Near & Far
Known for combining natural foods recipes with evocative, artful photography, New York Times bestselling author Heidi Swanson circled the globe to create this mouthwatering assortment of 120 vegetarian dishes. In this deeply personal collection drawn from her well-worn recipe journals, Heidi describes the fragrance of flatbreads hot off a Marrakech griddle, soba noodles and feather-light tempura in Tokyo, and the taste of wild-picked greens from the Puglian coast. Recipes such as Fennel Stew, Carrot & Sake Salad, Watermelon Radish Soup, Brown Butter Tortelli, and Saffron Tagine use healthy, whole foods ingredients and approachable techniques, and photographs taken in Morocco, Japan, Italy, France, and India, as well as back home in Heidi’s kitchen, reveal the places both near and far that inspire her warm, nourishing cooking.From the Hardcover edition.

Near & Far Details

TitleNear & Far
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 15th, 2015
PublisherTen Speed Press
Rating
GenreFood and Drink, Cooking, Cookbooks, Nonfiction, Food, Travel

Near & Far Review

  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    I got about 68% of the way through this one and gave up. The food pictures were good but there were a lot of other travel pictures that were blah. I could live with that but very few of the recipes were actually enticing enough for me to want to try them, which defeats the purpose of a cookbook. Maybe it was just me, but this isn't a cookbook that I would buy or recommend. I received an arc copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you NetGalley!
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  • Lara
    January 1, 1970
    I've subscribed to Swanson's blog for a long time, liking the sound of her recipes, but never getting around to making any. Reviewing her new cookbook through NetGalley was a great excuse for me to try her ideas out. This book is a collection of vegetarian recipes that she enjoys at home in San Fransisco (Near) and from (or inspired by) her travels in Morocco, Japan, Italy, France, India, and en route (Far). I made three and found all to be quite good. The Ricotta Breakfast Bowl is easy to put t I've subscribed to Swanson's blog for a long time, liking the sound of her recipes, but never getting around to making any. Reviewing her new cookbook through NetGalley was a great excuse for me to try her ideas out. This book is a collection of vegetarian recipes that she enjoys at home in San Fransisco (Near) and from (or inspired by) her travels in Morocco, Japan, Italy, France, India, and en route (Far). I made three and found all to be quite good. The Ricotta Breakfast Bowl is easy to put together and tasty. It is also easy to adapt to taste through using different nuts, dried fruits, or sweeteners. The Nori Granola sounded too intriguing to pass up, so I made a batch. It is spicy and slightly sweet. The nori adds a bit of the unusual and also helps to bridge the flavors. I gave some to my mother, who used it as a salad topping and said it was wonderful. As a topping the spicy heat was mitigated, so she wasn't bothered by it. Finally, I made the Cauliflower Pasta using gluten-free egg noodles. I had some zaatar, so didn't make my own from her recipe. It was mild and subtly flavored. My husband wasn't feeling well, but enjoyed it and asked for the leftovers the next day. All three recipes were clear, with accurate ingredient lists and instructions. Her side notes and descriptions help to give ideas for ways to use the recipes beyond the basic description. My main concern with the book was the number of ingredients that are less common in the typical US grocery store. Many recipes called for ingredients that are found in specialty or ethnic stores, which may not be available in smaller cities and towns. Also, some of the ingredients are on the expensive side. However, the book does not include a list of known mail order sources. All of the recipes include metric measurements. Not all recipes have photos, but the photos that are included are lovely, as expected from her blog. She also includes some basic recipes for supporting foods such as dashi and brown rice. Overall, it is a lovely book with an eclectic range of recipes and flavors. I'd recommend it to any serious vegetarian looking to add interest and variety while keeping to whole foods.
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  • Lynne
    January 1, 1970
    An amazing book with very inventive recipes! The first half consists of items that can be made with items from most farmers' markets. The second half is divided into sections from countries the author has visited. Including France, Italy, Japan, India and Morocco. There is also a section with recipes to make before you travel to eat while traveling. At the beginning of each chapter is a list of pantry items to keep on hand for impromptu cooking. Weather you cook or not, this book is enjoyable fr An amazing book with very inventive recipes! The first half consists of items that can be made with items from most farmers' markets. The second half is divided into sections from countries the author has visited. Including France, Italy, Japan, India and Morocco. There is also a section with recipes to make before you travel to eat while traveling. At the beginning of each chapter is a list of pantry items to keep on hand for impromptu cooking. Weather you cook or not, this book is enjoyable from the tone to the photography (even in the electronic version!). Thank you Net Galley for the ARC!
