Love and Vandalism
Rory has a secret: she’s the vandal who paints graffiti lions all over her small town. If her policeman dad knew, he’d probably disown her. So when Hayes, a former screw-up on the path to recovery, catches her in the act, Rory’s sure she’s busted. Instead, he makes her a deal. If Rory shows him around town, he won’t turn her in. It might be coercion, but at least the boy is hot. As they spend more time together, Rory worries she made the wrong choice. Hayes has a way of making her want things she shouldn't want and feel emotions she's tried to bury. Rory's going to have to distance herself from Hayes or confront a secret she can't bring herself to face...

Love and Vandalism Details

TitleLove and Vandalism
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 1st, 2017
PublisherSourcebooks Fire
Number of pages320 pages
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Romance, Contemporary

Love and Vandalism Review

  • Kaylin
    May 28, 2017
    DNF @ 43% "Want to know what shade of brown my shit was this morning too, Dad? How about the scent of my farts?" I half stand and wave my hand behind me, as if offering him a waft from my butt. NopenopenopenopenopenopenopenopenopeI'm so done with thisLook, this idea is cute. But I feel nothing for the main character. She’s neither relatable or interesting. Instead, she spends all her time thinking about her art and how awful it is that her father (a cop) wants her to stop vandalizing property. DNF @ 43% "Want to know what shade of brown my shit was this morning too, Dad? How about the scent of my farts?" I half stand and wave my hand behind me, as if offering him a waft from my butt. NopenopenopenopenopenopenopenopenopeI'm so done with thisLook, this idea is cute. But I feel nothing for the main character. She’s neither relatable or interesting. Instead, she spends all her time thinking about her art and how awful it is that her father (a cop) wants her to stop vandalizing property. There doesn’t seem to be much of a plot, aside from a few “twists” that feel really gimmicky. The MC’s relationship with her mother and father could have been explored more in depth—instead, it was all about shock value. (Also didn’t reach this point, but I’m told a past rape is used as a similar plot twist.)And overall, she’s just crass. I don’t mind books with mature content or characters who speak like real people. But everything Rory says is some scathing retort that comes across absurdly… gross? Above quote is an example. I received an ARC of this through Netgalley. Thanks to Sourcebooks for the opportunity!
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  • Dreamingintherain
    April 24, 2017
    I received an ARC of Love and Vandalism via giveaway from the publisher, this in no way affects my review or thoughts on the book. Okay, so I've been insanely busy with finals, and still am to be honest, but I felt like I needed to say something about this book, so here we go. There are spoilers ahead, but only ones I felt that needed to be brought up due to problems with the book. Because of this, the rest of my review in hidden as a spoiler.To start off:TRIGGER WARNING: There's rape in this b I received an ARC of Love and Vandalism via giveaway from the publisher, this in no way affects my review or thoughts on the book. Okay, so I've been insanely busy with finals, and still am to be honest, but I felt like I needed to say something about this book, so here we go. There are spoilers ahead, but only ones I felt that needed to be brought up due to problems with the book. Because of this, the rest of my review in hidden as a spoiler.To start off:TRIGGER WARNING: There's rape in this book. I don't usually put trigger warnings because I usually feel like I'm not a good judge of what needs to be mentioned. However this book just sort of thrusts rape into the reader's face and has a description that could definitely really harm someone. The rape itself was just overall really poorly handled, but I'll get to that later. There's cultural appropriation too, but I don't know if that's something people tag for.(view spoiler)[I had really been looking forward to this book, it was pitched to have a more silly blackmail element and something I love, art. Love and Vandalism is pitched as a love story, both familial and romantic. Unfortunately, both of those fell flat for me. Overall the romantic elements weren't really there, Rory was just, to blunt, horny. Everyone else seemed to be too, for the most part I don't even think the characters even really liked each other until the last third of the book.Honestly, I don't blame them though. Part of the story falling so flat for me was the fact that I didn't really like any of the characters, they just felt unrealistic to me. However, some of them were just downright unlikable, like the main character, Rory. All she did was complain and belittle people, seeing herself as someone who's above them and sees the whole picture. She has reasons for her behavior and does actually grow out of it somewhat at the end, but it made the book really intolerable. Hayes was truly unbelievable, and he's fills out the "nice guy" role, but in the sleazy "nice guys finish last" way.Now, getting to one of the biggest issues I had with this book. Cultural appropriation. Now, I'm not black, so I can't speak for anyone other than myself because it's not my culture. If I'm saying something wrong or offensive, please let me know because that's not my intention in the least. To start off, the main character, Rory has dreadlocks. This is something that's mention many times throughout the book, as if it's something really unique and special because Rory is such a hipster. I have no problem with people having dreadlocks, but the way it was used essentially took something with cultural meaning and turned it into an edgy accessory for Rory. Rory, who was never mentioned to be black, was quite possibly one of the whitest characters I've ever read. I'm going to guess that my assumption of her race is correct because it's later mentioned that her name is "Rory Capers" both names having white roots. To add to this, Rory is running around town spray painting in her dreadlocks at night, laughing it off as if she's some cool tough girl. If this story was featuring a black teen running around spray painting at night, smoking weed and sleeping with strangers it would have had a whole different ending. Overall I felt as if the author was disrespecting black culture and turning it into something to make her boring white character interesting. Maybe I'm the only one who will see it that way, and like I said before I can only weigh in as a POC who isn't black, but reading this made me very uncomfortable and disappointed.Moving on to Big Problem #2, the rape situation was handled pretty poorly in my opinion. The author was having the MC 'open up' about herself and her past, and her rape came across as something used for more of a shock value than a sexual assault. Rather than having it as something Rory opened up about and then have a more open emotional side, the author used it as a ploy to make her act out yet again. In this instance her acting out causes Hayes to not talk to her anymore. He dumps her almost as soon as he finds out about her rape. Now, I don't think it's what the author intended in the least, but it came across as rape victims being too "broken" to be in a relationship. It also discredited the severity of sexual assault, the way it was quickly blown over.The last thing I have to bring up before this review comes to a close is Rory's father. Now, I know the book was told from Rory's point of view so you could say that things were shown from her perspective, but her father seemed like he was coded to be abusive. He never actually lays a hand on her, but throughout the book he's shown to be overbearing, aggressive and frightening enough to make Rory freak out constantly with worry. At one point it's even mention that he drop-kicked the neighbor's dog one time. In the end things come to a seemingly nice conclusion, but the way he came across as coded to be abusive and that it was acceptable made me feel sick. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Atlas
