Never Binge Again
If you struggle with binge eating, emotional eating, stress eating, or if you repeatedly manage to lose weight only to gain it all back, you may be approaching things with the wrong mindset. Most contemporary thought on overeating and bingeing focuses on healing and self-love. But people who've overcome food addiction and weight issues often report it was more like capturing and caging a rabid dog than learning to love their inner child... Open the cage even an inch—or show that dog an ounce of fear—and it'll quickly burst out to shred your healthy eating plans, undoing all your progress in a heartbeat. From his perspective as a formerly food-obsessed psychologist—and previous consultant to major food manufacturers—Dr. Livingston shares specific techniques for isolating and permanently dis-empowering your “fat thinking self.”  He reveals much of his own personal journey in the process. If despite your best intentions you find yourself in one or more of the following situations then this book is for you... You've tried diet after diet with no permanent success... You constantly think about food and/or your weight... You feel driven to eat when you're not hungry (emotional overeating)... You sometimes feel you can't stop eating even though you're full... You sometimes feel guilty or ashamed of what you've eaten... You behave differently with food in private than you do when you're with other people... You feel the need to fast and/or severely restrict your food to “make up” for serious bouts of overeating... Never Binge Again can help you: Dramatically improve your ability to stick to ANY healthy food plan so you can achieve your weight loss and/or fitness goals... Quickly recover from mistakes without self judgement or unnecessary guilt... Free yourself from the prison of food obsession so you can enjoy a satisfying, delicious, and healthy diet for the rest of your life!  "What the Hades is this?  It can't be this simple.  But I'm closer to my goal weight than I've been in decades!"  - Peter Borromeo "A powerful, thought provoking, and very un-ladylike approach to the problem of bingeing!" – Stephanie King "A unique and brilliant way to leverage will power; passionate, convincing, defiant and inspiring - all at the same time" – Richard Guy "Never Binge Again squelched that awful voice in the back of my mind which says ‘you'll backslide eventually, no matter what.'  Thanks to this book failure is no longer an option!" – Warren Start "I'm still reeling with the revelation I have the ability to Never Binge Again, just like my ability to never rob a bank, never push and old lady into traffic, or never jump off of a perfectly good cliff! [...] This book is THE TOOL I need to conquer ever attempting to satisfy emotional feelings with carbo-laden calories again!" – Traci Rickards

Never Binge Again Details

TitleNever Binge Again
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 10th, 2015
PublisherPsy Tech Inc.
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Self Help, Health, Business, Amazon

Never Binge Again Review

  • Mischenko
    January 1, 1970
    Never Binge Again was just OK for me. It wasn't super helpful, and will definitely not cure everyone's eating habits. I feel food choices are most important in gaining control of "the pig" and unless you conquer that, the binge behavior may return.Still worth reading 3***
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  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    There's a reason this book is free. It's just an ad for the author's coaching services offered via his website. I got through 67% of the book and just couldn't go any further. My issues with the book: 1) It isn't edited well. The word PEDDLE is repeatedly using when PEDAL is what he means. Unless you're selling your bike you are PEDALING it not PEDDLING it. 2) The author states "A binge = even one bite and/or swallow outside of your Food Plan." This seems like a recipe for an eating disorder. 3) There's a reason this book is free. It's just an ad for the author's coaching services offered via his website. I got through 67% of the book and just couldn't go any further. My issues with the book: 1) It isn't edited well. The word PEDDLE is repeatedly using when PEDAL is what he means. Unless you're selling your bike you are PEDALING it not PEDDLING it. 2) The author states "A binge = even one bite and/or swallow outside of your Food Plan." This seems like a recipe for an eating disorder. 3) The author denigrates 12-step programs and the concept of alcoholism as a disease for reasons that aren't well explained and have no research backing them up. 4) He repeatedly says, "just Never Binge Again!" and those letters need to be capitalized because he has trademarked that phrase. 5) Almost every chapter ends with an admonition to check out his website because this book is just an ad for his coaching services.
