Echo After Echo
Debuting on the New York stage, Zara is unprepared—for Eli, the girl who makes the world glow; for Leopold, the director who wants perfection; and for death in the theater.Zara Evans has come to the Aurelia Theater, home to the visionary director Leopold Henneman, to play her dream role in Echo and Ariston, the Greek tragedy that taught her everything she knows about love. When the director asks Zara to promise that she will have no outside commitments, no distractions, it’s easy to say yes. But it’s hard not to be distracted when there’s a death at the theater—and then another—especially when Zara doesn’t know if they’re accidents, or murder, or a curse that always comes in threes. It’s hard not to be distracted when assistant lighting director Eli Vasquez, a girl made of tattoos and abrupt laughs and every form of light, looks at Zara. It’s hard not to fall in love. In heart-achingly beautiful prose, Amy Rose Capetta has spun a mystery and a love story into an impossible, inevitable whole—and cast lantern light on two girls, finding each other on a stage set for tragedy.

Echo After Echo Details

TitleEcho After Echo
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 10th, 2017
PublisherCandlewick Press
ISBN-139780763691646
Rating
GenreGlbt, Young Adult, Contemporary

Echo After Echo Review

  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    🌈📚✨: Email proof of preorder purchase from any bookseller to [email protected] and receive this breathtaking promo poster by Cori McCarthy (US addresses only): ARC provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.Buddy Read with Elise ❤ “This is the Aurelia Theater. It feels like coming home.” Echo after Echo is an own voices novel, that has such a beautiful f/f romance, surrounding a Broadway theater crew getting ready for opening night, while also trying to solv 🌈📚✨: Email proof of preorder purchase from any bookseller to [email protected] and receive this breathtaking promo poster by Cori McCarthy (US addresses only): ARC provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.Buddy Read with Elise ❤ “This is the Aurelia Theater. It feels like coming home.” Echo after Echo is an own voices novel, that has such a beautiful f/f romance, surrounding a Broadway theater crew getting ready for opening night, while also trying to solve a murder mystery that may or may not be a curse set on the theater they all love and adore. I devoured this with a smile on my face. I was completely enthralled and immersed by this. I love this story with my entire being. This theater crew has from November 5th to December 29th (opening night) to perfect the play, Echo and Ariston, which is a very reminiscent of Romeo and Juliet. During this time, two murders happen, but everyone knows these things come in threes, so our main character is slowly trying to piece the puzzle together, while also trying to protect herself at all costs. Our main character, Zara, is an eighteen-year-old girl, who has lived and breathed this play from a very young age. After she gets the leading role of Echo, she gives up her senior year of high school to move to New York and take a chance on making her dreams a reality. The other leading role of Ariston is played by Adrian Ward, an already very famous and good-looking male, where this is the first thing Zara has ever been in. So, she is constantly trying to better her acting and the play’s director, Leopold, easily directs her to do whatever he or his visions want from the play. We are also met with a full cast of characters, where you will constantly be guessing who is committing these crimes, and who might be the next victim. Yet, the writing is so beautiful and haunting, you won’t be surprised in the slightest if the Aurelia Theater is just truly cursed.Zara soon meets the assistant lighting designer, Eli, who makes Zara feels things she only thought were possible in the play she has grown up obsessed with. Yet, Leopold made Zara promise to only focus on the play and her opening night, while he also wants the media to believe in a budding romance between her and her costar, Adrian. “But here’s the real truth: time doesn’t work in neat, predictable ways. It doubles over on itself. Finds new ways to hurt you.” And this writing is so atmospheric and is truly a tier above most out there. I mean, I could have probably highlighted this whole entire book. The prose is nothing short of whimsical, even though this is a contemporary thriller. From the actual play being practiced, to the play that is constantly referenced, I am currently dying to see any and all productions of this play. “But