Where The Wild Cherries Grow
I closed my eyes as I tried to pick apart every flavour, because nothing had ever tasted so good before. It was like tasting for the first time. Like discovering colour . . .It is 1919 and the war is over, but for Emeline Vane the cold Norfolk fens only are haunted by memories of those she has lost. In a moment of grief, she recklessly boards a train and runs from it all.Her journey leads her far away, to a tiny seaside village in the South of France. Taken in by cafe owner Maman and her twenty-year-old son, Emeline discovers a world completely new to her: of oranges, olives and wild herbs, the raw, rich tastes of the land.But when a love affair develops, as passionate as the flavours of the village, secrets from home begin blowing in on the sea wides. Fifty years later, a young solictor on his first case finds Emeline's diary, and begins to trace a story of betrayal, love and bittersweet secrets that will send him on a journey to discover the truth...

Where The Wild Cherries Grow Details

TitleWhere The Wild Cherries Grow
Author
FormatPaperback
ReleaseJun 15th, 2017
PublisherBlack Swan
ISBN1784160733
ISBN-139781784160739
Number of pages368 pages
Rating
GenreHistorical, Fiction, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit

Where The Wild Cherries Grow Review

  • Joanna Park
    March 23, 2017
    1919 Emmeline Vale finds herself alone and grief stricken the Great War having claimed the lives of her two eldest brothers and her mother succumbing to the Spanish flu. Lost in her grief and unable to cope with her uncle's visions for her future, Emmeline makes the decision to run. Fifty years later, trainee solicitor Bill Perch is assigned to find out what happened to Emmeline. Whilst searching he finds her old diary and finds himself drawn into her story. Desperate to discover the truth he ab 1919 Emmeline Vale finds herself alone and grief stricken the Great War having claimed the lives of her two eldest brothers and her mother succumbing to the Spanish flu. Lost in her grief and unable to cope with her uncle's visions for her future, Emmeline makes the decision to run. Fifty years later, trainee solicitor Bill Perch is assigned to find out what happened to Emmeline. Whilst searching he finds her old diary and finds himself drawn into her story. Desperate to discover the truth he abandons everything and sets off to find her. But what will he discover and what really happened to Emmeline? Where the Wild Cherries Grow is a beautifully vivid and delicious story, and one that will definitely stay with me. The story is divided into two storyline told in alternating chapters. Emmeline's from 1919 & Bill Perch's from 1969. Unusually for me I found both storylines interesting and wanted to continue reading to find out what happened in both of them. I think this was helped hugely by the amazing characters the author has created. I liked how real they felt and how both go through such a huge journey throughout the book. It's lovely how both of their stories are quite similar and that both of them end up finding themselves in one way or another. I found I cared about both of them and wanted to see them succeed and find happiness. The author's descriptions are so vivid that you can really imagine the scenery and places in your mind. She is especially good Shen it comes to describing food- warning do not read this book when hungry! The descriptions of the food Emmeline helps cook was so vivid I felt that I could almost smell of cooking! I ended up having to look up quite a few of the dishes as I wanted to try them for myself they sounded so delicious. The story was quite realistic, with the events/ action seeming real and never forced. There wasn't a lot of huge leaps to make the two stories fit together which was great and neither Emmeline or Bill had an easy journey. This was well done and often left me guessing as to what was going to happen next. The book was quite difficult to put down because if this as there always seemed to be new twists and turns that kept me intrigued and wanting to read more! I really didn't want this book to end and was quite sad when it did. I wish that the boom had continued for linger as I would have loved to have read more about Emmeline and Bill's lives. This is the second book I have read by this author and it definitely won't be my last. I didn't think it would be possible for her to top her debut but she had as I think this book is even better! This book would be perfect for fans of Kate Morton & Victoria Hislop as they are similar in style. Huge thanks to Hannah Bright and Transworld Publishers for giving me a proof copy of this book. I loved it!
