Nicolae (Left Behind, #3)
First they were Left Behind. Then they formed the Tribulation Force.Now they must face Nicolae.In Nicolae, the most explosive of the three books thus far, the seven-year tribulation is nearing the end of its first quarter, when prophecy says that "the wrath of the Lamb" will be poured out upon the earth. Rayford Steele becomes the ears of the tribulation saints at the highest levels of the Carpathia regime. Meanwhile, Buck Williams attempts a dramatic all-night rescue run from Israel through the Sinai that will hold you breathless to the end.

Nicolae (Left Behind, #3) Details

TitleNicolae (Left Behind, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 3rd, 2005
PublisherThorndike Press
ISBN-139780786224692
Rating
GenreChristian Fiction, Fiction, Christian

Nicolae (Left Behind, #3) Review

  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    First, I must dispute some of the claims made by other reviewers. They claim that this series is sexist, mainly because of the character of Hattie Durham. That is ridiculous, not only because such women exist in the world, but especially because there are other female characters (Chloe, for example) who do not behave in this manner. Additionally, there are male characters who have impure sexual motives as well. So, calling this book sexist is utterly unfounded. Secondly, they have called this bo First, I must dispute some of the claims made by other reviewers. They claim that this series is sexist, mainly because of the character of Hattie Durham. That is ridiculous, not only because such women exist in the world, but especially because there are other female characters (Chloe, for example) who do not behave in this manner. Additionally, there are male characters who have impure sexual motives as well. So, calling this book sexist is utterly unfounded. Secondly, they have called this book "racist." Now that I didn't get at all, since race is not even mentioned in this book... so I can't fight fire with fire when there isn't any fuel. And lastly, they claimed that this book is "offensive to anyone who isn't a born-again Christian." Well, I'm not. I'm Catholic, and I'm not offended. But I also have more than half a brain to think with.The authors' theology does come on a bit strong -- but really, consider the source. Both are established Christian writers. What did you think they would write about? Some sort of philosophy in which God doesn't really care about our ultimate fate? That seems to be the popular idea nowadays, but still not one everyone embraces. These authors are writing from their ideas and their life experiences, which surely are different from mine or yours. Additionally, if you are trying to compare this fictional work with the text of the Bible, this series will come up short every time -- it is FICTION for a reason! It is someone's idea of what COULD happen, not a definite foretelling of what will happen.I enjoyed this book because it is a fascinating look at what COULD happen at the end of time. How the "Rapture" will effect the global economy, politics, and families. How easily people can be deceived and killed with kindness. It makes the reader reflect on what he or she would do in that situation. It was a very easy read, and very entertaining. I will absolutely be reading the next in the series.Nicolae is the third book in the Left Behind series, and in my opinion, it is the best one so far. This book gets into some real character development, which seemed to be lacking in the previous two books. The characters are multi-dimensional and face real problems and need to make serious decisions, and seem to have deep emotions. Significant characters do pass on in this book, and as the reader I felt all of the emotions connected with the loss. Additionally, the suspense is definitely more engaging in this book, and I kept the pages turning and am looking forward to reading "Soul Harvest."
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  • Stepheny
    January 1, 1970
    In an already exciting series, things really begin to get amped up in this installment. Once again LeHaye and Jenkins do a nice job of bringing biblical events into a believable dystopian setting. Even during the action-packed scenes, we are learning more and more about our characters and getting an in-depth description of the prophecies foretold in the bible. World War III has broken out as prophesied in the book of revelations. There is mass chaos and destruction. The death of a loved member o In an already exciting series, things really begin to get amped up in this installment. Once again LeHaye and Jenkins do a nice job of bringing biblical events into a believable dystopian setting. Even during the action-packed scenes, we are learning more and more about our characters and getting an in-depth description of the prophecies foretold in the bible. World War III has broken out as prophesied in the book of revelations. There is mass chaos and destruction. The death of a loved member of the Tribulation Force leaves the small group heartbroken and in search of guidance.Of course, our band of survivors are scattered throughout the world and are on their own. They’re looking for one another not knowing who is alive, who is dead, injured or maybe even captured by the Global Community.Tsion Ben-Judah, a Jewish rabbi and scholar was commissioned by his home country of Israel to study and analyze these prophecies. His study began three years prior to the Rapture and was meant to help the Jews recognize the promised Messiah. When Ben-Judah concluded that only one person fit the hundreds of prophecies that mention Messiah, and that person was Jesus Christ of Nazareth. He makes this bold proclamation on national television and is immediately shunned by most of the Israeli community. But things get even worse for Ben-Judah. His wife and children are brutally murdered, left beheaded in the streets. Amid his grief, he is forced into hiding as the Global Community, led by the antichrist, Nicolae Carpathia, concocts a much different story. They place blame at the feet of Ben-Judah claiming that it was he that murdered his family after their refusal to convert to Christianity.Chloe was in downtown Chicago at the time that bombs started dropping which resulted in a terrible car crash. Buck tries to locate her which proves even more difficult due to the wreckage from the bombings. Rayford asks his new girlfriend to go and aid Buck and Chloe and make sure they are safe while he is forced to charter the antichrist all over. Luckily for him, his new plane has a bugging system that allows him to know where the next attacks will be so that he can keep his loved ones safe.What follows is one of