The Edge of Worlds (The Books of the Raksura, #4)
An expedition of groundlings from the Empire of Kish have traveled through the Three Worlds to the Indigo Cloud court of the Raksura, shape-shifting creatures of flight that live in large family groups. The groundlings have found a sealed ancient city at the edge of the shallow seas, near the deeps of the impassable Ocean. They believe it to be the last home of their ancestors and ask for help getting inside. But the Raksura fear it was built by their own distant ancestors, the Forerunners, and the last sealed Forerunner city they encountered was a prison for an unstoppable evil.Prior to the groundlings’ arrival, the Indigo Cloud court had been plagued by visions of a disaster that could destroy all the courts in the Reaches. Now, the court’s mentors believe the ancient city is connected to the foretold danger. A small group of warriors, including consort Moon, an orphan new to the colony and the Raksura’s idea of family, and sister queen Jade, agree to go with the groundling expedition to investigate. But the predatory Fell have found the city too, and in the race to keep the danger contained, the Raksura may be the ones who inadvertently release it.The Edge of Worlds, from celebrated fantasy author Martha Wells, returns to the fascinating world of The Cloud Roads for the first book in a new series of strange lands, uncanny beings, dead cities, and ancient danger.

The Edge of Worlds (The Books of the Raksura, #4) Details

TitleThe Edge of Worlds (The Books of the Raksura, #4)
Author
ReleaseApr 5th, 2016
PublisherNight Shade Books
ISBN-139781597808439
Rating
GenreFantasy, Fiction, Adventure, Science Fiction Fantasy

The Edge of Worlds (The Books of the Raksura, #4) Review

  • Gergana
    January 1, 1970
    Update: 17 February, 2016Too many of my favorite books coming out on the same day! XD Update: 18 July, 2015BEST NEWS EVERRRRR! Another Raksura Book!Spread the love!
  • Kristalia
    January 1, 1970
    Final rating: 4.5/5 starsAnd done! It was amazing! This review will be spoiler-less for non series readers up to the point I mark.No quotes at the start because I highlighted so many sentences I forgot which one was the one I wanted to put. So no quotes this time. For those unfamiliar with the series, I highly recommend it. This is 4th and at the same time 6th book in order (because of the two book in between that had a lot of short stories that were, in fact, useful and necessary to read). Thi Final rating: 4.5/5 starsAnd done! It was amazing! This review will be spoiler-less for non series readers up to the point I mark.No quotes at the start because I highlighted so many sentences I forgot which one was the one I wanted to put. So no quotes this time. For those unfamiliar with the series, I highly recommend it. This is 4th and at the same time 6th book in order (because of the two book in between that had a lot of short stories that were, in fact, useful and necessary to read). This series has everything. Literally. Did I tell you that this fantasy throws all standard human social norms and behaviors out of window? Because it does just that. Reversed gender roles? Check.Queens in charge? Check.Dragonoid shapeshifters? Check.Unique races and none of them are entirely human? Check.LGBT? Check. Everyone is bisexual.Polyamory? A standard in Raksuran Court.A race that can choose their gender before maturity? Check.Awesomeness? Check. Check. Check. This series is among my absolute favorites from the book I. The Cloud Roads had everything that I hadn't known I needed and I loved it for it. But I made a mistake. I should have waited for the last book, The Harbors of the Sun, to come out first. Why? Because it is the only book with the cliffhanger so far! If you hate cliffhangers, my advice is to wait, because this is a big one! I'm in agony called waiting.I had a bit of an issue with pacing, but it was understandable because this time, we have an actual arc! And the first book in this arc gave us enough information of new characters and some of their culture and customs. Did i mention amount of fluff it had? Tons of it! Tons of fluff, and I was surprised. And also other POVs than Moon's. The angst part hit near the end and it was like thiiiiiiiiiis, i have been waiting for thiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiis because Martha Wells knows how to angst. From this point on, starts the section for Raksura fans, so if you are not a reader of this awesome series, don't read bellow, but go and get the first book! ► STORY & CHARACTERS: I will be merging Story and Characters sections because they are already well established through the previous books and there is no more I can add, well, except for the new characters that appear such as Kalam (what a cutie) and Rorra (a badass sealing cutie). But on that a bit later. Some very slight spoilers, but nothing too serious.There is actually no point in describing the plot of the story. The synopsis does a great job of it. There were twists in the story I certainly hadn't expected, and I was amused and saddened by them. I honestly can't wait to find out what happens in the sequel.There is a lot of fluff between Chime and Moon, in a way even more than previous books, and I just loved that. There was also a lot of scenes between Jade and Moon, but I believe Chime and Moon took the spotlight this time. It's such a blessing that polyamory here is real and that we have a perfect triangle of fluff and cuteness. Honestly. There were also POVs within Opal Night court members and Ember's as well. Ember is so nice, wonderful and even though he was so nervous, he figured out someone else needed help to escape, so he provided. I am proud to see that, because Ember is another wonderful character in this series.Then there is Shade, who is traumatized a lot since the happenings in third book, but still has strength and will to go on in a dangerous territory.I was wondering when Moon was going to lose it, to be honest. Through the first books, he was always on edge, not trusting anyone, but now that he finally realized that he found his home and that no one will abandon him anymore, he is more afraid of dying himself, or Jade dying, or both of them dying, because it would mean leaving their clutch orphans, just like he was. He was so overwhelmed with it that he wanted to stay home and take care of them. But then it changed and he went with Jade and other Raksura and groundlings on an expedition, trying to prevent the vision they all had shared. Don't get me wrong, as much as Moon is stable now, when it comes to Fell he can and he will fight, but there is always that underlying fear that Fell will capture him, and he himself knows what Fell have in store when it comes to Consorts like fear.Chime still feels useless, but others are trying to tell him otherwise (also can you tell that I love him so damn much? he is adorable.) And he is still not confident in his flying (poor guy).Delin is back, and he probably just kidnapped himself on this expedition. I shouldn't have expected it otherwise.Drift crying over the fact that River is going with Moon and company to once again prove that he is useful and worthy of going with them because he lost his place in the court.I was also so happy with the fact that Stone did not trust anyone on the Kish expedition to the measure he didn't want to show his other form and instead played a weak old man (that later turned into giant but you know, it was all for the shock effect).Moon ended up with 8 children. How can he resist their cuteness? The short answer is... he can't.Moon fake fainting? Oh he was successful. I can't even. There were so many precious parts, like for example:predators come on board, raksuran queen literally sends the message - you boarded the wrong ship you little shits - and they collectively nope and fly away. And many more parts like that one.From the new characters I will talk the most about Kalam and Rorra. Because they left the biggest impression on me. Of course, the whole crew was interesting, but I have no time nor will to write about them all. So, here we go.Also, Rorra is amazing (not)mermaid sealing who lost her fins and now she decided to stay aboard and help her newfound family. She is also just... adorable and has an aura of irritating races with good scents but she can't help it. Stone is immune though.... *Winks*Kalam is adorable. He comes from a species (Janderan) that does not chose gender until they reach maturity. He chose to be male and is maybe a bit too sheltered by his father Callumkal and is generally just inexperienced, sometimes nervous and adorkable (he entered sealing drug bar by accident instead of a trading station and Stone and Moon had to rescue him). I definitely didn't expect him to have a crush on (view spoiler)[ Moon, and that he even kissed him (hide spoiler)], but he was so fascinated with them that it wasn't all that surprising? Hehehe.And finally, the Fell. Here's a twist. There was a (view spoiler)[ Fell-Raksuran Queen (hide spoiler)] who is a confused little bubble of insecurities and is prone to making mistakes, but it was definitely a Fell Flight I wanted to know more about and I can't wait for more of them in the future. ► OVERALL: Great sequel. Not as amazing as the books before, but it is a set up for the bigger picture, ends up with a cliffhanger and is cute, fluffy, with angst at the end, full of adventure, awkward moments, some bad flirting, fake fainting, catching boyfriend so he doesn't crash land, mentors being mentors and arguing who should go, the royal clutch #1 being reasonable bunch, cuties being cuties, a lot of alksdjalksdjlasjasd moments. OTHER IMPORTANT INFO: ⚠ Standalone: No. Part of a series.