Ta deuxième vie commence quand tu comprends que tu n'en as qu'une
- Vous souffrez probablement d'une forme de routinite aiguë.- Une quoi ?- Une routinite aiguë. C'est une affection de l'âme qui touche de plus en plus de gens dans le monde, surtout en Occident. Les symptômes sont presque toujours les mêmes : baisse de motivation, morosité chronique, perte de repères et de sens, difficulté à être heureux malgré une opulence de biens matériels, désenchantement, lassitude...- Mais... Comment vous savez tout ça ?- Je suis routinologue.- Routino-quoi ?Camille, trente-huit ans et quart, a tout, semble-t-il, pour être heureuse. Alors pourquoi a-t-elle l'impression que le bonheur lui a glissé entre les doigts ? Tout ce qu'elle veut, c'est retrouver le chemin de la joie et de l'épanouissement. Quand Claude, routinologue, lui propose un accompagnement original pour l'y aider, elle n'hésite pas longtemps : elle fonce. À travers des expériences étonnantes, créatives et riches de sens, elle va, pas à pas, transformer sa vie et repartir à la conquête de ses rêves...

Ta deuxième vie commence quand tu comprends que tu n'en as qu'une Details

TitleTa deuxième vie commence quand tu comprends que tu n'en as qu'une
Author
LanguageFrench
ReleaseSep 17th, 2015
PublisherEyrolles
Rating
GenreFiction, Self Help, Cultural, France, Contemporary, Psychology

Ta deuxième vie commence quand tu comprends que tu n'en as qu'une Review

  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    "You can have lots of money and be really unhappy, or equally not have much but make your existence the sweetest there is. The capacity for being happy has to be worked on, built up day by day. All you have to do is take a good look at your system of values and re-educate the way you look at life and what's going on around you." Camille isn't unhappy but she isn't especially happy either. She lacks enthusiasm for life and her days are passing her by with dissatisfaction. On a day when everyt "You can have lots of money and be really unhappy, or equally not have much but make your existence the sweetest there is. The capacity for being happy has to be worked on, built up day by day. All you have to do is take a good look at your system of values and re-educate the way you look at life and what's going on around you." Camille isn't unhappy but she isn't especially happy either. She lacks enthusiasm for life and her days are passing her by with dissatisfaction. On a day when everything seems to be going wrong, she meets Claude, a routinologist who diagnoses her with routinitis: "While not being clinically depressed, one could still have a feeling of emptiness and unease and suffer from the unpleasant sensation that although you had everything you needed to be happy, you didn't have the key to make the most of it." Thankfully for Camille, Claude can help her. Your Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have One is more self-help than entertainment, but once I made peace with the format, I found it to be enjoyable and incredibly useful. I am a firm believer that our thoughts are much more powerful than we can possibly imagine, and this concept is threaded throughout the book which I appreciated. Readers watch Claude take Camille step by step through regaining her life by unlearning negativity and re-learning how to think in a more positive and productive way. Each step is well-communicated, and I highlighted so many sections just for the life-coaching help. There's a "Pocket Dictionary of Routinology" at the end which may serve as a handy reference guide for interested readers. Part fiction and part therapy, Your Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have One is a book I'm glad I read. Check it out!My favorite quote:"To really listen, you have to be able to identify with what the other person is experiencing, to have empathy. You can't imagine how rare it is to find someone who truly knows how to listen. I often tell myself that whoever knows that will be the king of the world."
