The Art of the Swap
Two girls trade places in time to solve a legendary art heist across two centuries! As the daughter of a caretaker for a mansion-turned-museum, twelve-year-old Hannah Jordan has spent nearly all her life steeped in the history of the Gilded Age of Newport, Rhode Island. The Elms, the mansion where her dad works (and they both live), is one of the most esteemed historical properties on famed Bellevue Avenue. Mysterious legends and priceless artifacts clutter every inch of the marble floors and golden walls, but Hannah is most drawn to the reproduction portrait of Maggie Dunlap, the twelve year-old subject of a famous painting stolen in a legendary art heist on the day of its scheduled unveiling in 1905. Hannah dreams of how glamorous life must have been for the young oil-heiress, Maggie, at the turn of the century, but she never expects she’ll have a chance to experience it herself… until the day a mysterious mirror allows the two girls to change places in time! In 1905, Hannah races to stop the art heist from happening—something she is convinced will allow the girls to trade back to their own eras—while in current times, Maggie gets a hilarious introduction to the modern digital age and a new perspective on women's roles in society while reveling in the best invention of all: sweatpants. So long corsets! As the hours tick off to the recorded moment of the legendary art heist, something’s not adding up. Can the girls work together against time—and across it—to set things right... or will their temporary swap become a permanent trade?

The Art of the Swap Details

TitleThe Art of the Swap
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 13th, 2018
PublisherSimon & Schuster/Aladdin
ISBN-139781481478717
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Historical, Historical Fiction, Mystery

The Art of the Swap Review

  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from NetgalleyHannah lives in Newport, Rhode Island in The Elms, a fabulous mansion from the Gilded Age. Of course, her father is the caretaker of the 1905 edifice, so she lives in a small apartment, but she does have the opportunity to roam around, and she loves learning about the history of the time, a fact which sometimes gets her into trouble with the docents! She is intrigued by the portrait of Margaret Dunlap-- the original painting by Mary Cassat was stolen the night of the unveilin E ARC from NetgalleyHannah lives in Newport, Rhode Island in The Elms, a fabulous mansion from the Gilded Age. Of course, her father is the caretaker of the 1905 edifice, so she lives in a small apartment, but she does have the opportunity to roam around, and she loves learning about the history of the time, a fact which sometimes gets her into trouble with the docents! She is intrigued by the portrait of Margaret Dunlap-- the original painting by Mary Cassat was stolen the night of the unveiling party and never recovered, although there is a copy hanging in its place. When Hannah is investigating the fram while dusting, she finds the outline of a key on the back... and somehow, she is able to talk to Maggie. Even more thrilling is the fact that the girls swap places! Hannah is sure that this swap must be about the theft of the painting and sets out to investigate, with the help of the main suspect, a kitchen boy named Jonah. Maggie finds it harder to insert herself into Hannah's life, since she doesn't have the background knowledge that Hannah has about the people, and there are so many new technologies and clothes to deal with! The two girls communicate frequently and manage to find out the fate of the original painting, and try to find a way to unveil it in the present day. They try to swap back, but are stopped, and continue to work in the time they inhabit to make things right. Strengths: This put me in mind of both Tom's Midnight Garden, as well as Konigsberg's The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler AND made me really want to take a tour of the historic houses of Newport! The time travel method was highly acceptable, the mystery solid, and the relationahip between the girls very charming. Hannah's realization that the history she knows so well really did happen, and had some ramifications she hadn't fully understood, is well done and tempers her somewhat bratty personality at the beginning of the book. Maggie's awe at the freedom of modern girls and her embracing that freedom when she returns to her own time were both heartfelt and touching. There are a lot of art mysteries, but this wasn't as much about the art. Modern girls would do well to understand that the freedoms they enjoy have not been around forever, and this book is an excellent way for them to gain more details about women's rights and how they affected every day life.Weaknesses: This was on the long side. Since Maggie's exploits in the modern day are not as crucial to the plot, I think I would have gone a bit lighter on them. What I really think: Will definitely purchase, since Malone has a huge fan base in my library. I am impressed with the seamless work of these two authors-- definitely a success story for Google docs!
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  • Jen Petro-Roy
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, I loved this! Swapping identity stories are always so fun, but the dual time periods of this book makes it extra fascinating.