⚠ Point of View: Third POV, multiply characters.⚠ Cliffhanger: Yeeeeeees⚠ Triggers: nothing new⚠ Angst: Mostly near the end :D⚠ Recommended: Just read this and scream with me► REVIEW(S) RELATED TO THIS BOOK: ◈ The Cloud Roads (Books of the Raksura, #1) ◈ The Serpent Sea (Books of the Raksura, #2) ◈ The Siren Depths (Books of the Raksura, #3) ◈ Stories of the Raksura, Volume 1: The Falling World & The Tale of Indigo and Cloud ◈ Stories of the Raksura, Volume 2: The Dead City & The Dark Earth Below ◈ The Edge of Worlds (The Books of the Raksura, #4)
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  • Mogsy (MMOGC)
    January 1, 1970
    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2016/07/03/...The Edge of Worlds is the fourth novel of Martha Wells’ Books of the Raksura. I haven’t actually read any of the previous installments (unless you count the short story collections), so I had some initial concerns about jumping in mid-series despite it being billed as a new adventure. Happily though, this turned out to be a pretty great place to start my Raksura journey, and I would strongly encourage others to try it out 4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2016/07/03/...The Edge of Worlds is the fourth novel of Martha Wells’ Books of the Raksura. I haven’t actually read any of the previous installments (unless you count the short story collections), so I had some initial concerns about jumping in mid-series despite it being billed as a new adventure. Happily though, this turned out to be a pretty great place to start my Raksura journey, and I would strongly encourage others to try it out as well.The story begins with a shared nightmare. Moon wakes up from a dream about an attack from the Fell, the enemy of the Raksura, and finds out that everyone else in Indigo Cloud court also experienced the same visions. No one is sure how to interpret what they saw, but they do know that an omen like this cannot be ignored. Soon, their worries are compounded with the arrival of a groundling emissary who tells them that the people of Kish have discovered an ancient sealed city by the sea. Callumkal, the leader of the groundling expedition, intends to find a way into the city and has come to the Raksura asking for help in this endeavor.The Raksura are torn on how to move forward. There are fears that this ancient city may have been built by the forerunners, distant Raksuran ancestors, and no one could forget that the last sealed forerunner city they encountered was actually a prison for a monstrous creature of evil. In the end though, the Raksura of Indigo Cloud court decide to help the groundlings, splitting themselves up into two groups. One group would remain behind to guard the colony, while the other one would accompany the groundling expedition to investigate the mysterious city.I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again; the Raksura are one of the most original fantasy races I’ve ever encountered in fantasy fiction. For those who are unfamiliar with them, taking in the sheer amount of information about Raksuran culture, physiology, and social hierarchy will probably be the most overwhelming aspect should you decided to start the series here. The truth is, the plot of The Edge of Worlds is actually quite simple and straightforward. But the Raksura themselves? Not so much. There are a lot of characters to meet, details to learn. I think I would have struggled more had I not received a crash course about the Raksuran race back when I read volume one of Stories of the Raksura.Basically, the Raksura are shapeshifters whose physical characteristics remind me of bird-people, but their societies are reminiscent of insect colonies. There’s a queen who rules, and she and her mate called a Consort will produce royal clutches composed of Queens, Consorts, as well as Warriors that are infertile males and females who defend the court. All three of these types are capable of flight, and they are called the Aeriat. Then there are the Arbora, who are Raksura that have no wings but are capable climbers. They are made up of Teachers who oversee the young, Hunters who provide food, Soldiers who guard the colony, and Mentors who are seers with magical abilities.It’s a bit overwhelming at first, but all the information about Raksuran ways can be picked up on the fly (no pun intended). Wells was clearly writing with new readers in mind, because she provides plenty of information for us to understand what’s happening. Presumably, this book also takes place after the events of the previous novel The Siren Depths, so there’s a lot of recap about what went on in the Raksura’s previous encounter with a sealed forerunner city, along with the history of the Fell.And speaking of the Raksura’s enemies, I loved the suspenseful build-up to their arrival at the ancient city. Martha Wells fills the expedition’s journey with interesting events, so that even the parts that involved traveling were enjoyable and engaging. As I said, the novel’s plot is actually very simple, but you get an incredibly rich experience nonetheless thanks to the fantastic world-building and smooth pacing.This was also the first time I got to have quality time with Moon, the series protagonist. I only got to know him briefly from the first anthology, so I really enjoyed seeing him as a more fleshed-out character here, settled into his life at Indigo Cloud. From the short stories, I was able to glean some details of Moon’s past, so I know that he grew up very differently than his fellow Raksura and therefore still has much to learn about the culture of the court, as well as how to be a Consort. His behavior and ways of thinking make him something of a wild card among his peers, and it’s fascinating to see how that affects the social dynamics.In sum, I can personally attest that The Edge of Worlds is a good starting point for readers new to the world of the Raksura. Taking in all its beauty and wonders may take some time, but it’s worth it. There’s certainly no lack of creativity in this series, making it perfect for fantasy readers looking to escape into a totally original tale and setting.Audiobook comments: The audio edition of The Edge of Worlds is narrated by Christopher Kipiniak, who also provides his voice for all the other audiobooks in the series. I’ve long heard about his excellent performance on these books, but this is the first I’ve ever listened for myself. He has a very rich and powerful voice, and I think much of the atmosphere I felt from the story was thanks to his superb narration. Some of his voices for female characters sound awkward to me, but I’m still beyond impressed by the huge range of voices he is able to perform. I never had any problems distinguishing who was talking, and considering the large cast of characters in this novel, that’s no small feat.
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  • Mimi
    January 1, 1970
    I'm always glad to be back in the Three Worlds and hanging out with the Indigo Cloud court--it's like coming home again. While this book is only one half of the adventure, it's still a fulfilling tale that makes you eager for more, and I'm eagerly looking forward to the other half of the story.More on this later* * * * *My favorite author is continuing my favorite series. Doesn't get any better than this.