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  • Brooke — brooklynnnnereads
    January 1, 1970
    This was a different read for me. Although it's classified as Fiction, I felt that the story and the messages and lessons involved in this character's journey, made this novel hover the Fiction/Non-Fiction boundary line. In fact, that is one of the main reasons I loved this novel as much as I did. The character of Camille, and her struggles, read like a reflection of myself (as well as many people that I know). Whether you have a case of "routinitis" now or later, it seems that particular ailmen This was a different read for me. Although it's classified as Fiction, I felt that the story and the messages and lessons involved in this character's journey, made this novel hover the Fiction/Non-Fiction boundary line. In fact, that is one of the main reasons I loved this novel as much as I did. The character of Camille, and her struggles, read like a reflection of myself (as well as many people that I know). Whether you have a case of "routinitis" now or later, it seems that particular ailment is inevitable. It seems like this is a struggle everyone will encounter throughout different seasons of their life. Now, the amazing part was that as I was reading this novel and following Camille's journey, it became obvious that the fictional lessons that she was participating in would be beneficial for many of the general public. This is where this novel hovered the Fiction/Non-Fiction border. Although there was a story, it also read like lessons from a self-help book were integrated within that story. It was done so naturally as well, that it didn't appear as if the author was preaching to the reader and instead flowed with the circumstances of the novel. Yet at the same time I was intrigued enough with the lessons on self-discovery that Camille was participating in, that I wouldn't have minded doing an experiment with my own answers. I really liked following Camille's journey and found it both inspirational and motivating. I cannot help but praise the unique format of this novel because it read so different than what I have read before when it comes to a character's self-discovery and personal journey. For those that read, "The Wealthy Barber" by David Chilton, this novel's format reminded me a lot like that book (minus the lessons on financial planning). It's a novel with real life messages and lessons being told in a fictional manner which I found made it more thought provoking. ***Thank you to Penguin Random House Canada for sending me a copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review***
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  • Amanda - Mrs B's Book Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    *https://mrsbbookreviews.wordpress.comYour Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have One penned by French writer Raphaelle Giordano, is a delightful self-help book, dressed in the form of a heart-warming novel. It follows the journey of Camille, a thirty something French woman, who decides she has had enough of her mundane day-to-day existence and sets about to make a great change, with the help of Claude, a routinologist.When and how do we find our happy place? These are the questions t *https://mrsbbookreviews.wordpress.comYour Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have One penned by French writer Raphaelle Giordano, is a delightful self-help book, dressed in the form of a heart-warming novel. It follows the journey of Camille, a thirty something French woman, who decides she has had enough of her mundane day-to-day existence and sets about to make a great change, with the help of Claude, a routinologist.When and how do we find our happy place? These are the questions that define Raphaelle Giordano’s worldwide bestseller, Your Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have One. Camille is thirty eight, she has a husband, son and stable job. She has all the comforts that would make one happy. But lately Camille has felt the opposite of happy, she feels unfulfilled and dissatisfied with her current way of life. A car accident, followed by the chance encounter with a stranger named Claude, a routinologist, sets Camille off on a journey to make some changes in her life. Camille’s metamorphosis is marked by some surprising adventures, along with some valuable life lessons that will significantly alter Camille’s mindset, as well as tap in to her dreams.My search for a translated book for my next round book bingo 2018 directed me in the pathway of a new release book with a lengthy but catchy title, Your Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have One by Raphaelle Giordano. I was keen to read this book as although it is a new release, it was first published in 2015, in France. Since then it has been a worldwide success, with the front cover stating ‘bestselling French novel that made 2 million readers happier’. It now makes its Australian debut and with such a cheerful cover, I’m sure this one will capture Australian readers. Personally I adore anything related to France, so I was very enthusiastic about reading this particular translated novel.Your Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have One is a novel that reads much more like self-help guide, in fact, readers will find a list of techniques used by the lead and prescribed by Claude the routinologist at the close of the novel. Those who are inspired by the ideas explored in this novel will find this extra inclusion useful. However, using this self help guide wrapped up in a warm-hearted novel format, means that any great character exploration does not occur. I was a little frustrated by the lack of depth and potential to explore the reasons why Camille feels dissatisfied with her life.Despite these misgivings with the book. I liked the process Camille went through to change her life. The tasks Claude issues Camille with range from small-scale to large-scale. On the whole they were believable and entertaining. I did enjoy witnessing Camille’s growth and development into the person she wanted to be. Your Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have One could be taken as a reflective tool and a catalyst for change in your own life. I know, as a thirty something like Camille, there have been moments where I have felt the same sorts of feelings Camille experiences. My only problem with Camille’s particular situation was that I couldn’t fathom why a woman living in my favourite part of the world would feel unhappy, but it happens!Your Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have One is a light and refreshing read. It is has a great contemplative tone, which makes it quite the little crowd pleaser. If you enjoy self-help style novels in the same vein as Eat Pray Love, this one should appeal.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Perfectly good advice but summarized in a pile of drivel and insufferable cliches. Who am I to judge if that format works for people? It’s just not for me. Other thoughts:Yawn every time Camille feels validated because men admire her while walking down the street.The lesson “be a cat” was charming.