the most intense chain of events. Buck, a fugitive on the run from the GC himself, must use one of his many false identities as a reporter to try to locate Tsion and bring him to safety. After receiving fragmented information from their mutual friend Chaim Rozenweig, Buck flies to Isreal in search of Tsion.Will Buck and Tsion make it back to the United States under the all-seeing eye of the Global Community? Will Rayford and Amanda be able to get back to Illinois for the funeral service of their beloved leader? How many more will die before the Glorious Appearing? This was one wild ride of a book. Don’t even think about picking it up unless you have time to devote to it. Every time I had to set it down, my mind was reeling with questions wondering what could possibly happen next, or how they could make it out of the situations they were in alive. As mentioned throughout all these books the trials and tribulations will only get harder and more severe as they near the Glorious Appearing. With main characters dying, you as the reader will be on the edge of your seat in anticipation about who will survive to see it. I know it may seem as if I have spoiled the whole book, but trust me, this is merely the tip of the iceberg. You can check out my reviews for the first two books here: Left Behind Tribulation Force
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  • Alexander
    January 1, 1970
    This is the third novel in the Left Behind series. The novel continues to build off of where the last book left off. The book was really intense in some parts, while other parts felt like they were added into the novel to make the book longer. Overall it was a nice installment to the series. ProsIntenseCharacter development Plot development Clift hangers ConsA few slow parts
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  • David Nichols
    January 1, 1970
    In which 25% of the remaining Non-Raptured Persons (NRPs) is killed by meteors, the Global Community bombs a few cities for peace, and Rayford Steele tries to convince Hattie not to abort the Devil's Spawn.
  • Sarah Swann
    January 1, 1970
    Good follow up! The craziness that the characters went through in this one were fast paced and had me on the edge of my seat. And I loved the way it ended.
  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    [audiobook] At this point I'm only listening to these for laughs and because they don't require much thought to follow. Being the third book in the series, there's a lot of time spent recapping the entire premise of the original story and the previous books, but most of this doesn't show up until the last third of the book. Again, the author shows that he has very limited knowledge of science despite attempting to throw terms into the book, even allowing for dating technology back about 15 years [audiobook] At this point I'm only listening to these for laughs and because they don't require much thought to follow. Being the third book in the series, there's a lot of time spent recapping the entire premise of the original story and the previous books, but most of this doesn't show up until the last third of the book. Again, the author shows that he has very limited knowledge of science despite attempting to throw terms into the book, even allowing for dating technology back about 15 years to publication. Concepts which are included erroneously in this book are centrifugal force, internal bleeding, flight ranges of specific aircraft, satellite dishes, truth serum, earthquakes / plate tectonics, and meteors / meteorites. Women are less disparaged in this book than in the past two, but only because they are almost completely inconsequential or stereotypical. The only women included are wives of main characters, a bitchy lesbian, a secretary, and a woman included in order to be able to preach the Christian standing on abortion. There are no female doctors, sales people, preachers, ambassadors, pilots, presidents, etc. There is one nurse and one policewoman mentioned in passing, because all nurses are women and the policewoman is incompetent.
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  • BAM The Bibliomaniac
    January 1, 1970
    You know for born-again Christians these are some selfish, self-centered, entitled people? Or is that redundant?Statements one doesn't hear everyday:"I had to kiss my husband goodbye in front of the Antichrist this morning.""Cabbie, the wailing wall please."
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  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    Once again, I am enthralled by the subject matter of these books but I am so confused as to why it was not executed better. The writing is so laughably lacking in any sort of creative realm it is almost painful to me. The use of metaphoric language is absolutely nonexistent in these novels. Basically, I read this book in a day. And while I am a fast reader, that is a feat I have rarely achieved. I am convinced I did it because they are so simple to read. Straightforward, no frills, just boom boo Once again, I am enthralled by the subject matter of these books but I am so confused as to why it was not executed better. The writing is so laughably lacking in any sort of creative realm it is almost painful to me. The use of metaphoric language is absolutely nonexistent in these novels. Basically, I read this book in a day. And while I am a fast reader, that is a feat I have rarely achieved. I am convinced I did it because they are so simple to read. Straightforward, no frills, just boom boom boom. But not exactly in a good way. While the pace is sometimes exciting, the author's frivolous use of flipping back and forth between stories is obnoxious at times and very unnecessary. I am not sure why this book was titled, "Nicolae" as very little of the book actually had to do with Carpathia. He was around...but the main story revolved around some sickeningly tidy and sugar sweet dual love stories about Buck/Chloe and Rayford and some obscure woman whom we are supposed to care about OUT OF THE BLUE! I am pretty disappointed in mostly the execution of this novel and not so much in the story. The final straw for me was the extremely obnoxious right wing preaching about abortion smack dab in the middle of the book. Uhm, random? To me it was a desperate attempt to throw down a religious agenda that had, up to this point, been coming along nicely with no "in your face" politics involved. Yuck. I'll keep reading because the story of the Rapture is captivating, I just wish someone else had this idea and did it better, because this series could have been absolutely astounding and breath taking, but it just isn't anything more than a little intriguing.
