topic: anorexia, rape culture, Curse you, Internet connection! I wrote a very eloquent, long review about how much I enjoyed Give Me a God I Can Relate To. However, when I went to save it my Internet connection failed me. I am under the weather and exhausted so I'll just give you the highlights of the review I wrote. 1. You should be reading Blythe Baird if you aren't already. Hell, you can listen to her perform on YouTube if reading poetry isn't your thing. 2. Baird is not afraid to tackle any topic: anorexia, rape culture, misogyny, coming out, and falling in love with the wrong person. Her verses deal with them fearlessly. I also like that she is not afraid to vulnerable with her readers/audience.3. Her poems that focus on having and recovering from an eating disorder are particularly good. If You Are Not Recovering tells the story of Baird's eating disorder and how growing up overweight affected that. Eat, which is probably my favorite poem of the collection, focuses on what recovery from an eating disorder looks like. I feel like this poem easily describes recovery in general. This is my favorite line from the poem: “Killing yourself slowly is still killing yourself. Wanting to die is not the same as wanting to come home. Recovery is hard work. Not wanting to die is hard work.” 4. Baird is also a master of exploring and eviscerating rape culture and misogyny in her poems. Girl Code 101 explores what it means to be a girl in our society, how we always have to be suspicious and afraid. Shirt Steak Girls discusses the difficulty of being a feminist and wanting to dismantle sexism and misogyny when you are friends with guys and feel vulnerable. My Fear for the First Woman President pretty much tells the story of the poem in the title, and I have to admit that I have many of the same fears about this that she does. 5. I don't think the word erasure poems work. I have never found them to work in any collection, and I was not a fan here. Sorry!6. I do wish the themes of the collection had been narrowed down for cohesion, but I understand how the collection works as a whole despite that. I feel like I understand why each poem was selected. I just don't like every single one. Overall, I recommend this collection and Baird's other work because I think she's a great poet. I think we need more honest, vulnerable, and feminist voices in poetry like hers.
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  • Gervanna Stephens
    January 1, 1970
    Baird uses words in a way that evokes a sense of purpose in the reader. I felt like I wanted to take up arms for a cause. I felt like a washed intention from her discourse into identity, expectations and feminism. She highlights the simple tenacity of youth, being misunderstood and a choking need to be accepted without explanation. I find a self less exposure in her writing that identifies itself with the reader and postures for a common ground. She makes you want to believe in goodness because Baird uses words in a way that evokes a sense of purpose in the reader. I felt like I wanted to take up arms for a cause. I felt like a washed intention from her discourse into identity, expectations and feminism. She highlights the simple tenacity of youth, being misunderstood and a choking need to be accepted without explanation. I find a self less exposure in her writing that identifies itself with the reader and postures for a common ground. She makes you want to believe in goodness because she shows you how shitty and awkward society extends itself to be. She transitions smoothly back and forth between her poems and their major tenets as easily as she trumpets on a stage for a slam/spoken session. “Give Me A God I Can Relate To” made me identify with self and self-love in a way I wouldn’t have if not for sharing in her madness depicted in ink; and yes, everyone experiences mania. What did I relate to at the end? That gods and godlikeness aren’t owned features.
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  • Alecia Lutrario
    January 1, 1970
    I just finished reading this and I'm struggling to come up with the words. This is just such a raw, beautiful, wonderfully-written book and I adore every piece of poetry in this collection. Blythe Baird talks so openly and honestly about sexual assault, feminism, eating disorders, and sexuality, (most) of which I've dealt a lot with as well. Reading this book felt like a mixture of reading into my own soul and talking with one of those friends that just really gets you. 5/5, definitely a must-re I just finished reading this and I'm struggling to come up with the words. This is just such a raw, beautiful, wonderfully-written book and I adore every piece of poetry in this collection. Blythe Baird talks so openly and honestly about sexual assault, feminism, eating disorders, and sexuality, (most) of which I've dealt a lot with as well. Reading this book felt like a mixture of reading into my own soul and talking with one of those friends that just really gets you. 5/5, definitely a must-read for poetry lovers!
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  • Jocelyn
    January 1, 1970
    The writing in this collection of poems is powerful. I did not relate to every piece, but there were plenty that I did."It is the dilemma of the woman who wishes to inform the misogynist, politely.It is the dilemma of the woman who wishes to be heard-Let us give you a formal invitation to be a decent person.Let us give you this reality check with a spoonful of sugar.Let us make this easier for you to hear Then it is for us to live"
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  • Erin Cleary
    January 1, 1970
    *3.5/5 StarsIt's always a risk for me when I read Poetry books, if I'm going to love them. This collection definitely opened me up to a new kid of poetry that I like. Some of the poems were beautiful and insightful, but some of them I couldn't relate to. I loved being able to see the story arch in these poems, I feel like I know who Blythe is now, and I really want to have a conversation with her. I'm always a fan of feminist poetry, it lives me feeling amazing. Well done.
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  • Ely
    January 1, 1970
    The noise I made when I saw this was on Scribd was not human. I've been watching Blythe Baird's spoken word poetry on YouTube for months now but I could never find a copy of her book. I'm so so happy that I finally got to read this. I think I can firmly say that Blythe Baird is on my list of favourite poets.
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  • Jillian Shoffstall
    January 1, 1970
    "Looking back I wonder why survival was my entertainment of choice.. ""I say I am sick, They sayNo, you are an inspiration." Hauntingly striking and realistic. Blythe's words poke at the wounds of all too many women growing up in the patriarchy.
  • Savannah Coffey
    January 1, 1970
    I've been a fan of Blythe Baird since I discovered her through Button Poetry. The work featured in Give Me a God is raw, poignant, and above all else, relatable. Young artists like Blythe are ushering in a new wave of modern feminism, and I am SO here for it.
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  • Rachele
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this poetry collectionthe best way I can describe it is that it was REAL, not super flowery language, but real. I also felt there was some humor at times, but the nitty gritty poems were - wow.I'd read more by this lady!
  • Megan's Reads
    January 1, 1970
    This is amazing. I loved the poetry itself and the messages within the poems. I will be buying more from her when more comes!
  • Catriona Kelch
    January 1, 1970
    I don't have the words to describe how this collection of poems made me feel but if I did, I'd do more than just write them here
  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    Very much reads like a 19 year old with a tumblr account, but I can't wait to see what she does next.
  • Anouk
    January 1, 1970
    this is amazing
  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Poetic. When I wonder if I am doing the right thing and if I am being what I am supposed to be being, she reminds me: "Little sister, the only thing you are supposed to be is here." I ask her "How do I do that?" and she tells me "You already have: you already are.""
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