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  • Mitticus
    January 1, 1970
    Donde tenemos al pobre Moon que estaba tan tranquilito en lo de IndigoyCloud , recién asentándose y echando raices , aunque creo que han pasado como 2 años desde el inicio de serie y todavia le queda algo de emo esperando que todo se le escape entre las zarpas, y paf que una tremenda pesadilla sacude a todo el mundo y se ven en el dilema de esperar a que los problemas lleguen o ir a cortarlos de raiz, o ... ¿será que el viajecito será el detonante a lo que no quieren que pase?Me acabo de dar cue Donde tenemos al pobre Moon que estaba tan tranquilito en lo de IndigoyCloud , recién asentándose y echando raices , aunque creo que han pasado como 2 años desde el inicio de serie y todavia le queda algo de emo esperando que todo se le escape entre las zarpas, y paf que una tremenda pesadilla sacude a todo el mundo y se ven en el dilema de esperar a que los problemas lleguen o ir a cortarlos de raiz, o ... ¿será que el viajecito será el detonante a lo que no quieren que pase?Me acabo de dar cuenta de algo... me aburren mucho los barcos. Incluso los barcos voladores. (aunque lo bueno es que a diferencia del steampunk, todos estos funcionan con musguitos y pedazos de piedra, no pregunten como porque ni idea.; asi que son no-contaminantes). El que todo sea comestible en más de un punto de la historia -incluyendo protagonistas y antagonistas- tambien te hace sentir bastante eco-amistoso , jaja.(de ahi la bajada de estrellita,; además de que el misterio es bastante predecible)Uf, y lo de Delin (view spoiler)[era bastante predecible que poner TODO por escrito era demasiado peligroso, para haber sobrevivido bastante los Raksura siguen siendo demasiado ingenuotes, sobre todo considerando que ellos tambien adquieren gran parte de su conocimiento por sus propias crónicas y las de otras cortes. ¿Qué pasará cuando Delin muera o se pierda su morral por ahi con mapas y TODO lo que cuenta de las cortes? (hide spoiler)] For a race who had supposedly originally used their shapeshifting abilities to trap and prey on groundlings, Raksura were lousy liars. ...no me digas :rodado de ojos:Adoro a todos los personajes, en especial a Stone, Moon, y hasta a Shade lo veo un poco como al Nico de las historias de Percy Jackson.He still didn’t want to die somewhere in the wilds of the Three Worlds and miss the important moments, like teaching the new clutch how to fly and hunt and fight, and the all-important task of making sure they ended up with the right mates, or at least the mates they actually wanted, whether they were right or not. Las reinas son quienes cuidan , protegen, toman decisiones, y cortan el queque, pero un vistazo en la siquis de Malachite y Pearl me agradaria muchisimo.When Jade and Moon had taken seats, Bone said, “We’ve been speaking among ourselves—” Pearl, without twitching a spine, said dryly, “You know I hate that.” Moon couldn’t do anything but stare. Pearl had just made a joke. Bone, the only one who wasn’t fazed, said, wryly, “Yes, I know. But we think at least one other Arbora should go [...] Jade didn’t react, but Pearl lifted a brow and said, “This is what comes of thinking.”Por primera vez hay distintos POV en la historia, ya no solamente se trata de Moon. Ember es un personaje del que me agradaria saber más también.Y me esta gustando hasta River, con eso de querer redimirse y lo demás.Me gustan los fuertes lazos sociales que existen entre los Raksura, a pesar de las pequeñas desaveniencias son fuertemente unidos y protectores, y les encanta dormir todos juntos :PBueno y les fue igual que a los que ...(view spoiler)[ pasaron por Moira y terminaran con el 'palantir' porque no creo que sea 'anillo' :P (hide spoiler)]Ahora a esperar con ansias... ¡JULIO! y el próximo libro------------------Construccion de Mundo: Genial. De un escenario a otro.Diversidad: Gente dragon de colores, con color bronce en el otro estado de protas. Y resto de seres pensantes en todas formas, colores, escamas, plumas y agallas.Sexo: Nada explicito. LGBT, de hecho a nadie le importa.Roles segun género: Las féminas son más grandes, más fuertes; reinas y guerreras. Los consortes viven en una especie de harem, protegidos.
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  • Athena
    January 1, 1970
    Stunning - I finished it 6 months ago and am still not worthy to write a review! In this fourth book Martha Wells takes us on the beginning of a whole new adventure with the people of the Indigo Cloud court, expanding on some plot elements from the first three books. You really should read the first three before Edge of Worlds to get the full impact of the plot elements, although Wells' writing is good enough that it is possible to read this one by itself.So since June I've been drumming my fing Stunning - I finished it 6 months ago and am still not worthy to write a review! In this fourth book Martha Wells takes us on the beginning of a whole new adventure with the people of the Indigo Cloud court, expanding on some plot elements from the first three books. You really should read the first three before Edge of Worlds to get the full impact of the plot elements, although Wells' writing is good enough that it is possible to read this one by itself.So since June I've been drumming my fingers on a figurative table, waiting waiting WAITING for the fifth book to come out! Guess I'll just have to re-read the previous four books while I wait ... :D
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  • Allison
    January 1, 1970
    Yes! A new Raksura series! Full length novels about Indigo Cloud, with Moon and Jade. Sign. Me. Up. Thank you Martha Wells.
  • Melissa McShane
    January 1, 1970
    This book marks the start of a new adventure for Moon, Jade, and the Raksura of Indigo Cloud. A dream shared by all the members of the colony indicates their enemies, the vicious Fell, may soon attack and destroy Indigo Cloud. It's not until an old friend arrives in company with others who have an unusual proposition that they begin to make sense of the dream. The newcomers, the Kish, have found an ancient, uninhabited city they can't get into, and they know the Raksura have explored such a city This book marks the start of a new adventure for Moon, Jade, and the Raksura of Indigo Cloud. A dream shared by all the members of the colony indicates their enemies, the vicious Fell, may soon attack and destroy Indigo Cloud. It's not until an old friend arrives in company with others who have an unusual proposition that they begin to make sense of the dream. The newcomers, the Kish, have found an ancient, uninhabited city they can't get into, and they know the Raksura have explored such a city before. The fact that that city held prisoner a terrible creature doesn't seem to matter to the Kish, who only care about learning more about their own past. Convinced that this new city may be the key to defeating the Fell, the young queen Jade takes an assortment of Raksura and her consort Moon along on a journey that will end in a way none of them expected.The thing I love about Martha Wells's books is how insanely creative they are. She comes up with new cultures and races like they're some kind of cerebral dandruff, just tossed off at a whim fully-formed and beautiful. I'm particularly fond of the gender role inversion among the Raksura, where the male consorts are protected and expected to care for the children and look pretty, while the queens are strong-willed and always putting themselves in danger. Moon, who started life as a near-feral outsider, has grown by book 4 into someone who cares about his colony and, while not the perfect example of an ideal consort, shows that he understands and respects his role despite not always living up to it. Here, he's torn between wanting to stay behind and knowing his queen needs him to be that not-perfect consort. He's still a great viewpoint character, the outsider who has to have things explained to him as the reader does, but he's grown from the earlier books.I'm still very fond of Stone, the line-grandfather ancient consort, and he's just one of the great supporting characters. There are quite a few of them, as Jade needs plenty of support in her quest, and Wells does an excellent job of distinguishing all the Raksura as well as the other "groundlings" who interact with them. We see a little less of Jade than in the earlier books, which is unfortunate, but overall the characterization is splendid.Of course, this is the start of a new adventure, and I saw the end of the book coming up fast and knew something bad was going to happen. Which it did. (view spoiler)[Vendoin's betrayal, and the death of some minor but still loved characters, gave the twist a good punch. But better than this was the conversation Moon has with the Fell queen, who is young and not completely under the Fell's control. I am really eager to find out where that's going. (hide spoiler)] Wells leaves the story in a good place, not a cliffhanger so much as suspended action; the heroes have direction and the ability to follow it, and I anticipate the next book being even more exciting.