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  • Briana
    January 1, 1970
    This is the last book I read in this series a year or so ago. It was ok, I guess 3.0 starsP.S that was a terrible review right there. Smh. This is why I don't wait for so long to write reviews haha
  • Donna
    January 1, 1970
    Book #3 of the Left Behind series was better than the first 2, in my opinion. I've become strangely (and long past publication date) addicted to this series.After the mass disappearance of many of the world's people, there is a growing belief among "rebel factions" that it could only have been the work of God. A new charismatic world leader has moved into office. Things have been fairly calm since the date of the disappearance, but that all changes when bombs are dropped on many cities to quell Book #3 of the Left Behind series was better than the first 2, in my opinion. I've become strangely (and long past publication date) addicted to this series.After the mass disappearance of many of the world's people, there is a growing belief among "rebel factions" that it could only have been the work of God. A new charismatic world leader has moved into office. Things have been fairly calm since the date of the disappearance, but that all changes when bombs are dropped on many cities to quell the "rebel factions". One of the main characters risks his life to rescue a prominent Rabbi who has gone into hiding, and you will enjoy the action and adventure of this long scene in the book. As the book closes, massive earthquakes and meteor showers hit the earth, just as the rebel factions have warned would happen next.If you are a Christian, or are interested in "the end times" as depicted in the book of Revelations, you will enjoy this series.
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  • Rod
    January 1, 1970
    Mucho fun
  • Rick Davis
    January 1, 1970
    By this point, I was finished with the series. I never picked up the 4th book.
  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    Nicolae , book three in the Left Behind Series, was especially exciting to re-read. Bombs are dropping where Chloe and Buck live in Chicago. Rayford is flying Nicolae Carpathia around to New Babylon, Iraq, and other exotic places, while spying on the man he’s convinced will soon be revealed as the Antichrist. The story expands to include Ken Ritz, Mac McCullum, and Amanda White, and returns to a familiar character, Hattie Durham, to give her another shot at redemption.In Israel, biblical schola Nicolae , book three in the Left Behind Series, was especially exciting to re-read. Bombs are dropping where Chloe and Buck live in Chicago. Rayford is flying Nicolae Carpathia around to New Babylon, Iraq, and other exotic places, while spying on the man he’s convinced will soon be revealed as the Antichrist. The story expands to include Ken Ritz, Mac McCullum, and Amanda White, and returns to a familiar character, Hattie Durham, to give her another shot at redemption.In Israel, biblical scholar Tsion Ben-Judah is hiding out from the men who murdered his family and wish to silence him. Buck attempts a daring rescue of Tsion, and they both become wanted men. Even natural disasters come into play. It’s non-stop action from start to cliff-hanger finish.This episode of the series illustrated something that amazes me about Bible prophecy. The story shows how so many will experience cataclysmic events, see all the norms of life change before their eyes, understand that in their humanness they can do nothing to help themselves, and yet turn to a human man to save them. While all the time God will continue to reach out to them through supernatural means and through the lives of Tribulation saints. I believe that whatever the Bible says will happen in the future is just as settled as what has already happened in the past. So the first time I read this series, I remember being so thankful that two authors, Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins, had taken literally the Scripture I’ve built my life upon and crafted a story from it. I felt that same thanks as I re-read each book. While other speculative fiction is fantasy, I know that the concept behind these books is based on truth. This gives each exciting installment eternal consequence.This is one of my summer reading reviews. If you haven't yet tried the Tyndale Summer Reading Program, you should. You don't need a blog. And for every 5 books you review, you receive a book for free!
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  • Amy T.
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this book. The Left Behind series so far has been riveting to me and this book has been the best yet. The writing was not fantastic, at times, but the characters are relatable and easy to attach your heart to. Some parts in this action-packed book had me on the edge of my car seat as I listened, especially the end and also the part in the middle with the escape from Israel!! You watch certain characters wrestle with making the choice to turn to Christ and your heart wrenches as you hope th Loved this book. The Left Behind series so far has been riveting to me and this book has been the best yet. The writing was not fantastic, at times, but the characters are relatable and easy to attach your heart to. Some parts in this action-packed book had me on the edge of my car seat as I listened, especially the end and also the part in the middle with the escape from Israel!! You watch certain characters wrestle with making the choice to turn to Christ and your heart wrenches as you hope they make that choice on time!! The story is great and is incredibly inspiring. Many people are overly critical of this series due to the fact that it is a fictional rendition of what is yet to come in the End Times, but I certainly am not one of those people. I love the opportunity it offers me to think about what that time may actually look like and to soften my heart to be ready to share my faith so that those I love can have an opportunity to avoid a time where an anti-christ who maybe will be like Nicolae Carpathia is in charge. This book is worth everyone's time and is the best yet in the series!