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  • angelareadsbooks
    January 1, 1970
    Lately I have been loving the trend of bestselling books from other countries being sold in the US. Books like A Man Called Ove and The Lido. So when I saw Your Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have One by Raphaëlle Giordano was a French bestseller, I was really excited to have a chance to read it. Your Second Life is the story of Camille, a middle aged woman looking for happiness. It seems she has everything and yet she feels something missing. Through a series of events she comes i Lately I have been loving the trend of bestselling books from other countries being sold in the US. Books like A Man Called Ove and The Lido. So when I saw Your Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have One by Raphaëlle Giordano was a French bestseller, I was really excited to have a chance to read it. Your Second Life is the story of Camille, a middle aged woman looking for happiness. It seems she has everything and yet she feels something missing. Through a series of events she comes in contact with Claude, a routinologist, who helps her to grow and discover new things. Unfortunately I was disappointed by this story. I found it to be too didactic and lacking in character development. It was this interesting mix of a self help book and narrative. Which in some instances can work well, but in this instance didn’t work for me. I found it to be heavy on therapy concepts and lacking in story. Perhaps if I knew this going in, I would have had a different response. Mostly I felt as if I was simply observing Camille’s sessions with Claude. I think with a little more editing and more plot development this could have been a much better story. The concept itself was interesting but it just came up short for me.Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for giving me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Your second life begins when you give yourself permission to abandon books that aren't working for you. (I am apparently still at life #1.)
  • Jenny
    January 1, 1970
    Hahahaha holy shit this book is SO bad. The prose is sophomoric, the dialogue stilted and contrived, the characters unsympathetic and uninteresting, and the self-help stuff that this book seems to have been written to deliver is a weird dilettante-ish mix of The Secret, CBT, mindfulness, and stoicism that glosses over anything of substance while spouting Live Love Laugh level platitudes. I read the first half and decided I did not need to subject myself to the second half.
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  • Carol - Reading Writing and Riesling
    January 1, 1970
    My View:Clever, life affirming, at times humorous, thought provoking.This is a charming, entertaining read that has many lessons to share. I enjoyed the journey that Camille embarks on and the clever twist at the conclusion.
  • Nicole Liu
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this book would be fun to read and possibly enlightening. However, I really didn't enjoy this book. I would describe this book as a self-help book disguised as fiction. It was predictable and cheesy and I can't believe I finished it! There were take aways if you are stuck in a rut, but the overall message was clear. You, and only you, are in charge of your own happiness.
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  • BookGypsy
    January 1, 1970
    This is so more than you think it is going in. It is a self help but it is written like a novel. The character is so relatable. If you feel like you are stuck in the same routine this book is for you. If you think you're Not suffering from the same routine you will find out that yes, you are. A great story. Engaging.
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  • Rawan
    January 1, 1970
    In a nutshell I recommend this book to everyone
  • Amandine Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    I would have given 3.5 stars but rounded at 4 because I am in a good mood.
  • Karin Pearson
    January 1, 1970
    A quick schmaltzy read. Mostly a "self help" book disguised as a novel. Lots of food for thought and tips to make the most of your life to break out of a rut or "routine".
  • Sakinah
    January 1, 1970
    2/5 First half was really good and motivating Second half was boring to death.And I don’t like overly enthusiastic and optimistic books. They frustrates me.
  • Tiffany Spitzer
    January 1, 1970
    This book reads like a novel but with a self-help theme. It’s fantastic with awesome ideas for improving the way you view yourself and life. I will definitely go back to it for a refresher thanks to the awesome idea dictionary in the back of the book. I recommend anyone in a rut or needing help with reinforcing positive self-image/worth read this book. It’s a very quick read!
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Whimsical, sweet, fictional almost-self-help novel.
  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    My French friend adores this book and got me the Italian version for my birthday (no english yet, but soon). Its a sweet story, with great intentions, but I found it either just a hair too predictable or in other parts a hair too perfect. But, I guess that's also the type of book it is - meant to prove that optimism guarantees success - meant to teach you how make things eventually go your way after a couple stumbles if you do XY and Z. Doubt its really that easy in the real world, but its a nob My French friend adores this book and got me the Italian version for my birthday (no english yet, but soon). Its a sweet story, with great intentions, but I found it either just a hair too predictable or in other parts a hair too perfect. But, I guess that's also the type of book it is - meant to prove that optimism guarantees success - meant to teach you how make things eventually go your way after a couple stumbles if you do XY and Z. Doubt its really that easy in the real world, but its a noble idea. I enjoyed reading it though, its cute, and think it does have certain gems of advice from Claude to Camille, and can see trying some of the tricks to make change in your own world / think positively etc. Certainly a neat twist on a self help book, being written as narrative, I suppose thats a fun way to do it! 3.5 stars.