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  • Michelle
    January 1, 1970
    I really thought I'd cracked it when I read this book. I thought I'd found 'the one', the one that was going to finally help me get some of my bad eating habits under control. But... no.I've only read a few self-help books, on various topics, but I always find that they basically state the obvious, and tell you what you (kind of) already know. And yet, quite a lot of the time, that's what you need - you just need someone to say it, maybe in a slightly different way to how you've thought of it be I really thought I'd cracked it when I read this book. I thought I'd found 'the one', the one that was going to finally help me get some of my bad eating habits under control. But... no.I've only read a few self-help books, on various topics, but I always find that they basically state the obvious, and tell you what you (kind of) already know. And yet, quite a lot of the time, that's what you need - you just need someone to say it, maybe in a slightly different way to how you've thought of it before.This book pretty much states the obvious, and the author sort of admits that himself, at one point basically saying that you don't need to read the book. His basic premise for never bingeing again is "just never binge again".He uses the idea that you have a Pig inside you. Not a cute little pink oinky pig, but a big ugly nasty grunting Pig-with-a-capital-P, and it's this Pig that has all the cravings, not you. So the next time the Pig says "ooh, lets eat a whole tube of Pringles" you are supposed to say "shut up Pig!" (or words to that effect) and lock it in it's cage and ignore it. And don't eat the Pringles. I didn't like the idea of being horrible to a pig, or even a Pig, so my internal craving voice belongs to a Troll. "Yeah, shut up Troll!" The thing is, this method did work for a while with me. I stopped snacking during the day, and I didn't have anything else to eat after our evening meal (I have a bad habit of having a bowl of cereal for 'supper' at around 9pm, even when I'm not hungry and I know I shouldn't eat that late). I managed to avoid all these bad habits by shutting down my Troll, and telling myself that I didn't need the snacks etc.But, after a while, the ideas in the book just started to slip from my mind, and the snacking and eating when I didn't need to slowly crept back in. Occasionally I still think about my Troll, and I ignore it's pleas, but sometimes it gets it's own way.So obviously it takes more than just reading a self-help book to change bad eating habits. Personally, I need someone to follow me around, and slap my hand away from my mouth every time I'm about to eat something unhealthy, I think that's the only thing that will work for me. The book does make some good points though, and it did give me another way of thinking about my eating habits, and another method of dealing with them; just because it didn't work out for me the first time, there's no reason I can't try it again.After all, you know what they say?"Don't feed the Trolls!"
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    The only reason this book gets 4 stars is because I gained some truly valuable insights from reading it. The concept of "pig" and "pig slop" and the importance of a food plan has helped change the way I think about food. I eat much better and feel like I am much more disciplined after applying the principles taught in this book. That said this book is repetitive and not all that well written. If you struggle with over eating then this is worth reading. Please note that he repetitively suggest yo The only reason this book gets 4 stars is because I gained some truly valuable insights from reading it. The concept of "pig" and "pig slop" and the importance of a food plan has helped change the way I think about food. I eat much better and feel like I am much more disciplined after applying the principles taught in this book. That said this book is repetitive and not all that well written. If you struggle with over eating then this is worth reading. Please note that he repetitively suggest you visit his website and the book ends with him suggesting you join his one on one coaching or mentoring program.
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  • joyce calhoun
    January 1, 1970
    I will not recommend this bookI do not agree that our speech is all that separates us from monkeys. So to me your book is pig slop.
  • Clark Goble
    January 1, 1970
    I typically don't bother writing reviews for books I didn't like. Heck, if I'm being honest, I typically don't finish a book I don't like. This is one of those instances. I picked up this book of because of the promise embedded in its title, "Never Binge Again." As someone who has always struggled with maintaining a healthy diet, this book appealed to me. In this book, Livingston spends a great many pages explaining that we need to change the way we look at our inner binge eater. Rather than lov I typically don't bother writing reviews for books I didn't like. Heck, if I'm being honest, I typically don't finish a book I don't like. This is one of those instances. I picked up this book of because of the promise embedded in its title, "Never Binge Again." As someone who has always struggled with maintaining a healthy diet, this book appealed to me. In this book, Livingston spends a great many pages explaining that we need to change the way we look at our inner binge eater. Rather than love the inner glutton that lives inside us, we need to develop an animosity toward it. He recommends that we call this inner self 'the pig.' In a sense, he is recommending that we personify our inner binge eater in a way that allows us to see it for what it really is - an enemy. The author offers this solution as an alternative to a self-love approach to healing. Livingston's approach may work for some people but, if I'm being honest, I thought it was all a little goofy. Livingston continued to lose me when he began attributing our inner binge eater to evolution and our "lizard brain" which is only concerned with self-satisfaction. I'm glad this book was free for my kindle because I didn't feel too bad when I quit reading it.