  • Patty Palmer
    January 1, 1970
    Is the Grass Greener on the Other Side?If you could switch places with someone, who would you choose? For Hannah Jordan, daughter of the caretaker at The Elms Mansion in Newport, RI, it’s Margaret, a.k.a. “Maggie” Dunlap, the young heiress who summered at The Elms in the early twentieth century.In a “Freaky Friday”-like time travel experience, Hannah no longer has to wonder what it was like to live in the Gilded Age. Her wish is granted when both girls appear on opposite sides of a mystery mirro Is the Grass Greener on the Other Side?If you could switch places with someone, who would you choose? For Hannah Jordan, daughter of the caretaker at The Elms Mansion in Newport, RI, it’s Margaret, a.k.a. “Maggie” Dunlap, the young heiress who summered at The Elms in the early twentieth century.In a “Freaky Friday”-like time travel experience, Hannah no longer has to wonder what it was like to live in the Gilded Age. Her wish is granted when both girls appear on opposite sides of a mystery mirror, completely swapping full-body identities – Hannah moving back in time, and Maggie leaping forward into the 21st century.Maggie is initially horrified to find that she’s wearing trousers instead of a dress, but rather enjoys the freedom of movement they allow! And what is the small rectangular object that vibrates and lights up with letters and a photo? She frets over how she will possibly be able to play soccer without perspiring. What would Aunt think about all this? Meanwhile, Hannah marvels at how much is exactly the same at The Elms in 1905, and quickly learns that she/Maggie enjoys many freedoms not afforded to those keeping the house running smoothly beneath her in the basement. She puts all her efforts into trying to prevent the commissioned painting of Maggie from being stolen in the famous 1905 art heist.Will Hannah’s best be enough? The girls can’t help but wonder if the grass greener on the other side. A temporary swap threatens to become permanent and the girls reflect on their old lives with yearning. In a race against time, Hannah and Maggie try to solve the mystery of the missing portrait without affecting the rest of history as written in the books.Spending most of my childhood summers in Newport: on the beach, walking through the shops in historic downtown, and visiting The Breakers and Rosecliff on school field trips, I appreciated all of the historical references embedded in the story, then and now.With equal parts mystery, science fiction, and ultimate girl power, The Art of the Swap, co-written by Kristine Asselin and Jen Malone, is a delightful title to seek on or after it’s Book Birthday on February 13, 2018.
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  • Janelle Hackbarth
    January 1, 1970
    I was so happy I got this book. Normally, I don't read a lot of Middle Grade books, but what drew me to this book was the time travel aspect (one of my favorite genres) and the fact that we (the readers) not only get a view of the past from a present girl, but a few of our present from a girl from the turn-of-the-twentieth century.I cannot name all the parts of the book I liked, but here's some of the most that stand out (and I'll try to be discreet and not spoil anything). I liked when Maggie ( I was so happy I got this book. Normally, I don't read a lot of Middle Grade books, but what drew me to this book was the time travel aspect (one of my favorite genres) and the fact that we (the readers) not only get a view of the past from a present girl, but a few of our present from a girl from the turn-of-the-twentieth century.I cannot name all the parts of the book I liked, but here's some of the most that stand out (and I'll try to be discreet and not spoil anything). I liked when Maggie (in Hannah's body) tried to play soccer, and her view of the Mansion-turned-Museum when she first arrived. I also liked seeing the past from Hannah (in Maggie's body) point-of-view and realizing what girls couldn't do back then.I am really glad I got this and any fans of time-travel or "switched" (two people switch places) stories, this is a book that will not disappoint. Good for any age, including fans of the Samantha series from American Girl.
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  • Jen Naughton
    January 1, 1970
    Two girls born a hundred years apart living in the same house located in Newport, Rhode Island in The Elms- magically switch places in time. I enjoyed the fun of Hannah (from the present) and Maggie (from the past) living an ordinary life in another time.  Hannah's quest is to stop an art heist from happening which may or may not switch them back. I think Hannah has things a little more comfortable because as a history buff she knows the history of the house and its contents. Maggie dealing with Two girls born a hundred years apart living in the same house located in Newport, Rhode Island in The Elms- magically switch places in time. I enjoyed the fun of Hannah (from the present) and Maggie (from the past) living an ordinary life in another time.  Hannah's quest is to stop an art heist from happening which may or may not switch them back. I think Hannah has things a little more comfortable because as a history buff she knows the history of the house and its contents. Maggie dealing with the tech of modern life is hilarious.More than the story which was appropriately twisty I liked the tone and the fact that these girls were thrust into a crazy situation and used their wits and smarts to figure it all out.
