The Wild Robot (The Wild Robot, #1)
When robot Roz opens her eyes for the first time, she discovers that she is alone on a remote, wild island. Why is she there? Where did she come from? And, most important, how will she survive in her harsh surroundings? Roz's only hope is to learn from the island's hostile animal inhabitants. When she tries to care for an orphaned gosling, the other animals finally decide to help, and the island starts to feel like home. Until one day, the robot's mysterious past comes back to haunt her....

The Wild Robot (The Wild Robot, #1) Details

TitleThe Wild Robot (The Wild Robot, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 5th, 2016
PublisherLittle, Brown Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780316381994
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Animals, Fiction

The Wild Robot (The Wild Robot, #1) Review

  • Jesse (JesseTheReader)
    January 1, 1970
    This was a nice read! I loved the illustrations so much. At times I did feel the story felt a little bit disjointed and all over the place, but it was a quick and sweet read.
  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t believe I’ve ever said this in a review of a book before, but I think a lovely video game for kids can be made out of Peter Brown’s new middle grade novel.The illustrations made me think that, with their original style and 3-D quality. Plus the story could work.Because this is about a robot female (Roz) who mysteriously ends up on an island devoid of humans but filled with animals that form a certain community. Roz tries to be part of that community by being friendly and helpful with the I don’t believe I’ve ever said this in a review of a book before, but I think a lovely video game for kids can be made out of Peter Brown’s new middle grade novel.The illustrations made me think that, with their original style and 3-D quality. Plus the story could work.Because this is about a robot female (Roz) who mysteriously ends up on an island devoid of humans but filled with animals that form a certain community. Roz tries to be part of that community by being friendly and helpful with the animals around her. It takes time and patience from Roz, but the community of animals slowly starts to admit her in their circle. Of course, there will always be those who won’t accept her, because we cannot be loved by everyone.I could easily imagine exploring the beautiful island filled with animals as Roz in a video game. But anyway, I doubt it would happen, so I’ll stop bringing it up.It’s a story that I would read to my kid, if I had one. There are so many themes included. It’s about community, trust, friendship, loyalty and family.Although it’s obviously imaginary, it’s not all fabrication. A lot of what is seen inside this novel—such as Roz’s struggles to belong and the animals’ mistrust of Roz who is not *like them*—can be translated into our contemporary world.Lovely. Just lovely.Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
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  • Wendy Darling
    January 1, 1970
    <3
  • Betsy
    January 1, 1970
    There are far fewer robot middle grade books out there than you might expect. This is probably because, as a general rule, robots fall into the Data from Star Trek trap. Their sole purpose in any narrative is to explain what it is to be human. You see this all the time in pop culture, so it stands to reason you’d see it a bit in children’s books too. Never you mind that a cool robot is basically a kid’s dream companion. Take away the kid, put the robot on its own, and you have yourself some phil There are far fewer robot middle grade books out there than you might expect. This is probably because, as a general rule, robots fall into the Data from Star Trek trap. Their sole purpose in any narrative is to explain what it is to be human. You see this all the time in pop culture, so it stands to reason you’d see it a bit in children’s books too. Never you mind that a cool robot is basically a kid’s dream companion. Take away the kid, put the robot on its own, and you have yourself some philosophy lite. Maybe that’s why I liked Peter Brown’s The Wild Robot as much as I did. The heroine of this book is mechanical but she’s not wrestling with the question of what it means to feel emotions or any of that. She's a bit more interested in survival and then, after a bit of time, connection. Folks say this book is like Hatchet or My Side of the Mountain. Maybe so, but it’s also a pretty good book about shedding civilization and going wild. In short, living many a city kid’s dream.The first thing she is aware of is that she is bound in a crate by cords. Once those are severed she looks about. Roz is a robot. She appears to be on an island in the sea. Around her are the shattered remains of a good many other robots. How she has gotten