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  • Caroline
    January 1, 1970
    Oh man. I really wanted to like this. It is such a pretty cookbook. And I really like Heidi Swanson's recipes. Some of the recipes in her previous book, Super Natural Every Day, are recipes that I use on a weekly basis, so I was excited to see what I could add to my recipe box.There were so many issues that I had with this book. First, I really don't like Swanson's cookbook voice and it was really easy to ignore in her other cookbook, but here it is harder. It's as if Heidi Swanson lives on a di Oh man. I really wanted to like this. It is such a pretty cookbook. And I really like Heidi Swanson's recipes. Some of the recipes in her previous book, Super Natural Every Day, are recipes that I use on a weekly basis, so I was excited to see what I could add to my recipe box.There were so many issues that I had with this book. First, I really don't like Swanson's cookbook voice and it was really easy to ignore in her other cookbook, but here it is harder. It's as if Heidi Swanson lives on a different planet. It's a beautiful planet, but not one that I recognize. The recipes are written differently and not in a good way. In Super Natural Every Day it felt like the recipes were written for the home cook and were very easy to adapt if you were missing an ingredient. Whereas in this book, the instructions were fussy and the ingredient list was much more exotic, which I guess is some of the appeal of the book, being the "far" part of the title. There was one recipe that asked for tomatillos and the instructions said to look for tomatillos with a purple blush. I don't know about you, but my tomatillos come from the grocery store and they're always green. Super Natural Every Day just seemed more down to earth. One of the recipes I made, the Squash and Wild Rice Soup, was just so watery and unsatisfying. I had to go back for 3 servings because it was like sipping at brown water. The taste was also just so bland even with all the garnishes she recommends. I've made better winter squash soups using far less ingredients and simpler techniques. I think this cookbook is in the same category of Isa Does It by Isa Moskowitz, which I read back in 2014: just disappointing.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    The photos are beautiful but I found it hard to compile many of the ingredients in my somewhat podunk town. Also, I didn't find myself inspired by very many recipes. Loved the two previous cookbooks but this one felt half-inspired.
  • Madeleine
    January 1, 1970
    If you make only one recipe in this cookbook, make the edamame mint spread. It’s simple, healthy, and a little bit special—like most of the recipes in this book. I know this because in the last 9 months I’ve cooked my way through all but a handful of the dishes.The recipes are ordered by locale: watermelon radish soup and root donburi are in the Japan section; France has a wine-washed arugula salad with ripped croissant instead of croutons. Ordering recipes by place means that there’s no clear i If you make only one recipe in this cookbook, make the edamame mint spread. It’s simple, healthy, and a little bit special—like most of the recipes in this book. I know this because in the last 9 months I’ve cooked my way through all but a handful of the dishes.The recipes are ordered by locale: watermelon radish soup and root donburi are in the Japan section; France has a wine-washed arugula salad with ripped croissant instead of croutons. Ordering recipes by place means that there’s no clear indicator of the season: You have to do your own detective work to figure out when yellow wax beans will show up at your market.There’s also the trouble of finding ingredients locally when your recipes are from far-flung places. I was fortunate, for the first 6 months of cooking, to live within walking distance of Korean and Turkish grocers. If you’re more reliant on a standard supermarket, you may have trouble finding yuba skins, shiso leaves, or preserved lemon. Some of these ingredients could be skipped (basil instead of shiso), but others were critical—preserved lemons, for example, really elevated the dried fruit salad.The recipes are all vegetarian, but they still manage to feel luxurious. I struck out just a few times with the slightly bland leek soup and the far too weird radishes with nori butter—but touches of saffron and smoked paprika and ricotta kept other dishes lively. I wouldn’t recommend Heidi Swanson for beginners, but for cooks who are comfortable with substitutions and imprecise instructions, this is a beautiful and memorable book.
