It's Not Jack and the Beanstalk (It's Not a Fairy Tale, #1)
Jack is not fond of the bossy narrator of his fairy tale! When Jack is told to trade his beloved cow Bessie for some magic beans, throw the beans out the window, climb the ENORMOUS beanstalk that sprouts overnight, and steal from a GIANT, he decides this fairy tale is getting out of control. In fact, he doesn’t want to follow the story line at all. Who says Jack needs to enter a life of daring, thievery, and giant trickery? He takes his story into his own hands—and you’ll never guess what happens next!With laugh-out-loud dialogue and bold, playful art (including hidden fairy tale creatures for kids to find), this Jack and the Beanstalk retelling will have children rolling with laughter till Bessie the cow comes home.

It's Not Jack and the Beanstalk (It's Not a Fairy Tale, #1) Details

TitleIt's Not Jack and the Beanstalk (It's Not a Fairy Tale, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 19th, 2017
PublisherTwo Lions
ISBN-139781542045650
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Humor, Fantasy, Fairy Tales, Fractured Fairy Tales

It's Not Jack and the Beanstalk (It's Not a Fairy Tale, #1) Review

  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    While many may be familiar with the story, Jack has decided to hijack the narrative and steer things in his own direction. He protests the beans, the beanstalk, and violence with the Giant (Fred, by name). Instead, Jack pesters the narrator to allow him full control of the story, which has an interesting ending. Neo laughed throughout this story and hopes that I can find some more tales where the characters protest the traditional version.
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  • Niki (Daydream Reader)
    January 1, 1970
    Hilarious and a MUST have for the library and any fairy tale unit!!
  • Kate Olson
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the #kidlitexchange network for the review copy - all opinions are my own. This remix of the classic Jack and the Beanstalk story will be a perfect addition to my fractured fairy tale collection in my library and is a guaranteed read aloud for my 4th graders during their fairy tale unit. I love that the format is more complex than most storybooks and requires understanding/discussion of the role of the narrator versus that of the participants in the story. I will definitely preface Thank you to the #kidlitexchange network for the review copy - all opinions are my own. This remix of the classic Jack and the Beanstalk story will be a perfect addition to my fractured fairy tale collection in my library and is a guaranteed read aloud for my 4th graders during their fairy tale unit. I love that the format is more complex than most storybooks and requires understanding/discussion of the role of the narrator versus that of the participants in the story. I will definitely preface my read alouds with a discussion of the structure of the book and use a pointer as I am reading to highlight the speech bubbles, etc. Another hit picture book from Josh Funk - can't wait to add it to my library!
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  • Julie Kirchner
    January 1, 1970
    So I’m FINALLY writing the review for this book which is long overdue. And I’m not gonna lie, I think Josh Funk is da bomb and he also asked me and a bunch of my nerdy friends to help him on the book trailer for this book, so I’m sort of biased.With that said, this book is fantastic. So much great humor, and fun for both kids and adults. My students were laughing out loud when we read this book together. It was a blast. And let’s face it, any book with a character in his underwear and saying bea So I’m FINALLY writing the review for this book which is long overdue. And I’m not gonna lie, I think Josh Funk is da bomb and he also asked me and a bunch of my nerdy friends to help him on the book trailer for this book, so I’m sort of biased.With that said, this book is fantastic. So much great humor, and fun for both kids and adults. My students were laughing out loud when we read this book together. It was a blast. And let’s face it, any book with a character in his underwear and saying beans make him toot is going to cause rolling on the floor laughter, which I fully encourage. I can’t wait for Josh’s next book! He never disappoints.
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  • M
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Josh Funk & Amazon Publishing for sharing this ARC w/ #kidlitexchange! All opinions are my own. Fantastic and fun! I can already hear my students giggling as Jack argues his way through the story. The style mirrors techniques used in the ever-popular Mo Willems stories, guaranteeing success amongst its readers. An absolute purchase for all libraries and a MUST read aloud this fall!
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    Poor narrator. He tries so hard to tell the traditional Jack and the Beanstalk story, but Jack just won't cooperate, and he complains the whole way, first about selling his cow, then about climbing the beanstalk, and finally refusing to rob the giant. And then to top it all off, he gives away the ending of the story. In frustration, the narrator tries to end the story, but naturally Jack doesn't let him have his way. Funk and Taylor have created a thoroughly amusing fractured telling of Jack and Poor narrator. He tries so hard to tell the traditional Jack and the Beanstalk story, but Jack just won't cooperate, and he complains the whole way, first about selling his cow, then about climbing the beanstalk, and finally refusing to rob the giant. And then to top it all off, he gives away the ending of the story. In frustration, the narrator tries to end the story, but naturally Jack doesn't let him have his way. Funk and Taylor have created a thoroughly amusing fractured telling of Jack and the Beanstalk. And they've thrown in Cinderella to boot. This is another fun retelling for me to add to my growing collection. It's fun to compare original fairy tales with fractured ones. And when the illustrations complement the humor as well as these do, well that is icing on the cake.