    April 30, 2017
    I roar and scream again and again until all the lions are overcome by my passion* * 2 / 5This was an odd book. It had one spectacular twist and some exploration of art, mental health, alcoholism, family relationships and the like, but there was also a whole load of eye rolling on my part and cringe-worthy scenes. Love and Vandalism is, in essence, a romance story. I sigh. I'm way to stubborn to be a true artist because I don't give a shit if he's dripping and deformed and his colours are all wro I roar and scream again and again until all the lions are overcome by my passion* * 2 / 5This was an odd book. It had one spectacular twist and some exploration of art, mental health, alcoholism, family relationships and the like, but there was also a whole load of eye rolling on my part and cringe-worthy scenes. Love and Vandalism is, in essence, a romance story. I sigh. I'm way to stubborn to be a true artist because I don't give a shit if he's dripping and deformed and his colours are all wrong, wrong, wrong; this lion is going to freaking roar at the break of dawnRory paints graffiti in secret, hiding her art from her (vaguely) abusive cop father. She spray paints roaring lions across the city as some sort of artistic therapy and teenage danger high. When she is caught spray painting by a stranger, Rory strikes a deal: Hayes won't turn her in and she'll show him all the best spots around town: the best restaurants, the most beautiful natural spots, the secrets the locals keep. He won't leave her along due to some perceived spiritual connection on his part. As a character, I found Rory a bit bland, to be honest. I read this book under a week ago and I'm having a bit of difficulty recalling much about her, other than that she loves art. She's gritty and brash and angry and impulsive. I've noticed that other reviewers don't much like the fact that she does weed and has sex - I can't say that this bothered me; I found Rory's character to be understandable, if a touch annoying. I found that I did prefer her to the love interest, Hayes. He's a weird variation on the nice guy trope with a penchant for talking about fate and sounding pseudo-spiritual. I wasn't really a fan of their romance; I wasn't convinced by them as a couple. Frankly, I think it would have been best for the pair of them to leave each other alone and go to therapy. Hayes only ever manages to upset Rory, whilst she's constantly risking his parole in order to satisfy her dream to paint a lion on the town's water tower. The best romance here is in the subplot between Rory's manager at the art store and her coworker. It's cute and nerdy and made me smile. "Our stars have aligned," Ken says. "Your Wars and my Trek."The art was the standout feature of this book for me. How it weaved it's way through Rory's life via her mother, how it impacted her childhood and the angry teenager she became. How it is now a sort of therapy for her. I was disappointed by the lack of actual graffiti-ing in Love and Vandalism. I wanted to know more about it! How do you create all the effects? How do you do it with a stencil by yourself? Rory's lions are pretty awesome and the ending scenes of this book involving graffiti are great and really heartwarming. This book is emotional and sometimes hard hitting in a good way. Unfortunately, I didn't much care for either of the two main characters, which dampened the joy I got from the artistic scenes.My thanks to Netgalley, the publisher, and the author for an ARC of this book. Read this review and more on my blog: http://atlasrisingbooks.blogspot.com/...
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  • Madison
    January 30, 2017
    Love and Vandalism is a surprising and heartfelt novel about art, family, emotional overload, and reconnecting.Rory creates her art in the dark depths of night, spray painting her lions onto vacant walls and overpasses. It helps her control her rage and rebel against her father. Art is the thing she has most in common with her artist mother. But Rory has a plan to escalate her art and paint a lion that is larger and far more visible than all her previous pieces. She knows she will need help to p Love and Vandalism is a surprising and heartfelt novel about art, family, emotional overload, and reconnecting.Rory creates her art in the dark depths of night, spray painting her lions onto vacant walls and overpasses. It helps her control her rage and rebel against her father. Art is the thing she has most in common with her artist mother. But Rory has a plan to escalate her art and paint a lion that is larger and far more visible than all her previous pieces. She knows she will need help to pull it off but the new guy in town is probably last on her list of limited choices. Never mind his city-boy looks and his determination to stay away from trouble (especially the illegal kind), it's enough that he is threatening to reveal Rory's identity as the lion graffiti artist if she doesn't show him around town. I really latched onto the first few pages of Love and Vandalism. The writing and story line drew me in. And while Rory at first seems like your average 'bad girl', she soon reveals plenty of hidden layers, secrets, and reasons for her actions. I have to admit that I wasn't all that impressed with Rory to begin with. Within the first chapter she heads to a strange guy's apartment to smoke drugs, so I wasn't sure how we were going get along. But I'm well aware that often characters who make puzzling and seemingly stupid decisions usually have an interesting and complicated story to tell. I figured Rory deserved to have her story told, and I'm very glad I kept reading because her story is as saddening as it is encouraging.While Rory might have initially been disconcerting the story very quickly grew on me. I had to add major awesome points for all the Narnia references. Hayes (aforementioned blackmailer) is a huge The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe fan and to him Rory's lions are a clear message. Rory thinks he is crazy. And Rory very quickly becomes a likeable character. Her level of skepticism is fantastic and her home life is both troubling and complicated. It definitely made me want to learn more about her. And I thought there was something suspicious about Rory's relationship with her mother, I just didn't expect THAT twist. Rory's relationship with her father is volatile, and their journey of learning to understand each other is an important part of this novel.Family relationships, grief, guilt, and uncontrollable emotions are huge and important themes in this story. As Rory tries on hold on and not explode with all the emotions she is keeping inside, she also has to try and not fall for the so-not-her-type, has-his-own-baggage, attraction-sparking Hayes. Their slide from casual observers to friends, all while trying to avoid becoming more-than-friends, is very enjoyable to witness and is the perfect contrast to Rory's personal and family issues. Love and Vandalism is complicated and provoking contemporary YA novel. The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library.