here, she doesn’t know, but it doesn’t take long for her to realize that she is in dire need of shelter and allies. Roz is not a robot built for the outdoors, but part of her programming enables her to adapt. Learning the languages of the denizens of the forest, Roz is initially rebuffed (to put it mildly) by the animals living there. After a while, though, she adopts a gosling she accidentally orphaned and together they learn, grow, and come to be invaluable members of the community. And when Roz faces a threat from the outside, it’s her new friends and extended family that will come to her aid.They say that all good stories can be easily categorized into seven slots. One of the best known is “a stranger comes to town”. Roz is precisely that and her story is familiar in a lot of ways. The stranger arrives and is shunned or actively opposed. Then they win over the local populace and must subsequently defend it against an incoming enemy or be protected by it. But there is another kind of book this conjures up as well. The notion of going from “civilized” to “wild” carries the weight of all kinds of historical appropriations. Smart of Brown then to stick with robots and animals. Roz is a kind of anti-Pinocchio. Instead of trying to figure out how to fit in better with civilization, she spends the bulk of her time trying to figure out how to shed it like a skin. In his career, Brown has wrestled continually with the notion of civilization vs. nature, particularly as it relates to being “wild”. The most obvious example of this, prior to The Wild Robot, was his picture book Mr. Tiger Goes Wild. Yet somehow it manages to find its way into many of the books he does. Consider the following:• My Teacher Is a Monster! (No, I Am Not) – A child sees his teacher as a creature best befitting a page in “Where the Wild Things Are” until, by getting to know her, she is humanized in his sight.• Children Make Terrible Pets – A bear attempts to tame a wild human child with disastrous results.• The Curious Garden – Nature reclaims abandoned civilization, and is tamed in the process.• Creepy Carrots – Brown didn’t write this one but it’s not hard to see how the image of nature (in the form of carrots) terrorizing a bunny in his suburban home could hold some appeal.• Even the Chowder books and his first picture book The Flight of the Dodo had elements of animals wrestling with their own natures.In this book, Brown presents us with a robot created with the sole purpose of serving in a domestic capacity. Are we seeing only the good side of nature and eschewing the terrible? Brown does clearly have a bias at work here, but this is not a peaceable kingdom where the lamb lays down next to the lion unless necessity dictates that it do so. Though the animals do have a dawn truce, Brown notes at one moment how occasionally one animal or another might go missing, relocating involuntarily to the belly of one of its neighbors. Nasty weather plays a significant role in the plot, beaching Roz at the start, and providing a winter storm of unprecedented cruelty later on. Even so, those comparisons of this book to Hatchet and My Side of the Mountain aren’t far off the mark. Nature is cold and cruel but it’s still better than dull samey samey civilization. Of course, you read every book through your own personal lens. If you’re an adult reading a children’s book then you’re not only reading a book through your own lens but through the lens you had when you were the intended audience’s age as well. It’s sort of a dual method of book consumption. My inner ten-year-old certainly enjoyed this book, that’s for sure. Thirty-eight-year-old me had a very different reaction. I liked it, sure I did. But I also spent much of this book agog that it was such a good parenting title. Are we absolutely certain Peter Brown doesn’t have some secret children squirreled away somewhere? I mean, if you were to ask me what the theme of this book truly is, I’d have to answer you in all honesty that it’s about how we see the world anew through the eyes of our children. A kid would probably say it’s about how awesome it is to be a robot in the wild. Both are true.If you’re familiar with a Peter Brown picture book then you might have a sense of his artistic style. His depiction of Roz is very interesting. It was exceedingly nice to see that though the book refers to her in the feminine, it’s not like the pictures depict her as anything but a functional robot, glowing eyes and all. Even covered in flowers she looks more like an extra from Miyazaki’s Castle in the Sky than anything else. Her mouth is an expressionless slit but in her movements you can catch a bit of verve and drive. Alas, the illustrations are in black and white and not the lovely color of which we know Brown to be capable. Colored art in middle grade novels is a pricey affair. A publisher needs to really and