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  • Traci
    January 1, 1970
    This one's a rib tickler! Guaranteed to at least bring a smile to young ones but more than likely, make them laugh. This is the story of Jack and the Beanstalk but maybe not how you remembered it.Written by Josh Funk, illustrated by Edwardian Taylor and published by Two Lions.#mustread #fracturedfairytale #funny
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  • Jillian Heise
    January 1, 1970
    Added July 9, 2017: Having now gotten to see the final version of this book, I think I love it even more. It's creative, unexpected, and hilarious. It left me laughing, and I'm sure kids will be cracking up also at the snarkiness of Jack as he responds to the narrator and questions how the story is going. A fantastic addition to a fractured fairy tales collection or unit, or as a mentor text for looking at dialogue and narration. LOVE!July 8, 2015: Got to hear the author read the manuscript of t Added July 9, 2017: Having now gotten to see the final version of this book, I think I love it even more. It's creative, unexpected, and hilarious. It left me laughing, and I'm sure kids will be cracking up also at the snarkiness of Jack as he responds to the narrator and questions how the story is going. A fantastic addition to a fractured fairy tales collection or unit, or as a mentor text for looking at dialogue and narration. LOVE!July 8, 2015: Got to hear the author read the manuscript of the text. Even without the illustrations, I was chuckling to myself and highly entertained by the metacognitive narrative elements and Jack's attitude in this fractured tale. Can not wait to see a finished copy and share with students!!
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  • Matthew Winner
    January 1, 1970
    "Woah! It's a good thing I didn't eat those beans!" This book is HILARIOUS and gives voice to an entirely different perspective of the story: Jack's! Can't wait to share with readers this school year!
  • Michelle Simpson
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so funny! Our kids loved it! It is the perfect book to use for reader's theater.
  • V
    January 1, 1970
    V's ReviewJack weighs in as a narrator retells the fairy tale.In this comedic rendition, speech bubbles show characters' incredulity as the story unfolds. Imagine Jack giving the vegan giant tips on his rhymes, and an exasperated narrator who can't get his characters to behave as expected. Probably more smirk-inducing for parents; children without a complete grasp of the original version may miss the humor.T's Review(age 3 years)V: Was it a fun, silly book?T: No. It has a giant who wants to eat V's ReviewJack weighs in as a narrator retells the fairy tale.In this comedic rendition, speech bubbles show characters' incredulity as the story unfolds. Imagine Jack giving the vegan giant tips on his rhymes, and an exasperated narrator who can't get his characters to behave as expected. Probably more smirk-inducing for parents; children without a complete grasp of the original version may miss the humor.T's Review(age 3 years)V: Was it a fun, silly book?T: No. It has a giant who wants to eat the boy.T's Dad: In the end did the giant want to eat the boy? What did you think about that?T: They becomeded friends. I think that was neat.V: What did they cook? They made a taco bowl? I know someone who makes those!T: T!V: What would you do if you met the giant?T: Eat a taco bowl with him.
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  • Jana
    January 1, 1970
    For those readers that think they know how Jack and the Beanstalk goes, think again! This fun fractured fairy tale shows what happens when the main character of your story is uncooperative and takes over! From the start, Jack wants to do things his own way and kids will have a great time reading to find out where he takes this story. Fractured fairy tales have always been very popular with my students, and this book could serve as a great mentor text for taking traditional stories and giving the For those readers that think they know how Jack and the Beanstalk goes, think again! This fun fractured fairy tale shows what happens when the main character of your story is uncooperative and takes over! From the start, Jack wants to do things his own way and kids will have a great time reading to find out where he takes this story. Fractured fairy tales have always been very popular with my students, and this book could serve as a great mentor text for taking traditional stories and giving them a new twist. The detailed, colorful digital illustrations have the added fun of favorite fairy tale friends sprinkled throughout the book. I found myself going back and forth through the pages and feeling mighty clever each time I found a new one! This is definitely a book for every bookshelf!