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  • Seregil of Rhiminee
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published at Risingshadow.Martha Wells' The Edge of the Worlds is an outstanding and delightfully original fantasy novel for adults. It's a wonderful new instalment in the Books of the Raksura series. It's an unputdownable novel that hooks you from the very start, because it begins a new story arc that expands the author's fantasy world in an entertaining and exciting way. It's an excellent antidote to bland and mediocre fantasy novels that most bookshops are filled with, because it's Originally published at Risingshadow.Martha Wells' The Edge of the Worlds is an outstanding and delightfully original fantasy novel for adults. It's a wonderful new instalment in the Books of the Raksura series. It's an unputdownable novel that hooks you from the very start, because it begins a new story arc that expands the author's fantasy world in an entertaining and exciting way. It's an excellent antidote to bland and mediocre fantasy novels that most bookshops are filled with, because it's pure quality from start to finish.The Edge of Worlds is every bit as good and intriguing as the previous Raksura novels. It's everything that fans of the series have come to expect from the series - it's an entertaining, exciting and enjoyable novel with excellent characterisation and original story. It continues the saga of the shapeshifting Raksura in a fascinating way, because the author explores her fantasy world further and reveals new things to readers. It takes the beloved characters on a journey of discovery towards an ancient and unknown city that may contain something dangerous inside its walls.Readers who are familiar with the previous novels will get the most out of The Edge of Worlds, but I think that newcomers will also love it, because it has been written in a way that allows new readers to enjoy it. It's possible that a few things may be difficult to understand if you haven't read any of the previous novels, but I'm sure that you'll enjoy the intriguing story. It's nice that the author reveals bits and pieces about the Raksura and their way of life as the story begins to ulfold, because it gives new readers an opportunity to get to know them better and old fans will be able to refreshen their memories about them. It's possible that The Edge of Worlds may be a bit overwhelming reading experience to new readers due to the amount of new names and races, but I advise readers to bear with it, because they'll be rewarded with a good story and everything will make sense when the story unfolds.After being fascinated by the three previous novels and the two excellent short story collections, I had high expectations for this novel. I was positively surprised when the story exceeded my expectations and the author delivered the anticipated delights big time. I have to admit that I'm amazed at the amount of freshness this novel has. The author has created a strong story that rivals the previous novels and even surpasses them on certain levels. This novel is an irresistible tour-de-force of excellent storytelling and fine characterisation. I honestly think that we need more this kind of adult fantasy, because there are way too many mediocre fantasy novels that lack originality.I consider The Edge of the Worlds to be one of the most addictive and entertaining fantasy novels of the year, because it's a thoroughly enjoyable and satisfyingly original novel that lacks all the weak spots that plague many contemporary fantasy novels. Martha Wells moves the story forward in an entertaining way and doesn't get stuck on meaningless issues, but masterfully keeps everything in motion and delivers surprises and fascinating scenes to her readers. It's great that she has paid attention to developing a good story and doesn't prematurely rush into action.Here's a bit of information about the story:- At the beginning, Moon and the other Raksura share a nightmare about the Fell attacking the Reaches and their colony. The Raksura feel uneasy about the shared dream, because nothing like it has ever happened before and nobody seems to know why it happened.- A bit later, Moon and the others meet a Golden Islander called Delin who tells them of an ancient city that has been found by the people of Kish-Jandera. Delin fears that the city may have been built by the forerunners, just like the city that was discovered on the northwestern coast. Callumkal, Master Scholar of the Conclave of the Janderan, intends to enter the city and wishes to be as forearmed as possible. There are signs that the Fell may have found the ancient city.- The Raksura decide to help the groundlings. A group of them accompany the groundlings to the ancient city...If there are readers out there who haven't read any of the previous Raksura novels, below are a few words about the Raksura, because in order to fully enjoy this novel you need to know something about them.The Raksura are shapeshifting beings who have the ability to shift their appearance from a winged form to a groundling form. The Raksuran court is ruled by a queen. There are two breeds of the Raksura: the Arbora who have no wings and the Aeriat who are winged Raksura. The Arbora are divided into four castes: hunters, mentors, soldiers and teachers, and the Aeriat are divided into warriors, consorts and queens.I'll also say a few words about the Fell who are the enemy of the Raksura. The Fell are divided into major kethels, minor dakti, rulers and progenitors. Major kethel is the largest of the Fell and the dakti are smallest of the Fell, but neither are very intelligent. The rulers are intelligent and can control the lesser Fell.The Raksuran colony and social hierarchy has an intriguingly entomological structure, because the author uses elements that remind readers of the insect world and how insects behave in hives. This adds an intriguing layer of depth and originality to the story.One of the things that makes this novel a success is the social dynamics of the Raksura, because the author writes excellently about issues related to the Raksuran behaviour, relationships and court manners. What goes on in the Indigo Cloud Court and among its inhabitants is genuinely interesting, because the author examines politics and relationships in a fresh way. I love the way the author writes about these issues from Moon's perspective, because Moon is a bit different from the other Raksura and he easily notices the differences between him and the others.The characterisation is excellent, because the author has created fully fleshed characters that continue to develop and grow with each new novel. Although the Raksura are not humans and differ from humans in terms of appearance and social structure, they resemble humans in certain ways and have humane feelings. It's great that all of the characters have their own distinct voices.Moon is a genuinely interesting and wonderfully three-dimensional protagonist. In this novel, Moon has settled into his life as Jade's consort, but he still has a few things to learn. Because he grew up alone, he doesn't know everything about the Raksura and their secrets and abilities. He has accepted certain things about himself and the other Raksura, but still has a bit of problems with some of them. The other Raksura have learned to accept him and his slightly strange and independent behaviour, which differs quite a lot from what they've come to expect from consorts.I enjoyed reading about Moon's struggle with his feelings, because the author writes convincingly about his feelings. He has a lot of things on his mind, because he has a clutch and should stay at the court, but he is not an ordinary consort. Because he is not a normal kind of a consort, he decides to participate in the voyage to the ancient city.The dialogues between the different Raksura are nuanced and wonderfully poignant. Martha Wells has a talent for writing realistic dialogues that feel believable. I find it intriguing that there are small grains of humour and sarcasm in some of the dialogues, because it's refreshing to read this kind of dialogues.The relationship between Pearl and the other Raksura is fascinating, because there are tensions. Pearl is a queen who has her own opinions about many things and her vision of how things should be may clash with the others. She has good days and bad days with some of the other Raksura. The loss of her