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  • Vicki
    March 25, 2017
    More 4.5 stars... Dual time narratives are one of my favourite plot devices going. I love the alternating chapters, skipping between one era to the other and tying both times together. So when I read the synopsis for Where The Wild Cherries Grow, I knew this was going to be a book for me.In 1919 Emmeline faces an uncertain future, following the successive loss of her brothers to war and her Mother to heartbreak. Alone in the imposing family mansion, she's vulnerable to her unscrupulous uncle and More 4.5 stars... Dual time narratives are one of my favourite plot devices going. I love the alternating chapters, skipping between one era to the other and tying both times together. So when I read the synopsis for Where The Wild Cherries Grow, I knew this was going to be a book for me.In 1919 Emmeline faces an uncertain future, following the successive loss of her brothers to war and her Mother to heartbreak. Alone in the imposing family mansion, she's vulnerable to her unscrupulous uncle and his vision for the ancestral home. When faced with an alarming and terrifying realisation, she makes a spontaneous bid for freedom across France. Fifty years later and solicitor, Bill Perch, embarks on his first case. Young and eager to please, his first case seems straightforward enough. But when he comes across a diary, written fifty years ago, he becomes more and more intrigued and connected, until he must confront a moral dilemma, leading him on a journey of his own.What I loved about this book was how both Emmeline and Bill's chapters captivated me and complimented each other. They both begin in situations of suffocating formality, baring the pressure of the expectations of others and being stifled. Emmeline is trapped by her position as a young lady in 1919 and society's expectations which are imposed on her. Without any family left, she can't support herself or make choices about the future of her family home. Bill may initially seem to have the world at his feet, but he's also stifled by life and the expectations of his parents, his girlfriend and the monotony of his professional life in a claustrophobic city. As the chapters alternated, I could see the journey both character went on to individual freedom, and feel the development of both as they surged towards new beginnings. Usually, in this type of narrative, I favour one perspective or era more than the other. In Where The Wild Cherries Grow I found both voices equally as enjoyable, making this book flow beautifully, intertwining both Emmeline and Bill's stories effortlessly.Laura Madeleine has a beautiful descriptive prose, which transports the reader to the times and places of this book. The smells, the sounds, the sights...all brought alive in wonderful, multi-coloured vividness. And the food....oh the food! My mouth watered as I read about the sumptuous recipes. I could almost taste them. I wanted nothing more than to be in a beautiful coastal village in the Mediterranean, eating fresh and delicious food once I'd finished reading. But Laura's stunningly descriptive prose extends to the unsaid and unseen too. The love affair between Emmeline and Aaro was intense and breathtaking. Impressive as Aaro is deaf and has no speech, and so conveying his feelings relies on the author's poetic turn of phrase and tender and intricate detailing of a look or a touch.I adored this book, and was fully immersed in it as I read. Not only did the intrigue of Emmeline's secrets keep me glued, but the feeling of truly being transported to another place had me transfixed and I felt almost to sad to have ended it. For quite a short book, there's a lot packed in and I found myself turning the pages effortlessly and enjoying every single mouthwatering word. This is the first book I've read by Laura Madeleine, but it won't be the last and I highly recommend this book for those times when you have a few hours to spare and just want to be carried away on a beautiful story.
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  • Lynsey Summers
    June 17, 2017
    Every now and then a book comes along whereby when I finish it I think to myself - I will read that again and again - some examples for me include Little Women and The Great Gatsby, more recently Gone Girl and I Let You go.  Where the Wild Cherries Grow by Laura Madeline has just added itself to that list.Now I must admit the cover of this book, well, it didn't enthral or entice me into reading it.  I found it a little dull and twee and was worried the book would be too, perhaps more something m Every now and then a book comes along whereby when I finish it I think to myself - I will read that again and again - some examples for me include Little Women and The Great Gatsby, more recently Gone Girl and I Let You go.  Where the Wild Cherries Grow by Laura Madeline has just added itself to that list.Now I must admit the cover of this book, well, it didn't enthral or entice me into reading it.  I found it a little dull and twee and was worried the book would be too, perhaps more something my mother might enjoy.  THIS WAS NOT THE CASE AT ALL.Inside the reader finds a joyful, pleasure in the beautiful and quite frankly, mouth-watering, story of Emeline Vane.  Disappearing in a puff of mystery when she was just 19, in 1919, she is presumed long dead by the family of 1969 which is our starting point.  With the family eager to be able to sell the derelict manor house sitting on prime real estate to a developer they must seek proof she is actually dead.  They enlist the help of small time solicitors Hillbrand and Moffat and the case falls newbie Bill Perch.Written between two narrators, Bill Perch in 1969 and Emeline Vane in 1919, the world of Emeline is slowly unravelled explaining to the reader the events leading up to her disappearance and pieces together what happened afterwards.  As Bill Perch's investigation continues he begins to feel a bond and obligation to Emeline Vane to discover the truth - he believes she is still alive - going against what he is being paid to do.  Thus not only do we go on Emelines adventure but Bill's as well.There are a whole host of quirky characters within this novel, who open both narrators eyes and I loved them all, particularly Emeline's 'boss' Clemence, with her warm and wise motherly love for the town which she cooks and lives.  The author's use and descriptions of recipes and ingredients are so passionate and vivid you can almost smell the tomato's and garlic roasting.  I loved the stories behind them and, at this point, Kudos must go to Madeline for her research of the traditions and cultures of the cuisine of the time.Although this is tale told gently and with amazing locations and settings the mystery is kept really strong throughout.  It keeps you wondering and turning the pages and I was desperate for Bill to discover what happened to the scared 19 year old who gave up everything she knew in order to have a real life.It was totally absorbing to read about the women's world of the time and I think if I was Bill Perch I would have been inclined to through caution to the wind and do exactly the same as what he does!  This was one of those books whereby you near the end, but still so much is to be discovered and I loved the ending - I wished there had been more of it, a longer scene between the two final characters that went deeper and into more detail.  The final sentence by Bill really made me smile.  For me it would have been the perfect place to end - I personally didn't really feel the epilogue was really necessary.Beautifully paced and written with a gentle hand I can not recommend this book highly enough
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  • Shaz Goodwin
    July 10, 2017
    This is Laura Madeleine's second novel and it's just as awesome as her first!Review coming soon!