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    This is my favorite book of Heidi's so far. Her recipes and photos are artwork. She makes gorgeous food that also happens to be vegetarian. Not everything is to my taste. Practically speaking, I'll probably only cook 25% of what's in here, but the book is inspirational. The location-based organization of the recipes was fun. I appreciate that she provides substitutes for hard-to-source ingredients; it gives me an idea of what the original ingredient is like, and a workaround for things I can't g This is my favorite book of Heidi's so far. Her recipes and photos are artwork. She makes gorgeous food that also happens to be vegetarian. Not everything is to my taste. Practically speaking, I'll probably only cook 25% of what's in here, but the book is inspirational. The location-based organization of the recipes was fun. I appreciate that she provides substitutes for hard-to-source ingredients; it gives me an idea of what the original ingredient is like, and a workaround for things I can't get in my area. Things to try:SF:- red lentil hummus - spring carrots and beans (old favorite from her blog)- buttermilk cakes- baked oatmeal - whole wheat waffles- turmeric teaEn route:- chive dumplings- spring rolls (or components)Morocco- beghrir- saffron honey- saffron tagine- harira- roasted winter squash Japan- turmeric miso soup- brussels sprouts- simmered winter squashItaly- Fiasco-style fagioli- Eggs in purgatoryFrance- baby artichoke salad- lettuce hearts with melted butterIndia- vaghareli makai- saag paneer- rasam- makhaniya lassiextras- cultured honey butter.
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  • Mia
    January 1, 1970
    I was provided with a copy of this book as an advance e-reader copy to provide an honest and fair review. Not that I needed to be given an ARC to review this book. I love Heidi Swanson's blog and recipes.Although several recipes call for ingredients that may be hard to find depending on where you live, there are almost always online sources. This cookbook is more a travel diary of her adventures around several countries and her home in northern California. I am drawn to the recipes from North Af I was provided with a copy of this book as an advance e-reader copy to provide an honest and fair review. Not that I needed to be given an ARC to review this book. I love Heidi Swanson's blog and recipes.Although several recipes call for ingredients that may be hard to find depending on where you live, there are almost always online sources. This cookbook is more a travel diary of her adventures around several countries and her home in northern California. I am drawn to the recipes from North Africa but in this cookbook, I have found myself wanting to make them all. The super simple recipes in this cook book call for using the freshest and best ingredients you can find. Take the time to get to know your local farmers at the farmers market. They will help you with what you need to have for cooking at its best.Even if you never cook a single recipe out of this cookbook, it is the perfect book for an arm chair traveler to explore other cultures. The best way to learn about a culture is to learn about how it prepares food.
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  • Ann
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeous as expected, haven't had time to try the recipes yet.
  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    Swanson's narrative is one of privilege, it is true. A lot of the reviews at Goodreads have mentioned this, with varying degrees of annoyance. The book, however, does not pretend. The minute you touch the embossed hard cover and look at the photos, you know that this is a chichi cookbook (although the recipes are simple), not Betty Crocker's Cookbook or The Joy of Cooking. The subtitle does not lie: "Recipes Inspired by Home and Travel." And traveled she has: India, Japan, Morocco, France, and I Swanson's narrative is one of privilege, it is true. A lot of the reviews at Goodreads have mentioned this, with varying degrees of annoyance. The book, however, does not pretend. The minute you touch the embossed hard cover and look at the photos, you know that this is a chichi cookbook (although the recipes are simple), not Betty Crocker's Cookbook or The Joy of Cooking. The subtitle does not lie: "Recipes Inspired by Home and Travel." And traveled she has: India, Japan, Morocco, France, and Italy. The photos of the destinations are sometimes so artsy as to feel contrived, but they anchor each section in its own ethos. I haven't yet made any of the recipes, but I am inspired. As a committed omnivore, vegetarian recipes rarely inspire me, but I find her approach to flavors intriguing. If you are someone who likes hunting down interesting ingredients, you will likely enjoy this book. She isn't writing for someone who does not know anything about ethnic foods, so you will not find explanations and definitions for a lot of the ingredients. I think she could have done more in that regard, and it was a missed opportunity. Overall, however, this is a beautifully produced cookbook, with accessible-but-not-accommodating prose. I'm looking forward to digging in to the recipes.