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  • Amélie Rêverie
    January 1, 1970
    Blogger and journalist Fred Clark has repeatedly attacked the book as being "Bad Writing and Bad Theology"[1] in a long running series of weekly posts[2]. He feels that after the Rapture the people of the world, including the heroes of the story, assimilate the disappearance of all the world's children with a monstrous rapidity that displays the ways that the authors have allowed their checklist of prophecies to be fulfilled to outweigh the consequences these events would have on the psyches of Blogger and journalist Fred Clark has repeatedly attacked the book as being "Bad Writing and Bad Theology"[1] in a long running series of weekly posts[2]. He feels that after the Rapture the people of the world, including the heroes of the story, assimilate the disappearance of all the world's children with a monstrous rapidity that displays the ways that the authors have allowed their checklist of prophecies to be fulfilled to outweigh the consequences these events would have on the psyches of real people[3]. He also criticized the book for being written in "slapdash" manner in just 28 days, which in Clark's opinion betrays the Christian (Protestant) notion of the importance of treating one's craft being a vocation for God. I enjoyed reading this series; soley based upon the premise I am an "historical fiction" lover. Take what you need leave the rest behind.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    I'm really enjoying these books for some reason. They're like a fluffy VC Andrews book without the incest. Granted, I find them a bit heavy-handed on the morals and 'thou shalt nots,' but what else would you expect from a novel about the rapture?
  • Ralph
    January 1, 1970
    This reminds me of someone in the news today.
  • David Sarkies
    January 1, 1970
    Another fictional account of the Christian end-times18 August 2012 I believe that I finished this book and I read about three pages of the forth book before I thought 'this is rubbish' and metaphorically threw it away (because I was reading it on a laptop at the time – I didn't end up throwing away the laptop). I guess it was simply the really poor writing skills of the author that ended up putting me off because reading even one sentence would make me cringe. Granted there are a lot of cringewo Another fictional account of the Christian end-times18 August 2012 I believe that I finished this book and I read about three pages of the forth book before I thought 'this is rubbish' and metaphorically threw it away (because I was reading it on a laptop at the time – I didn't end up throwing away the laptop). I guess it was simply the really poor writing skills of the author that ended up putting me off because reading even one sentence would make me cringe. Granted there are a lot of cringeworthy books out there, but I generally do not read them. It is not that I have anything against pure escapism, but even then the Left Behind series would hardly be called escapism: I would describe them more as being 'fear evangelism'. In the previous book I spoke about pre-millenialism, and I has spoken about 'fear evangelism' elsewhere, so I think I might spend some time talking about amillenialism and post-millenialism (which does not get all that much press, unfortunately). The concept of amillenialism is that we are currently living in the millenium which began when Christ ascended into heaven and ends when Christ returns. The time of the return is unknown, meaning that it could happen tomorrow, or it could happen in another two thousand years. We simply do not know. While there is an essence of urgency, as I have indicated elsewhere, the fact that we could get hit by a tram while crossing Flinders Street and killed puts the whole idea of Christ's return in a new perspective: let us realise that while Christ can return at anytime, but we could also die at anytime, and as such, being caught with our metaphorical pants down is a concern that of which we need to be aware. Mind you, the metaphorical pants down could simply be us being oblivious to how we are offending God, even if we profess Jesus as Lord. Remember that James says that even the demons know that Jesus is lord, and tremble with fear. Let me outline something that Graeme Goldsworthy indicated in his book, The Gospel in Revelation, that I looked at previously. He speaks of the concept of us being washed clean and being given new clothes. This is an image that appears throughout the bible, but I did not fully understand it until I read Goldworthy's book. The idea of being given new clothes is another analogy of us being cleansed of our sins. However, there is a story of a wedding feast in Matthew where the host comes in to see a person dressed inappropriately, and as a result he is tossed out. This could be anyone of us, and because I did not fully understand the nature of this analogy, I would always worry about being this person (simply because I never seem to be able to know how to dress). However, the clothes are an analogy that represents how God views us. We all wear dirty clothes in God's eyes, but what Jesus has done, with his death, is that he has removed our old, soiled, clothes and put on new ones. However some of us, while paying lip service to God, have never actually had our clothes removed, so while we might go through life believing God owes us because of our self-righteousness, when we arrive at the wedding feast, the bouncer will say 'I'm sorry, there is a dress standard, and you are not dressed appropriately.' So, as Plato says through the mouth of Socrates, 'the unexamined life is not worth living', meaning, let us continue to examine our lives, and our relationship with God, so that that may not happen. Now, another aspect of amillenialism is the struggle between wanting Christ to return soon, and wanting time to be able to finish the work that we have been put here to perform. Now, when the proverbial shit hits the fan, and life simply sucks, we want Jesus to come and take us away, however, when I look at the piles of books that I want to read and comment on, and all of the people that I have not met, I desire for there to be a delay. I am not the only one in that boat because Paul the apostle was in that boat as well. I guess what we need to remember is that the days are short, and Christ can come at anytime, so let us take whatever opportunity arises to continue God's work. Now, post-millenialism is the idea that the millenium has passed as that we are in a new age awaiting God. However God will not return until a certain point has been reached, which involves bringing people into his kingdom. This is not much different from amillenialism, or even pre-millenialism, however the difference is the timing of the millenium, and this could be the period from 500 to 1500, which saw the rise and fall of the Catholic Church in Europe. This, I believe, is a bit problematic simply because it is very speculative. However, moving on we have entered a period of unprecidented evangelism and technological advancement, as well as a period where our understanding and reasoning has expanded. The wonderful thing about humanity is our ability to preserve knowledge and to teach others, particularly the younger generation. Thus, in a way, each successive generation becomes more knowledgeable than the preceding one. This, in my opinion, is the crux of evolution. Humanity was degenerating right up until Christ's first appearance, and with that appearance, history turned 180 degrees and humanity began to evolve again. As history continued, our understanding grew, and our knowledge increased, and we have reached this point. Is this the end, I do not think so, because we still have not evolved out of our greedy and self-centred nature. However, as time moves on, and knowledge increases, we will continue to evolve to a point where we can evolve no further without further intervention from above, at which point Christ returns. While a wonderful idea I feel that it does fall down in a lot of places, namely because there is no one who is righteous, not even one. However, our understanding of human rights, and our desire to step in and help the poor, our overthrowing of corrupt governments, which are among many other aspects of our evolution, have moved us socially forward. Yet, it is also trying to pin point a date, which is something we cannot do. So, in the end, there are probably only two understandings of the millenium which I feel comfortable with, and that is the amillenialist view, and the pan-millenialist view, namely that it will all pan out in the end.