truly believe in a book to give it color. That said, with this book appearing regularly on the New York Times bestseller list, you’d think they’d have known what they had at the time. Maybe we can get a full-color anniversary edition in a decade or so.Like most robot books, Brown does cheat a little. It’s hard not to. We are told from the start that Roz is without emotions, but fairly early on this statement is called into question. One might argue quite reasonably that early statements like. “As you might know, robots don’t really feel emotions. Not the way animals do.” Those italics at the beginning of the sentence are important. They suggest that this is standard information passed down by those in the know and that they believe you shouldn’t question it. But, of course, the very next sentence does precisely that. “And yet . . .” Then again, those italics aren’t special to that chapter. In fact, all the chapters in this book begin with the first few words italicized. So it could well be that Brown is serious when he says that Roz can’t feel emotions. Can she learn them then? The book’s foggy on that point, possibly purposely so, but in that uncertainty plenty will find Brown’s loving robot a bit more difficult to swallow than others. Books of this sort work on their own internal logic anyway. I know one reader who seriously wondered why the RECO robots had no on/off switches. Others, why she could understand animal speech. You go with as much as you can believe and the writer pulls you in the rest of the way.I’ve read books for kids where robots are in charge of the future and threaten heroes in tandem with nature. I’ve read books for kids where robots don’t understand why they’re denied the same rights as the humans around them. I even read a book once about a robot who tended a human child, loving her as her parents would have, adapting her to her alien planet’s environment over the years (that one’s Keeper of the Isis Light by Monica Hughes and you MUST check it out, if you get a chance). But I have never read a robot book quite as simple and to the point as Peter Brown’s. Nor have I read such comforting bedtime reading in a while. Lucky is the kid that gets tucked in and read this at night. An excellent science fiction / parenting / adventure / survival novel, jam packed with robotic bits and pieces. If this is the beginning of the robot domination, I say bring it on.For ages 8 and up.
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  • Kayla Dawn
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the illustrations in this so much. They are absolutely perfect for the story. I actually loved the whole book. I thought it would be just a children's book but it actually had some important topics in it (global warming and the effect it has on animals for example). I'm really curious for the second book in this series!
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  • Melki
    January 1, 1970
    I know, I know. I'm as surprised as anyone . . . a book about a robot that I didn't go absolutely ga-ga over.Who'd a thunk it?I was expecting this to be one of my favorite reads of the year, but instead, I just found it strange - a weird, disconcerting read. You see, the author employs this folksy, gather-'round-kiddies-and-I'll-tell-you-a-tale voice that seems most likely to appeal to very young children, and yet, there are such mature themes here. And death. Lots and lots of death. On the plus I know, I know. I'm as surprised as anyone . . . a book about a robot that I didn't go absolutely ga-ga over.Who'd a thunk it?I was expecting this to be one of my favorite reads of the year, but instead, I just found it strange - a weird, disconcerting read. You see, the author employs this folksy, gather-'round-kiddies-and-I'll-tell-you-a-tale voice that seems most likely to appeal to very young children, and yet, there are such mature themes here. And death. Lots and lots of death. On the plus side, there are some tender moments:"One year ago, I awoke on the shore of island. I was just a machine. I functioned. But you --- my friends and my family --- have taught me how to live."And, there's an exciting Ewoks forest creatures VS evil technology battle that should appease the action fans.Most other people seem to have loved this book, so it's probably just me and my current mood of impending doom.I did really like the illustrations . . . enough to make me wonder if maybe this wouldn't have worked better as a graphic novel.
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  • Donalyn
    January 1, 1970
    Read the ARC, which doesn't have the final illustrations and still thought it was powerful. This book will spark lots of great conversations with kids about kindness, community, and what it means to be alive.Update: Read the finished book and declare it even better with the illustrations, of course!