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  • Jennifer Harvey
    January 1, 1970
    This book is amazing. I recommend any home chef to own this little beauty. The pantry staples are so simple, the recipes are so relatable and you can actually cook the food in your everyday life (I am particularly fond of the Saffron Honey recipe and use that stuff on EVERYTHING). Not just that though, Swanson includes with every recipe a worldly story of how she came to try the food for the first time. It immerses you in steamy markets in India, bustling airports of San Francisco and truly brin This book is amazing. I recommend any home chef to own this little beauty. The pantry staples are so simple, the recipes are so relatable and you can actually cook the food in your everyday life (I am particularly fond of the Saffron Honey recipe and use that stuff on EVERYTHING). Not just that though, Swanson includes with every recipe a worldly story of how she came to try the food for the first time. It immerses you in steamy markets in India, bustling airports of San Francisco and truly brings life to a recipe book. If you love food, beautiful photography, amazing tactile quality and a lust for adventure you will love this cookbook. Must have.
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  • Janel Gradowski
    January 1, 1970
    Ms. Swanson was one of the first food bloggers who I ever started following, years ago. This cookbook features recipes inspired by her life at home in northern California and by her travels in Morocco, France, India, Italy, and Japan. I love it! All of the recipes are vegetarian. While many are simple they also focus on quality ingredients. The photographs are gorgeous too. It’s like taking a foodie trip around the world with glimpses into the author’s life.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    Just not my kind of cookbook. The ingredients are too hard to source without going to great lengths (ordering online? visiting your amazing California farmer's market or local Southeast Asian specialty shop?) and I kept on wanting to add more protein to the recipes. Perhaps a shredded vegetable with a sprinkling of almonds and a complex sauce would suffice for you, but I need a bit more to sustain me more than an hour or two.
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Quite refined, the tone bordered on superiority. Many ingredients were inaccessible on a normal shopping day, and some of the technical side of recipes made me feel gastro-stupid. The implication throughout the book was that most people can travel the world, pick out exotic ingredients from exotic markets and then make simple satisfying dishes in their pied-a-terre. Irritated me.
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  • Catherine
    January 1, 1970
    I've found the recipes to be hit or miss, but I love how the book is structured: by destination, with a list of pantry ingredients for each locale. This is less of a reference and more of an inspiration to travel, cook, and eat.
  • Reza Islam
    January 1, 1970
    Heidi Swanson
  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    the stories paired with stunning photography accented by the recipes, OMG! I want to cook everything in this book!
  • Simonew
    January 1, 1970
    Love Heidi Swanson's recipes. Lovely book
  • Juli Anna
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very pretty book, containing quite a few inspired recipes. In general, the ingredient lists tend to be a little too daunting to make it 100% accessible to the home cook, but it's great for inspiration. The recipes seem well balanced and hearty, although I would often classify them as "project recipes" as far as their labor goes. But Swanson has a keen eye for fresh flavor combinations that don't feel gimmicky, and that makes for some pleasant browsing here.
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  • Nora St Laurent
    January 1, 1970
    This book reminds me of a T.V. show I enjoy called Parts Unknown by Anthony Bourdain. He travels the world showing audiences different cultures and their food. Heidi Swanson loves to travel and samples the cultures food on her adventures. She keeps a journal of her travels that include newspaper clippings, photos, stamps, lists, sticky notes reminding her of the trip. The author says, “Every place has its own, always evolving culinary voice…it’s not just ingredients and flavors, but also techniq This book reminds me of a T.V. show I enjoy called Parts Unknown by Anthony Bourdain. He travels the world showing audiences different cultures and their food. Heidi Swanson loves to travel and samples the cultures food on her adventures. She keeps a journal of her travels that include newspaper clippings, photos, stamps, lists, sticky notes reminding her of the trip. The author says, “Every place has its own, always evolving culinary voice…it’s not just ingredients and flavors, but also techniques, traditions and vessels.”This book seems to be set up as if you were peeking into her travel journals. There are notes and photos woven in-between interesting and yummy looking recipes. This hardback book is filled with color pictures of recipes and those of her travels. Heidi says, “This book is divided into two major sections – Near and Far. The near section focuses on recipes inspired by my life in San Francisco and northern California. Far is divided into five chapters Morocco, France, India, Italy and Japan…within each chapter recipes are organized starting with lunch, moving on to dinner, drinks and treats…It is understood in many cultures that food is powerful medicine, with whole or natural foods being the most beneficial, interesting