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  • Margo
    January 1, 1970
    In my opinion this book is the only book that offers a solution to binge behaviors that is 100% effective, and that in and of itself makes it worth the read. While I can see people having issues with the philosophy around the book that would make people who suffer from mental illnesses involving binge addictions very upset, for someone who doesn't have a substantial diagnosis but needs to get their eating habits in order, this book is the answer! How do you never binge again? You decide to never In my opinion this book is the only book that offers a solution to binge behaviors that is 100% effective, and that in and of itself makes it worth the read. While I can see people having issues with the philosophy around the book that would make people who suffer from mental illnesses involving binge addictions very upset, for someone who doesn't have a substantial diagnosis but needs to get their eating habits in order, this book is the answer! How do you never binge again? You decide to never binge again! So simple, yet such an important skill to learn in life. I think there are so many people who feel like they have no control over food and binge addictions, and this book is helps you identify what is ultimately going on and provides a solution to get control back in your life. I have in fact put the skills to use that are taught in this book and have found them to be life changing! The only complaint I have is the quotes from the "Pig" which I found to be excessive and silly at times. Other than that, definitely worth the read and the kindle edition is free!
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  • J
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to edit my review, because people kept liking the review and probably buying the book based off of it. Long-term, this book did not work for me. It didn’t really offer long term solutions, just short term tricks.
  • Heema Shirvaikar
    January 1, 1970
    Usually, if I don't have a good review for a book, or if I just don't like a book or it doesn't resonate personally with me, I just sort of leave it alone. I wouldn't go out of my way to bash anything, because liking any literature is subjective and being a writer myself, I know the kind of effort that goes in writing anything, even a bad book. But when someone is basically selling advertisement and a potentially dangerous thought which might influence several people disguised as a book, well th Usually, if I don't have a good review for a book, or if I just don't like a book or it doesn't resonate personally with me, I just sort of leave it alone. I wouldn't go out of my way to bash anything, because liking any literature is subjective and being a writer myself, I know the kind of effort that goes in writing anything, even a bad book. But when someone is basically selling advertisement and a potentially dangerous thought which might influence several people disguised as a book, well then that is a different issue altogether and I do have a LOT to say about this goddamn 160-page shady-af advertisement pamphlet. First off, I swear it's taking me all the self-restraint that possibly exists within me not to add this book in my 'unreliable narrator' shelf (which is obviously one of my favourite fiction genres but NOT the kind that should even exist in non-fiction self-improvement literature) for the kind of sheer tone-deaf and potentially damaging advice this author spews in this book.The reason I purchased (did not actually purchase since it was free on Kindle) this book was because the blurb sounded pretty promising and I have had a horrible and toxic relationship with food for as long as I can remember due to body dysmorphia. Little did I know, this book not only contributed zilch in even remotely improving my relationship with food but instead was a huge trigger in fuelling more toxicity in my existing shitty relationship with my own body and food in general. My first red flag should have been the title itself - any book that promises to "reprogram" by brain into thinking like a "permanently thin person" is a recipe for disaster. MY BAD.The writer clearly himself has some unresolved issues with his own body and a screwed up relationship with food and this book is basically as bad as two teenage girls in a high school washroom throwing up their lunch in adjacent cubicles while discussing what "diet" (a.k.a eating disorder) works best for them. He liberally sprinkles his fat-shaming