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  • Julie (*Happily Ever Chapter*)
    April 22, 2017
    I've never read anything from this author before, but I wanted to give this one a shot because I love books with artsy main characters, as I'm an artsy girl myself. I sadly didn't love it as much as I had hoped. I'm having issues gathering all of my thoughts on this one without giving too much away, so I will make a list. Everyone likes lists, right?!What I liked:I enjoy when books are able to surprise me, and I really didn't see a little twist coming with Rory's story. It happens fairly early I've never read anything from this author before, but I wanted to give this one a shot because I love books with artsy main characters, as I'm an artsy girl myself. I sadly didn't love it as much as I had hoped. I'm having issues gathering all of my thoughts on this one without giving too much away, so I will make a list. Everyone likes lists, right?!What I liked:I enjoy when books are able to surprise me, and I really didn't see a little twist coming with Rory's story. It happens fairly early (around 39%) too! I don't want to say too much and give it away.Things I didn't like:Rory. She was a very unlikeable character from the very being of the story and she never really got any better. When we first meet her she is smoking a bong and hooking up with a guy she's just met. She's pretty much a giant mess.Rory is extremely selfish. She knows that Hayes is on probation but constantly tries to guilt trip him into help her vandalize an advertisement that she doesn't like. There's also an occasion that she brings him somewhere when it's obvious there is going to be a conflict and he could get in trouble.There is little to no character growth. Rory has a lot of issues and Hayes has suggested that she seek counseling to help herself move past it and she never does. She also never becomes a character that thinks of anyone but herself. I wanted her to grow up a little bit. The girl doesn't think about her actions at all!The ending was really unrealistic. I think her dad would/should have handled it differently. I also highly doubt any dad would be completely okay with their daughter hanging out with someone with Haye's background. Whether he's getting help or not.I think this one was just a case of, it's not you it's me. I didn't absolutely love this one, but that doesn't mean you won't!* I received an ARC of this title via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. *
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  • Melanie
    April 14, 2017
    I don’t even know where to begin. I hate reviews with spoilers so I’m going to do my best to avoid any here. I’ve read quite a few books this year and just began reading ARCs, this is my third and by far my favorite.I guess the best place to begin is the beginning. Rory Capers, full of unexplained teenage angst, trying to figure out emotions that the reader can’t even begin to understand. Rory. Whose dad is a cop and doesn’t know that his daughter is a vandal. Rory. Who is denying a very real is I don’t even know where to begin. I hate reviews with spoilers so I’m going to do my best to avoid any here. I’ve read quite a few books this year and just began reading ARCs, this is my third and by far my favorite.I guess the best place to begin is the beginning. Rory Capers, full of unexplained teenage angst, trying to figure out emotions that the reader can’t even begin to understand. Rory. Whose dad is a cop and doesn’t know that his daughter is a vandal. Rory. Who is denying a very real issue.Hayes. Alcoholic, trying to work the AA system but forgetting that you can’t be by yourself forever. Hayes. Scratching at the surface of Rory’s secrets. Hayes. Wiggling into parts of Rory’s life that she’s not ready to let people into. Hayes. That understands for some people it just takes time.I started this book in the early afternoon knowing I wouldn’t have a ton of time to read it before life kicked into gear. I picked it back up after every one went to bed and finished it in just under four hours. The book surprised me. While parts are a corny teen romance there is so much more emotion hidden within the pages. Denial. Grief. Loss. Rage. I found myself heartbroken. When Rory discovers her dad’s secret I was devastated when the truth of the story was revealed. Thinking back all the signs are there, I just didn’t want to see them myself. I, like Rory, wanted a nicely wrapped story with a happily ever after.Once the secret was revealed I didn’t feel betrayed as one might expect. I felt relieved. It was a mix of emotions and an overwhelming sense of relief once you discover the secret for yourself. Relief that Rory wasn’t simply angry because of her father’s attitude and being able to see his side of the story as well really brought the story together for me.A mix of flirting, sadness, laughing and anger throughout the book made the characters likable and relatable. Getting to know the characters that seemed like background pieces through the first of the book made me enjoy the story even more.Love and Vandalism is a story about the human condition. Emotions we struggle to understand in the real world can almost laughably be under explained in a book but this book makes them feel real. The passion and rage that Rory feels is well described without over using “rage” and “angry”. The emotional descriptions are subtle and easily missed if you’re not paying close attention.The only thing I have left to say about this book is that I loved it. Every word was written with care to make sure that the reader is not overwhelmed by the anger and sticks with the story long enough to learn the cause. I love the references to Narnia, such a nostalgic part of my childhood and waiting for Aslan to come save me from some non-catastrophe in my child’s heart. The over all development of the storyline had me saying “one more chapter” until the very end. A well deserved five stars.To read all of my reviews, check out my website the-pink-moose.com
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  • Nayab
    May 9, 2017
    Love & Vandalism was mostly slow-paced, I thought about putting it down so many times but there was something about it that kept me reading up until about 60% in at least. I couldn’t read on after that.I tried, I really did. As much as it pained me to leave this book unfinished when I was so far in, I just couldn’t read on. I was still trying to “connect” with the female lead character at 60% in and to be honest, I wasn’t looking forward to finishing it so I put it down. Better that than to Love & Vandalism was mostly slow-paced, I thought about putting it down so many times but there was something about it that kept me reading up until about 60% in at least. I couldn’t read on after that.I tried, I really did. As much as it pained me to leave this book unfinished when I was so far in, I just couldn’t read on. I was still trying to “connect” with the female lead character at 60% in and to be honest, I wasn’t looking forward to finishing it so I put it down. Better that than to force myself to finish/read a book I wasn’t enjoying right?To be honest, I was a little iffy about Rory as early on as 5% in (when she talks about reading a fashion magazine “ironically”, I waited for the punchline but then realised the author/Rory was actually serious. Who says you can’t be an artist & love fashion at the same time?) but I decided to give her/the book the benefit of the doubt but I really should start believing my first impressions, they’d save me so much time.