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  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    The phases of the book of Revelation continue to play out as prophecied. The third installment of the Left Behind series takes focus on the continued rise of Nicolae Carpathia and the continued expansion of the Tribulation Force. This installment certainly does a better job of thickening the plot of the entire series with a chess match beginning to take form between Carpathia and the Tribulation Force (and the growing number of followers). However, differing from the first two, this book spends The phases of the book of Revelation continue to play out as prophecied. The third installment of the Left Behind series takes focus on the continued rise of Nicolae Carpathia and the continued expansion of the Tribulation Force. This installment certainly does a better job of thickening the plot of the entire series with a chess match beginning to take form between Carpathia and the Tribulation Force (and the growing number of followers). However, differing from the first two, this book spends more time on regurgitating verses from the Bible than on actually advancing the plot. During the times where there was an advancement in the story, it definitely does a good job of keeping you going and wanting to see what happens next. Yet just as you think you have a hit a groove you get hoodwinked with 5 straight pages of proselytizing, which given the nature of the book series shouldn't come as a big surprise. It just deters from a growing plot and seems extremely forced and out of place in the grand scheme of the storyline. Overall, the storyline has definitely peaked my interest, but the forced Bible verses really undercuts the flow.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    I read what I did of this series because it was one of the few books my then-husband would read, and I wanted to be able to discuss books with him. I won't be reading more of these books, or re-reading any of the ones I already read, and reading them didn't help give me and my ex-husband anything interesting to talk about anyway since he didn't want to hear the ways in which my opinion on the series varied from his.
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  • Sarah Piper
    January 1, 1970
    So this might be my favorite of the series so far .... and can I just say had I read these years ago as they came out I’d be ticked off to have to wait 12 months for the next book with an ending like that. I do not appreciate you not telling me who survived the Great Earthquake. And I love Tsion Ben-Judah .... just saying. Really enjoying the new characters that have come into this book .... Loretta and Mac ... but then you had to ruin half that for me at the end but whatever.
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  • Shannon
    January 1, 1970
    Meh. Meh. Meh. Lots of condescension and anti-intellectualism in this book as well, though I guess that's to be expected. Nothing of serious interest goes on, and Nicolae continues to be the most uninspiring and boring anti-Christ ever presented in book form. The Omen series was a good, somewhat schlocky set of movies dealing with the birth and rise of the anti-Christ. Sam Neill was an AWESOME son of the devil; charismatic, attractive, actually well spoken and wonderfully subtly evil. You could Meh. Meh. Meh. Lots of condescension and anti-intellectualism in this book as well, though I guess that's to be expected. Nothing of serious interest goes on, and Nicolae continues to be the most uninspiring and boring anti-Christ ever presented in book form. The Omen series was a good, somewhat schlocky set of movies dealing with the birth and rise of the anti-Christ. Sam Neill was an AWESOME son of the devil; charismatic, attractive, actually well spoken and wonderfully subtly evil. You could see him rising to power easily; could imagine people being captivated by him. Nicolae is nice looking and that's about it. Buck and Rayford continue to be generally self-involved jerks, though Buck sometimes deigns to lend a hand to someone outside of the elite "Tribulation Force" inner circle. Buck drives like an absolute asshole all over Chicago looking for Chloe, then seems to worry more about the state of their newly purchased car than his wife when finding her knocked over near some kind of embankment. Later on in the book, both he and Rayford try to talk Hattie into keeping her child, which happens to be the spawn of our charming anti-Chris Nicolae. They badger her relentlessly about doing the right thing, which equals not an abortion (and heavily leans toward keeping the baby), but Buck flat out thinks to himself that he wouldn't be up to raising the child of the anti-Chris. Nice, Buck. It's cool for you to think it's icky, but Hattie should just handle that shit like it's no big thing, right? I could go on, but it would just belabour the point. The authors of this book seem to misunderstand nuclear arms/bombs quite a bit. In the beginning of the book, World War 3 apparently breaks out and some militia's around the world coordinate attacks on major cities. The Global Community forces then retaliate with their own bombs. Despite using nukes, in many cases it's mentioned that they are several megatons, there is little to no fallout in the areas where the authors would like their kickin rad Tribulation saints to reside (namely Chicago, but pretty much a ton of other areas around the world that they want to scoot through). It's mentioned that Heathrow and the surrounding areas will have fallout for months or something ridiculous after being