consort seems to have affected her greatly and she hasn't recovered from it.Rorra is an interesting character, because she's a sealing and can produce different scents that may be recognised by others. She has lost a set of fins and has been changed by a healer to be able to breath air at all times. She has found work with Callumkal.Kalam is also an interesting character, because he's of different race and has recently chosen his gender. He hasn't yet learned to be wary of strangers, but is interested in exploring places.I also liked the way the author wrote about Delin, Vendoin and Callumkal. In my opinion, she writes fluently about them.It was fascinating to read about the forerunners and their secrets, because the Raksura and the Fell come from this ancient species. The forerunners are a mystery to the Raksura, because nobody knows anything about them.It's nice that the author writes fluently and maturely about the sex life of the Raksura. Their different kind of biology allows them to have easy, friendly and casual sex. Breeding may be a serious business because of the various bloodlines, but sex is an altogether different matter.The author also writes well about a species that chooses their gender when they're near maturity. I think it's great that she has created this kind of species, because it's difficult to find something like this in other fantasy novels.Reading about the shared dream was very intriguing for me, because it had never happened before to the Raksura. They were aware of the fact it's theoretically possible for it to happen, but nobody had ever experienced it and knew nothing about it. They were worried about the dream, because it predicted doom for them in the form of the Fell attacking the Reaches.I enjoyed reading about the voyage to the ancient city, because the author wrote well about it. It was genuinely intriguing to read about how Moon and the others travelled to the ancient on the flying boat and what they encountered during the voyage. I'm aware of the fact that there are readers out there who are used to constant action scenes and think that novels containing long voyages may be boring to read. I can say to these readers that there's nothing boring about the voyage in this novel, because the author's writing will keep you absorbed in the story.The ancient city is a magnificent and mysterious sight. It will please readers who enjoy reading adventure stories that feature old and possibly dangerous cities. It was nice to read about how the Raksura tried to enter the city, because they feared that the Fell might spy on them. There's a wonderful sense of mystery in this novel, because the Raksura don't know what they may find in the city.Just like in the previous novels, the fight scenes with the Fell are admirably executed and fresh. When you read about how the Raksura fight against the Fell, you'll be able to feel how much they hate and distrust the Fell.The Edge of Worlds features a good balance between entertainment, originality, depth, adventure, politics and characterisation. It's actually amazing how fluently all of this works in this novel, because nothing feels forced or artificial. All the tiny pieces and different elements fit perfectly together and form a fantastic story.One of the reasons why I like this novel and the whole series is that the author explores perfectly how the groundlings feel about the Raksura and vice versa. There are several tensions between them, because the groundlings often mistake the Raksura for the Fell due to their similar appearance. The groundlings may be confused, frightened and even hostile when they meet the Raksura.What makes The Edge of Worlds stand out among other fantasy novels is the author's passion for storytelling and and her strong worldbuilding. Martha Wells has created a strong and addictive story that adds depth and more sense of wonder to her fantasy world. She has also created three-dimensional characters that are wonderfully realistic and even have flaws that make them all the more interesting.Worldbuilding is excellent and stunningly original. The Three Worlds is a vast place that consists of different areas and is inhabited by several different species. The author writes fluently about the different areas and their inhabitants. I like the way she writes about the various species and how they differ from each other, because there's plenty of diversity in her fantasy world. There are fascinating differences between the species, because many of them are totally different from each other. In this novel, the author continues to reveal more information about her fantasy world and its various species.I won't go into details about the ending, because I might end up revealing too much information, but I'll mention that it is excellent and offers intriguing happenings, well written action scenes and unexpected surprises to readers. The story will continue in the sequel, The Harbors of the Sun.Before I write the final paragraphs of this review, I'll mention that I like the cover image by Yukari Masuike. It's a perfect cover image for this novel.The Edge of Worlds is so impressive a novel that I can hardly wait to read the next novel. I think that everybody who reaches the final page will want to get their hands on the sequel as soon as possible. I'm sure that the next novel will be something special.Martha Wells' The Edge of Worlds can be recommended to readers who want to read something out of the ordinary that immediately evokes feelings of fascination, mystery and wonder in the reader. It's not your average run-of-the-mill fantasy, because it has everything you could ever hope to find in an original and engaging fantasy novel. If you expect addictive storytelling and fascinating characters from your fantasy novels, you won't be disappointed by this novel. You're in for quite a rare treat when you let yourself be hooked by the story.The Edge of Worlds is an essential and satisfying fantasy novel for those who love quality fantasy and want originality from their novels. Please, do yourself a big favour and read this fantastic novel as soon as possible.Highly recommended!
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  • Alisi ☆ wants to read too many books ☆
    January 1, 1970
    Jade: "Not every problem can be solved by you trying to get yourself killed."Moon: "Not every problem but this one could be."Then a bit later.Moon: "We were slowing it down for you because you're old."Stone: "Slowing it down by throwing yourselves into its mouth? Did you think it was a picky eater?"Moon! You always crack me up! I love you! I LOVED THIS! LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVED THIS! But now I'm crushed! I have another year to wait. That ending! That slight cliffhanger! Whhhhhhhhhhy?!?!I loved Jade: "Not every problem can be solved by you trying to get yourself killed."Moon: "Not every problem but this one could be."Then a bit later.Moon: "We were slowing it down for you because you're old."Stone: "Slowing it down by throwing yourselves into its mouth? Did you think it was a picky eater?"Moon! You always crack me up! I love you! I LOVED THIS! LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVED THIS! But now I'm crushed! I have another year to wait. That ending! That slight cliffhanger! Whhhhhhhhhhy?!?!I loved all the characters in this. I really like the promise of the Fell plot thread. The one short seen with Ember was also nice. I really like how his character is rounding out, despite how little time he has in the books. And then the plot! I was so expecting one thing, maybe multiple things, and it was all total red herrings. XD~ The ending really caught me by surprise. I'm still like WAIT?! WHAAAAAAAT? I'm a total pacifist but gimme the ability to shift or a gun and I'd be right there with them. People gunna die in the next book. T_TAnd I still have to wait a YEAR for the next one!
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  • Anya
    January 1, 1970
    Really enjoyable place to jump in. I had a bit of catching up to do since I haven't read the first trilogy, but there were enough hints to help me out. There were a few too many references to past events to really call this a standalone trilogy though. The world and magic and entire ecosystem is so fascinating and my heart was pounding during the action scenes. There is a bit of a cliffhanger though so be warned!
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  • J.