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    Jack is reluctant to carry out the story as the narrator is telling it. After all, why throw the beans out of the window if you're hungry. And how can you climb a beanstalk without climbing gear? And seriously? You want me to walk into a giant's house? I'd rather go to Cinderella's party.A lively retelling of the classic fairy tale with a sassy Jack and humorous illustrations.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Josh Funk writes a narrative (wait, is it Josh? Or Jack?) about Jack and the Beanstalk...no, wait! It's not about that Jack-in-the-Beanstalk version that you remember from long ago. Jack, the giant, and other fairy tale characters talk to the reader in this hilarious new picture book. A MUST read for kids, lovers of fractured fairy tales, or anyone who would like to go to a party.
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  • Mrs Mommy Booknerd http://mrsmommybooknerd.blogspot.com
    January 1, 1970
    A delight of a read, this story is so brilliant and fun. It is fun as a read aloud and a delight to read alone. I read it a few times and laughed each time. The illustrations are bright, funny and add so much to this richly written story. Kids and and adult alike are going to love this book. A must for the classroom and home library.
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  • Mrs. Krajewski
    January 1, 1970
    Laugh-out-loud funny! My son and daughter gave this book "50 million stars."
  • Donna Mork
    January 1, 1970
    Funny retelling of Jack and the Beanstalk where the characters interact with the storyteller and change the story as they go. Quite amusing.
  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    I love how Jack gets sassy with the narrator. This is destined to be a classic fractured fairy tale.
  • Lorraine
    January 1, 1970
    Full review online at http://missmageesreads.com/.What would happen if fairytale characters didn’t listen to the narrator? That’s the question Josh Funk explores in his new book, It’s Not Jack and the Beanstalk. This hilarious, inventive new take on a classic will keep kids laughing out loud. When the narrator starts the story, Jack doesn’t exactly cooperate. He doesn’t want to get up in the morning, doesn’t want to throw the beans out the window, and especially doesn’t want to start climbing. I Full review online at http://missmageesreads.com/.What would happen if fairytale characters didn’t listen to the narrator? That’s the question Josh Funk explores in his new book, It’s Not Jack and the Beanstalk. This hilarious, inventive new take on a classic will keep kids laughing out loud. When the narrator starts the story, Jack doesn’t exactly cooperate. He doesn’t want to get up in the morning, doesn’t want to throw the beans out the window, and especially doesn’t want to start climbing. If Jack doesn’t do what the narrator says, will it change the end of the story?My students are big fans of fractured fairy tales. They love rooting for characters who may not have been heroes the first time around. I know they’ll love this book, where the giant is a little different than they might remember. They’ll also enjoy the playful illustrations by Edwardian Taylor, which just add comedy to an already hilarious tale.It’s Not Jack and the Beanstalk will be released on September 19th, 2017 by Two Lions.Huge thanks to Josh Funk for sharing a copy of It’s Not Jack and the Beanstalk with our #bookexcursion group! #bookexcursion is a group of nine educators who read and share new children’s and middle grade titles.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Jack is not pleased with the narrator of this story who tells him to do things he would prefer not to like sell his cow, throw away the magic beans he got for the cow, and climb the beanstalk that will lead him to a giant's castle.
  • The Library Lady
    January 1, 1970
    This is the sort of fractured fairy tale that you wouldn't read to your 2 year old, or for that matter probably your 3 year old. But your older preschoolers and early elementary kids will cackle, and would cackle even if there were a few mild jokes of the sort boys love--as in "Beans make me toot." The illustrations are by another artist of the sort who has spent a lot of time in contemporary kids animation-- I knew that even before I checked the credits. Certainly not a book that the awards com This is the sort of fractured fairy tale that you wouldn't read to your 2 year old, or for that matter probably your 3 year old. But your older preschoolers and early elementary kids will cackle, and would cackle even if there were a few mild jokes of the sort boys love--as in "Beans make me toot." The illustrations are by another artist of the sort who has spent a lot of time in contemporary kids animation-- I knew that even before I checked the credits. Certainly not a book that the awards committees will put on their short lists--or their long lists--but just the sort of book kids really enjoy.
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  • Amber Webb
    January 1, 1970
    It's Not Jack and the Beanstalk was a fun twist on the classic fairy tale told from the perspective of the narrator with input from all the characters. The narrator isn't thrilled with the input which makes for a hilarious retelling of the story. Josh breaks away from his rhyming schemes to make this engaging and entertaining tale come to life. Edwardian Taylor does an amazing job with illustrations and brining out the details of the story. You won't want to miss this one from Funk!