hit by a many megaton nuke. Seriously guys, do a little freaking research. With a 20 megaton nuke you have first degree burns as far out as 53km, so halve that for a 10 megaton nuke. That is some serious initial damage, and very serious long term effects. But Heathrow is up and running again about a year later (in future books) and no one seems to be suffering from those effects. Back to the Hattie abortion thing again. At one point, as Rayford is pretty much trying to guilt Hattie into keeping the child, he thinks to himself "He had to remind himself that she was not a believer. She would not be thinking about the good of anyone but herself. Why should she?" Seriously? SERIOUSLY? Because apparently only born again Christians can possibly think about doing anything at all ever for the good of others. Thus far in the book series, Rayford has helped to convert exactly one person, his daughter Chloe. He sometimes witnesses to co-pilots and the like, but he has very honestly never done any thing particularly nice and or charitable for anyone outside of his little core group of elitists. He knew about planned attacks on the bay area in California ahead of time yet warned exactly NO ONE about it, including the co-pilot who had just flown into the airport with him. He delayed the flight until his new wife got on board a connecting flight, making sure that she and only she was okay, then fucked off and left the lives of millions of innocents in God's hands. Awesome job, Rayford. You sure do exemplify caring about others to an inordinate degree there champ. This is par for the course in these books though, as unbelievers are always prideful or stupid or illogical or selfish or childish or any number of other things. I knew going in that things would be this way, but I can't help but get pissed off every time it happens. On another note, Ken Ritz is probably my favorite character so far. He has this folksy, down-to-earth quality that I really like, and he takes part in all of the actiony type sequences, which are frankly the best parts of any particular book in this series. I hope that he is still my favorite after he converts, which I'm sure is coming fairly soon.Oh, one other thing. No one in these books can cuss, obviously, because the books are written by two believers and I guess it's a thing with them. I'm aware of the not taking God's name in vain stuff, but I had no idea that there was anything else relating to cussing in the Bible. However, I digress. Because of this prohibition, everyone, even the blatantly EVIL characters in the book have to speak a certain way. When someone pisses them off, they can't just fly off the handle and call them assholes. Instead of this, they use the word "rascal". Repeatedly. Every character. I would think that words like "jerk" and/or "punk" and/or any number of other non-cusswords would work, but everyone and their brother uses "rascal". I feel like I'm stuck back in 1930's America reading this. I wish that they would use something even more blatant and flowery like "rapscallion", but no dice so far.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Things keep getting crazier as the tribulation progresses, but God is still there helping His people through all of it.
  • Gary
    January 1, 1970
    It's hard to rate this book -- it's so horrible it's fantastic. A view of Evangelical history before it becomes history (or at least that's how Evangelicals view it) -- "prophecy" written in fictional form (as if there's any other form). What's not to love about it? It's both amusing and tragic that people actually think this is a realistic portrayal of the future. There are so many holes in it at every turn that one can't help but question the logic of this Evangelical vision.Worse yet, the wri It's hard to rate this book -- it's so horrible it's fantastic. A view of Evangelical history before it becomes history (or at least that's how Evangelicals view it) -- "prophecy" written in fictional form (as if there's any other form). What's not to love about it? It's both amusing and tragic that people actually think this is a realistic portrayal of the future. There are so many holes in it at every turn that one can't help but question the logic of this Evangelical vision.Worse yet, the writing is simply awful. The dialogue is to die. Not to die for. It should just die.
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  • Kayla
    January 1, 1970
    I liked several things about this third book in the series, although I did spend some time trying to make the little thing at the beginning ("First they were LEFT BEHIND. Then they formed the TRIBULATION FORCE. Now they must face NICOLAE) work for all the other book titles in the series. It didn't work very well. I only got as far as "Then was the SOUL HARVEST, and then APOLLYON came, and then Rayford and Chaim became ASSASSINS" before I had to abandon it. So this book was all right, although Ni I liked several things about this third book in the series, although I did spend some time trying to make the little thing at the beginning ("First they were LEFT BEHIND. Then they formed the TRIBULATION FORCE. Now they must face NICOLAE) work for all the other book titles in the series. It didn't work very well. I only got as far as "Then was the SOUL HARVEST, and then APOLLYON came, and then Rayford and Chaim became ASSASSINS" before I had to abandon it. So this book was all right, although Nicolae and Hattie's relationship was weird and all the plane flying was a little boring. But Ken Ritz, a new character, was funny and likeable, and a lot of great things happened. Sorry for the short review.
