Eyes Like Mine
She is a wealthy Negro aristocrat living in Jim Crow Washington D.C. He is a Jewish lawyer who fled Nazi Germany. When Justinia and Julius meet at an NAACP convention, they defy family and societal expectations and change each other's lives forever. Their story, told in alternating viewpoints with insightful wit and humor, reveals their experiences involving race and class and sacrifices they make while living and surviving the turbulent 1930s.

Eyes Like Mine Details

TitleEyes Like Mine
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 1st, 2015
PublisherCreateSpace
ISBN-139781508457725
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Romance, Fiction, Interracial Romance, Historical Romance

Eyes Like Mine Review

  • Lulu
    January 1, 1970
    This was more of a 2.5 for me. I loved the concept of the book, but it didn't really pick up for me until I was about 75% done and then it felt rushed. The beginning kinda read like a who's who of black America...interesting stuff, but not really pertinent to the story. I would have loved to read more about Julius and Justinia actually falling in love and their time together and apart in Germany. Again...the concept was great, but the story telling just kinda missed the mark for me.
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  • Dawn
    January 1, 1970
    This book was on my kindle unlimited. After not reading for a month and quitting another book in the beginning, I decided to pick this book up. An upscale African American college graduate meets an up and coming German lawyer that happens to be Jewish. They meet at a time when racial tension was high in America and Germany and find love in common.This is book is filled with facts and information, that most, probably have never heard of. I actually looked up a few of the cases that were discussed This book was on my kindle unlimited. After not reading for a month and quitting another book in the beginning, I decided to pick this book up. An upscale African American college graduate meets an up and coming German lawyer that happens to be Jewish. They meet at a time when racial tension was high in America and Germany and find love in common.This is book is filled with facts and information, that most, probably have never heard of. I actually looked up a few of the cases that were discussed. If you're like me and read with your kindle, I was using the dictionary probably on every page I read. lol No issue with that because that is what you're suppose to do. While the book was filled with great information, the author basically skipped over the romance in the story. I did have tears at the end but I just missed out on so much of Julius and Justinia's relationship as a couple, I almost felt robbed. Even with the way the epilogue ended, it was just an abrupt stop. The end of the story felt so rushed. It wasn't a good balance of fact and fiction. All of the facts were at the beginning and the the fiction came in about 80% of the book.I ended the book feeling incomplete. If the author decides to write another book, I am hoping there is a better balance.
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  • Angela Christopher
    January 1, 1970
    This was an excellent debut novel for new author Lauren Cecile. Well written, thought provoking and poignant, the author forces the reader to think about the impact of race, religion and class during the pre-Holocaust era. Justinia, a wealthy American Negro, and Julius, a Jew from Germany, meet at an NAACP convention and find that though their backgrounds couldn't be more different, their philosophies on life are quite similar. We learn about the lives of each through their first person narrativ This was an excellent debut novel for new author Lauren Cecile. Well written, thought provoking and poignant, the author forces the reader to think about the impact of race, religion and class during the pre-Holocaust era. Justinia, a wealthy American Negro, and Julius, a Jew from Germany, meet at an NAACP convention and find that though their backgrounds couldn't be more different, their philosophies on life are quite similar. We learn about the lives of each through their first person narratives. Headstrong Justinia makes her own decisions about the course of her life, despite the expectations of her overbearing, high brow mother. Julius leaves his close knit family during a volatile time for Jews in Berlin, to attend law school in America. An unlikely friendship evolves between the characters, as the writer expertly weaves a historical context into the backdrop.
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  • Shermaine
    January 1, 1970
    Well written, would have loved if the book had focused more on the love story instead of Slavery in America and Nazi Germany. This took up way too much of the book and by the time it started the story of Julius and Justina the end. Would have liked to see how their love story played out, just a little bit longer.
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  • reneeNaDaBomb
    January 1, 1970
    I am a fan of history and historical fiction as well. So most of the book opened up new information for me about the upper middle class people of color. Events that surrounded the Nazi coming into power in Berlin, Germany and Hitler at the 1936 Olympics. Lawyer Thurgood Marshall's work kept me captivated once Julius volunteered to help out in his office. Not much romance was explored with Justinia Treadwell and Julius Sommerfeldt, a Jewish fellow that she befriended and really liked. I wondered I am a fan of history and historical fiction as well. So most of the book opened up new information for me about the upper middle class people of color. Events that surrounded the Nazi coming into power in Berlin, Germany and Hitler at the 1936 Olympics. Lawyer Thurgood Marshall's work kept me captivated once Julius volunteered to help out in his office. Not much romance was explored with Justinia Treadwell and Julius Sommerfeldt, a Jewish fellow that she befriended and really liked. I wondered could/would Justinia step out of the box and go with her heart or conform and date the upper echelon man of color that mom groomed her to marry. Fortunately these questions were answered in this book. I really liked it.
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  • Teaguem2005
    January 1, 1970
    abandoned at 13%
  • Tanya Chaney
    January 1, 1970
    This was vividly written and historically engaging. Rich with diversity,challenges, and a love affair that tried to overcome many societal challenges. I absolutely would absolutely recommend this book to young adults as well as any on else.
  • Bill Wehrmacher
    January 1, 1970