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  • Zee Yasser
    May 26, 2017
    I hate Hayes.Thats it.I just find him so annoying that I practically had to force myself to complete the story just so I would know what happened to Rory.He just seems like the kind of person that would constantly blame Rory for everything in the futurs.
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  • Fahda
    April 22, 2017
    RTC
  • Kai
    May 6, 2017
    "No matter how hard our hearts are, they are all broken eventually by someone."Love and Vandalism could have been a quick and enjoyable read. It’s not one of the best or worse books I’ve read but I highly disagree with the way the author handled certain topics in her novel.I have to do a trigger warning here. This novel is very graphic in two scenes depicting suicide and rape. So graphic even, that I could be quite harmful for some readers.The plot is exciting and never really gets boring. We ha "No matter how hard our hearts are, they are all broken eventually by someone."Love and Vandalism could have been a quick and enjoyable read. It’s not one of the best or worse books I’ve read but I highly disagree with the way the author handled certain topics in her novel.I have to do a trigger warning here. This novel is very graphic in two scenes depicting suicide and rape. So graphic even, that I could be quite harmful for some readers.The plot is exciting and never really gets boring. We have a (very cliché) relationship, between a snarky and sarcastic girl and an overly charming but slightly broken guy. Not a very original or new concept, but hey, some people love this kind of romance. Our main character, Rory, has a few family issues, especially with her father, who banned her from creating art. As a result and as an act of rebellion, Rory runs around town and sprays graffiti lions on walls in the middle of the night. Her one big goal is to spray paint the water tower, where her lion will be seen from all around.When it comes to the writing, I loved Rory’s comebacks. I’m always a sucker for sarcastic dialogue. Oftentimes Rory is overly dramatic, though and it’s too much of a cliché. I think we’re past the point where we nod along when a character throws a fit or sulks because they got their feelings hurt and need some alone time for self-pity. It’s childish, and twelve year old girls reading this might not think about it too much, but overall it’s melodramatic and unrealistic. Same thing goes for those huge misunderstandings between a character and the love interested that could be solved in a minute if they would just talk. These are tools that have been overused, especially in the YA genre. I really cannot read one more "I’m not your little girl anymore!" But I think I just did.Spoiler alert:What really bothered me, though, is the way the author handled rape. It’s used as a plot point, only to further show the brokenness and sadness of the main character. It comes out of nowhere and really doesn’t fit in. It is wrong, to use something so terrible in such an off-hand way.The second thing that really has me worried is the way Rory’s mother staged her suicide, like it was an art project. Before slitting her writs, she stripped down, put on red lipstick and a pearl necklace, so as to look as dramatic as possible.I added a quote so you know what I’m talking about. The videos mentioned show Rory’s mother talking about art.“Monitors lined up in a row with her videos playing in a loop. Photographs of the crime scene blown up and arranged on the ground for visitors to either walk over or around as they choose. It would be a powerful installation.”This is honestly so sick. As if it’s not enough that this girl lost her depressed mother. Nope, this cold woman plans her suicide for weeks, tapes around 50 clips where she advises her daughter on what it means to be an artist, and makes her suicide an art installation. This reads like a glorification of suicide. Especially because the author fails to declare the wrongness of this act. It’s a complete no no.I’ve heard one reviewer voice her concern about cultural appropriation in this book, because the (supposedly) white main character has dreadlocks. I don’t agree. If she was wearing a hijab because she thought it was stylish, that would be wrong in so many ways. But dreadlocks don’t belong to a race. Please correct me if I’m wrong.In a nutshell: this could have been a simple and light read, if it wasn’t for the many concerning ways the author handled rape and suicide. When you write books for teenagers, keep in mind what message you are sending your readers, especially if they are easily influenced or triggered. Not everyone can distinguish between what is written and what is real or put controversial topics in a critical context.Find more of my books on Instagram
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  • Jackie
    May 11, 2017
    [Review posted on http://fictionistmag.com/]I actually started writing this review while I was still reading Love and Vandalism by Laurie Boyle Crompton. I just needed to gush about this book.I spent a few days slowly reading the first nine chapters or so, not really getting into the plot. I did like the main character, Rory, which is what kept me interested. Then, boom. The reason for Rory's character, the reason she paints badass lions all over her hometown, the reason her relationship with he [Review posted on http://fictionistmag.com/]I actually started writing this review while I was still reading Love and Vandalism by Laurie Boyle Crompton. I just needed to gush about this book.I spent a few days slowly reading the first nine chapters or so, not really getting into the plot. I did like the main character, Rory, which is what kept me interested. Then, boom. The reason for Rory's character, the reason she paints badass lions all over her hometown, the reason her relationship with her father went to shit, all of it is explained in one explosive confrontation. I felt that thing, that tug, telling me I needed to gobble down the rest of this book. Even though the main love interest kind of gets on my nerves. But, hey, that means the character has a personality. A personality