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  • Kristin Crouch
    January 1, 1970
    Two girls living in a Newport mansion 100 years apart- and their lives intersect because of a famously stolen painting. On the surface they seem mismatched, but Hannah and Maggie soon find out they can work together to solve a mystery and change history. The mystery was intriguing, the setting breathtaking, and the differences they encounter by being swapped in time are entertaining. But what I loved the most was how Asselin and Malone made sure to highlight societal issues in both eras. From cl Two girls living in a Newport mansion 100 years apart- and their lives intersect because of a famously stolen painting. On the surface they seem mismatched, but Hannah and Maggie soon find out they can work together to solve a mystery and change history. The mystery was intriguing, the setting breathtaking, and the differences they encounter by being swapped in time are entertaining. But what I loved the most was how Asselin and Malone made sure to highlight societal issues in both eras. From class structure, to women's rights, Asselin and Malone carefully introduce inequality in the 1900s and present day America. Multiple copies will be on my classroom shelf, and this is one I'll be sure to put on my granddaughter's shelf as well! Highly recommend.
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  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    really enjoyed this time traveling story! I liked that the story switched back and forth between this century and the last century. It was very interesting to see how different the two centuries have become and how a 21st century kid might fare in the 20th century and vice versa. Maggie and Hannah are both in for some shocks as they try to navigate the others world without permanently messing anything up for each other. As Hannah tries to solve a century old mystery in the 20th century, she rea really enjoyed this time traveling story! I liked that the story switched back and forth between this century and the last century. It was very interesting to see how different the two centuries have become and how a 21st century kid might fare in the 20th century and vice versa. Maggie and Hannah are both in for some shocks as they try to navigate the others world without permanently messing anything up for each other. As Hannah tries to solve a century old mystery in the 20th century, she realizes that her actions could change history and therefore change the life she knows back in her own century.
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  • Kristen Picone
    January 1, 1970
    A time-travel story, reminiscent of Freaky Friday. Written from the perspective of Maggie, who spends her summers at The Elms, a Newport mansion during the Gilded Age, and Hannah, who lives at The Elms in the present-day with her caretaker father. The girls travel through time and work to solve a decades-old mystery of a missing portrait, while also experiencing and adjusting to a time/life so different from each of her own. I enjoyed the back matter, which includes information about the parts o A time-travel story, reminiscent of Freaky Friday. Written from the perspective of Maggie, who spends her summers at The Elms, a Newport mansion during the Gilded Age, and Hannah, who lives at The Elms in the present-day with her caretaker father. The girls travel through time and work to solve a decades-old mystery of a missing portrait, while also experiencing and adjusting to a time/life so different from each of her own. I enjoyed the back matter, which includes information about the parts of the story that are fact, Newport mansions and tours, and info about other “girl-power” books and resources.
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  • Lisa Lewis
    January 1, 1970
    The Art of the Swap is about two 12 year old girls (Hannah and Maggie) that live a century apart in the same residence. It resonated deeply with me, as I am a lover of mysteries. And the mystery of the stolen portrait is intriguing. But this book is so much more. It discusses the class systems that were the staple in America. It discusses women’s rights before women had the right to vote and today. I absolutely loved the strong female leads. I have already recommended The Art of the Swap to my l The Art of the Swap is about two 12 year old girls (Hannah and Maggie) that live a century apart in the same residence. It resonated deeply with me, as I am a lover of mysteries. And the mystery of the stolen portrait is intriguing. But this book is so much more. It discusses the class systems that were the staple in America. It discusses women’s rights before women had the right to vote and today. I absolutely loved the strong female leads. I have already recommended The Art of the Swap to my librarian, and I preordered a copy for my niece. Thank you to these authors for writing such a wonderful book!
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  • Frynsg
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so very very sad that I've finished reading this book. Right from the start the characters of Hannah and Maggie pull you in and drag you by the hand through this whirlwind adventure. I couldn't put it down and only wanted to pick it back up again when I did. The storyline is similar enough to Freaky Friday (book and movie) but takes on a whole new level of intrigue with solving a mystery and dominating with GIRL POWER! These two authors have combined their voices seamlessly into one fantasti I'm so very very sad that I've finished reading this book. Right from the start the characters of Hannah and Maggie pull you in and drag you by the hand through this whirlwind adventure. I couldn't put it down and only wanted to pick it back up again when I did. The storyline is similar enough to Freaky Friday (book and movie) but takes on a whole new level of intrigue with solving a mystery and dominating with GIRL POWER! These two authors have combined their voices seamlessly into one fantastic tale. WTG!
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  • Darla
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars for this ARC. Thank you to Aladdin and Edelweiss for the opportunity to read this book before publication.In The Art of the Swap we have historical fiction with a mystery, an art heist and time travel. Yes, please. Really enjoyed watching Maggie and Hannah cope in their new environments. The mansion at the center of the plot is a real place and still a tourist attraction in Newport. Loved the ways the girls modeled friendship to each other and those they encountered during the swap. Hi 4.5 stars for this ARC. Thank you to Aladdin and Edelweiss for the opportunity to read this book before publication.In The Art of the Swap we have historical fiction with a mystery, an art heist and time travel. Yes, please. Really enjoyed watching Maggie and Hannah cope in their new environments. The mansion at the center of the plot is a real place and still a tourist attraction in Newport. Loved the ways the girls modeled friendship to each other and those they encountered during the swap. Highly recommended.