  • Sophie
    July 14, 2017
    Where The Wild Cherries Grow is a book that reads as beautifully as it looks. And you know, honestly, sometimes those beautifully written books have no substance. No depth to the story, no mystery to each character, nothing to absorb yourself into other than beautiful words. Where The Wild Cherries Grow could have been one of those books, but it definitely wasn’t. There was more than enough substance between the pages with a multi-layered story full of mystery and hidden truths, a life that has Where The Wild Cherries Grow is a book that reads as beautifully as it looks. And you know, honestly, sometimes those beautifully written books have no substance. No depth to the story, no mystery to each character, nothing to absorb yourself into other than beautiful words. Where The Wild Cherries Grow could have been one of those books, but it definitely wasn’t. There was more than enough substance between the pages with a multi-layered story full of mystery and hidden truths, a life that has fallen off the radar but is delivered to us as the reader in a delicious manner. Laura Madeleine’s writing is gorgeous, but the story was even better. The narrative transports us seamlessly back and forth in time between 1919 and 1969. In 1919, we meet Emeline Vane, whose life has been shattered by the war. We see her flee from the life she knows, a life of sadness and despair. Fifty years later, we meet young solicitor Bill Perch. Bill is absolutely thrilled to finally have been given a job of some interest to do. Here we discover the enchanting Hallerton House, a place that is ready to go on the market, so long as Bill can find enough evidence to prove that Emeline is dead. But there is much more to Emeline’s life than that.It didn't take me long to be drawn into this book and the mystery of Emeline Vane. I was fascinated by her character and her disappearance and found her chapters really engaging as I longed to find out what had happened to her. Could she really have been dead all those years? The further into reading this book I was, the more intrigued I became and I found myself lost inside the book, hours of my day disappeared in a flash as I escaped into Where the Wild Cherries Grow. Whilst Perch is lead to believe that Emeline is dead, the story doesn’t seem as black and white as that to him. One night he stays up reading through her diary and he is utterly absorbed and determined to find out more about this woman and what really happened to her. I loved how he had that sleepless night reading Emeline’s diary as his actions echoed my own. I, too, was hooked on Emeline’s story and knew there was much more to her life than what was first thought. Another thing I absolutely loved about this book was the author’s writing style. Laura Madeleine’s writing is truly beautiful with every moment brought to life by the description and evocative detail she uses. Everything is so vividly told and the story came to life right in front of me as I envision every little detail. This is my first book read by this author but it definitely won't be my last. I loved the beauty of her storytelling and how she built up the layers of mystery and intrigue to a completely gripping level which had me eagerly reading on to discover more. Early on we read extracts that Emeline has written in her diary which piqued my interest, but in the second part of this book where we get to meet Emeline properly, this is the moment I became really engrossed in the book and I spent the entire morning in bed reading until the book was finished. Bill Perch was another character who I liked instantly and grew to like even more as the story progressed. Though this book is about Emeline, Bill’s life became important to me too. I loved seeing him explore Hallerton House. This place was described so atmospherically. From the crows to the strange noises and the shadows, the dust and the damp, everything about the place was captivating. In fact, everything about this book was captivating. There is also a big foodie element to the narrative that had me salivating with every page. Do not read this book on an empty stomach! But definitely do pick up a copy of Where The Wild Cherries Grow – you won’t regret it.