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  • Carrie Charley Brown
    January 1, 1970
    Jack is a boy who is not afraid to speak what's on his mind. When the narrator's directions begin to lead him in directions he does not want to go, he stands strong and offers his honest advice (and ear for rhyme) to a giant in need. As it turns out, Jack is not the only one who doesn't like to be pushed in undesirable directions. And as all fairy tales seem to go, happy endings make the best of all.In a traditional story, a narrator usually doesn't interact with other characters. But author Jos Jack is a boy who is not afraid to speak what's on his mind. When the narrator's directions begin to lead him in directions he does not want to go, he stands strong and offers his honest advice (and ear for rhyme) to a giant in need. As it turns out, Jack is not the only one who doesn't like to be pushed in undesirable directions. And as all fairy tales seem to go, happy endings make the best of all.In a traditional story, a narrator usually doesn't interact with other characters. But author Josh Funk adds a unique metafiction spin when he plays with the story's structure. Jack and the narrator don't just communicate, they even disagree. It gets downright bossy at times and Jack is fully aware that he is in a story. I must disagree with Jack when he says, "This story keeps getting worse and worse." For readers, it just keeps getting better and better. Reader code for worse and worse is of course, tension, drama, and conflict. Yes! We crave it! We must have it! Without it, the story would be boring. There will be none of that in this story which begs to be read a loud. Step into character and be ready to perform. It's your chance to use two distinct main character voices... (Personally, I use an British announcer-ish voice (think Robin Leach) for the narrator and a pronounced nasal-ish tone for Jack. Oh, and a low moo voice for Bessy the Cow, a dreamy voice for Cinderella, and a booming voice for the Giant.)Paired with Edwardian Taylor's animated illustration style and lots of dialogue between characters, It's NOT Jack and the Beanstalk appeals to the reader just as a humorous video or television program would. And in this age of electronics and technology, it ought to earn high points with kids. Reaching the child reader's interest level is the key to transforming them into lifelong readers.
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  • Sheri
    January 1, 1970
    Poor Jack is caught in a re-telling of Jack and the beanstalk and it isn't going his way. He's disappointed with the beans for his cow and these cannot be eaten when he's hungry. A narrator within the story tells Jack what he has to do in this story and it is a fun take on the original. I would read both to children and compare and contrast in a lesson in differences. Bringing in another fairy tale and changing the ending is fun new take. And a child might like the new version better. Read it an Poor Jack is caught in a re-telling of Jack and the beanstalk and it isn't going his way. He's disappointed with the beans for his cow and these cannot be eaten when he's hungry. A narrator within the story tells Jack what he has to do in this story and it is a fun take on the original. I would read both to children and compare and contrast in a lesson in differences. Bringing in another fairy tale and changing the ending is fun new take. And a child might like the new version better. Read it and see what you think.
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  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely loved this story! It will work great for K-2nd grade. Super funny, great rhythm, nice illustrations. Can't wait to read this aloud.
  • Kirsti Call
    January 1, 1970
    This story had me and my kids laughing and wondering what could possibly happen next. I'm a huge fan of fractured fairy tales, and a huge fan of Josh Funk, so this book is a winner!
  • Lauren- The Smile Lines
    January 1, 1970
    Get ready to LAUGH! ✨It's Not Jack and the Beanstalk by Josh Funk is laugh out loud funny. First of all, if you put the words 'toot' and 'bum' and have a character in their underwear, my boys will roar laughing! This was such a great twist on Jack and the Beanstalk with a fun additional character, Cinderella. ✨I think I laughed more than my kids for the first read aloud because I caught onto the idea of a narrator telling the story and the characters having side chats with the narrator. ✨When we Get ready to LAUGH! ✨It's Not Jack and the Beanstalk by Josh Funk is laugh out loud funny. First of all, if you put the words 'toot' and 'bum' and have a character in their underwear, my boys will roar laughing! This was such a great twist on Jack and the Beanstalk with a fun additional character, Cinderella. ✨I think I laughed more than my kids for the first read aloud because I caught onto the idea of a narrator telling the story and the characters having side chats with the narrator. ✨When we read it again, the kids were laughing just as loud because I used different voices for the narrator and characters. They LOVED it!! The sarcasm and silliness is very clever throughout the entire book! ✨The illustrations, by Edwardian Taylor, jump right out at you. My boys kept commenting on how much they enjoyed the drawings! Pay close attention to the last pages. There are so many fun characters in the illustrations! ✨I taught third and fourth grade and can absolutely see students writing their own versions of classic tales with a narrator/character twist like this! It would be a great extension activity! I also think having children read different parts aloud would be a fun activity. Giving different parts to different readers. It would definitely be funny to listen to. ✨We just loved this book! Thank you to @kidlitexchange for providing me with a copy of this book. All opinions are my own.