I may not be attracted to, but a personality all the same. He isn't just your usual cookie-cutter fiction man. Which is good, because Rory isn't a typical princess-type, either. Nor is she of the magical, lost-princess variety. She is her own dreadlock-wearing, lion-painting self. Rory's character arc was also impressive. Not in an unrealistic way, either; Crompton makes Rory's character flaws and her arc very realistic. In fact,(view spoiler)[ Rory's description of her rape and her reaction to it were extremely accurate, and I felt Crompton handled it well. Rape isn't a back-alley affair. Rory didn't even fight after it became obvious that the boy wasn't taking no for an answer. He literally laughed at her when she said she changed her mind, and her brain decided to play dead (well, play sleeping) rather than try to fight, which is a realistic reaction if you have any first- or second-hand experience with survivors of assault or rape.It did bother me a bit that when Scott tries to hook up with Rory and pretty angrily shames her for not having sex with him. She holds her ground, which is good character development, especially since she tells him to his face that what he did was wrong. But it was sort of portrayed as a "boys will be boys" moment as well as a character development, "now she's confident enough to not be raped" moment. While I truly appreciate the positive examples that were set in Love and Vandalism, I think the idea that a woman has to be strong enough to not be raped sets a bad example for both sexes. We should be taught that men should be strong enough not to rape, and to respect consent (or lack thereof). It is not a woman's responsibility to be strong enough to keep fighting over and over. One 'no' should suffice. To be fair to Crompton, though, the scene was well-written, and it's hard to fit in a long essay about rape and sexism when you're writing a fiction novel. Rory's character development was still very impressive, and Scott's almost-assault getting swept under the rug isn't a huge issue with the book's plot or writing style. (hide spoiler)]Even as lover of YA fantasy, I appreciate Crompton's writing in Love and Vandalism. Once I hit that explosive "oh" moment, I finished the book in a couple of hours. I didn't want it to end. But end it did, and at least it wasn't a cliffhanger or some other kind of cruel ending. I am satisfied that Rory is picking up the pieces of her life and moving forward. In fact, it gives me hope. Crompton and all who lent her a hand in the publishing process have done an amazing job. Four solid stars from me.
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  • tracey
    May 13, 2017
    Love and Vandalism by Laurie Boyle Crompton is a perfectly quick, emotion-filled read. Heavily character driven and at times difficult to read because the characters themselves are dealing with issues that they aren't ready to reveal, this is ultimately an interesting read for those who enjoy a wide range of emotions from light-hearted joy and laughter all the way up to rage. It explores mental health, artistic release, vices, relationships... and yet with it being so heavy in context, there is Love and Vandalism by Laurie Boyle Crompton is a perfectly quick, emotion-filled read. Heavily character driven and at times difficult to read because the characters themselves are dealing with issues that they aren't ready to reveal, this is ultimately an interesting read for those who enjoy a wide range of emotions from light-hearted joy and laughter all the way up to rage. It explores mental health, artistic release, vices, relationships... and yet with it being so heavy in context, there is also a certain ease and lightness to the plot.The story, in short: angsty teenage girl vandalizes her town unbeknownst to her father, who is a police officer, and is busted in the act by a recovering alcoholic teenage boy who makes her feel things she doesn't want to feel or face (yet). Also be prepared for a nearly, if you are not paying attention, character reveal. Rory, the teenage girl in question, isn't what you would call a teen role model. She has some incredibly questionable and destructive behavior. However, her drive to spray paint in the middle of the night isn't one of the destructive behaviors exactly. It is more of a healthy expression of what she is feeling. Her character becomes more likable and relatable as the story continues and Hayes, the love interest, helps her to see things (including her choice of painting a lion) in a different light. Overall I found the book to be interesting and engaging. I liked it in the way that I like a not often told, but predictable, comfortable to read, angsty teen romance. 3/5 stars.Note: Thank you to Sourcefire Books and NetGalley for a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Amanda
    May 14, 2017
    I recieved an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Love and Vandalism introduces us to Rory, a fiesty teenage artist always equipped with a spray can and a sarcastic remark. She deals with her teenage angst and feelings by painting secret graffiti art around her small town, until one day the mysterious new guy in town, Hayes, catches her in the act. Instead of turning her in to her policeman father, who has forbidden her art, Hayes essentially blackmails Rory into being his new tou I recieved an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Love and Vandalism introduces us to Rory, a fiesty teenage artist always equipped with a spray can and a sarcastic remark. She deals with her teenage angst and feelings by painting secret graffiti art around her small town, until one day the mysterious new guy in town, Hayes, catches her in the act. Instead of turning her in to her policeman father, who has forbidden her art, Hayes essentially blackmails Rory into being his new tour guide around town.I loved Rory. I usually have trouble relating to the female characters in books. They are always plain, yet special. Young, yet wise beyond their years. Naive, yet able and strong. Rory is almost none of those things. She is impulsive and reckless and thoughtless. She is sarcastic, selfish and emotional. SHE IS A TEENAGER. And the most realistic depiction of a teenager i have read in awhile. It's a beautiful thing.Rory's relationships with Hayes and her father also progressed wonderfully throughout the book. There was actual emotional growth in both relationships and the ending wraps up nicely with no cliffhanger. The real star of the book in my opinion though, were Rory's painted lions. They were described in such depth and emotion, I could actually picture them. I especially loved the ending, when Rory is on the water tower and she sees in her mind all her lions throughout the town rise up and face her. It was beautiful and I cried with her at the end (It was a good cathartic cry-It was not a sad book).