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  • Book Riot Community
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t read a lot of books about robots or about the wilderness, but it’s hard to imagine that the two overlap very regularly. The odd concept and fantastic artwork is what had me picking up children’s book author Peter Brown’s first novel, but the beauty of the story full of loss, love, and humor is what stuck with me long after I put it down. Like most of the very best middle-grade books, The Wild Robot can connect with adults just as easily as children.–Trisha Brownfrom The Best Books We Rea I don’t read a lot of books about robots or about the wilderness, but it’s hard to imagine that the two overlap very regularly. The odd concept and fantastic artwork is what had me picking up children’s book author Peter Brown’s first novel, but the beauty of the story full of loss, love, and humor is what stuck with me long after I put it down. Like most of the very best middle-grade books, The Wild Robot can connect with adults just as easily as children.–Trisha Brownfrom The Best Books We Read In August 2016: http://bookriot.com/2016/08/31/riot-r...
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  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    Update 3/18/18I just read this book for the second time in preparation to read the sequel The Wild Robot Escapes tomorrow. I don't know if it's possible to love this book any more than I already did, but I'm thinking maybe I do. Or maybe I just fell in love with Roz all over again. I wish we could all have someone like Roz in our life. We would never be sad or lonely or feel unloved. Someone would always have our back and be there to support us through whatever life deals us. What a perfect worl Update 3/18/18I just read this book for the second time in preparation to read the sequel The Wild Robot Escapes tomorrow. I don't know if it's possible to love this book any more than I already did, but I'm thinking maybe I do. Or maybe I just fell in love with Roz all over again. I wish we could all have someone like Roz in our life. We would never be sad or lonely or feel unloved. Someone would always have our back and be there to support us through whatever life deals us. What a perfect world that would be.Original review 2/4/17Last year when so many of the teachers and librarians in the 2017 Mock Newbery group on goodreads started raving about this book, I thought it didn't sound like something I wanted to read. Even last month when so many of the same people in the group were posting their five favorite books of 2016 or the five favorites of their classroom, and The Wild Robot was on the majority of the lists, I still didn't feel the need to read it. I'm not really into robots and couldn't imagine having all the warm feelings for one that so many reviewers were having. I finally gave in the other day when I saw it on the Lucky Day shelf at the library. I thought, what the heck, it's short and has illustrations, so maybe I'll give it a read. Wow, am I ever glad I did! I LOVED this book. And as far as the warm fuzzies for Roz the robot, I had plenty. She may be a robot, but she has more heart and goodness and kindness than some humans I know. A more loyal friend, or a more loving mother than Roz would be hard to find. If you haven't read this book yet, don't put it off like I did. Read it to your class, read it to your kids and grandkids, read it to yourself. And like me, you'll probably get a little misty eyed too.
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  • Liza Fireman
    January 1, 1970
    I did not like this book at all. Except the premise of a robot in the wild it did not make much sense. I'll expand on the reasons. There is a big gap between the writing style, which is almost so simple to fit only a really short juvenile book, and the length, which is MG. For over 70% of the book nothing that is not straight forward is happening (yes, she befriends the animals, build fire etc, but nothing really interesting to hold a smart reader is there). In addition, the reader (referred by I did not like this book at all. Except the premise of a robot in the wild it did not make much sense. I'll expand on the reasons. There is a big gap between the writing style, which is almost so simple to fit only a really short juvenile book, and the length, which is MG. For over 70% of the book nothing that is not straight forward is happening (yes, she befriends the animals, build fire etc, but nothing really interesting to hold a smart reader is there). In addition, the reader (referred by the author as "you, the reader") is not getting much credit to be smart enough not to get these annoying referrals from the authors.(e.g. Reader, it must seem impossible that our robot could have changed so much.).What Roz knows and doesn't know, what she can learn and what she can't doesn't make much sense either). She can identify any animal and say everything about it, she can learn the language of animals and communicate with them, but she doesn't know what a new born goose should be eating. Same if with Brightbill, he can somehow know that cars and airplanes and other things are robots, these gaps made me feel really uncomfortable, and the logical jumps make the story much less engaging.For the careful reader, the pictures also differ sometimes massively from the written words. Roz is in a giant box, standing up straight in the picture, but it is written that she is folded so small inside. Any kid would find it strange. And there are several of these contradictions throughout the book.The robots wars in the end were maybe the worst. Why, oh why. Tearing out parts, risking lives, killing anything on the way. I was extremely unhappy with these. And going back to what is the age group that is supposed to read this? I think not enough thought was invested in this question.Overall, too many problems. 2 stars (or a bit less).
