Speaking Truth in Love
You probably speak 20,000 words a day, give or take, and each one influences those who listen. No wonder God has so much to say about our words. We are all counselors, whether we realize it or not! Speaking Truth in Love is a blueprint for communication that strengthens community in Christ. The principles outlined in this pivotal work are specific to counseling, yet extend to marriage, family, friendship, business and the church. ? Have you ever wondered how to be a more effective counselor? ? Have you ever looked for a better way to talk to difficult people? ? Have you ever wanted to express faith and love more naturally in your relationships? Practical in its approach yet comprehensive in its scope, Speaking Truth in Love is sure to become required reading for anyone interested in pursuing a career as a counselor or anyone else who longs for ways to redeem relationships.

Speaking Truth in Love Details

TitleSpeaking Truth in Love
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 1st, 2005
PublisherVantagePoint
ISBN-139780977080717
Rating
GenrePsychology, Counselling, Christian, Religion, Theology, Christian Living, Nonfiction

Speaking Truth in Love Review

  • Steven Wedgeworth
    January 1, 1970
    The first half of this book was an excellent guide to personal spirituality, prayer, and the way in which humans deal with identifying the presence of God in difficult times. The second half was disappointing, as it sought to get into the explanation and defense of "Biblical Counseling" over and against other forms. While I certainly do believe that the Bible ought to be foundational in all forms of counseling, these kinds of discussions always tend to conflate the content of the Bible with meta The first half of this book was an excellent guide to personal spirituality, prayer, and the way in which humans deal with identifying the presence of God in difficult times. The second half was disappointing, as it sought to get into the explanation and defense of "Biblical Counseling" over and against other forms. While I certainly do believe that the Bible ought to be foundational in all forms of counseling, these kinds of discussions always tend to conflate the content of the Bible with metaphysics in general and the role of metaphysics and philosophy in other disciplines. Thus you get unwitting denials that natural revelation or other forms of science are "authoritative." But that's unwarranted. Of course they are authoritative. They are not infallible or ultimate, but they are certainly authoritative if done properly. This sort of confusion manages to obscure many deep problems and present shallow solutions. Additionally, the term "church" is used without proper definition, thus you get statements which promise more than they deliver like "Counseling IS the Church." That line sounds profound, but upon inspection it rests upon multiple equivocations, multiple meanings of both "counseling" and "the church" at play in the same argument. Powlison is not an extremist of this sort, but his principles are still confused and thus the advice is of limited value.
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  • Matt Tyler
    January 1, 1970
    I intend to read several books this year that I hope will grow me in my counseling ability. David Powlison’s Speaking Truth in Love was very helpful in considering certain counseling foundations. I was especially helped by chapter 12 What Will You Ask For?, Chapter 6 Think Globally, Act Locally, and many quotes in various individual chapters. I have deducted half a star because there doesn’t seem to be a cohesion among the chapters. They are more like separate essays. And I have deducted another I intend to read several books this year that I hope will grow me in my counseling ability. David Powlison’s Speaking Truth in Love was very helpful in considering certain counseling foundations. I was especially helped by chapter 12 What Will You Ask For?, Chapter 6 Think Globally, Act Locally, and many quotes in various individual chapters. I have deducted half a star because there doesn’t seem to be a cohesion among the chapters. They are more like separate essays. And I have deducted another half a star for an absolutely terrible book cover.
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  • Rick Davis
    January 1, 1970
    While I disagree at some points, especially in the last two chapters, this is one of the best books I've read about biblical counseling.
  • Josiah
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fairly helpful book to read. While this book is perhaps specifically targeted to biblical counselors, it has a lot of solid advice for the layperson as well, since, honestly, all of us are called to informally counsel another in one way or another. I got more from the first half of the book than I got from the latter half, which may be due to the latter part being less practical, or which may be due to waning interest in the latter half. Nevertheless, I really appreciated Powlison's t This was a fairly helpful book to read. While this book is perhaps specifically targeted to biblical counselors, it has a lot of solid advice for the layperson as well, since, honestly, all of us are called to informally counsel another in one way or another. I got more from the first half of the book than I got from the latter half, which may be due to the latter part being less practical, or which may be due to waning interest in the latter half. Nevertheless, I really appreciated Powlison's thoughts on how Psalm 119 is actually a very personal psalm, and also how to counsel someone by relating Scripture one verse at a time to their life. Very helpful thoughts.Rating: 3.5-4 Stars (Good)
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I would give this a 2.5 out of 5, but that's not an available rating! I liked the beginning-middle of this book, but towards the middle/end Powlison really pushed for the Biblical Counseling movement, which I do not agree with. Yes, Biblical Counseling (unlike secular counseling) deals with the problem of sin ("soul healing" as Powlison calls it), but it completely rejects all Psychological advancements. We were given the intelligence to delve into the problems of the human mind and heart, and t I would give this a 2.5 out of 5, but that's not an available rating! I liked the beginning-middle of this book, but towards the middle/end Powlison really pushed for the Biblical Counseling movement, which I do not agree with. Yes, Biblical Counseling (unlike secular counseling) deals with the problem of sin ("soul healing" as Powlison calls it), but it completely rejects all Psychological advancements. We were given the intelligence to delve into the problems of the human mind and heart, and these advancements are a gift!
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  • Helen Von seth carpenter
    January 1, 1970