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  • Eileen (BookCatPin)
    May 8, 2017
    Love and Vandalism was a good read. It tackled some hard topics which I felt were done realistically. The characters weren't the easiest to like but I genuinely wanted them to find closure and happiness.I really like the way the writing was set up to reveal certain aspects of the story. I knew something was off but we don't grasp what it is right away. The story slowly brings the twists out- that moment of clarity where you realize there are valid reasons as to why the characters were acting out Love and Vandalism was a good read. It tackled some hard topics which I felt were done realistically. The characters weren't the easiest to like but I genuinely wanted them to find closure and happiness.I really like the way the writing was set up to reveal certain aspects of the story. I knew something was off but we don't grasp what it is right away. The story slowly brings the twists out- that moment of clarity where you realize there are valid reasons as to why the characters were acting out. Their actions and behaviour were justified.Rory was a really prickly character. I didn't like her hot and cold attitude but I think that's exactly what made her relatable. She's far from perfect but she never stops trying to do what she feels is right for her. Her fears kept her emotions at bay and it wasn't until she met Hayes that she starts to really feel. He woke her up as he tried to help her face her problems head on.Hayes blackmailing Rory started off innocently enough. He acted on the pull he felt towards her not realizing she might be a lot more than he could handle at that moment in his life. He was strongly persistently to begin with so I was disappointed when he made some tough decisions. I want to say he was selfish but he had a right to protect and think of himself first. As it turns out he always had Rory's best interests at heart and does end up redeeming himself in her eyes.The setting in Love and Vandalism sounds incredible. The ice cave, waterfall and more sound amazing. Not to mention Rory's artworks! I wish I could see her lions in real life! So many sights and wonders to behold. I don't blame Hayes for wanting a tour guide to show him around. I'd want a tour too!I love the unexpected teamwork in Love and Vandalism. Rory wasn't alone and she knows it by the end. It's good to see she has friends she can count on regardless of their relations. There was also a side couple that was surprisingly cute. I also very much enjoyed the tension between Rory and Hayes. The mutual attraction was palpable every time they were in proximity of each other. I like how things worked out.Love and Vandalism recognized mental health issues and had a very positive portrayal for me. The story's not too heavy and features beautiful artwork and sceneries. Hear the lions roar ;)
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  • Mel Black
    June 1, 2017
    Netgalley's eArc in exchange for an honest review. Stars: 2 I had hight hopes for this book. The cover looks amazing and the title sounded like a perfect summer read.Sadly, unfinished summer read.The book is so slow paced, with scenes jumping from scene to scene. It sounded boring and odd.I've gone to check for the other reviews and sadly they didn't encourage me to further reading of this book.
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  • Sara
    March 16, 2017
    I received an ARC on Netgalley and here's my review. So, well.. actually I don't know where to start. The book was good. Interesting. Intense. Well written. I just... guess it was different from what I expected. I didn't like Rory for the first half of the book. She was really annoying and treated everyone like [email protected] I didn't like that side of her. Even knowing why she was so angry and scared to love anyone, it was still too much. I'm glad she worked it out at some point. Hayes.... there were ti I received an ARC on Netgalley and here's my review. So, well.. actually I don't know where to start. The book was good. Interesting. Intense. Well written. I just... guess it was different from what I expected. I didn't like Rory for the first half of the book. She was really annoying and treated everyone like [email protected] I didn't like that side of her. Even knowing why she was so angry and scared to love anyone, it was still too much. I'm glad she worked it out at some point. Hayes.... there were times I liked him and other times he got on my nerves. He acted really selfish and hurt Rory really bad. I seriously wanted to slap him. Is it crazy that I liked Scott much more than Hayes at some point? I found him really cute. And a really good friend. Kinda hot too. I liked Kat and she also was a really good friend to Rory. So, all in all a nice read.
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  • Deena Lipomi
    February 27, 2017
    VOYA review to come!