the feelings Zara has been chasing since the day she found that ragged paperback of Echo and Ariston are right here, in a girl who made herself out of tattoos and abrupt laughs and every form of light.” And the romance, oh boy, the romance. I was living for every scene with Zara and Eli, even though they are both too pure for this world and need to be protected at all costs. I think the reason I read this book so quickly was because I simply could not get enough of them and their perfect growing love. Zara coming to terms with her sexuality is a big part of this book and it really resonated within me, while also really hitting very close to home and how I felt when I was eighteen and realizing I wasn’t straight. I think the bi representation was amazingly done and made me feel all the feels. “But girls touch each other all the time. Girls have intense friendships that have nothing to do with wanting to tear each other’s clothes off.” And the diversity is also outstanding. Zara is on the page bisexual (be still, my heart) and Jewish. There are wonderful discussions about how she feels living in a world that predominately celebrates Christmas in December, and it was really insightful and heartwarming. Eli is a lesbian, Puerto Rican, and grew up Catholic. Adrian is that typical, everybody loves me, straight, white guy, but he also talks about how he is Dyslexic and suffers from ADHD. Seriously, this is a well written diverse cast that I really loved and appreciated. Trigger Warnings for mention(s) of: eating disorders, rape, and suicide. I loved this. This would be such a perfect fall or winter read. I mean, I could read Broadway murder mysteries about girls loving girls all year round, but I do think this is going to feel ever more perfect for its October 10th release. This story is absolutely beautiful and such a shining light among 2017 publications! I recommend this with my whole heart and hope you pick it up come this fall. “There is always an imperfection in beauty, some flaw or surprise to remind you that it’s real.” Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Youtube | TwitchThe quotes above were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication.
    more
  • Elise (thebookishactress on wordpress)
    January 1, 1970
    The thing I keep coming back to about Echo after Echo is the sheer power of the writing. Almost everything about this book is awesome, but the writing is stunning. It is "I will remember this for the rest of my life" stunning. I genuinely do not remember the last time I read a book written so beautifully. I wanted to highlight every other sentence but I didn't want to put it down because it was so. fucking. engaging. I am going to read every single thing Amy Rose Capetta publishes for the rest o The thing I keep coming back to about Echo after Echo is the sheer power of the writing. Almost everything about this book is awesome, but the writing is stunning. It is "I will remember this for the rest of my life" stunning. I genuinely do not remember the last time I read a book written so beautifully. I wanted to highlight every other sentence but I didn't want to put it down because it was so. fucking. engaging. I am going to read every single thing Amy Rose Capetta publishes for the rest of her life. You can't stop me. // LET'S BEGIN ANALYZING THIS MASTERPIECE♔ OH MY GOD THE LEADS. Zara and Eli are both such well-developed and compelling characters. Zara is a surprisingly down-to-earth daydreamer desperately attached to her play. Eli is the more cynical of the two, with a passion for lighting and a deep love of the theater.Also, quick note about diversity - our two leads are a chubby Jewish bi girl who states that she's bi on the fucking page and a Puerto Rican lesbian with short dyed hair. Okay, okay, I just loved them both so much and I'm so happy about the rep being so good. ♚ God, the romance?? Echo wants Ariston so quickly and so completely because she’s already fallen in love. She’s been hollowing out a place inside herself for years —and he fits. I've been thinking a lot recently about how to make a fast-flowing romance work, and I think this book has given me the solution. Up until now, the only instaromance I've ever truly loved has been that of Laini Taylor's Daughter of Smoke and Bone. You know what those books have in common? They establish why these two characters could possibly fall so fast. Here, we explicitly see the loneliness of the romantic leads, how they both want someone in their lives. Instalove isn't bad because it's instant - it's bad because it's unbelievable. And okay, yes, sometimes instalove is