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Be prepared to cry. I loved every minute of this book. It was creative and heartwarming and as realistic as you can get considering it's about a robot surviving in the wilderness. Also, there better be a sequel in the works or else someone is getting a nasty letter.
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  • Scope
    January 1, 1970
    Isaac Asimov writes HATCHET. Wonderful book.
  • The Captain
    January 1, 1970
    Ahoy there me mateys! I was looking to read something short that fit me current mood and this book was found in the hold. This is listed as a middle-grade but bah! I don’t put age limits on things.This is about a robot whose crate gets washed overboard from a cargo ship and she ends up on a deserted island. Except the island isn’t actually deserted. It is filled with local wildlife. So the robot, Roz, has to to discover how to survive on the island, her purpose, and perhaps how she got there.Tho Ahoy there me mateys! I was looking to read something short that fit me current mood and this book was found in the hold. This is listed as a middle-grade but bah! I don’t put age limits on things.This is about a robot whose crate gets washed overboard from a cargo ship and she ends up on a deserted island. Except the island isn’t actually deserted. It is filled with local wildlife. So the robot, Roz, has to to discover how to survive on the island, her purpose, and perhaps how she got there.Though this book had a slow start, I soon grew to love Roz. By the end of the story, I knew that I wanted to read the further adventures of this adorable robot. I just loved the idea of a robot going “wild” and making friends with all of the animals. Though the robot has some limitations due to programing, this does not stop her quest for growth and communication and companionship. A quick and lovely read. And the author’s illustrations were fun and perfect for the book. Check it out.See me other reviews at https://thecaptainsquartersblog.wordp...
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  • Jill Pickle
    January 1, 1970
    This book will do for robots what Charlotte's Web did for pigs. I loved, loved this book. Peter Brown maintains his perfect picture book voice but in an early chapter book... And this voice is maintained throughout. Many picture book authors attempt this, few succeed. (Parents: such a great read aloud!)The Wild Robot is essentially a survival story--not quite as scary as The Hatchet, but it definitely doesn't shy away from basic facts of violence in nature (including humans). But what I love mos This book will do for robots what Charlotte's Web did for pigs. I loved, loved this book. Peter Brown maintains his perfect picture book voice but in an early chapter book... And this voice is maintained throughout. Many picture book authors attempt this, few succeed. (Parents: such a great read aloud!)The Wild Robot is essentially a survival story--not quite as scary as The Hatchet, but it definitely doesn't shy away from basic facts of violence in nature (including humans). But what I love most about this book is the unique voice given to all the creatures in the woods, and how gradual the story went from a scary survival one to a story about creatures living in balance with one another, even if they don't fully understand each other. It's a powerful, but gently told, message about adoptive friends (and family--robot adopts a gosling and raises him as her own).
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  • Amber
    January 1, 1970
    Roz is a robot who wakes up on an island. Determined to survive, Roz decides to befriend the animals of the island and learns from them how to survive. Will she succeed? Read on and find out for yourself.This was a pretty good audiobook. I enjoyed this robot story. If you like stories about survival and friendship, be sure to check this out for yourself. It is available at your local library and wherever books and audiobooks are sold.
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  • Niki Marion
    January 1, 1970
    This book makes me wanna return to grad school so I can write all the papers on this book, which somehow manages to include every hot button topic in today's culture in this book (a sampling: motherhood, humanness, disability, climate change, civilization, gun violence) while making it extremely readable and only semi-heavy-handed at parts.