throughout the whole damn book starting with its very premise where he asks you to call your "fat-thinking self" as a "pig." WAY to promote even more body dysmorphia! Throughout the book, he asks you to "cage the Pig" by talking down to it, asking it to shut up and basically screaming at it and insulting it, and what you're basically doing is basically hating and talking down a very real part of YOURSELF that has these cravings. Am I the only one who thinks this is absolutely nuts, most likely only a temporary solution, and not to mention possibly very dangerous and damaging to your sense of self?!"Identifying and caging your fat-thinking alter-ego is how YOU finally come to dominate all your food decisions and permanently reprogram yourself to think like a thin person." What IS this? An annorexia bootcamp?As someone who struggles with serious body issues and self-image issues, as someone who used to punish her self and her body by resorting to everything from avoiding food to purging food, and as someone who routinely talks down to herself ANYWAY and has sought therapy to recognise and correct these patterns, this book was highly triggering for me. In a day and age when "fitness" and "healthy" should be promoted, the author instead categorises your mind into the "fat-thinking self" who is a slop and wants to do nothing but eat junk and "thin-thinking self" as the rational part of you who wants to remain fit and healthy. BUT. The problem with this is who is to decide WHAT constitutes fat and what constitutes thin? Inside the head of someone with severe body dysmorphia, there IS NO SUCH filter that lets them consider themselves to be "thin" no matter how thin they are in reality! THIN and FAT are a state of mind. "Obese" would rather be the right medical term. Secondly, has the author taken those people into account who binge and then punish themselves by - starving, purging, or exercising heavily? Their body may not be "FAT" as such, but they still have unhealthy coping mechanisms. AND for goddamn's sake, insulting yourself and talking down to yourself is EQUALLY as bad as the coping mechanisms I have listed above. Doing that will never let you have a peaceful and healthy relationship with yourself, your body, your mind or even food. Also, here's another gem from the book:"Interrupting and disempowering the thoughts which sustain your bingeing and overeating is not a game of mercy, it’s a game of unbreakable control and domination."This guy clearly also has some repression issues. I would have still appreciated this book if it used the words 'unhealthy' instead of fat or 'fit/healthy' instead of thin. No psychologist in his right mind should be reinforcing, let alone actively using words that will trigger unhealthy body standards in people. No psychologist should be actively encouraging people to repress urges and then talk down to yourself by personifying the thoughts/urges and picturing them as a "pig." Binge-eating for most people with body dysmorphia or self-harm issues is a way of punishing oneself - punishing the body. Binge-eating also sometimes stems from severe starvation and repression of urges. Calling these urges as a pig and asking it to shut up is neither a healthy nor a sustainable way of dealing with these urges. I expected a lot from this book because the author is also psychologist, and everything that I have learnt about my body dysmorphia is from my therapist. But I was so severely let down, it troubles me to my core the very idea that someone might be pushed into or revert back to unhealthy coping mechanisms after reading this book. Coming to the book itself - not only is the philosophy bullshit, the actual book is just as shitty. There is zero formatting - First off, the randomly changing font and font size is disorienting. As a lot of other reviewers have mentioned (which I sadly read AFTER the book) there's a lot of random YELLING in the book which is highly annoying. It is basically a guy screaming at you in a late night infomercial about something you need to BUY RIGHT NOW that's going to CHANGE YOUR LIFE! But in book form. He tags his website after every second sentence and adds a ™ symbol every goddamn time he says "Never Binge Again" to make it even more painfully obvious that this book is just a 160 page pamphlet for his business. If you're someone who struggles with body dysmorphia or other issues and eating disorders, or if you're just someone who cannot stand a badly written and badly formatted book, just stay the hell away from this book.