bad because it's forced, but trust me - this was not forced. LET'S TALK ABOUT THAT STATUE SCENE. LET'S TALK ABOUT THAT LIGHTING SCENE. Zara and Eli have so much chemistry. There are so many tiny moments where you can feel the heart-arresting sensation of first love. The writing is just that vivid. ♔ I liked the And Then There Were None-esque whodunnit aspect. Echo after Echo builds up so many different characters that it's hard to know where to turn for suspects. Yet in a strange way, you don't want the culprit to be any of them. Not after the buildup. There's Roscoe, the eccentric soundboard operator. There's Etta, washed-up dame, and Carl, her first husband. There's Kestrel, Zara's bitter and mysterious roommate. There's Meg, the assistant director, and Adrian, the star-power male lead. And of course, there's the head of the whole show - Leopold, our mysterious director. I found all these characters super intriguing, and they certainly felt very developed for side characters. ♚ Art. I can feel Capetta's love for the theater world bleeding through the pages, and I am so freaking thankful for it. As a theater nerd myself, I've seldom felt the true joy and feeling of acting and performing conveyed so well. ♔ I touched on this a bit earlier, but I loved the parallels between the stage show and real life. The entire book just felt very meta and interesting due to all its symbolism. And thankfully, Capetta didn't feel the need to throw it in your face!! I've read several YA books recently that felt the need to explicitly run the reader through every single moment of symbolism, and damn, am I glad this book avoided doing that very thing. I felt far more respected by the author as a result. ♚ I do have to say that the pacing varied. This is very much a slow-burn novel, and I have to say that I never felt that true desperation to finish I'd expected in the latter half. It's not necessarily a bad thing - it just means more focus on character building - but it's something I wish I could've known going in. VERDICT: There's so much I loved about this - the character arcs, the atmospheric writing, the theatrical aspects, the romance. God, it was just so good. I hope all of you get a chance to read this, because it is truly one of the year's gems. Blog | Goodreads | Twitter | Youtube
    more
  • theo ⚓ Reading & Rambling
    January 1, 1970
    **Thank you so, so, SO much to NetGalley and Candlewick Press for providing me with a free eARC in exchange for an honest review.**This was one of my most anticipated books of the ENTIRE year, so obviously as you would think I went in with some fairly high expectations. And let me tell you, this one by far did not disappoint. Echo After Echo was absolutely INCREDIBLE. If I were able to do an interview with the author, Amy Rose Capetta, I think I'd literally die.It was a super fast read; I re **Thank you so, so, SO much to NetGalley and Candlewick Press for providing me with a free eARC in exchange for an honest review.**This was one of my most anticipated books of the ENTIRE year, so obviously as you would think I went in with some fairly high expectations. And let me tell you, this one by far did not disappoint. Echo After Echo was absolutely INCREDIBLE. If I were able to do an interview with the author, Amy Rose Capetta, I think I'd literally die.It was a super fast read; I read it in two days, and I could have finished it faster but I had to stop reading every now and then because I just had to take in how astonishingly amazing it was.A FEW THINGS I LIKED: - The gay - The theatre - The mystery (aka, the deaths in the theater) was actually written WELL. - The writing was fucking BREATHTAKING. Holy shit. - The characters were STUNNING and I am OBSESSED with them and I want to marry them. (But at the same time I want the main OTP in the book to get married eventually.)A FEW THINGS I DIDN'T LIKE: - Um, I kinda forgot to take notes (😢)...but I do remember ONE tiny little minor thing that I didn't like, which was that every now and then the pacing would get a little weird. But then it would get back to normal again.So yeah, all in all, as you can CLEARLY see, I one hundred percent L O V E D this book so so so much oh my goooooodddddddd. Please read it when it's released.
    more
  • Dahlia
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeous, intense, romantic, mysterious, and a really pleasant surprise to me in the Jewish rep, too.
  • Shelly
    January 1, 1970
    This was just amazing. The perfect amount of suspense/mystery mixed in with the theatre elements and the romance was just extraordinary. Add it to your TBR immediately!
