The Quiet Man (A Jefferson Winter Thriller, #4)
What scares you?Ex-FBI profiler, Jefferson Winter is in Berlin, hunting down a serial killer who terrorizes his victims by bringing them face to face with their greatest fears. So far, three women have been abducted and murdered. Physically they are unharmed, but psychologically it's a different story. A DVD that shows the women being tortured has been left at each of the crime scenes, a detail that echoes a killer who operated in Berlin five years earlier, one the media nicknamed Warhol because of the 15 minute long films he left with his victims. Warhol was never caught. He killed five young women then suddenly stopped. But Winter knows that serial killers don't just stop. The police think they are dealing with a copycat killer, but what if the real Warhol is behind the latest killings?

The Quiet Man (A Jefferson Winter Thriller, #4) Details

TitleThe Quiet Man (A Jefferson Winter Thriller, #4)
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 4th, 2017
PublisherFaber & Faber
ISBN057132228X
ISBN-139780571322282
Number of pages400 pages
Rating
GenreThriller, Mystery, Crime

The Quiet Man (A Jefferson Winter Thriller, #4) Review

  • Paromjit
    April 3, 2017
    This is the first I have read of the Jefferson Winter series, and I found it an excellent read. It works fine as a standalone. Winter is a serial killer specialist and he has personal experience of the phenomena. His father was a serial killer, neither he nor him mother had a clue although it changed both their lives forever. Having been a rising star with the FBI, he quit to become a consultant to local law enforcement agencies facing a serial killer. In this case, he arrives in Vancouver at th This is the first I have read of the Jefferson Winter series, and I found it an excellent read. It works fine as a standalone. Winter is a serial killer specialist and he has personal experience of the phenomena. His father was a serial killer, neither he nor him mother had a clue although it changed both their lives forever. Having been a rising star with the FBI, he quit to become a consultant to local law enforcement agencies facing a serial killer. In this case, he arrives in Vancouver at the behest of prematurely retired cop and now PI, Laura Anderton, whose client is Nicholas Sobek. Sobek's wife, Isabella, was the first victim of a serial killer who ties women up and straps a homemade bomb on them which is triggered when the husband returns and opens the kitchen door. The only fatal casualty is the wife. The killer is a patient and quiet man who only kills once a year on the 5 August. Winter has been kept up to date by Anderton but due to other commitments has been unable to get involved until now when another murder is expected.Winter clearly knows his stuff, and his methods focus on getting into the heads of killers and the victims to home in on motive, what drives the need to kill and the criteria for victim selection. Sobek is a odd client, with many features in common with psychopaths, he will not stop until the killer is apprehended and made to pay for the death of his wife. Winter and Anderton make a excellent team and utilise her past experience as the lead investigator on the case with the Vancouver police until Charlotte Delaney, a TV journalist, succeeded in getting her removed through her media influence. No trace of the killer has ever been found. Winter does whatever he needs to do to get his man, whether it is using the media for his own ends or deploying unorthodox means to access evidence, information or people. The newest victim and their circumstances has abnormalities that differ from the norm, Winter relentlessly chases down the reasons why. After some time, Winter and Anderton begin to close in on their murderer. I can see why this is a successful series, the lure of Jefferson Winter's character is completely understandable. This is an intelligent man who has charisma in spades with a compelling and traumatic backstory. His obsession with serial killers is his reason for living. He is his own man and he is not going to kowtow to the pressure that Nicholas Sobek puts him under for a specific outcome or conform to police or media demands. A well written thriller that easily ensnares the reader with plenty of suspense and tension. Thanks to Faber and Faber for an ARC.
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  • Emma
    March 22, 2017
    4.5 stars This series has taken a big step forward with this instalment. Like Robert Hunter in the Chris Carter series, Jackson Winter is a bit of a bloody know it all. Both characters seem all surface; intelligent and effective at catching serial killers, but just a bit too perfect to be real. James Carol has changed that for his creation, this is the first book i've seen and felt Winter as a real person. Still damn good, but human. Of course, that doesn't mean he's lost his deductive reasonin 4.5 stars This series has taken a big step forward with this instalment. Like Robert Hunter in the Chris Carter series, Jackson Winter is a bit of a bloody know it all. Both characters seem all surface; intelligent and effective at catching serial killers, but just a bit too perfect to be real. James Carol has changed that for his creation, this is the first book i've seen and felt Winter as a real person. Still damn good, but human. Of course, that doesn't mean he's lost his deductive reasoning or ability to inhabit the killers he comes across, but it makes the interactions he has with others that much more authentic. The character uses real evidence and the insight of others as well as himself to make progress and there are some excellent moments of behaviour manipulation (of a particularly awful reporter) that made me cheer out loud. Add all that to a plot that comes to murder from a different direction and it makes this book well worth your time.ARC via Netgalley