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  • Elisabeth
    July 6, 2017
    It's 1919 and not only has Emeline Vane lost 2 brothers in the First World War but she has just lost her mother in the influenza epidemic.Fifty years later in 1969, trainee solicitor Bill Perch is tasked to confirm that Emeline Vane is deceased so that surviving relatives can make a claim on her estate. After finding Emeline’s diary, Bill takes it upon himself to find out the truth about this elusive young woman and discover her amazing story.This is a timeless story of love and intrigue that wi It's 1919 and not only has Emeline Vane lost 2 brothers in the First World War but she has just lost her mother in the influenza epidemic.Fifty years later in 1969, trainee solicitor Bill Perch is tasked to confirm that Emeline Vane is deceased so that surviving relatives can make a claim on her estate. After finding Emeline’s diary, Bill takes it upon himself to find out the truth about this elusive young woman and discover her amazing story.This is a timeless story of love and intrigue that will have you gripped from start to end. Perfect for a summer read, this book will delight fans of Santa Montefiore, Kate Morton and Rachel Hoare.
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  • Biggy Marshall
    May 11, 2017
    Babette's Feast by Isak Dinesen (Karen Blixen) - that was what the cooking scenes and food descriptions in this book reminded me about. Laura Madeleine is a good writer, but she cannot match Blixen's vivid descriptions of seductive tastes and smells.But, this book was more than cooking and feasting. Follow your instinct - daring stepping out into the unknown? At lot os us dare not venture outside the throdden path as it has been laid out for us by parents, society, and fate. Emeline and William Babette's Feast by Isak Dinesen (Karen Blixen) - that was what the cooking scenes and food descriptions in this book reminded me about. Laura Madeleine is a good writer, but she cannot match Blixen's vivid descriptions of seductive tastes and smells.But, this book was more than cooking and feasting. Follow your instinct - daring stepping out into the unknown? At lot os us dare not venture outside the throdden path as it has been laid out for us by parents, society, and fate. Emeline and William dared - 50 years apart - to follow the voice that told them to go for the unknown, no matter what their probably well meaning family tried to box them in to.A good read!
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  • Caitlin
    March 22, 2017
    I received an electronic copy of this book for free from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. I had read Laura Madeleine's previous novel so I was eagerly anticipating the release of this one. The male POV was unexpected but I liked it. I know this sounds sexist but I don't usually read books with a male POV. I usually prefer to read about the thoughts of my own gender. However, that did not put me off. I especially loved the ending. It was a very exciting and fulfilling conclusion. I wo I received an electronic copy of this book for free from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. I had read Laura Madeleine's previous novel so I was eagerly anticipating the release of this one. The male POV was unexpected but I liked it. I know this sounds sexist but I don't usually read books with a male POV. I usually prefer to read about the thoughts of my own gender. However, that did not put me off. I especially loved the ending. It was a very exciting and fulfilling conclusion. I would recommend this book to all.
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  • Anna Giovane Reader
    July 2, 2017
    Un romanzo sorprendente, anche grazie ad uno stile semplice ma molto curato, e di grande compagnia. Una di quelle letture che sanno come soddisfare il lettore. Una storia delicata e che vi catapulterà tra le pagine di un passato tutto da ricostruire.Recensione completa sul blog: https://appuntidiunagiovanereader.blo...
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  • Julie Boon
    March 20, 2017
    Loved this one! Review to come soon as part of the Blog Tour!
  • Rachel Burton
    March 15, 2017
    Set in two of my favourite periods of history (1919 and 1969), Where the Wild Cherries Grow is a story of loss, of running away, of finding out who you really are and that family is so much more than blood. I absolutely loved this book; the parrallel of the two stories, the characters, the train journeys through France are all beautifully depicted - and the pace is just right. And as for the descriptions of food....well, it was as though you were right there, cooking and eating with the characte Set in two of my favourite periods of history (1919 and 1969), Where the Wild Cherries Grow is a story of loss, of running away, of finding out who you really are and that family is so much more than blood. I absolutely loved this book; the parrallel of the two stories, the characters, the train journeys through France are all beautifully depicted - and the pace is just right. And as for the descriptions of food....well, it was as though you were right there, cooking and eating with the characters. Thanks to the publishers for an ARC of this (ebook out 23 March - paperback in June)
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  • Lea
    March 19, 2017
    Thank you Laura Madeleine and Netgalley for a copy in exchange for an honest review.I have to say that I absolutely adored The Confectioner's Tale so to read Laura's second book was very exciting. I gobbled it up in one day.I love books that converge two different times and this book did it beautifully. A missing young woman and the solicitors assistant sent out 50 years later to look for clues to where she went is. Written so beautifully that you feel yourself beside them all the way through.. Thank you Laura Madeleine and Netgalley for a copy in exchange for an honest review.I have to say that I absolutely adored The Confectioner's Tale so to read Laura's second book was very exciting. I gobbled it up in one day.I love books that converge two different times and this book did it beautifully. A missing young woman and the solicitors assistant sent out 50 years later to look for clues to where she went is. Written so beautifully that you feel yourself beside them all the way through.. To quote the book - "how do you describe colour?" - well Laura did just so with the smells of the recipes just wafting off the page.I highly recommend this book. Thank you Laura, I will be on the lookout for your books forever.