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  • Cassie
    January 1, 1970
    Completely by chance, I read this book at the same time I was reading The Art Forger which created a unique and interesting experience.Completely by chance, I read this book at the same time I was reading The Art Forger which created a unique and interesting experience.The Art of the Swap is a middle grade heist adventure shared by Hannah, who lives in modern times and idealizes life at The Elms during the Gilded Age, and Maggie, a young woman from the Gilded Age who struggles with living up to Completely by chance, I read this book at the same time I was reading The Art Forger which created a unique and interesting experience.Completely by chance, I read this book at the same time I was reading The Art Forger which created a unique and interesting experience.The Art of the Swap is a middle grade heist adventure shared by Hannah, who lives in modern times and idealizes life at The Elms during the Gilded Age, and Maggie, a young woman from the Gilded Age who struggles with living up to expectations society places on her. The two girls switch places; Hannah sets out to solve the mystery of Maggie's portrait that was stolen on the day of it's debut. Maggie meanwhile flounders in Hannah's world as she realizes that women have many more freedoms than she ever imagined. Since this is a middle-grade book, the actual solving of the heist happens fairly easily and quickly. The power of the book is in each of the girls realizing that they can have an impact on the world around them. The writing style is pretty straightforward and I really struggled with the laid-back and almost robotic dialogue. Overall, this is a fun read and I enjoy that it has some basis in reality. The Berwinds did build The Elms which was an extravagant home. I didn't find mention of Mary Cassat being commissioned to paint a portrait of a niece that was then stolen but the Berwinds did have an impressive art collection.
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  • BookishOwlette
    January 1, 1970
    Short Review:Identity Swap: CheckDual Time Frame: CheckMystery Solving: CheckWhirlwind Adventure: CheckWhat else could you possibly ask for? Tell me!Spoiler Free Review:This was absolutely thrilling! The time travel genre is one that should not be reckoned with. Especially this one. The Art Of The Swap was educational in an interesting way. It teaches our young minds aboutFull Review: Here!Insta: Here!Twitter: Here!Facebook: Here!
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  • Suzanne Warr
    January 1, 1970
    A delightful time traveling historical, with two very different girls swapping places...and racing to unravel a mystery, so they can make it home! Read my thoughts and an interview with author Kristine Asselin on my blog--plus the cat's questions.
  • Christina Gagliano
    January 1, 1970
    What a fun romp through Newport past and present! I suspect that the authors had a blast doing research for this book. The feminist themes that emerge are quite timely and not preachy messages for 8-12 year old girls (and this considerably older woman enjoyed the story and the messages as well).
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  • Dreaday
    January 1, 1970
    I loooove the girl power theme. There’s a swap, there’s historical fiction, and there’s girl power. I love it.Fun & feminist. Plus, there’s a cool section at the end with book recommendations. I freaking love it.
  • Jaymie
    January 1, 1970
    Fun historical fantasy! The characters are great and the adjustments to the new time period felt on target. But to me the best part was the girl-power piece. Great resources in the author’s note for kids who want to read more.
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    EARC provided by EdelweissI really loved this mystery with main characters who trade places and time periods.
  • Kristine Asselin
    January 1, 1970
  • Amber Webb
    January 1, 1970
    The Art of the Swap by Kristine Asselin and Jen Malone was an outstanding historical fiction book for middle grade readers. The authors effortlessly combine historical and present-day culture in a way that will make the reader think about how they live now and why we have those opportunities. There is also an ever-present theme of change, growth and development throughout the book. The characters, landscape and technology are changing. These changes present both opportunity and struggle. This is The Art of the Swap by Kristine Asselin and Jen Malone was an outstanding historical fiction book for middle grade readers. The authors effortlessly combine historical and present-day culture in a way that will make the reader think about how they live now and why we have those opportunities. There is also an ever-present theme of change, growth and development throughout the book. The characters, landscape and technology are changing. These changes present both opportunity and struggle. This is a theme not to be missed by the reader. Hannah and Maggie are two girls living in separate time periods who find themselves in a time travel swap that leaves them both with puzzles to solve. The adventure makes you want to keep reading chapter after chapter and difficult to put down. The book is fun to read, but also makes you think long and hard about life then and now and what we can do to continue to make change and move forward. The book is full of girl power, mystery, intrigue, family, friendships, and history. I highly recommend this book and can't wait to share it with readers!
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