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  • Neil
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book quite a bit. More than I thought I might, on the one hand. I think I am going to be generous and rank it four stars (even if for nothing more than two excellent "moments" in the story). It starts right where the second book leaves off (view spoiler)[the start of World War III and the death/destruction of the United States of America as a global power (hide spoiler)]. It moves at a pretty good pace; I did not notice it having quite the jump that the end of the second novel had I enjoyed this book quite a bit. More than I thought I might, on the one hand. I think I am going to be generous and rank it four stars (even if for nothing more than two excellent "moments" in the story). It starts right where the second book leaves off (view spoiler)[the start of World War III and the death/destruction of the United States of America as a global power (hide spoiler)]. It moves at a pretty good pace; I did not notice it having quite the jump that the end of the second novel had (view spoiler)[where Tribulation Force jumped ahead eighteen months to just before WWIII started (hide spoiler)]. As any book does, it focuses on the primary characters, but it also introduces some new minor characters into the mix. I do think the authors have gotten better in their conversations with the various characters, in some respects. I thought the conversations had a better flow to them than in the first book. They did not feel quite as "forced" as they did in the first book of the series.I thought the authors did a better job of balancing out the "action" versus the "conversation" in the book. At the same time, there are a couple of large info-dumps where the authors rehash "stuff" from the first two books in this book; once for Buck and once for Rayford. I am not sure how much those two info dumps helped, especially as the book has a decent "prologue" to bring the reader up-to-speed on what is happening.(view spoiler)[I suppose the title has to do with the United States of America and her two allies being decimated in order for Nicolae's Global Community/Order to rise to power has to do with the title? Despite being titled after the Antichrist, it really did not focus that much on Nicolae. Because of the "hidden microphone" that Rayford's old boss and friend had built into the Condor-216, Rayford is able to learn much of the Antichrist's plots against his friends/family as well as intentions for the rest of the world. Other than calling quickly to warn his loved ones of impending danger, this additional information does not seem to do Rayford any real good; it does not seem to have any "real value" to the story so far. Perhaps this information he has listened in on will be used in the later books? I cannot remember; it has been quite some time since I read this book. (hide spoiler)]There were two parts that I thought the authors did an excellent job at in this book. (view spoiler)[The first has to do with the rescue of Tsion ben-Judah. Buck goes into Israel at the best of Chaim Rosenweig to attempt to rescue Tsion after Tsion's family and driver are brutally murdered. The global government then lays the blame of the murders on Tsion. Buck ends up taking a midnight boat ride and has to answer some questions lest he lose his life. Answering the questions properly, he is led to Tsion and Tsion's protectors. From there, Buck and Tsion drive to Egypt and, after crossing the border, head to an airport to meet Buck's pilot to fly back to the United States of America. It was a crazy escape via bus out of Israel into Egypt, and there were some "miraculous moments" that ensured their safety and escape, but it was still a crazy moment. It did have me on the edge of my seat, to be honest.The other "excellent" description had to do with the global earthquake. Earlier in the book (I forgot to note the page number), Nicolae makes the comment that he hopes the earthquake predicted in Revelations does happen so he can see how well the "earthquake-proof" buildings survive the quake. "We're gonna need a bigger boat!", right? You NEVER make a dare like that to God 'cuz you don't want Him to call your bluff! So, yeah, queue the music in anticipation of the "super-quake" that is to come. It was funny; I was reading the beginning stages (view spoiler)[when it describes the animals going crazy (hide spoiler)] and I momentarily thought, "What is going on?" before the proverbial 2x4 hit me square in the forehead and I went "Oh, duh!" And then the earthquake hit. It was crazy intense! Most of New Babylon was destroyed as buildings fell to the ground. It shook the whole planet; granted, the authors only described what happened in the Chicago-metro area and New Babylon/Baghdad, so we do not (yet) know what happened globally. I say "yet" because I assume the fourth book will start off describing the damage done by this massive earthquake. (hide spoiler)]It does end on a cliff-hanger (view spoiler)[as Rayford and Buck walk through the new wreckage looking for loved ones, to see who lived, who needs saving, and who died (hide spoiler)].(view spoiler)[It was kind of "amusing" to me, that Buck's search for Chloe after Chicago was decimated by Carpathia's retaliatory attack, really seemed to drag on for me, whereas I thought the writing for both the escape out of Israel and the earthquake at the end to be superb. I really just wanted Buck to find Chloe and "get it over with" as it really seemed to start dragging on. It took up a good chunk of the first portion of the book; that, and describing some of the various retaliatory attacks that occurred. (hide spoiler)]Overll, I did think the pacing was all-right. As I am writing this review, I am remembering how it did seem to have its ebbs and flows. However, (view spoiler)[other than it feeling like it took "too long" for Buck to find Chloe, (hide spoiler)] the slower moments did not take away too much from the overall pacing of the novel. It did feel like it moved at a faster pace than the first two books, in some respects. It will be interesting to see if there are any "time jumps" in the fourth book, to get it moving along. (view spoiler)[Also, even though it was titled as "the Rise of the Antichrist", it felt like it was more about Tsion ben-Judah; about his escape from Israel and how he learned how to process his family's murder while learning how to cope with living the life of a "secluded hermit-prisoner" in the underground bunker built under the church in Chicago. (hide spoiler)]I did "enjoy" another scene (moment) in the book. (view spoiler)[Verna decides to try and blackmail Buck, somehow, after she sees Tsion ben-Judah at the funeral for Bruce, the Tribulation Force's now-deceased pastor. After she confronts Buck, Amanda, and Chloe about Tsion's appearance and his leaving with Loretta, Chloe deftly takes apart her claims and arguments by asking the right kind(s) of questions to get Loretta to start doubting herself. As it turns out, the truth of the matter was that Verna never really SAW saw Tsion; she just had assumed she had even though she never actually saw her face. That was some pretty good writing, there, too. (hide spoiler)]I know this book (and series) is about a "serious" event, but it felt like, to me, the authors still tried to inject some humor into the book(s) (and maybe some of it was unintentional). I know I have mentioned a comment that was humorous because of what happened later(view spoiler)[, but it seemed like the "villains" should have been chortling and rubbing their hands with glee as they plotted the demise of any opposition. It was really comical to read some of the comments that were made, some of the conversations that were had by "the Enemy" of the Tribulation Force. I realize a lot of these conversations were overheard by Rayford on his special intercom system, but I could still picture the "bad guys" twisting around and playing with mustaches as they sneered while making their plans, hoping no pesky kids would spoil their efforts. That is what some (much) of it felt like to me as I was reading (hide spoiler)].Overall, it was a good book, and I would rate it at 3.5 - 3.7 stars, rounded up to 4 stars. I am glad I took the time to revisit the series and reread it. It was better than I remembered it being (which could have had to do with my disappointment over some of the "later" books in the series).