    January 1, 1970
    So I'm sitting here staring at the wall whilst trying to think how I should start sorting through all the emotion in my head. Perhaps the brutal truth to get that out of the way: Compared to the first trilogy, this second series hasn't grabbed me so much. Maybe it's the situation that's not so compelling to me, if only because I love the idea of dumb babies having to be integrated back into their native people when they know nothing, and all the conflict that comes from it. That's what made me f So I'm sitting here staring at the wall whilst trying to think how I should start sorting through all the emotion in my head. Perhaps the brutal truth to get that out of the way: Compared to the first trilogy, this second series hasn't grabbed me so much. Maybe it's the situation that's not so compelling to me, if only because I love the idea of dumb babies having to be integrated back into their native people when they know nothing, and all the conflict that comes from it. That's what made me fall so hard for books 1 and 3 in particular, as for me, I enjoy them more when they examine Moon's inner conflict rather than when they go flying about fighting things. But that's just me.But that's not to say this is a bad book -- because hey, I thoroughly enjoyed it and gave it an easy four stars -- it's just that it's different from the first books. In theory, The Edge of Worlds was everything I wanted. Not only do we have more Raksura books, but we've also got Opal Night (oh Shade my baby <3), multi POVs, and the book is part one of a bigger arc because loose threads and cliffhangers and oh my heart can't take a year of waiting. So don't do what I did and race through it. Be patient, savour it, because we're not getting more for a while. But there was something ... more I was after.This book takes place after the short story anthologies, so to reap the most benefit, definitely go and check them out if you haven't already (I know I'm not to only one who tends to skip anthologies, but I'm glad I didn't this time). Whilst this can be considered a jumping on point for new readers, I very much wouldn't recommend starting here. There's a lot of references to previous Raksura books that I got the impression of "this is assumed knowledge" and might leave people flailing, as well as missing out on worldbuilding quirks and in-depth descriptions of what things look like, including Raksura (it's never really touched upon unless anatomy's important in the middle of a scene, and so it can be a little jarring), the Reaches, the Indigo Cloud court mountain-tree, etc. It just adds to the richness. And honestly, I don't know why you'd want to miss the first trilogy.Moon's character is further explored here, as he's becoming more acquainted with his place in Indigo Cloud as their first consort, as well as balancing his duties as a new father in a socially strange child-raising environment sorta. Character dynamics are further embarked upon, and as ever I'm staring starry-eyed at the way Moon and Stone interact with each other (and left wondering how their relationship has gotten to this considering how they started off together). I definitely enjoyed the Raksura more than I did the other characters of different races, and I must say (view spoiler)[I'm very, very intrigued by that Fell-Raksura Queen; I hope we learn more about her (hide spoiler)].The worldbuilding is still top-notch, and it was fun to see snippets I've read online in print now. The cover art is fantastic, and more than once I've opened the dust jacket all the way up just to look at the entire wrap-around, sometimes in the middle of a paragraph because it's just that gorgeous.Oh! And there was one "turned to turned to" typo that I snorted at (top of pg. 373), as well as a couple of instances where speech hadn't been correctly bracketed, but eh, it was nothing too jarring.
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  • Seelenstaub
    January 1, 1970
    Not as good as the othersSo yeah, this wasn't great. Though it did have some of the things that made the other books so awesome: likeable characters, fascinating landscapes and cities and a wide variety of interesting races.But some things just didn't sit right with me. What irritated me the most was the development of the main characters Moon and Jade pertaining to their gender roles. The Raksura have always had a very strict gender system with prescribed roles for males and females - like the Not as good as the othersSo yeah, this wasn't great. Though it did have some of the things that made the other books so awesome: likeable characters, fascinating landscapes and cities and a wide variety of interesting races.But some things just didn't sit right with me. What irritated me the most was the development of the main characters Moon and Jade pertaining to their gender roles. The Raksura have always had a very strict gender system with prescribed roles for males and females - like the one we used to have in the 1800s - but in reverse: The consorts (fertile male Aeriats) are supposed to be submissive and shy while their female pendants - the queens - are fierce and aggressive. But Martha Wells then proceeded to show us very cleverly in the first three books that these supposedly inherent traits are in fact learned - with the example of Moon, a consort, who has lived his whole life away from the Raksuran courts and doesn't behave like a consort is supposed to. The court he eventually joins isn't happy about it, but eventually they start to accept this. It even comes in handy when the court is in danger (which is almost always), because Moon is very experienced in this sort of thing. But in this book Moon and his queen Jade are slipping more and more into their prescribed roles - with no explanation and for whatever reason. Which is too bad, because it makes me like them a lot less than I used to. Jade for example was a great character in the first books, because she was strong but not overpowering and accepted Moon how he is. The result was that they were mostly equals and acted like partners which is how IMHO all relationships should be. In 'The Edge of Worlds', however, Jade is all too often telling Moon (and once even Stone) to stay behind and let her handle this - for no other reason than because she's a queen and he a consort. And Moon actually lets her! What irks me the most is that there really is no reason for them to act like this, except that this is how they are supposed to act. It is also never questioned.Another thing I could have done without were the POV-changes. They really weren't necessary for the plot and also kind of confusing since there are just so many characters to keep track of - thankfully they didn't occur very often.The next annoying factor was the open ending - there was really too much left unsolved, like (view spoiler)[ what is this crystal-in-a-cage thing they found, what's with the vision of the Fell attack on the Reaches, the half-Fell queen, the abducted Raksura (and the other groundlings),... (hide spoiler)]. It doesn't make me eager for the next book, it's just frustrating.Also (though this is just a minor issue) what's with the swear words? Phrases like "What the shit is this" or "this shitting city" sound kind of weird. Why not just say "fuck"/"fucking"?And last but not least: Why did the book have to be released in hardcover?So don't get me wrong - this wasn't a bad book. As a standalone book from any other author I could have overlooked the faults, because the plot was interesting enough and the Raksura are really awesome (at least most of the time), but as the fourth (or sixth) book in this series and apparently "the start of a new saga" this was pretty weak and disappointing.