    What a dismal story, but given the subject matter and time frame, it would not have done history justice if it had not been. Eyes Like Mine is a story of the universal bigotry that permeated life, primarily the United States and Germany in this story, during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Lauren Cecile brings the history to us on a personal level with the lives of her two main characters. Justinia is the daughter of a wealthy black, born around the end of the first world war. She and he What a dismal story, but given the subject matter and time frame, it would not have done history justice if it had not been. Eyes Like Mine is a story of the universal bigotry that permeated life, primarily the United States and Germany in this story, during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Lauren Cecile brings the history to us on a personal level with the lives of her two main characters. Justinia is the daughter of a wealthy black, born around the end of the first world war. She and her family are part of the 'black elite' and much of the first third of the book dedicated itself to touching upon famous events and people. As part of this history, Ms. Ciclle makes clear the rampant bigotry between rich and poor blacks. Personally, I was surprised at how pleasant were the lives of her community. In fact, had it not been for the constant reminder that the people were black, one could believe they were white. I am glad, in a way, that not all blacks were poor and tormented and lynched. Julius was from a rich Jewish family in Germany. He left Germany, just before Hitler was made Chancellor, to study law in the USA. things changed in Germany during the three years he was in the United States. We do not learn much about his family until he returns in 1936 at which time he finds Germany a very different place than the one he left. Jews are being suppressed, although not to the extent they would be in the next few years. Added to all the rest of the intolerance and bigotry in the book, Julius and Justinia fall in love adding not only racial, religious burdens, but inter-racial issues as well. All in all, Lauren Cecile does an excellent job of portraying a world in which, it seems, no one should be happy. However, they are, for a while. The book includes a Book Club Guide in which she poses the question: "Do you think a Jim Crow or Nazi society could take root again?" This is a powerful question in our current day. I hope the answer is no, but I fear it is yes.
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  • Bruce
    January 1, 1970
    Very interesting story. Sorry to say it's very slow and just way to detail heavy for my taste. At least it didn't do the everything is roses ending. The story is near a 5 but I just can't give it more that a 3. If it was maybe 20 to 30 % shorter, it would go up to a 4.
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  • Linde
    January 1, 1970
    Good Read...I would have liked even more detail..but found the story grabbed and kept you coming back...look forward to more by the author.
  • Colleen Mertens
    January 1, 1970
    This book follows the relationship between an American Negro woman & a German Jewish man in the 1930s. The characters are charming & optimistic. You want them to make it in spite of the odds against them. This well-written, thought provoking book is definitely timely and needed for today's world as well.
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  • Angela Crook
    January 1, 1970
    A very well written book packed with history. Great characters. Very thoughtful.
  • Linda Sommers
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating and unusual read~~well worth it!Eyes like mine opened a window into a lifestyle of very wealthy and very well educated African Americans at a time when this country was slowly pulling itself out of the worst Depression in history and to my knowledge little was known about this segment of Americans. Their affluence and privilege was new to me and I am sorry to say that it is probably new to many people. The love story between a Jewish man and a very light skinned black woman is fraugh Fascinating and unusual read~~well worth it!Eyes like mine opened a window into a lifestyle of very wealthy and very well educated African Americans at a time when this country was slowly pulling itself out of the worst Depression in history and to my knowledge little was known about this segment of Americans. Their affluence and privilege was new to me and I am sorry to say that it is probably new to many people. The love story between a Jewish man and a very light skinned black woman is fraught with problems and danger just stemming from the times that they lived in and from their "insane" decision to leave the relative safety of the United States and go to Germany in 1938. I will not tell readers any more, except that the end is very emotional. From those who know more about the history of Germany under Adolf Hitler, some of this book describes an ugly, brutal time, however, it is history and no matter whether we may like it or agree with it, the things described in this book really happened. Read it and learn a lot!!!
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  • Linda Marie Marsh
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 STARSEver read a book where you feel like you are watching a film in your minds eye? That is what EYES LIKE MINE felt like as i read it. A love story yes, between a young Jewish man in college in American, and a light-skinned. well-to-do- black woman. But also a historical social statement comparing the Jim Crow south with Nazi Germany......awakening really.Close your eyes if you don't want to know this, but the end IS hearbreaking. And at the same time somewhat expected. It IS about two 'su 4.5 STARSEver read a book where you feel like you are watching a film in your minds eye? That is what EYES LIKE MINE felt like as i read it. A love story yes, between a young Jewish man in college in American, and a light-skinned. well-to-do- black woman. But also a historical social statement comparing the Jim Crow south with Nazi Germany......awakening really.Close your eyes if you don't want to know this, but the end IS hearbreaking. And at the same time somewhat expected. It IS about two 'sub-humans' living in Germany after all....Sad in that we know what happens to those who thought they could "wait out" the reign of Hitler. Who lives and who does not? The ONLY negative, and the ONLY reason why i did not give a 5 is that their baby son is introduced unexpectedly toward the near end, almost like an afterthought. Just my opinion.
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