and delicious…” She encourages readers to get the best food they can find because it’s worth it. That’s another thing I liked about this book. I can go on her travels with her experiencing the food and different cultures along the way. I like how the author explains a little about the dish and why it works. I found it interesting that the ingredient measurements in every recipe are broken out in cups, ounces and grams. Most of the ingredients in this book are easily obtainable and her instructions are easy to follow. Many recipes have helpful notes from the author that make the recipe easier and/or give readers an added bonus.I want to travel but haven’t be able to. This book has helped me take a virtual trip with the author as she shares about her journey and a little bit about the culture and traditions of the countries she’s gone to. This is a book you’ll enjoy reading as much as trying the recipes. It’s a win, win. This book is a keeper.Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a complimentary copy of this book from Blogging for Books site. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising”Nora St LaurentTBCN Where Book Fun Begins! www.bookfun.orgThe Book Club Network blog www.psalm516.blogspot.comBook Fun Magazine www.bookfunmagazine.com
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  • Jo Young Switzer
    January 1, 1970
    My husband and I are drawn to cookbooks, and it was no surprise to find this under the tree this Christmas. It is a beautiful book -- artistic & colorful photographs, elegant paper, a nice "feel." Swanson has organized the book by her journeys -- starting in San Francisco and moving through Morocco, Japan, Italy, France, and India. As a result of the locations of her travels, the recipes are wildly varied as are the ingredients. In each location, she provides recipes and beautiful photograph My husband and I are drawn to cookbooks, and it was no surprise to find this under the tree this Christmas. It is a beautiful book -- artistic & colorful photographs, elegant paper, a nice "feel." Swanson has organized the book by her journeys -- starting in San Francisco and moving through Morocco, Japan, Italy, France, and India. As a result of the locations of her travels, the recipes are wildly varied as are the ingredients. In each location, she provides recipes and beautiful photographs of a combination of the "basics" of the cuisine as well as more contemporary recipes. Each chapter (representing a location) also has a list of pantry basics. Even those simple lists are informative about the cultures -- and also helpful to readers who need to know if they can find the ingredients where they live. The recipes include both U.S. measures and also metric system amounts. This is simultaneously helpful and confusing. Over all, this is a lovely book with a wide variety of recipes.
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  • Heidi
    January 1, 1970
    Makes me want to buy some plane tickets!
  • Nick Klagge
    January 1, 1970
    Heidi Swanson is a mainstay of my wife's blog feed, and I often end up reading her posts as well. She is probably the most consistent source of recipes (or, to put it more broadly, meal ideas) that have ended up being a hit with us. She, along with Tamar Adler, is probably the food writer whose tastes and sensibilities we most identify with. So it's no surprise that I liked this book. True, there are a lot of pretty pictures, which is not my favorite way for a cookbook to be. But there is a ton Heidi Swanson is a mainstay of my wife's blog feed, and I often end up reading her posts as well. She is probably the most consistent source of recipes (or, to put it more broadly, meal ideas) that have ended up being a hit with us. She, along with Tamar Adler, is probably the food writer whose tastes and sensibilities we most identify with. So it's no surprise that I liked this book. True, there are a lot of pretty pictures, which is not my favorite way for a cookbook to be. But there is a ton of stuff that looks great. We already made one recipe out of it, the Moroccan harira soup, which is great. (We had already made it or a version of it based on a blog post of hers before.) But by far the most appealing section of the book for me was the Japan section. I really wanted to make everything in it, especially the savory breakfasts. I also want to find the guy that she bought togarashi shichimi from when we go to Kyoto!
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Cookbook author of 101cookbooks.com. My favorite blog for vegetarian recipes. I love Heidi Swanson's inspiration for cooking, eating and food in general. I have never had a fail from any of her recipes. This cookbook is beautiful and offers many delicious recipes. For my personal tastes (I unfortunately don't have the opportunity to travel much) steer away from some of the more exotic international inspired dishes. I love the photography, layout of the book, she usually offers an alternative ing Cookbook author of 101cookbooks.com. My favorite blog for vegetarian recipes. I love Heidi Swanson's inspiration for cooking, eating and food in general. I have never had a fail from any of her recipes. This cookbook is beautiful and offers many delicious recipes. For my personal tastes (I unfortunately don't have the opportunity to travel much) steer away from some of the more exotic international inspired dishes. I love the photography, layout of the book, she usually offers an alternative ingredient if you can't find one that is unavailable...and even though I just said I avoid some of the international dishes, I still find that I am much more willingly to try something new because of Heidi's endorsement.