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  • Wendy
    January 1, 1970
    This is the fourth book in the Raksura series and I'm going to be honest, what actually happens in the story, plotwise, wasn't all that interesting to me as our favourite Raksura join up with the perpetually curious and undaunted historian, Delin, and a group of groundlings and sealings intent on discovering the secrets of another ancient city. After their experiences in The Siren Depths, the Raksura are nervous about anything that could be related to their forerunners, but if this city was buil This is the fourth book in the Raksura series and I'm going to be honest, what actually happens in the story, plotwise, wasn't all that interesting to me as our favourite Raksura join up with the perpetually curious and undaunted historian, Delin, and a group of groundlings and sealings intent on discovering the secrets of another ancient city. After their experiences in The Siren Depths, the Raksura are nervous about anything that could be related to their forerunners, but if this city was built by the foundation builders, there could be so much to learn. No matter the results of their discovery, the ever present Fell are on their tails, seeking the same city for reasons of their own. How this all comes together, from the Raksura's shared dream of the Fell, to expeditions on flying boats, to a very long walk up stairs, gets a bit tedious, logistically. And yet I was totally into it the whole way. Why? Because I love the Raksura of Indigo Cloud. I've spent four books with them now and can't get enough of their intricate and intimate lives. I've come to know them so well that I have renamed the books to be more reflective of my journey with them:Book 1: A Raksura and a Fell Walk Into a Groundling BarBook 2: Moon Teaches Everyone How to GroundlingBook 3: Moon Still Doesn't Know How to RaksuraBook 4: Stone is Too Old For This Shit But He Does It Anyway for Shits and GigglesI fell in love with Wells' worldbuilding and her unique creatures from the beginning, in The Cloud Roads, and now I am happy to see them continue their misadventures just so I can get more of their amusing interactions. I still enjoy learning about the ways of the Raksura. Initially, this came through Moon, who, after 40 turns spent not knowing he was one, has only just settled into his role as a Raksuran consort and is finally being accepted by everyone such that his trouble adhering to the rules at times is overlooked. In the fourth book, time is spent with creatures who fear or look down on the Raksura because of their ignorance of the reclusive race that happens to resemble the deadly Fell. These new creatures, who have their own unique ways that Wells deftly incorporates into her world, get to learn about Raskuran views on nudity and sex, their pecking order, from consort to warrior to queen, and the importance of nap time. I especially love Moon and line-grandfather Stone who is older than everyone and does what he wants and also can hulk out so he just doesn't give a damn about all the Raksuran rules and etiquette that's required of everyone else. Stone was the one who recognized Moon for what he was and brought him back to Indigo Cloud's court. Now that Moon is more comfortable in his role and his place within the court and has more than proven himself in everyone's eyes, including Stone's, their relationship has settled into a loving rivalry of sarcasm and mutual (dis)respect. Stone shrugged one shoulder. “I’ve seen one before. And somebody has to stay down here and keep an eye on the boat.”“So you’re just tired?” Moon said. Stone pushed him off the railing.What I really need is more books about Moon and Stone hanging out, trading barbs and sharing donuts. But back to the actual story for a moment. This book was a bit unusual in that the stories have always been told from Moon's perspective. That is still true here, but Wells interrupts with a few other characters, including ones from another court. This is all well and good if more is to come from these characters, especially with some of them following days behind our group of Raksura. But instead of everyone coming together, I found myself coming to the end of the book and wondering why any time had been spent with the other characters at all. Save for providing me with a bit more insight into the consort's life through Ember, for example (I bet Stone has an awesome tea set):"Ember led the way to the steps down to the passage that led through to the queens’ hall, and he and Shade made what Ember considered to be a very decorous and correct entrance. Ember liked and admired Moon a great deal, but he wasn’t very good at entrances. He entered formal meetings looking either like a captive dragged there against his will or like he was coming to murder someone."But the other perspectives didn't add anything to the story that couldn't have been filled in with a few lines of dialogue when everyone *finally* got together. Moreover, this book is described as a good place for new readers to step into the Raksura series. While you do get to learn a lot about them through their interactions with the other people on their expedition, a new reader would miss out on the nuance behind all the interactions and relationships that can't simply be explained away with a few lines of dialogue or description.Still, this is a worthy entry into the series if only because it lets me sit back and have more fun with Stone and Moon. This review is based on an advanced reader copy of the book.www.bibliosanctum.com
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  • Clare O'Beara
    January 1, 1970
    You may or may not have read the previous books - it would be easier to pick up the tale if you have, since this is a continuing adventure with references to earlier scenes. The Raksura are a winged lizard folk, who can shapechange, and who live in forest canopies. They are invited to go on an expedition in this tale. The world they are adapted to ends at the coast, after which sealings, or selkies as we would call them are adapted to the ocean. Moon and his queen Jade head off to see if a rumou You may or may not have read the previous books - it would be easier to pick up the tale if you have, since this is a continuing adventure with references to earlier scenes. The Raksura are a winged lizard folk, who can shapechange, and who live in forest canopies. They are invited to go on an expedition in this tale. The world they are adapted to ends at the coast, after which sealings, or selkies as we would call them are adapted to the ocean. Moon and his queen Jade head off to see if a rumoured threat is real. Some of the best scenes were the aerial combat, while island exploration is always fun. We meet various other races including some destructive ones. You don't have to have read the earlier books, but it would definitely help if you'd read at least one. I was sent an e-ARC by Fresh Fiction. This is an unbiased review.
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  • Alopexin
    January 1, 1970
    I'M YELLING BECAUSE Martha Wells didn't end her previous books like this but she did now and WHY DID SHE BETRAY ME THIS WAY.Don't take me wrong, this book is excellent and true to the spirit of the series. The author has an exceptionally vivid imagination, and that shows in her inventiveness with different species, their cultures, morals, even the tools they'd devised for their everyday use. The Three Worlds is so vast that one people doesn't even know how the others live, and they puzzle over e I'M YELLING BECAUSE Martha Wells didn't end her previous books like this but she did now and WHY DID SHE BETRAY ME THIS WAY.Don't take me wrong, this book is excellent and true to the spirit of the series. The author has an exceptionally vivid imagination, and that shows in her inventiveness with different species, their cultures, morals, even the tools they'd devised for their everyday use. The Three Worlds is so vast that one people doesn't even know how the others live, and they puzzle over every aspect: what is that tool for? What is taboo and what is just rude? All that is very convincing and I enjoy puzzling along with the Raksura as they wonder and explore. The story telling is solid. I find these books have just the right balance between 'wandering around looking at ruins and puzzling about things' and 'quick run something wants to eat us' and the story just pulls you right along. I've always had difficulties though when the author describes the layouts of a few more complicated structures (the layout of city inside the rock just completely escaped me) but it doesn't affect my enjoyment of the book.And as I already mentioned, I love the characters so much that I'm attached to them now. Moon continues to be Moon and Stone continues to be Stone, etc. The addition of new groundlings and sealings to the cast is interesting as well and it's lovely to learn the strength and limit of each species. That being said, this book is not finished. As in this is half a book, that ended on a GODDAMN CLIFFHANGER. So, if you're not good with cliffhangers, better wait until the last book is out until you plunge into this adventure.EDIT : reread 1 year later to be able to get back into Harbor of the Suns!
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  • egelantier
    January 1, 1970
    new raksura book! finally! ending on a harrowing cliffhanger because god hates me. no seriously, though, it’s an amazing book, one of the best in the series - widening the scope of already hella extensive worldbuillding once again, impeccably plotted, riveting and full of big and tiny perfect character beats. i loved that moon’s character development actually stuck and he believed in the way his families, birth and adopted, love him and value him, and therefore was focused on the business at han new raksura book! finally! ending on a harrowing cliffhanger because god hates me. no seriously, though, it’s an amazing book, one of the best in the series - widening the scope of already hella extensive worldbuillding once again, impeccably plotted, riveting and full of big and tiny perfect character beats. i loved that moon’s character development actually stuck and he believed in the way his families, birth and adopted, love him and value him, and therefore was focused on the business at hand and the way he is now a protective figure of authority without lapsing, i loved his and jade’s relationship, stone was a delight as always, delin was back, new species were fascinating, everything was amazing and nothing hurt. (lies, this one character death hurt a lot, way more then i’ve expected - the unexpectedness and violence and waste of it; i loved it even when i hated it). now stuck in waiting for the book five, which i want like nothing else. i’ve also re-read the previous trilogy, and am happy to report it remains a beautiful and comforting and impressive read, so. have you not yet? if you like non-standard, immensely imaginative and casually diversive (both race and sexuality-wise) worldbuilding, matriarchal societies, copious hurt/comfort, beautiful character relationships and a lot of adventures, it’s a must read.