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  • Jacob O'connor
    January 1, 1970
    John Owen repackaged, but I needed this.  I'll follow up in a few months to let you know how much it helped.  NotesPromises to teach you to trick yourself into not overeating.  Putting the possibility of failure out of your mind.  Even if you do failNaming your appetite "the pig".  Its squeals are not your thoughts Aggressively separate yourself from this alter-egoWrite down your diet planAnything outside your plan is pig squealingKeep your food plan privateFood in categories: Always, never, som John Owen repackaged, but I needed this.  I'll follow up in a few months to let you know how much it helped.  NotesPromises to teach you to trick yourself into not overeating.  Putting the possibility of failure out of your mind.  Even if you do failNaming your appetite "the pig".  Its squeals are not your thoughts Aggressively separate yourself from this alter-egoWrite down your diet planAnything outside your plan is pig squealingKeep your food plan privateFood in categories: Always, never, sometimes, conditionalPerfectionism when setting your goals, not when you fail.  If you do binge, analyze what went wrong, then recommitIf you can't control a particular food, move it to the "never" categoryDon't count time (connotes insecurity)The better tasting and more convenient a food is, the worse it probably is for you The pig is powerless, and you are its masterWillpower is only expended when there is a decision.  You don't have to strain and struggle to do something you've sworn not to do.  Make a journal of your pig squeals.  It helps to recognize them as they come up.  
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  • Sonya
    January 1, 1970
    Thinking of the part of myself that binges as the Pig with its own insidious ways of getting me to binge is a mind trick but it might be useful for some people. More resonant for me is the idea of having a food plan that I follow 100%. Bright lines that eliminate the need to debate if and when I'll eat a particular food.
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  • Kelly Martinez
    January 1, 1970
    Best book I’ve read on the addiction of food and binge eating.
  • Lin
    January 1, 1970
    I'm sure glad this was a freebie, because if I'd have paid even .99, I'd feel ripped off. Written by a psychologist, it reads like a bad 2:00 am infomercial with !!lots!! of emphasis by !!CAPITAL!! letters and !!UNNECESSARY!! exclamation points!!! and links to his website (where, of course, you can sign up for !!!MORE!!!). *ugh*At one point, the author says, "You don't have to do what I say, it's ultimately up to YOU to change."Duh. I think I'll take that advice, over any other in this waste of I'm sure glad this was a freebie, because if I'd have paid even .99, I'd feel ripped off. Written by a psychologist, it reads like a bad 2:00 am infomercial with !!lots!! of emphasis by !!CAPITAL!! letters and !!UNNECESSARY!! exclamation points!!! and links to his website (where, of course, you can sign up for !!!MORE!!!). *ugh*At one point, the author says, "You don't have to do what I say, it's ultimately up to YOU to change."Duh. I think I'll take that advice, over any other in this waste of time, space, and words.
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  • Kayo
    January 1, 1970
    Glad it was free. Wasn't worth a penny. Ugh!
  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    Fun, emphatic writing that gets incredibly repetitive. Admittedly, the author has a refreshing message about food consumption, and makes references to brushing teeth or obeying the law to convince the reader that rule making and following is definitely doable. I started skimming though after a third of the book because I was tired of reading chapters that could be condensed to 1/4 of their actual length. There were also way too many links to online resources distracting from much of the content.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I recently found a website called Book Bub that sends you daily emails with e-books that are free that day on Amazon based on your genre preferences. This is one of the books sent to me a while back. The concept of this book is great. The execution of it was not the best. The voice was annoying to say the least.Just never binge again. That's it. Got it? Get it? Good."In fact, you don't even really need this book. To stop, just draw 100% clear lines and stop.""We all must make a decision in this I recently found a website called Book Bub that sends you daily emails with e-books that are free that day on Amazon based on your genre preferences. This is one of the books sent to me a while back. The concept of this book is great. The execution of it was not the best. The voice was annoying to say the least.Just never binge again. That's it. Got it? Get it? Good."In fact, you don't even really need this book. To stop, just draw 100% clear lines and stop.""We all must make a decision in this life to either get well or get even."
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  • Emma Banbury
    January 1, 1970
    Terrible formatting. Bad grammar. If an infomercial was written down with ALL THE RANDOM YELLING! AND FORCED POSITIVITY! AND THE OVER SIMPLIFIED FALSE PROMISES! you would get this book.Maybe he was able to make it free because he didn't fork out for an editor.I could never recommend a book that uses negative self talk as a tool to treat something that can be part of an eating disorder! But I guess it could be effective for some people who are into that.