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  • The Book Review Café
    March 31, 2017
    review to follow soon
  • Emma
    April 7, 2017
    Review to follow.
  • Elaine Tomasso
    March 20, 2017
    I would like to thank Netgalley and Faber & Faber for an advance copy of The Quiet Man, the fourth full length novel to feature the peripatetic serial killer specialist Jefferson Winter.Winter lands late in Vancouver having been held up in Detroit. Late isn't normally an issue when he joins the existing hunt for an active serial killer as a last desperate resort on the part of the hunters but this case is different. The killer only kills on the 5th of August and takes one victim a year by st I would like to thank Netgalley and Faber & Faber for an advance copy of The Quiet Man, the fourth full length novel to feature the peripatetic serial killer specialist Jefferson Winter.Winter lands late in Vancouver having been held up in Detroit. Late isn't normally an issue when he joins the existing hunt for an active serial killer as a last desperate resort on the part of the hunters but this case is different. The killer only kills on the 5th of August and takes one victim a year by strapping a bomb to her body and linking the detonator to the kitchen door so that her husband kills her when he opens the door. Late means he has less time to save the next victim, if he knew who she is.I thoroughly enjoyed The Quiet Man. The plotting is clever and convoluted with some great twists and turns. It had me desperately turning the pages to work out what was coming next. I did, however, guess one of the twists very early on, miles before the great Jefferson Winters, as it is fairly obvious so 4 instead of 5 stars. A minor blip in an otherwise great read.I remember reading Broken Dolls and being quite annoyed by the perfect Mr Winters but as the series progresses he has grown on me - he even gets something wrong in this novel! He is charming, amazingly smart and not afraid to mix it up when required. I think his interactions with Charlotte Delaney, a serpent of a journalist, are clever and hilarious.The Quiet Man should not be taken too seriously as it is rather tongue in cheek but it is a very entertaining read and I have no hesitation in recommending it.
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  • Liz Barnsley
    March 26, 2017
    Very excellent indeed. But then I love this series so no surprise there. Banged through it, I love the fast paced yet considered plotting from James Carol, always utterly engaging. And I'm a little in love with our main protagonist. Book crush!Full review to follow on blog tour in May.
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  • Sarah
    March 23, 2017
    I feel like this series has taken a slight change of direction and I'm loving it. Jefferson Winter is on the hunt for a serial killer who only kills once a year on August 5th. Winter along with an ex detective from the task force seek to work out who the killer is and what the significance of the date is. This book twists and turns as we go along and it was an outstanding read. I'm really looking forward to the next instalment.
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  • Annette
    April 4, 2017
    This is part of a series about ex FBI profiler Jefferson Winter who caches notorious serial killers by getting inside their heads and working out what makes them tick leading them to commit such horrendous crimes.However Jefferson posseses a unique insight as his own father was also a serial killer who was caught and executed without either Jefferson or his mother suspecting a thing.On this occasion he is called to Vancouver to consult with Anderton, an ex cop who is pursuing a killer know as th This is part of a series about ex FBI profiler Jefferson Winter who caches notorious serial killers by getting inside their heads and working out what makes them tick leading them to commit such horrendous crimes.However Jefferson posseses a unique insight as his own father was also a serial killer who was caught and executed without either Jefferson or his mother suspecting a thing.On this occasion he is called to Vancouver to consult with Anderton, an ex cop who is pursuing a killer know as the August 5th murderer on behalf of one of the victim's husbands. Wolzek's wife Isobel was killed by a bomb strapped to her chest which was detonated when he opened his own front door.Every year on the same day there is another victim and it is a race against time to catch him before he strikes again.This thriller worked well as a procedural with lots of tension as Winter and Anderton work against the clock to catch the killer. The manner of death is unusual as serial killers normally strike with knives or guns so this led to some interesting deductions by Winter and Anderton. Why was this killer using this particular modus operandi?I liked the way Winter used psychology to work out the killer's background and story in order to catch him. The glimpses into Winter's past were also helpful, particularly for readers who have followed the whole series. This book can also be read as a stand alone and is recommended to those who enjoy an exciting thriller that moves at a fast pace.Thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for my advance copy in exchange for an honest review.
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