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  • Barb in Maryland
    January 1, 1970
    The synopsis does a great job with the basic plot, so I don't feel the need to do a recap.It was great to be back among the Raksura. Moon, Jade, Stone, and Chime are along for the ride, as well as several other familiar members of the Indigo Cloud court. We even get cameo appearances from members of the Opal Night court, including Malachite and Shade.Of course the adventure does not go smoothly--oh no, not at all! Minor perils along the way and then the expedition finally finds the mysterious ci The synopsis does a great job with the basic plot, so I don't feel the need to do a recap.It was great to be back among the Raksura. Moon, Jade, Stone, and Chime are along for the ride, as well as several other familiar members of the Indigo Cloud court. We even get cameo appearances from members of the Opal Night court, including Malachite and Shade.Of course the adventure does not go smoothly--oh no, not at all! Minor perils along the way and then the expedition finally finds the mysterious city. More danger--two(!) different groups of Fell on the outside and some very nasty surprises on the inside. Plus a side order of betrayal by one of the members of the expedition. I am constantly amazed at Wells' world-building. All of the new characters are well developed; I became quite fond of Rorra the sealing and young Kalam, son of the expedition leader. My one quibble is that the book ending is a definite 'to be continued'. Not really a cliff-hanger, but a regrouping before heading off again. It's a good thing I know that the next book (The Harbors of the Sun) is coming out next year. I am eagerly looking forward to it.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    This book should really be called "Edge of Worlds: Chapters 1-23, we'll publish the rest when we feel like it." Because it's really not a stand-alone, or even a part of a series, in any way shape or form. Very little actually happens in this book, nothing whatsoever is resolved, and it ends so abruptly that at first I suspected my kindle app ate some of it. Until I saw the "About the Author" blurb on the last page... And even then I doubted myself and went back to Amazon to see if I missed somet This book should really be called "Edge of Worlds: Chapters 1-23, we'll publish the rest when we feel like it." Because it's really not a stand-alone, or even a part of a series, in any way shape or form. Very little actually happens in this book, nothing whatsoever is resolved, and it ends so abruptly that at first I suspected my kindle app ate some of it. Until I saw the "About the Author" blurb on the last page... And even then I doubted myself and went back to Amazon to see if I missed something. But no, it's not just me, apparently everyone else got the same (very curtailed) text. So this gets 2.5 stars for one half of what I assume will be an excellent book, once the powers that be decide to write or publish it (that's me giving them the benefit of the doubt here). Minus 0.5 stars for false advertising, because nowhere does it say that the story is part of a larger series. Sure, it's Raksura part 4, but all the other books were stand-alones. So is this one part of a series of 2? or 3? or 10? or will it remain perpetually unresolved as long as the money keeps coming, and then end abruptly, still unresolved, when the readers finally get bored???
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  • thefourthvine
    January 1, 1970
    I was a little apprehensive going into this series, because the previous trilogy had ended so well! But, as usual, I found both the Raksura and the world they live in irresistible. This is a delightful continuation of the series, and this and its sequel complete Moon's arc and introduce great new characters (and some fascinating new wrinkles). If I'd read this when it first came out, I'd probably have been frustrated at where the book ended, but fortunately I could just go right on to the next o I was a little apprehensive going into this series, because the previous trilogy had ended so well! But, as usual, I found both the Raksura and the world they live in irresistible. This is a delightful continuation of the series, and this and its sequel complete Moon's arc and introduce great new characters (and some fascinating new wrinkles). If I'd read this when it first came out, I'd probably have been frustrated at where the book ended, but fortunately I could just go right on to the next one. All in all, a great entry in a great series in a great world.
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  • Brittany
    January 1, 1970
    I spent this whole book worried about something that doesn't happen. MILD SPOILER: (view spoiler)[ Stone does NOT die. I spent the whole book mentally yelling at Martha Wells: "Dammit, woman, I am pregnant and VERY EMOTIONAL, I cannot handle ANYTHING happening to Stone right now. Or, you know, ever. But now I'm worried he might in the next book. (hide spoiler)]Other than that, it was another wonderful romp in the world of the Raksura. They're so much fun, and I wish I could just hang out there a I spent this whole book worried about something that doesn't happen. MILD SPOILER: (view spoiler)[ Stone does NOT die. I spent the whole book mentally yelling at Martha Wells: "Dammit, woman, I am pregnant and VERY EMOTIONAL, I cannot handle ANYTHING happening to Stone right now. Or, you know, ever. But now I'm worried he might in the next book. (hide spoiler)]Other than that, it was another wonderful romp in the world of the Raksura. They're so much fun, and I wish I could just hang out there all the time. As always fantastic characters, dialog, world-building, and writing.
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  • Sally
    January 1, 1970
    Ok, now I have the author's modus operandi. The characters travel a long way, with interpersonal conflicts and adjustments taking place. Then they get to a really weird place, not much happens, but somehow they get out of the dangerous place. And of course they fight their biologically closest relatives, the Fell, and more will be discovered.....in the next book! But, really the Raksura and their world are pretty interesting and the books are somewhat compelling. Just not much happens in them. I Ok, now I have the author's modus operandi. The characters travel a long way, with interpersonal conflicts and adjustments taking place. Then they get to a really weird place, not much happens, but somehow they get out of the dangerous place. And of course they fight their biologically closest relatives, the Fell, and more will be discovered.....in the next book! But, really the Raksura and their world are pretty interesting and the books are somewhat compelling. Just not much happens in them. I am looking for the next book in the series now.
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  • Margaret
    January 1, 1970
    These are just so consistently entertaining and well-written, I'm glad she's continuing them. This would not be the best place to pick up the series, though, as there are lots of references to the events of earlier books, and this one ends on a cliffhanger (which I don't recall previous installments doing).
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  • Lorena
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeous writing and wonderful characters, as always. The cliffhanger ending, though, has me desperate for the final book in this series!
  • E_bookpushers
    January 1, 1970
    Sneaky author made this a cliffhanger ending...Very interesting developments. I loved seeing how torn Moon was along with how much he has settled into his position as an unusual Consort.
  • Miriam
    January 1, 1970
    CLIFFHANGER ARRRRRGGGGHHH!
  • Meggie
    January 1, 1970
    Have to admit, the main plotted story wasn't as pulling and interesting, as in previous three books. Sure I still enjoyed the story, but was party bored by it, too. Ending was predictable!
  • Quartzen
    January 1, 1970
    Like a lot of Wells' books, this one is something of a slow burn, with things really picking up near the end and making it hard to put down. This one is full of the inventive worldbuilding that's the trademark of the series, and raises a lot of interesting questions about the world too- but doesn't answer a lot of them, this being less a standalone story than the first half of a larger story. I find myself really glad that I waited to read this one until The Harbors of the Sun was out as well so Like a lot of Wells' books, this one is something of a slow burn, with things really picking up near the end and making it hard to put down. This one is full of the inventive worldbuilding that's the trademark of the series, and raises a lot of interesting questions about the world too- but doesn't answer a lot of them, this being less a standalone story than the first half of a larger story. I find myself really glad that I waited to read this one until The Harbors of the Sun was out as well so I can continue on directly.
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  • Tyrannosaurus regina
    January 1, 1970
    Fairly or not, when I get more than a couple of books into a series, the books are compared more to other books in the series than the rest of the books in the world when it comes to ratings. I did enjoy this, but for me it was a little less vibrant, the story a little less compelling, the worldbuilding a little less captivating, than in previous installments.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series, but I am not okay with the way it ends. The concluding chapter is so abrupt that I had to check I wasn't missing another page in the ebook. For a moment, I thought I'd bought a faulty copy. Great story but shit ending basically. I know Martha Wells isn't one for drawing out a book's ending, but it'd have helped if it didn't feel like the rest of the story was purposefully split into the next book.
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