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  • Alice Huerta
    January 1, 1970
    Finally the answer to stop the binge diet cycle. I have struggled for 20 years with Yo-Yo Dieting, losing and gaining back the same 10 pounds. This book kills the destructive self talk and rationalizations that kept me repeating this fruitless pattern. I read the book in 2 days with the help of the audio format. Immediately I am seeing positive results and feeling joyful.
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  • Anita
    January 1, 1970
    i read this book to fulfill the goal "read a non fiction book" I laughed, I cried. i can truly say it changed my life. I am not a Pig (a criminal monster who will do anything to get her next bite of food--not a cute barnyard animal) i do not eat pig slop. i will never binge again...(120 pg) by the way this book is free on Amazon, and it comes with a bunch of bonuses.
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  • Bianca
    January 1, 1970
    My first reaction was "Wait, this book tries to convince you that it's not you who's responsible for your eating behavior, it's The Pig inside you. Like it's not your fault that you're stuffing your face with cookies."But what it says is that actually you don't need to identify with those destructive thoughts, because they don't represent who you are and your life goals. You can see them as what they are (read: Pig Squeal) and let go, instead of getting caught up in them.This book had me say "I' My first reaction was "Wait, this book tries to convince you that it's not you who's responsible for your eating behavior, it's The Pig inside you. Like it's not your fault that you're stuffing your face with cookies."But what it says is that actually you don't need to identify with those destructive thoughts, because they don't represent who you are and your life goals. You can see them as what they are (read: Pig Squeal) and let go, instead of getting caught up in them.This book had me say "I'll never eat Pig Slop again", which I'm grateful for.
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  • Rosa Bustinza
    January 1, 1970
    Useful!I really enjoyed this reading. I've never had actual problems with food binge, but this little book not only make you think twice about your food habits but your general habits as well. You realize that we also have other kinds of Pigs living inside us. A good ebook to learn how to control mind and emotions, not just related to food but to other life aspects too.
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  • Vivian
    January 1, 1970
    No. No I will not call my craving mind the Pig, and then tell the Pig to stop squealing to shut off the craving. Repetitious, badly edited, and lots of 'screaming' - this book is to be avoided. Read at your own risk...
  • Jacqueline Bolaños
    January 1, 1970
    Funny and easy to understand this book had everything I need it to know about how to stop the habit of binge eating (or pretty much any other bad habit). I am very thankful to the writer not only he made it available and free for everyone, but he also provides all the worksheet and audio you need to take the control over your bad habit, also completely free.A really cool book that if you take seriously it can help you overcome bingle eating.In case you wonder I do not agree with the whole metaph Funny and easy to understand this book had everything I need it to know about how to stop the habit of binge eating (or pretty much any other bad habit). I am very thankful to the writer not only he made it available and free for everyone, but he also provides all the worksheet and audio you need to take the control over your bad habit, also completely free.A really cool book that if you take seriously it can help you overcome bingle eating.In case you wonder I do not agree with the whole metaphorical idea of the pig, but if I had to choose an eating monster that makes me eat whenever I am not supposed to, it will be a little evil Homer Simpson.
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  • Clinton Hutchings
    January 1, 1970
    I have mixed feelings about this book - I love the message - make an eating plan, and stick to it. The author's philosophy is one that I believe in and have seen over and over in my own life - anything you don't fully commit to will eventually come undone. So, a fairly simple message that is couched in defined terms such as your inner "Pig" and "Pig Squeals" and "Pig Slop". It is nice to be able to articulate or define what you might be feeling or fighting. So, while not impressive in writing or I have mixed feelings about this book - I love the message - make an eating plan, and stick to it. The author's philosophy is one that I believe in and have seen over and over in my own life - anything you don't fully commit to will eventually come undone. So, a fairly simple message that is couched in defined terms such as your inner "Pig" and "Pig Squeals" and "Pig Slop". It is nice to be able to articulate or define what you might be feeling or fighting. So, while not impressive in writing or even content really, this book, which basically does nothing to hide the ball ("just don't binge again!"), is a good check. Sometimes you need a good screaming at - or reminder that things may not be nearly as complicated as you might think. Interestingly, what the author calls "Pig Squeals" I found eerily similar to almost the exact same things my church would define as the devil or Satan. Is it bad that I like the Pig Squeal references better?