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  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    I agree with Giordano's principles and tricks to hitting the reset button on one's life, but it's not necessary to conceal them within a poorly written novel. It certainly doesn't do justice to the brave folks in professional circles of psychology and counseling, who know very well that there isn't a person on the planet who could solve such deep issues (children, marriage, career, mending fences) as quickly as this narrator. In short, a book for people who would rather chomp on a stick of cotto I agree with Giordano's principles and tricks to hitting the reset button on one's life, but it's not necessary to conceal them within a poorly written novel. It certainly doesn't do justice to the brave folks in professional circles of psychology and counseling, who know very well that there isn't a person on the planet who could solve such deep issues (children, marriage, career, mending fences) as quickly as this narrator. In short, a book for people who would rather chomp on a stick of cotton candy than face the uphill battle of reinvention and healing.
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  • Katharine Coggeshall
    January 1, 1970
    This is a book to read and re-read over your lifetime. It is filled with excellent advice that you just can't hear enough. This is a work of fiction, but the characters are so real and the situations so relatable, it comes across as an autobiography. The style of writing eludes French/British origins in the sayings, attitudes, etc. and isn't really my favorite, but the plot and lessons more than make up for it.
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  • Mary Mccallister
    January 1, 1970
    It's fiction but it's not because you become the main character. Warning: Self reflection
  • Kristy Holland
    January 1, 1970
    Quick and easy read maybe veering toward 3.5 ⭐. Part fiction, chick-lit, part self-help. Sometimes predictable, sometime slightly repetitive, but overall, Good message. Quick and easy read maybe veering toward 3.5 ⭐️. Part fiction, chick-lit, part self-help. Sometimes predictable, sometime slightly repetitive, but overall, Good message.
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  • Alexa
    January 1, 1970
    There’s something special about Your Second Life Begins When You Realize You Only Have One. It’s fiction but it also kind of reads like self-help because while reading it there are so many good tips and examples of changing perspectives. This book is...Review: https://www.likeliterallyliterary.com...*A copy of this book was provided to me by Penguin Random House Canada in exchange for an honest review*
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  • Zahra MiresmaIli
    January 1, 1970
    So much inspiring and mentioned some good techniques for problem solving.
  • Sharon
    January 1, 1970
    A selfself-help book thinly plotted to mimic a novel. The best thing about it is the title.
  • litewolf
    January 1, 1970
    A self-help book disguised as a novel and not even written in a way to motivate me to keep going.
  • Kathryn
    January 1, 1970
    Your Second Life Begins is more of a self-help fable than the novel I was expecting, which meant that I initially struggled with the writing style, and didn’t feel as if the characters were fleshed out enough. I also found Camille a little too whiny: she runs to Claude at every little setback. But then once he’s given her a nudge in the right direction, she overcomes all obstacles, fairly easily, with optimum outcomes.Or so it seems. That might not be a fair assessment because she does put in ti Your Second Life Begins is more of a self-help fable than the novel I was expecting, which meant that I initially struggled with the writing style, and didn’t feel as if the characters were fleshed out enough. I also found Camille a little too whiny: she runs to Claude at every little setback. But then once he’s given her a nudge in the right direction, she overcomes all obstacles, fairly easily, with optimum outcomes.Or so it seems. That might not be a fair assessment because she does put in time and effort on the assignments Claude sets her. It’s just that it feels glossed over thanks to how Your Second Life Begins is written. I’m also aware that Camille needs to progress through the tasks and challenges reasonably quickly to keep the reader engaged but the transformations that come about in Camille and her life still seem too good to be true. That’s the cynic in me, though… and I’ll get back to you once I’ve finished working through them myself!Your Second Life Begins is a quick and easy, upbeat read: I read it in one short sitting. Raphaëlle Giordano has come up with some really interesting challenges for anyone who wonders if this is it, and if their life could be improved. She collects them together at the end of the book, too, which is a great reference tool if you want to try any of them out, and it means you don’t have to jot them down while reading but simply enjoy following Camille’s journey instead. And some of the ways in which Claude encourages Camille to get out of her comfort zone and make changes to her life are amusing and entertaining, even if you may have to find your own alternative and won’t be able to try them all at home.So, yes, I had a couple of issues with this book but I’m grateful that it came along when it did. I took so much from it: Your Second Life Begins made me look at things differently (never a waste of time), think about where I am and what makes me happy. This offbeat adventure in happiness is an insightful read.