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  • Ali Bookworm
    July 13, 2017
    What a lovely read. From the very start it had me hooked and initially it reminded me of The Woman in Black mainly because Bill Perch very much reminded me of Daniel Radcliffe visiting Eel Marsh House (or in this case Hallerton). However there the similarities ended as it was not a ghost story but a moving tale about forbidden love and war. I loved all the characters and really warmed to poor Emeline Vane (and also spookily I know somebody with the same surname too). Set with the two narratives What a lovely read. From the very start it had me hooked and initially it reminded me of The Woman in Black mainly because Bill Perch very much reminded me of Daniel Radcliffe visiting Eel Marsh House (or in this case Hallerton). However there the similarities ended as it was not a ghost story but a moving tale about forbidden love and war. I loved all the characters and really warmed to poor Emeline Vane (and also spookily I know somebody with the same surname too). Set with the two narratives of Bill and Emeline it was easy to follow and flowed well. I really recommend it especially for a lovely summer read where it will take you to the beautifil seaside place in France called Cerbere otherwise known as the end of the world. It was very visual and I would love to see it as a film or TV drama. Highly recommended.
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  • Emma
    April 20, 2017
    I really enjoyed this book. It was a quick read for me and the lure of a family mystery really drew me in. The book switches between 1919 and 1969 alternating with each chapter. We hear Emeline's story of 1919 and Bill's attempts to discover the truth in 1969.I usually worry when I see an author has written a member of the opposite sex in the first person. I've read this in books before and it doesn't always work well. However, Laura Madeleine has written Bill's perspective really well. At no po I really enjoyed this book. It was a quick read for me and the lure of a family mystery really drew me in. The book switches between 1919 and 1969 alternating with each chapter. We hear Emeline's story of 1919 and Bill's attempts to discover the truth in 1969.I usually worry when I see an author has written a member of the opposite sex in the first person. I've read this in books before and it doesn't always work well. However, Laura Madeleine has written Bill's perspective really well. At no point in reading his narrative did I think 'this is clearly written by a woman' and I quite enjoyed Bill's investigations and exploits as he tracks down the truth.Out of the two narratives, I enjoyed Emeline's more. But that was because I preferred her time period. There are some truly wonderful descriptions of the food that is cooked at Cafe Fi del Mon, where Emeline finds sanctuary. I could taste, smell, see the food - my mouth was watering! This was a really pleasant and enjoyable read. I'll be keeping an eye for more books by Laura Madeleine.
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  • Sally Coles
    May 3, 2017
    Bill Perch is a young solicitors assistant in 1969 and the first case he is handed to look into is finding a woman that disappeared 50 years in 1919 - she is still the joint owner of Hallerton House, a lovely old house that is disintegrating and falling down after years of neglect.The house was left to two siblings Emeline Vane and her brother Tommy, but Tommy has had a stroke and his children want to sell the house to build a holiday complex on the site and so want proof that Emeline is dead bu Bill Perch is a young solicitors assistant in 1969 and the first case he is handed to look into is finding a woman that disappeared 50 years in 1919 - she is still the joint owner of Hallerton House, a lovely old house that is disintegrating and falling down after years of neglect.The house was left to two siblings Emeline Vane and her brother Tommy, but Tommy has had a stroke and his children want to sell the house to build a holiday complex on the site and so want proof that Emeline is dead but where do you start after 50 years.In 1919 devastated by the war - the loss of her two brothers and parents - Emeline is desperate not to leave her home but with the money all gone there is not much choice. Her uncle thinks that Emeline is mentally unstable and arranges for her to go to a Swiss asylum to recuperate - scared that she will never get out again Emeline jumps off the train and on to another one and goes as far south as she can to a lovely little town in Catalonia on the French/Spanish border. Here she is taken in by a local family and learns to cook and help run the restaurant.A lovely story - Bill gets so involved with the task - especially when he finds Emeline's diary at Hallerton that he gives up part of his own life in his quest to find the truth - is Emeline still alive or dead - Tommy tried to find her years earlier but couldn't, can he do any better. Both stories in 1969 and 1919 draw you in and I found it hard to put it down - especially loved the descriptions of Catalan cuisine - don't read it if you are hungry!
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