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  • Jacqueline
    January 1, 1970
    I'm sure that writing this book helped the author work through his problems with food, and I'm honestly happy for him. Unfortunately, the book was kind of awful.What this book wants you to do is to label your desire for junk food as a separate entity, "the pig". You then label the unhealthy food as "pig slop". When you get a craving you yell "shut up pig, I won't eat pig slop".If you like that premise, then use it. The book is 99% filler and that's all you'll get from it. If you don't want to ye I'm sure that writing this book helped the author work through his problems with food, and I'm honestly happy for him. Unfortunately, the book was kind of awful.What this book wants you to do is to label your desire for junk food as a separate entity, "the pig". You then label the unhealthy food as "pig slop". When you get a craving you yell "shut up pig, I won't eat pig slop".If you like that premise, then use it. The book is 99% filler and that's all you'll get from it. If you don't want to yell at yourself, then this probably isn't the book for you.
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  • Az
    January 1, 1970
    The male version of Brain over binge , it was refreshing reading a book about eating disorder that's actually written by a man who has the same problems as you, the Pig concept is pretty good and I took it to the extreme and it did FUCKING work,
  • Yari
    January 1, 1970
    I was going to put the book down because of the whole mildly annoying 'cage the pig!' visualization technique but I'm glad I didn't. The last few chapters are gold! Really good teachings throughout the book - can be put to use with any addiction.
  • Ursula Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    What a load of tripe! I admittedly didn't finish this book, I only read the first 4 chapters but it just "droned on and on" it was so boring I just lost the will to 'stick with it'. I can't say if the book "does what it says on the cover" but if it doesn't it's guaranteed to bore you to death....
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  • DavidO
    January 1, 1970
    this is a book about taking your animalistic impulse to overheat or binge and calling it the pig. It sounds kind of silly, but I think it works rather it works rather well.
  • Jennifer Kepesh
    January 1, 1970
    This is written in that aggressive salesman/self-help style that I just grit my teeth through, and of course it has a gimmick, but I think the underlying message/lesson/opportunity is a good one. One of the things that Livingston does well is to provide counter-examples to common excuse thinking. He points out that there are plenty of things we choose to do and never waver on--many from social pressure (wear clothes out of the house), and many from personal conviction (few people start smoking i This is written in that aggressive salesman/self-help style that I just grit my teeth through, and of course it has a gimmick, but I think the underlying message/lesson/opportunity is a good one. One of the things that Livingston does well is to provide counter-examples to common excuse thinking. He points out that there are plenty of things we choose to do and never waver on--many from social pressure (wear clothes out of the house), and many from personal conviction (few people start smoking in their 50s). So making an unbreakable vow is certainly doable by any human being. He points out that it is okay to be uncomfortable, that this doesn't mean you need to give in to a craving (and that not giving in over time makes the craving less common and less strong). He points out that when we encourage others, we don't encourage them by saying, "well, it probably won't work, but there's nothing wrong with trying," so we should treat ourselves with as much support as we would someone we are encouraging. He points out that in no other area of our lives do we say that a slip-up means we are no longer going to be accountable (running one red light). He brings up numerous examples of undermining thinking that is otherwise difficult to notice, and explains how illogical the arguments are, but he points out that it's important to simply ignore, not engage with, such undermining thinking. As I read about this, I thought about the difference between someone who obliges herself to do something out of duty/guilt, and someone for whom that act is simply part of their nature...for example, Steve, who exercises because he feels antsy when he doesn't, and myself, who exercises because I should and because the blanks in my exercise diary would bother me, etc. If I want to get to the point where the boundaries I establish are just part of me, I need to establish a model in my mind of myself as that person, not as someone who's adopting for convenience a time-limited approach, making amends for something I should have done. So I'm thinking a lot about this, and I intend to try his suggested approach.
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