  • Maureen
    January 14, 2017
    When Rory is caught by Hayes spray painting a graffiti lion, little did either of them know how quickly their troubled lives were about to connect. Rory is an artist whose fathers forbids her to paint. Hayes is an alcoholic on the road to recovery. As the story unfolds, layer by layer Hayes and Rory's pasts are peeled away until we meet two very vulnerable teens who can actually make each other whole. Laurie Boyle Crompton has written a gritty female protagonist who will leave readers cheering h When Rory is caught by Hayes spray painting a graffiti lion, little did either of them know how quickly their troubled lives were about to connect. Rory is an artist whose fathers forbids her to paint. Hayes is an alcoholic on the road to recovery. As the story unfolds, layer by layer Hayes and Rory's pasts are peeled away until we meet two very vulnerable teens who can actually make each other whole. Laurie Boyle Crompton has written a gritty female protagonist who will leave readers cheering her on, hoping she will forge a relationship with Hayes and repair the relationship with her police sargent father. The result is satisfying. Edelweiss provided this Egalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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  • HNGC Library
    December 18, 2016
    Rory spray paints lions on various surfaces around her town. She does this to honor her mother, release her aggression and get back at her father. Rory's father, a police sergeant, has forbidden Rory to express herself via any artistic medium. Rory doesn't believe that art is a problem and has a dream to paint a huge lion on the city water tower. Along the way she meets Hayes, a teen who has his own set of issues. While there is potential in Love and Vandalism (or Graffiti Love-as the book is ti Rory spray paints lions on various surfaces around her town. She does this to honor her mother, release her aggression and get back at her father. Rory's father, a police sergeant, has forbidden Rory to express herself via any artistic medium. Rory doesn't believe that art is a problem and has a dream to paint a huge lion on the city water tower. Along the way she meets Hayes, a teen who has his own set of issues. While there is potential in Love and Vandalism (or Graffiti Love-as the book is titled here in Goodreads), it is an uneven book.
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  • Naruto4Hokage(Jessica)
    June 7, 2015
    I'm so excited to read this! I've been reading Laurie's works ever since she published Blaze! :)EDIT:OMFG. It's so close now!!!! I'm so excited for this book to kick 2017's butt!
  • Amanda Coppedge
    November 28, 2016
    Loved this story about a girl using subversive art therapy on herself.
  • Olivia Farr
    April 6, 2017
    “Love and Vandalism” was not what I expected from the synopsis. This isn’t really a book about crime and punishment or about blackmail. It’s really a book about redemption and personal growth. Rory is a vandal in her spare time, painting beautiful lions around town with spray paint. She hides this from her father, who is not only very anti-art but also a policeman. She and her father have been very distant for the last year or so, and Rory’s choices have not always been the best. This new boy, H “Love and Vandalism” was not what I expected from the synopsis. This isn’t really a book about crime and punishment or about blackmail. It’s really a book about redemption and personal growth. Rory is a vandal in her spare time, painting beautiful lions around town with spray paint. She hides this from her father, who is not only very anti-art but also a policeman. She and her father have been very distant for the last year or so, and Rory’s choices have not always been the best. This new boy, Hayes, suddenly starts showing up everywhere and catches her painting one of her lions. They are undeniably attracted to each other, but both seem reluctant to give in to their feelings (a theme throughout the book).Things are not as simple as they seem, and as we read more and more, we learn a lot more about Rory and her family’s history plus about Hayes and his history that make each character much deeper and the story much more difficult (emotionally) to read. The book really grew on me- although I was a little worried from the get-go (when Rory goes to some random guy’s house to hook up and smoke pot) about how I would be able to connect with this character, I found that the story and personality became more clear as we learn more and more about her. This was an emotionally difficult book to read- it confronts/presents suicide, drunk driving, alcoholism, rape, and drugs. Neither the questions nor the answers in this book are simple. This book is really only appropriate for older audiences. That being said, it is really well written- we witness a lot of character growth and rebound/recovery. As Rory and Hayes pick up the pieces of their own lives, we view a lot of healing and progress- not always pretty, but it’s there the same. The way that this growth/emotion is reflected in Rory’s art is really beautiful. I feel like overall the really huge issues that this book tackles were handled well- the mistakes the characters make are acknowledged as such and become a platform for learning/nothing is glorified or treated with too much levity. It’s a heavy read- but definitely worth it.Overall, this is a really poignant tale of healing and recovery. Although it’s not a light-hearted/summery read, it is difficult to put down and highly memorable- a book that is worth a read and maybe even a re-read. Please note that I received an ARC from the publisher through netgalley. All opinions are my own.
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  • Sumaya Musse
    April 15, 2017
    Really liked this book! For a full review, follow the link: https://suereadingcorner.wordpress.co...