    This book was an invaluable guide to assertive communications through a Christian lens. (However, let me reassure you that it is not an “in your face” Christian publication!). I appreciated the Biblical examples as well secular situations which provided real-world application to the skills which were taught. In light of today’s generally accepted behaviors, everyone should read and apply this book. The world would be a better place.
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  • Kirk
    January 1, 1970
    For those with an interest in counseling or those interested in playing a leadership role in their church trying develop its ability to be a wise, gracious, speak-truth-in-love community, this book is a must read. I might suggest beginning the book by reading the chapter "Affirmations and Denials", and then start at the beginning.
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  • Ryan Jankowski
    January 1, 1970
    The chapter on Psalm 119 was spectacular and inspiring. The rest, as is common among this tradition of counseling, was rather shallow (identify presenting problem, address, but it seems never explore why it is a PP in the first place).
  • Drew
    January 1, 1970
    An excellent practical and vision oriented book on Biblical counselingPowlison writes with conviction and skill to address the needs of Gods word to reach a human heart as well as providing a confessional vision for counseling within the church.
  • Lynn Lohr
    January 1, 1970
    A must readFor me this was a must-read and continuing my biblical counseling education. I found everything in this book helpful to realizing that only my needs as a counselor but the needs of the community. I so agree with the premise he set forth about the church.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    The first part of the book was very informative but the second half seemed more geared towards pastors and not lay persons.
  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    I was working on a poem based on Psalm 119 and was inspired to finish it while I was reading this book. http://cinderellasang.blogspot.ca/201...
  • Charity Hall
    January 1, 1970
    Incredible breakdown of the Biblical theology and praxis of Pastoral Care.
  • Brandon Wilkins
    January 1, 1970
    This was a good intro to biblical counselling. I recommend most of its content. It's practical, clear, and has a lot of good guidance for those who want to learn about sharing biblical truth effectively with others. I liked that part of this book a lot (and it constitutes the vast majority of the book).However, the issue that I could not get past in this book was it's extremely diminished view of secular psychology. There is obviously a long-standing battle between biblical counselling vs. secul This was a good intro to biblical counselling. I recommend most of its content. It's practical, clear, and has a lot of good guidance for those who want to learn about sharing biblical truth effectively with others. I liked that part of this book a lot (and it constitutes the vast majority of the book).However, the issue that I could not get past in this book was it's extremely diminished view of secular psychology. There is obviously a long-standing battle between biblical counselling vs. secular psychology. I have nothing particularly new to add to the debate. I take a more mediating position than Powlison seems to. I would say for my own outlook: common grace is a real thing, and it creates a situation in which non-Christians can operate in a way utterly inconsistent with their non-believing worldview (and in a way consistent with a Christian worldview). Why can't that apply to the field of psychology?Other than that issue, I still think the book has a lot of good instruction for discipling and helping through the ministry of the word.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Since we actually each do some counseling in our family and among our friends, just by the mere fact that we interact with them and are involved in their lives -- caring about the ups and downs of their lives -- this is good for all Christians to read. It sets the stage and directs the thoughts toward what good and godly counsel should look like and established the principles and source of the layperson's ministry.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Powlison is not an easy read. The first couple of chapters are the most difficult to get through. The writing is a little cumbersome but the subject matter is relevant and he has a lot to offer in the way of insight once you decipher the content. I read this in preparation for biblical counseling training and the case studies within are helpful in that regard. I'd say it's a good starting place for those considering counseling anyone from a biblical perspective.
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  • Susanna
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book 4 years ago, but now I have my own copy and am going thru it with a highlighter. I am seeking to speak God's truths into the lives of several people now, so this is a timely tool. I'm excited about what I will be reminded of as I read it (and know that it will probably benefit me personally far more than anyone I speak to!)
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  • Nathan Schneider
    January 1, 1970
    We are all counselors. Every day and in every conversation, we are either leading people in a positive or negative direction. Read this book to understand our role in counseling and the ways to positively impact those around us.
  • K B
    January 1, 1970
    ok - didn't hold my interest, sorry to say
  • Jeff Boettcher
    January 1, 1970
    Great book on Gospel centered counseling with wonderful practical applications.
  • Joy
    January 1, 1970
    Really loved this book. Some chapters are nitty-gritty, others are more heady but all point to practical ways to help people. Would be we'll worth rereading.
  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    A fantastic introduction to biblical counseling and a compelling case for biblical counseling within the church.
  • Frans Karlsson
    January 1, 1970
    A difficult way of writing to get used to. The author is saying many good things but they are lost in the writing.
  • Maria Connor
    January 1, 1970
    Kind of hard to read, but some good nuggets.
  • Paul Lawrence
    January 1, 1970
    Helpful and Interesting ReadQuite a helpful read to help equip us to minister to others but also to grow in a mature faith ourselves.
  • Aaron Boyce
    January 1, 1970
    Reading yourself in chapter 2 alone is worth the purchase of the book.
  • High Pointe Baptist Church
    January 1, 1970
    A gospel-oriented approach to communication
  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    Powilson is great...so wise, practical, pastoral and loving in this book on how to counsel biblically and through the lens of the Gospel.
  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Great book!
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