  • Paige (Illegal in 3 Countries)
    January 1, 1970
    Echo After Echo has that spooky atmosphere like Phantom of the Opera and I love it. The book is perhaps a bit too long at 432 pages, but it's still damn good.Also, Echo After Echo confirms that mediocre white men are a plague upon the arts and must be gotten rid of. All those in favor of starting with Woody Allen, say aye!Diversity: Eli is Puerto Rican and a lesbian, Zara is bi, there are a few other QUILTBAG characters about. Must consult highlights.
    more
  • Sabrina
    January 1, 1970
    This was so so beautifully written. The romance, ohmygod.And! one! of! the! characters! is! bi!!!! I'm so happy!!!!! RTC.
  • Shay McClean
    January 1, 1970
    It's an LGBTQ love story / murder mystery set in a theatre on Broadway. IS THERE ANYTHING ABOUT THAT SENTENCE THAT ISN'T AWESOME
  • KTReads
    January 1, 1970
    Heeeee! I read this before most of you, and it's so so good! Pure dark sparkle magic, with sexy sprinkles on top.
  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeous, intricate, evocative. Love the characters and the setting. Adored the romance at its center. You will smell the greasepaint, feel the heat of the lights, see the streets of the city when reading the beautiful writing. Loved it.
  • Madalyn (Novel Ink)
    January 1, 1970
    HOLY HELL I LOVE THIS BOOK.
  • Shelby Machart
    January 1, 1970
    Yay, I'm getting an ARC of this!
  • Tirzah Price
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeous, romantic, and thrilling!
  • Sam Musher
    January 1, 1970
    At first I found this book wearying, another story of theatre people who are so very pleased with themselves for being theatre people. As the mystery picked up, I got sucked in and ended up finding it quite satisfying. But I never got a handle on Zara, the main character. The other characters wrote on her whoever they wanted her to be, that's the point, but to such a degree that I'm not sure the author ever really knew who she was. The thing this book did best, I think, was weave a completely be At first I found this book wearying, another story of theatre people who are so very pleased with themselves for being theatre people. As the mystery picked up, I got sucked in and ended up finding it quite satisfying. But I never got a handle on Zara, the main character. The other characters wrote on her whoever they wanted her to be, that's the point, but to such a degree that I'm not sure the author ever really knew who she was. The thing this book did best, I think, was weave a completely believable and creepy as hell portrait of a brilliant, powerful man and the (mostly) women's lives he ruined. He chose to produce plays about young, beautiful, tragic women, so he could cast young, beautiful, naive women in those roles and wield his power over them, and the theatre-going public ate it up. Even the "good" men, in this book, assume the women in their lives want what they want without ever asking or listening to the answers. It's all entirely plausible, well-crafted, and an important story to tell. Until (view spoiler)[the end, when the real villain turned out to be a wronged woman pushed too far. Leopold is Roman Polanski or Bill Cosby, powerful and charismatic, pushing Zara's line back by smidgens, each smidgen feeling forgivable or survivable, until she's so far over she's trapped and can't get back. We hear story after story of how Leopold did that to a series of hand-selected ingenues over years and years. He's an entirely convincing "art monster." Meg orchestrating his death along with a team of the rest of the cast and crew he hurt was a satisfying twist end to the mystery, except that it left Leopold as a pitiable victim and victimized Meg as the scary perpetrator of the "real" crimes. But the "real" crime here wasn't only the murders; nothing Leopold did in his career deserved to be forgiven by the text in light of Meg's more direct crimes. The end was a tragedy, but it robbed the social commentary of its punch. (hide spoiler)]The romance is sexy, Zara's declaration of bisexuality feels a little ham-handed but is welcome representationally, and the prose is a little overwrought at times but in a way that is entirely appropriate for teenage theatre people. High school students who like Big Drama mysteries -- Speak, All the Truth That's in Me, We Were Liars -- will love it. It verges on "New Adult," because the protagonists are 18+ working teenagers living on their own, and is definitely too old for middle school.