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  • Ashton
    January 1, 1970
    I still hated the prologue of this book. When I am reading a series, especially one that's been out for a while, I hate rereading the same thing over again. I realize that it doesn't happen when the books first come out but I feel like it's poor style to write the same thing over again. It would be easy to show a new scene that would set the whole feeling for the rest of the book without relying on your old book. Despite that, I actually think that I liked this book the best out of the first thr I still hated the prologue of this book. When I am reading a series, especially one that's been out for a while, I hate rereading the same thing over again. I realize that it doesn't happen when the books first come out but I feel like it's poor style to write the same thing over again. It would be easy to show a new scene that would set the whole feeling for the rest of the book without relying on your old book. Despite that, I actually think that I liked this book the best out of the first three that I've reread thus far. It's got more action and suspense in it. You can really feel the drama heating up as things start to happen. It has the feel that time is short and every single second and every decision really matters. That's quite appropriate for the subject matter of this book and I feel like it's starting to click together more and more. I do wish that there was a bit more variety in the characters, however. I don't feel like the other side is given as much of a showing. I don't mean the Global Community side but the skeptics side. I know there are some but it almost feels like it's a given that the characters they do focus on that aren't saved will become that way soon. Maybe I just like more variety in the characters. Either way this was a decent book, the best of the three I've read so far. If possible, I'd give it three and a half stars.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This book picks up where the last one left off, with Steele going to fly the new Global Community plane for Carpathia and Buck finding out about the slaughter of his friend Tsion's family. As the bombing of major cities by the Global Community starts WWIII, Steele is equipped to listen to everything said beyond his cockpit by a secret intercom system installed for him by the maker of the plane and his good friend Earl. Buck makes a trip overseas to save Tsion and brings him back to the church to This book picks up where the last one left off, with Steele going to fly the new Global Community plane for Carpathia and Buck finding out about the slaughter of his friend Tsion's family. As the bombing of major cities by the Global Community starts WWIII, Steele is equipped to listen to everything said beyond his cockpit by a secret intercom system installed for him by the maker of the plane and his good friend Earl. Buck makes a trip overseas to save Tsion and brings him back to the church to hide in the shelter made by the late pastor. Though not as intense as "Tribulation Force," there are still many moments in this book that are powerful and disturbing. As the book ends, the great earthquake happens, leaving Buck and Steele angry and unsure of where their loved ones are. The political stuff seems to make a comeback but it moves the story along. No longer are people viewing Nicolae as the new Messiah...his true nature is finally being seen by even those who haven't been saved. Good book...on to the next one...
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  • Naomi Bowen
    January 1, 1970
    So, a lady from my church is lending me the Left Behind series which focuses on the Rapture and the End Times - topics that aren't easy to understand when you're reading Revelation and cause much discussion. Do we take things literally? Metaphorically? Are there verses that support the Rapture (I've personally been a bit sceptical...Of course, God can prove a vast deal of us wrong when the time comes)Regardless of your beliefs about how our world will end, these are exciting reads in and of them So, a lady from my church is lending me the Left Behind series which focuses on the Rapture and the End Times - topics that aren't easy to understand when you're reading Revelation and cause much discussion. Do we take things literally? Metaphorically? Are there verses that support the Rapture (I've personally been a bit sceptical...Of course, God can prove a vast deal of us wrong when the time comes)Regardless of your beliefs about how our world will end, these are exciting reads in and of themselves. This book takes a closer look at LaHaye and Jenkins depiction of the Antichrist - and he's a chilling man, let me tell you. (I personally prefer Wendy Alec's take on it - but that's just me).There's car chases. There's conspiracies. Unfortunately, there's a lot of people sitting round and talking - a theme that kind of drags the books down for me.But...an interesting and thought provoking series so far.
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  • Sherri Bryant
    January 1, 1970
    Another awesome story in this series. I don't know if I should be irritated that each book ends with such a climatic cliffhanger that leaves me on the edge of my seat waiting for the next story to see what happens. This book also leaves me anticipating what will happen to the members of the Tribulation Force now that the Earth has been struck by the Wrath of the Lamb. Who has survived? Who didn't?I highly recommend this series. This is the third book and there are nine more to go and I am eagerl Another awesome story in this series. I don't know if I should be irritated that each book ends with such a climatic cliffhanger that leaves me on the edge of my seat waiting for the next story to see what happens. This book also leaves me anticipating what will happen to the members of the Tribulation Force now that the Earth has been struck by the Wrath of the Lamb. Who has survived? Who didn't?I highly recommend this series. This is the third book and there are nine more to go and I am eagerly anticipating each one.
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