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  • Melissa Posten
    January 1, 1970
    Picture book author/illustrator Peter Brown gifts us with The Wild Robot: a spare, haunting tale of figuring out the roots of your humanity, and trying to reconcile what you learn with the reality of the life you are living. It's a story of family and community; of learning what loneliness is and how to fight it; of growing together and coming apart; of the interaction between the human world and the natural world. It's a story of sacrifice and overcoming fear of the unknown and different; of ch Picture book author/illustrator Peter Brown gifts us with The Wild Robot: a spare, haunting tale of figuring out the roots of your humanity, and trying to reconcile what you learn with the reality of the life you are living. It's a story of family and community; of learning what loneliness is and how to fight it; of growing together and coming apart; of the interaction between the human world and the natural world. It's a story of sacrifice and overcoming fear of the unknown and different; of changing for both the ones you love and for yourself (and knowing when not to, knowing when you are enough). It's a story that has resonated with me every day since I finished it, and it will make for deep and beautiful discussion and debate in classrooms. I hesitate to say too much about the plot because I don't want to give anything away, but I will say this: this story is about Roz, a robot, who is on a ship that sinks at sea. Her crate washes up on an island, and she comes to awareness for the first time. The island is inhabited only by animals, who have never seen anything like Roz before. And Roz has never seen anything at all.I read an uncorrected advance review copy, which was missing most of the art that will grace the pages of the finished book. I thought the story stood on its own, but am excited to see what it looks like when it hits bookshelves in April.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    (Reviewed from an ARC that I received as part of a reader affiliate program.)I was excited to start this book for several reasons:1. It had received starred reviews2. It was featured in one of Donalyn Miller's best-of-the-year so far lists3. I am a HUGE fan of picture book authors who take their top-notch storytelling skills and cross over into middle grades fiction (hellloooo Mac Barnett)However, this book frustrated me. I was intrigued by the premise (container ship filled with robots gets stu (Reviewed from an ARC that I received as part of a reader affiliate program.)I was excited to start this book for several reasons:1. It had received starred reviews2. It was featured in one of Donalyn Miller's best-of-the-year so far lists3. I am a HUGE fan of picture book authors who take their top-notch storytelling skills and cross over into middle grades fiction (hellloooo Mac Barnett)However, this book frustrated me. I was intrigued by the premise (container ship filled with robots gets stuck in a hurricane, one surviving robot gets stranded on an island) but I found the plot too disconnected and episodic. I could just imagine readers telling me, "Yeah, I get what's going on in the story just fine, but nothing's happened yet."And then, in maybe the last 15 pages or so, something happens. Because something has to happen. Because Stories of How A Robot Befriended Animals and Bested the Wild can't go on forever.Before I go on too much about my lack of satisfaction with this book, I do want to get it into the hands of some readers for their thoughts. It's possible that they will engage with the story in a different way.
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  • mills♥
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so adorable! Also, (view spoiler)[ the ending killed me. I WANTED A HAPPY ENDING WITH ALL THE ANIMALS HAPPILY THRIVING WITH ROZ. Although the author leads us to believe that Roz finds her way back home, we have to read the sequel to know that. (hide spoiler)]It is a kids book, and in that case, it was hard to read because of the choppy writing. But, that also means that the writing style is engaging, and I quite liked that because it kept me interested and, well, engaged.I don't th This book was so adorable! Also, (view spoiler)[ the ending killed me. I WANTED A HAPPY ENDING WITH ALL THE ANIMALS HAPPILY THRIVING WITH ROZ. Although the author leads us to believe that Roz finds her way back home, we have to read the sequel to know that. (hide spoiler)]It is a kids book, and in that case, it was hard to read because of the choppy writing. But, that also means that the writing style is engaging, and I quite liked that because it kept me interested and, well, engaged.I don't think I would like to read the sequel. I'll just stick with my good fantasies for now. This book threads in beautiful and new qualities. It's so original, and I really liked reading a book where there was no sentence like, "She let out a breath she didn't know she was holding." in some way.It was very refreshing and enchanting.Roz was a curious, observant, and kind robot. Which troubles me because, well, she is a robot and should have no emotions, and while that is stated in the book, we completely ignore that throughout the rest of the book. I loved her character though, yet I did wish she had flaws. Even robots have flaws, c'mon.Brightbill was adorable. He was curious and loving, and I did like that I questioned if she was is an actual mother. It would've been a bit unrealistic if he didn't. But really, this book is completely unrealistic so who am I to talk.The side characters (such as Chitchat and the mother goose) were great too. I would've like them featured more.The only real problem that I had with the characters was that they were too curious and questioning. I mean, they asked A LOT of questions. It started to become annoying.(view spoiler)[ The *battle* at the end had me on the edge of my seat the whole time. Combined with the engaging writing style, it made for a hard to put down last few pages, and overall book. (hide spoiler)]For a kids novel, this book was packed with lots of twists, and that's what kept me interested and able to finish it in one sitting.