  • Alia Therese Lazo
    April 29, 2017
    Letting go doesn’t mean that you forget them and the memories you have with them. It means you are able to live and laugh a little despite the pain they left you. In a quiet town, the lions painted on the walls roar of a loud emotion of one artist who seeks to leave not only a mark in town but on other lives as well. When Rory was finally caught by Hayes, she thought her graffiti painting days was over only to be surprised by a deal Hayes proposed. He wouldn’t tell her secret if she would sh Letting go doesn’t mean that you forget them and the memories you have with them. It means you are able to live and laugh a little despite the pain they left you. In a quiet town, the lions painted on the walls roar of a loud emotion of one artist who seeks to leave not only a mark in town but on other lives as well. When Rory was finally caught by Hayes, she thought her graffiti painting days was over only to be surprised by a deal Hayes proposed. He wouldn’t tell her secret if she would show him around town. When she accepted the deal, she didn’t expect her world to be shaken. Maybe she got more than she bargained for. The plot was interesting and the conflicts presented as the book went on was realistic and heart-breaking. The way the author handled a few of the issues that came up was great. The writing was quite easy to follow and get lost in. The main character Rory was fiery, passionate about art and isn’t someone who got close with people. She was stubborn at times especially toward her dad and somehow I was glad that at the end, she became a better person without losing who she was which is a big problem for me in some of the books I read. Hayes was jolly, stubborn and was afraid of becoming who he was in the past. I liked how he never gave up on Rory even though she pushes him out of her life. As the story progressed, his character was developed greatly and (view spoiler)[I was satisfied and happy that they ended up together.(view spoiler)[The romance in the book didn’t give an insta-love vibe for me. The author took it in a pace that wasn’t to slow that it bore me or to fast that it would become unrealistic.Overall, it is one of the best books I have read this year.Warning: There are a few scenes that may or may not trigger you. If you are someone who gets triggered easily or has a feint heart, I would suggest you to read slowly and carefully or with an open mind. Also there are a few curse words.I received an ARC from the publisher from Netgalley. I thank them for sending this wonderful book to me. (hide spoiler)] (hide spoiler)]
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  • Samantha Myers
    April 12, 2017
    I received an ARC copy of this book via Netgalley and SourceFire Books in exchange for an honest review. I think this book is more about growth than some other form of cliche romance that occurs in a lot of books. While this story has romantic parts I actually think of this book as Rory's story. It's a lot more than your usual contemporary YA Lit novel which is always a welcome surprise. The family dynamics take center stage in this novel and then, even after the plot twist, you're also experien I received an ARC copy of this book via Netgalley and SourceFire Books in exchange for an honest review. I think this book is more about growth than some other form of cliche romance that occurs in a lot of books. While this story has romantic parts I actually think of this book as Rory's story. It's a lot more than your usual contemporary YA Lit novel which is always a welcome surprise. The family dynamics take center stage in this novel and then, even after the plot twist, you're also experiencing Rory's slow come around to being likeable as the story goes on. So while it might be easy to dislike her in the beginning of the book it's a huge change by the time the novel ends. It's a good change. Rory has her art as an emotional outlet and when she encounters Hayes, (I enjoyed the Narnia bits), the story goes to more than friends for the two of them in a very slow believable way that didn't feel tacked on or added to the story as an after thought. But, as I said above I liked that this read more as an emotional journey rather than a usual YA Lit novel.Would recommend to others looking for a mix of both genres as it's a great mixture of YA Lit as well as one characters own personal growth.
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  • Jessica
    April 18, 2017
    Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC! Well, this one was a disappointment. The characters and "love" was flat. The story line felt weak. I called what was going on with the mother pretty early, and I got sick of the main character just as early. She was not a teen you sympathize with, even if she's being difficult. She's not a teen you hope good things for, even if she's being a jerk to everyone. She's just difficult...and a jerk. I also found some things about the AA process a little unrealistic. I' Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC! Well, this one was a disappointment. The characters and "love" was flat. The story line felt weak. I called what was going on with the mother pretty early, and I got sick of the main character just as early. She was not a teen you sympathize with, even if she's being difficult. She's not a teen you hope good things for, even if she's being a jerk to everyone. She's just difficult...and a jerk. I also found some things about the AA process a little unrealistic. I'm not an expert, but I feel like you can't just be -boom!- through the last few steps of the process as quickly as you want. Also, she doesn't want anyone to know about her mission, and then suddenly it's like everyone knows. It just all went along with the overall feel of the book. No police officer father or employer or friend would be so clueless that she's vandalizing so hard core. Honestly. This one just fell short in many ways. 1.5 stars
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  • Elaine
    May 1, 2017
    This is an engaging, emotive story of teenage angst and turmoil, rebellion and reconciliation, grief and loss, romance and family. Trying to issue warnings without giving spoilers away, the story does involve alcoholism, rape, graffiti, suicide, death, grief and different forms of rebellion. The two main characters have dramatic pasts which are seriously impacting both their attitudes and behaviours.Rory is rebellious, determined to prove her independence, self reliance and that she's in full co This is an engaging, emotive story of teenage angst and turmoil, rebellion and reconciliation, grief and loss, romance and family. Trying to issue warnings without giving spoilers away, the story does involve alcoholism, rape, graffiti, suicide, death, grief and different forms of rebellion. The two main characters have dramatic pasts which are seriously impacting both their attitudes and behaviours.Rory is rebellious, determined to prove her independence, self reliance and that she's in full control, even when she really isn't. It is her way of coping with tragedies and has been for more than eighteen months. Hayes has revelled but is now living with the consequences and is determined to make the right choices, even when that is difficult. He's recovering, but isn't there yet. He is seriously attracted to Rory and her lions, even though he acknowledges she could be detrimental to him but he also wants to help her heal and to get to know her.Their relationship is a real roller coaster ride, with so many twists and turns it feels in danger of derailing at times. As the story progresses, the reader discovers he reasons from their pasts which have influenced them both. The journey to a possible HEA has so many obstacles but love and art are the key. I have to say that Rory's Mum's constant strive for perfection and her messages are so focuss d that I can understand why her Dad was so worried about Rory! The ending is a brilliant one, helping to show that love and friendships are key.I found this a very different, totally enthralling read and highly recommend it to adults as well as YA readers. I'll certainly look out for more by his author in future! I was gifted a copy of this book via NetGalley. This is my honest opinion after choosing to read it.
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