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  • Victoria Colotta
    January 1, 1970
    My Highly Caffeinated Thought: Charming and inspiring. It's way of approaching the re-thinking of one's life was so refreshing as well as useful. YOUR SECOND LIFE BEGINS WHEN YOU REALIZE YOU ONLY HAVE ONE is one of those books that came across my desk at the right time in my life. This beautifully written story opens up the reader's mind to a new and much more positive way at looking at life. In truth, how many of us feel like we are in a rut or can't figure out why we are not happy more often? My Highly Caffeinated Thought: Charming and inspiring. It's way of approaching the re-thinking of one's life was so refreshing as well as useful. YOUR SECOND LIFE BEGINS WHEN YOU REALIZE YOU ONLY HAVE ONE is one of those books that came across my desk at the right time in my life. This beautifully written story opens up the reader's mind to a new and much more positive way at looking at life. In truth, how many of us feel like we are in a rut or can't figure out why we are not happy more often? I am certainly guilty of this. It can be hard to see past the negative and appreciate what we do have in our lives. However, this book, though fiction, tackles these very real emotions. As I was brought into Camille's life, I immediately identified with her. The sincere portrayal of this woman resonated with me more than I even thought possible.I will not sit here and rehash the story because I truly believe everyone should read it for themselves and allow it to affect them in their own way. What I will say is this. The writing is eloquent, the characters are completely relatable, and the way the author enlightens the reader is not done in a preachy way. From beginning to end, I loved this book. In our current world where so much is negative, I cannot recommend it more.Added bonus...there is a list of tools you can use in your real life to embrace the credos of routine-ology.Reviewer Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.Highly Caffeinated Rating of… ☕ ☕ ☕ ☕ ☕✦ ✦ ✦ ✦Follow the Highly Caffeinated Victoria Colotta: Website | Facebook | Twitter @vcolotta | Instagram | Goodreads✦ ✦ ✦ ✦
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  • Clair Sharpe
    January 1, 1970
    Camille is approaching her 40s, she has a young son and is married and has a good job, yet her life feels unfulfilled and despite having all the things that should make her happy, she is not.When her car breaks down in the middle of nowhere, she walks to a house to try and get help. There she meets Sean Connery lookalike Claude, who seeing her distress (the car breaking down is the final straw) offers her a business card because he thinks he can help her. He is what is known as a routinologist a Camille is approaching her 40s, she has a young son and is married and has a good job, yet her life feels unfulfilled and despite having all the things that should make her happy, she is not.When her car breaks down in the middle of nowhere, she walks to a house to try and get help. There she meets Sean Connery lookalike Claude, who seeing her distress (the car breaking down is the final straw) offers her a business card because he thinks he can help her. He is what is known as a routinologist and Camille soon embarks on a journey of self-discovery and surprising adventures in an attempt to find true happiness.Camille’s journey of self discovery is interesting and there are lots of tips to change your life and live the way you want to live instead of in the way you’ve fallen into doing.It felt very French in the writing (don’t ask me to explain how!) and I really enjoyed this unique mix of a self-help and fiction novel. It certainly makes you think about your life, the routines we get into and ways to change for the better!Thank you Transworld books for my copy.
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  • Jenna
    January 1, 1970
    it moves a little slow. but it was a short book & a quick read.To be honest, I kept reading b/c it was in one of my bookblurbs as a best seller in Europe. I like to read books/writers (translated in English) from around the world whenever I can. I know it’s fiction, but couldn’t we all use a “routinologist” in our lives? And some of the self-help items mentioned were helpful. it was charming. a nice little upbeat story. i was surprised by the ending. and i found that camille was a relatable it moves a little slow. but it was a short book & a quick read.To be honest, I kept reading b/c it was in one of my bookblurbs as a best seller in Europe. I like to read books/writers (translated in English) from around the world whenever I can. I know it’s fiction, but couldn’t we all use a “routinologist” in our lives? And some of the self-help items mentioned were helpful. it was charming. a nice little upbeat story. i was surprised by the ending. and i found that camille was a relatable character. and i liked claude too once the ending was revealed. maybe i'll try some of the tips.
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  • Suep
    January 1, 1970
    Routine-itis is a real bummer. It sucks the joy out of paradise. Camille suffered from this ailment but she managed to overcome. This is a French novel that was on the charts for over a year. It’s a cute read. It’s real. And it’s very self-helpy. So, it really has one foot in fiction and the other in counseling or life coaching.There’s a lot of great suggestions for happiness and de-stressing. I could see how this would be a popular book; definitely cheaper than therapy. I ended up knowing I sho Routine-itis is a real bummer. It sucks the joy out of paradise. Camille suffered from this ailment but she managed to overcome. This is a French novel that was on the charts for over a year. It’s a cute read. It’s real. And it’s very self-helpy. So, it really has one foot in fiction and the other in counseling or life coaching.There’s a lot of great suggestions for happiness and de-stressing. I could see how this would be a popular book; definitely cheaper than therapy. I ended up knowing I should follow the suggestions.....Should should should. Stop shouding on yourself! Ahhhhh!
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