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  • Miranda Reads
    January 1, 1970
    FRIENDSHIP OVER - if you don't love this book(I'm deadly serious - don't test me)I cannot remember the last time when I was so surprised and delighted by a book - this book made me remember all the things I absolutely love about reading books as a kid and I am forever grateful to Peter Brown for writing it. One year ago, I awoke on the shore of island. I was just a machine. I functioned. But you --- my friends and my family --- have taught me how to live. Roz - a standard issue manual labor robo FRIENDSHIP OVER - if you don't love this book(I'm deadly serious - don't test me)I cannot remember the last time when I was so surprised and delighted by a book - this book made me remember all the things I absolutely love about reading books as a kid and I am forever grateful to Peter Brown for writing it. One year ago, I awoke on the shore of island. I was just a machine. I functioned. But you --- my friends and my family --- have taught me how to live. Roz - a standard issue manual labor robot - is stranded on an island. At first, she is at a loss - she's alone, without any instructions, and the openly hostile wildlife are intent on getting rid of her. But slowly (oh so slowly) she finds a way to fit in - in part do to one very, very loving little orphaned gosling. “But I do not know how to act like a mother.” “Oh, it’s nothing, you just have to provide the gosling with food and water and shelter, make him feel loved but don’t pamper him too much, keep him away from danger...And that’s really all there is to motherhood!” If you haven't guessed already, I abso-freaking-lutely loved this book. The storyline was so strong and Roz's transformation was just perfect. I even enjoyed all of the bittersweet parts - kudos to Brown for NOT making another cookie-cutter-life-is-perfect middle grade book. He had the right balance of emotion throughout all of his book.I just cannot wait to get my hands on the next one.Audiobook CommentsI only listened to the audiobook (read by Kate Atwater) and let me tell you - fantastic audio. Seriously, the best so far this year. Her voice for Roz was beyond cute and the way Kate Atwater was so into all of the animal voices - absolutely spot-on.
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  • Skip
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this cute middle school age book about a robot, which survives a shipwreck and is activated on an island with no human inhabitants. Instead, Roz makes friends with the animals, and adopt a young orphaned gosling (Brightbill), becoming his mother. This book is really about friendship, love and community as a series of events make things interesting for all. Peter Brown's illustrations were fun, but his basic robot shape was a bit too human (for an adult anyway.)
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed reading this middle grade book about a robot that learns to adapt and thrive on an island with the wild life. The reason I ended up giving this a 4 instead of a 3 is because I think this is a great introduction to young kids about artificial intelligence that may get them excited about science fiction. On the younger side of middle grade, 8 or 9.
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  • Darinda
    January 1, 1970
    A ship carrying hundreds of robots sinks, but one box washes ashore an island. In that box is Roz, a robot. She awakens on an island full of wildlife. The other animals think Roz is a monster, but she slowly finds her place among the island inhabitants. A weird and quirky middle grade book. The story is odd, but fun.
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  • Rikke
    January 1, 1970
    A very sweet story. Also plenty educational, and it provides lots of opportunities to talk about various subjects as well. Definitely good for reading aloud, and the chapters are short. I've given this book four stars, although I don't like it enough for it to compare with books I would normally rate four stars. But then, I rarely read books intended for younger kids anymore, and I really do feel, I would like it a lot, if I were in fact, a kid.
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  • Jillian Heise
    January 1, 1970
    I really loved this story. Heartwarming and written in a way that kept the plot moving even when it was quiet changes. The voice of talking to the reader made for some great moments and a feeling of a special story.