    more
  • Bethany
    January 1, 1970
    Echo After Echo had so much potential. I was heartbroken when I couldn't justify purchasing it for the teen collection at the library where I work. But then! I was elated and so excited when I found out I could request an egalley of it! But like a middle school theater production, it was cringe-worthy, haphazardly constructed, sometimes hard to follow.Echo After Echo's narration is third person limited and switches between "chapters" (which are actually structured to be like scenes within three Echo After Echo had so much potential. I was heartbroken when I couldn't justify purchasing it for the teen collection at the library where I work. But then! I was elated and so excited when I found out I could request an egalley of it! But like a middle school theater production, it was cringe-worthy, haphazardly constructed, sometimes hard to follow.Echo After Echo's narration is third person limited and switches between "chapters" (which are actually structured to be like scenes within three acts). The main narrators are Zara and Eli, which makes complete sense. However, some of the scenes/chapters are narrated only once by very minor characters like Toby, Barrett, or Kestral. (Side note: what's up with all the special snowflake names: Zara, Kestral, Eli, Enna, etc.? I couldn't roll my eyes hard enough or often enough.) Why have only one scene/chapter narrated by these characters and then make them so unrevealing to the "reveal" at the end? I suppose I get that Capetta wanted to save the Great Plot Twist for the end, but then don't include effing scenes/chapters narrated by them! It was just not good storytelling. There is a lot of very good diction-- very lyrical and theater-esque-- and a lot of very bad diction-- jargon without definitions/explanations. Some aspects of the story, including emotions, plot, and mystery intrigue are missing, which makes for a hard-to-follow storyline on all levels of reader attachment. In all, this Echo After Echo is a wonderful idea, but that idea isn't followed through in the execution of the actual book.
    more
  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this one. I confess I was continually pulled out of the play parts by my brain arguing about Echo-personally I would have preferred a fake myth with fake names instead of telling the remnants of classics classes in my brain to shut up. But the hints of romance were pretty cute, the atmosphere dire and appropriately dramatic, and I admit I didn't see the solution to the mystery. In my own defense I was running out of time at lunch break and tore though it to get to the end, so I may not I enjoyed this one. I confess I was continually pulled out of the play parts by my brain arguing about Echo-personally I would have preferred a fake myth with fake names instead of telling the remnants of classics classes in my brain to shut up. But the hints of romance were pretty cute, the atmosphere dire and appropriately dramatic, and I admit I didn't see the solution to the mystery. In my own defense I was running out of time at lunch break and tore though it to get to the end, so I may not have given clues their due-but it says good things about the pacing of the book, right?And not at all plot related but I loved this bit about Christmas and Three Kings Day and Chanukah, so have to quote it:"Does this Christmas stuff bother you?" she asks."I'm used to it," Zara says, but it feels like an automatic answer. Then she slows her pace and presses her lips together, really thinking about it. "I guess it makes me feel...lonely. That's not the right word. There are millions of people around. But that's how it feels."THIS. Every freaking year and I don't know how to explain that feeling when you're somewhere public and it's all dolled up for a holiday you don't celebrate and people tell you that it doesn't mean anything and it's not excluding you and whatever. Just seeing it on paper, that someone else has that, felt so good. I don't think I've seen it in a book outside of maybe something I read as a kid a gazillion years ago aimed specifically at Jewish kids.
    more
  • emma
    January 1, 1970
    it'd be really great if i could stop being so picky, bc this sounded interesting, but i'm just not in the mood for a murder mystery. did i love the writing? yeah. did i love the wlw plot? yes. i'm quite disappointed in myself, so i'm keeping this on my (physical) shelf to rediscover later.
    more
  • Caitlin Kling
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely beautiful.
  • Be A Rebel
    January 1, 1970
    The love story between Zara and Eli is the bright point of this story. The length of the book, the uneven pacing and the creeper of a play director make it a hard book for young adult readers.
  • Alana
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was going to wow me, but I kept losing interest as it went on, and that ending felt inappropriate. Good mystery, almost-great romance. Well-developed characters. Bad made-up play.
Write a review