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  • Lili
    January 1, 1970
    From Netgalley for a review:I love cookbooks, hate to cook and rarely ever use them for cooking, but I love reading about food. It is alchemy in a modern time, it is the ability to travel far and wide without actually having to travel, let's face it, food is really kinda cool. This cookbook was a blend of travel journal and of course food, taking us on a journey to the author's favorite places in food. There were lots of color photos of the food, making them look quite delicious, also photos of From Netgalley for a review:I love cookbooks, hate to cook and rarely ever use them for cooking, but I love reading about food. It is alchemy in a modern time, it is the ability to travel far and wide without actually having to travel, let's face it, food is really kinda cool. This cookbook was a blend of travel journal and of course food, taking us on a journey to the author's favorite places in food. There were lots of color photos of the food, making them look quite delicious, also photos of the author's journey in an old photograph (or new filter) style.The food looks inspiring, and the recipes are very clear. I was especially intrigued by the food from Japan and Morocco!
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  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    This is definitely not one of my favorite cookbooks. The cover is quite lovely, so if the only purpose were to sit on my shelf with my other collection of cookbooks, this would be top notch. But once I open it up, I'm not very impressed. The recipes are not ones I'm interested in trying, for the most part. But even worse than that, for me, is the photos. Half of the recipes don't have an accompanying picture. Instead, it is some travel photo, and even those are not to my taste. They just don't t This is definitely not one of my favorite cookbooks. The cover is quite lovely, so if the only purpose were to sit on my shelf with my other collection of cookbooks, this would be top notch. But once I open it up, I'm not very impressed. The recipes are not ones I'm interested in trying, for the most part. But even worse than that, for me, is the photos. Half of the recipes don't have an accompanying picture. Instead, it is some travel photo, and even those are not to my taste. They just don't translate well for a cookbook. This is not one I'd recommend. I received this book from Blogging for Books in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a fan of Swanson's blog but this particular cookbook is full of ingredients in unusual places and photographs that don't particularly add to the text. Swanson's writing is sweet and nostalgic and she clearly loves each place she writes about and the recipes she is presenting. There is much of her heart in here. But every single recipe has ingredients that are difficult to find if you don't live in a diverse area. I appreciate she doesn't mix and match ingredients and cultures but that also d I'm a fan of Swanson's blog but this particular cookbook is full of ingredients in unusual places and photographs that don't particularly add to the text. Swanson's writing is sweet and nostalgic and she clearly loves each place she writes about and the recipes she is presenting. There is much of her heart in here. But every single recipe has ingredients that are difficult to find if you don't live in a diverse area. I appreciate she doesn't mix and match ingredients and cultures but that also does lead to multiple 'pantries'. This is so well written but I was sad about not being able to cook from it.
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  • Heidi Pepin
    January 1, 1970
    I went into this book really hoping to like it and walked away disappointed. I was overwhelmed at the sheer number of ingredients I've never even heard of (yuba skins, anyone?) and that was a big turnoff. I like to try new things but it has to be things available to me. I am on the East Coast, so maybe that's part of the problem, but I felt the recipes with ingredients I could find were few and far between. The pictures are lovely and several recipes did catch my eye, like the Strawberry Salad, I went into this book really hoping to like it and walked away disappointed. I was overwhelmed at the sheer number of ingredients I've never even heard of (yuba skins, anyone?) and that was a big turnoff. I like to try new things but it has to be things available to me. I am on the East Coast, so maybe that's part of the problem, but I felt the recipes with ingredients I could find were few and far between. The pictures are lovely and several recipes did catch my eye, like the Strawberry Salad, Ricotta Breakfast Bowl, and Salt Baked Sweet Potato.Overall, disappointed.
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  • S Vanorse
    January 1, 1970
    Only found two recipes that I would be even remotely interested in trying. The pages in this book are extremely difficult to turn, they stick together which makes it difficult to go through the book. I personally did not care for the photography.Nice clear ingredient list and good assembly instructions with a nice lead into each recipe. A lot of the ingredients I would never find in my neck of the woods but Swanson does give alternatives for a lot of those.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Swanson at her most rarefied, privileged, and precious. Alas, because Supernatural Everyday is my go-to cookbook. Local eating so quickly degenerates into pure snobbishness, and that's very much what seems to have happened here. I'm glad to have some of these recipes, but as a whole this collection is just so twee and self-congratulatory.
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