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    The storyteller of the regular story holds a conversational battle with Jack in this new tale by Josh Funk. That storyteller wants everything to remain the same, regular, old-fashioned story. Jack, the feisty character we haven’t know much about before except that he’s a sneaky thief, argues back, questions often, and remains the star no matter how the story changes. He really is poor but manages NOT to eat the beans. He isn’t exactly strong, yet somehow manages to climb that vine. And he forge The storyteller of the regular story holds a conversational battle with Jack in this new tale by Josh Funk. That storyteller wants everything to remain the same, regular, old-fashioned story. Jack, the feisty character we haven’t know much about before except that he’s a sneaky thief, argues back, questions often, and remains the star no matter how the story changes. He really is poor but manages NOT to eat the beans. He isn’t exactly strong, yet somehow manages to climb that vine. And he forgets to be sneaky (cheeky is a better description) and forgets what he should be stealing from the giant. In this same mode, Jack even manages to correct the giant’s poetry rhyming. Remember that “fee fi fo fum?” Jack’s right (or Josh Funk is right), the poem does not have a true rhyme--‘fum’ with ‘man’! Even the end is a conflict, but it all ends happily with cheery faces and delicious food. With Edwardian Taylor’s managing the bubble speeches within the cartoon-like illustrations, this is a delightful romp that expands an old fairy tale. He even manages a reunion of many storybook characters at the end. I laughed at the added parts, like Cindy saying hi and inviting Jack to a ball at the palace as he climbs the beanstalk or the “real” size of those three things Jack was supposed to steal from the giant. They say it’s all in the details, and Josh Funk and Edwardian Taylor added some extraordinary ones to this story.
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  • Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you @kidlitexchange for providing me with a copy of this book to read and review. All opinions are my own. My daughter and I absolutely love Josh Funk and have enjoyed reading several of his books numerous times. I was so excited when I heard about his new fractured fairytale. Retelling are my favorite in any genre and this one definitely didn’t disappoint. After reading it for the first time, my seven year old exclaimed that we needed to buy it and add to our collection. Can’t argue with Thank you @kidlitexchange for providing me with a copy of this book to read and review. All opinions are my own. My daughter and I absolutely love Josh Funk and have enjoyed reading several of his books numerous times. I was so excited when I heard about his new fractured fairytale. Retelling are my favorite in any genre and this one definitely didn’t disappoint. After reading it for the first time, my seven year old exclaimed that we needed to buy it and add to our collection. Can’t argue with that recommendation! It includes highlights from the original story that we are all familiar with. However, what happens when Jack doesn’t quite agree with the narrator. What if he doesn’t really want to climb the beanstalk or steal anything from that grumpy giant? This is sure to be an instant hit. Full of endless humor and fabulous illustrations. It’s a wonderful way to teach kids about the importance of a narrator or introduce them to the concept of perspective. It would be a fun selection to read aloud to a group and a great source for students as they study fairytales.
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  • Cindy Hudson
    January 1, 1970
    Jack really doesn’t want to sell Bessie the cow, but the narrator of his tale says he must, so he must. Then he wants to eat his magical beans, but the storyteller says he must throw them out the window. And when he discovers he must climb the gigantic beanstalk, he wants to grab his climbing gear.So goes the fractured fairy tale, It’s Not Jack and the Beanstalk by Josh Funk. Cinderella makes an appearance while Jack climbs, and he develops a rapport with the giant, who prefers to go by his name Jack really doesn’t want to sell Bessie the cow, but the narrator of his tale says he must, so he must. Then he wants to eat his magical beans, but the storyteller says he must throw them out the window. And when he discovers he must climb the gigantic beanstalk, he wants to grab his climbing gear.So goes the fractured fairy tale, It’s Not Jack and the Beanstalk by Josh Funk. Cinderella makes an appearance while Jack climbs, and he develops a rapport with the giant, who prefers to go by his name, which is Fred. It’s all good, silly fun that children are likely to love. Edwardian Taylor’s illustrations are whimsical and funny as they show Jack interacting with an animated cow, winking magic beans, and a vegan giant dressed up with a bow tie. Other fairy tale figures make an appearance in the final scene, and children should enjoy naming characters from other familiar tales. Expect lots of laughs.The publisher provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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