  • Elisabeth
    January 1, 1970
    Anfangs war ich sehr begeistert vom Buch, allerdings gesellen sich dazu nach und nach ein paar Stellen, die mich gestört haben. Positiv waren das mal völlig andere, spannende Setting mit Themen, die zum aktuellen Weltgeschehen passen, die liebevollen Illustrationen des Autors (ja, er war selbst am Werk) und der tolle Schreibstil, der zum Vorlesen einlädt. Als störend empfunden habe ich die zu schnelle Entwicklung der Charaktere, Konflikte, die lieber unter den Teppich gekehrt, als gelöst werden Anfangs war ich sehr begeistert vom Buch, allerdings gesellen sich dazu nach und nach ein paar Stellen, die mich gestört haben. Positiv waren das mal völlig andere, spannende Setting mit Themen, die zum aktuellen Weltgeschehen passen, die liebevollen Illustrationen des Autors (ja, er war selbst am Werk) und der tolle Schreibstil, der zum Vorlesen einlädt. Als störend empfunden habe ich die zu schnelle Entwicklung der Charaktere, Konflikte, die lieber unter den Teppich gekehrt, als gelöst werden sowie ein paar weitere Botschaften dieses Buches, die ich insbesondere in einem Kinderbuch als fehl am Platz empfunden habe. Dazu rate ich dringend vom Klappentext ab, wenn man nicht gespoilert werden möchte. Dafür gebe ich noch 3,5 Sterne, es hatte deutlich mehr Potential, als hier abgerufen wurde.
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  • Stacey
    January 1, 1970
    What would happen if a robot happened to arrive on an island that is humming with wildlife? The Wild Robot is delightful and unexpected. The concept of this story is so unlike any others I've ever read. Roz goes on a journey to make her days meaningful by surrounding herself with friends and by doing things for others. The animals of the island pay her back with their friendship. I can't wait to share this with my 4th grade students. Perfect for a read aloud because, reader, you won't be able to What would happen if a robot happened to arrive on an island that is humming with wildlife? The Wild Robot is delightful and unexpected. The concept of this story is so unlike any others I've ever read. Roz goes on a journey to make her days meaningful by surrounding herself with friends and by doing things for others. The animals of the island pay her back with their friendship. I can't wait to share this with my 4th grade students. Perfect for a read aloud because, reader, you won't be able to put it down.
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  • Mieke Mcbride
    January 1, 1970
    Just started reading this to Conall tonight. First time trying out a chapter book; we'll see how long his attention span lasts and how well he holds onto the story from night to night. Maybe jumping the gun here but this is one of the things I've been looking forward to the most about being a parent. So far he loves the otters and my robot voice.
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  • KC
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars. Somewhere in the ocean, a cargo ship full of robots sinks miles from a nearby island. Five wash ashore, all are damaged, with the exception of one. "Roz" finds herself having to adapt to her new home, learning how to communicate with the animals that inhabit this new place, as well as having to adjust to the fact that she is truly an outsider. Roz's journey is often slow and uneventful until the end but there is certainly a verifiable underlying social theme to this tale. The Wild Rob 2.5 stars. Somewhere in the ocean, a cargo ship full of robots sinks miles from a nearby island. Five wash ashore, all are damaged, with the exception of one. "Roz" finds herself having to adapt to her new home, learning how to communicate with the animals that inhabit this new place, as well as having to adjust to the fact that she is truly an outsider. Roz's journey is often slow and uneventful until the end but there is certainly a verifiable underlying social theme to this tale. The Wild Robot is a 2019 Nutmeg nominee and there is a newly released sequel.
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  • Claudia Badiu
    January 1, 1970
    Ce face o roboțică atunci când naufragiază pe o insulă? Cum se proiectează inteligența artificială, în sălbăticie? Va reuși Roz să își folosească sistemul de adaptare la mediu, al sistemului ei de operare? Povestea deschide posibilități interesante, aduce idei creative și ne învață o mulțime de lucruri despre prietenie, toleranță și empatie. Chiar dacă toate acestea sunt generate de un robot...
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