Notorious RBG
You can't spell truth without Ruth.Only Ruth Bader Ginsburg can judge me.The Ruth will set you free.Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg never asked for fame she was just trying to make the world a little better and a little freer. But along the way, the feminist pioneer's searing dissents and steely strength have inspired millions. Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, created by the young lawyer who began the Internet sensation and an award-winning journalist, takes you behind the myth for an intimate, irreverent look at the justice's life and work. As America struggles with the unfinished business of gender equality and civil rights, Ginsburg stays fierce. And if you don't know, now you know.

Notorious RBG Details

TitleNotorious RBG
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 27th, 2015
PublisherDey Street Books
ISBN-139780062415837
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Biography, Feminism, Politics, History, Audiobook

Notorious RBG Review

  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    For every millennial who thinks Lena Dunham is an important feminist, pick up this tidy gem of the feminist movement and fucking digest. Ruth Bader Ginsburg is bae.
  • Petal X
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not a feminist although I was once until I realised that I didn't want to stop at having equal opportunities and rewards in a man's world. I wanted the world to become more female-centric. Women and men are quite different in many ways, we have strengths and priorities and ways of working things out, and now we've tried the man's way, let's move on to the women's. When I read that Ruth Bader Ginsburg said, "“Women will only have true equality when men share with them the responsibility of br I'm not a feminist although I was once until I realised that I didn't want to stop at having equal opportunities and rewards in a man's world. I wanted the world to become more female-centric. Women and men are quite different in many ways, we have strengths and priorities and ways of working things out, and now we've tried the man's way, let's move on to the women's. When I read that Ruth Bader Ginsburg said, "“Women will only have true equality when men share with them the responsibility of bringing up the next generation.” I thought yes! This is how I feel, that men must come into the women's world and that all of us must have an equal opportunity to fulfill ourselves regardless of sex (and race, etc). Bader wants those equal opportunities to extend to everything whether it is time off for both men and women for child care, to insurance, to the military and most important of all the right to decide what to do with our own bodies. Men don't face the awful choice of what to do with an unwanted pregnancy. Twenty years or more of raising a child or abortion. Men don't face it because they can leave the mother of their child and only pay child support. For perhaps the majority of women this will either be an inadequate sum or nothing at all. But women's wombs are owned by the government and to Bader this is wrong, women must have the right to have an abortion if they choose. Bless her for fighting so hard. Like Bader I support all feminist issues unlike Bader, my support is minimal, just how I treat people, but she really gets things done. I believe her influence goes far beyond the US because the world looks to the US for progress whether or not they approve of it.Could she have done so much on her own? She never needed to find out. Her husband, whom she always described as her partner, was her support whether it was giving up his job to follow her (which she also did to follow him) or to do the cooking and child care, he was there. They were there for each other. And perhaps that is the ultimate microcosm of how the world should be, we support and encourage each other in what we want to do and forget about gender differences and who is "supposed" to do what.If I was into tattoos, which I'm not, I'd have Notorious RBG on my forearm, to remind me to act with courage, and without rancour against those who disagreed with me.
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  • carol.
    January 1, 1970
    I'm still mad at RBG.Appointed by Clinton in 1993, Ruth was only the second female on the Supreme Court (That's right, kids: the mens used to think that mixing a career and family was too much for us. It wasn't until 1993 that we had enough juice to play in the most powerful court. Did you vote for Hilary?). Ruth Bader Ginsberg has acquired a bit of a cult following since then, perhaps because our perceptions of both petite, reticent women, and elderly women don't always square with the powerhou I'm still mad at RBG.Appointed by Clinton in 1993, Ruth was only the second female on the Supreme Court (That's right, kids: the mens used to think that mixing a career and family was too much for us. It wasn't until 1993 that we had enough juice to play in the most powerful court. Did you vote for Hilary?). Ruth Bader Ginsberg has acquired a bit of a cult following since then, perhaps because our perceptions of both petite, reticent women, and elderly women don't always square with the powerhouse legal mind and workhorse Ruth so obviously is. The book, Notorious RBG, came out of a Tumblr started by two women who admired her work, particularly her dissenting opinions when the Supreme Court eroded the Voting Rights Act. (http://notoriousrbg.tumblr.com/)Notes about the book: structurally, it reminded me of a cross between the 'Dummies' series of books and a biography. The biographical bits were broken down by subject focus, such as her very early years, academic life, family life, her work pre-Supreme Court, her relationships with other Court members, and her relationship with her husband. Being older and of a more traditional literary discipline, I tend to like my biographies to follow along a more chronological order. I feel it builds a better conceptual idea of how someone becomes who they are. Instead, it jumped around, mentioning her academic work in that section, but then talking more about the personal sacrifices in the family section. So it didn't work as well for me. I appreciated the authors' attempts to make law more interesting and to provide some historical context, but inclusions often made the topical sections feel even more disjointed. For instance, one chapter has a timeline of major decisions affecting women, and one has a short brief she wrote with red notations on the side, commenting on Ruth's paper. I greatly appreciated the collected pictures, both personal and professional. So here's the deal: I'm irritated as hell she didn't step down during President Obama's second term, particularly as a person who believed that cultural change comes from small, progressively stacked, well-founded decisions. The trend of the country was obvious. She had faced two cancer diagnosis and turned 80 his second term. Had she retired as Sandra Day O'Connor did after dealing with breast cancer, she would have had a solid 20 years on the court and a remarkable career by anyone's definition. But no one--not even powerhouses--lives forever, and I felt like she had a duty to her feminist, populist and legal principles to ensure a better successor than one we will be likely to get. However, in context of her life, it absolutely makes sense from her perspective, that of a woman who is passionately dedicated to law. She worked while her children were young, at one point trading positions with her husband so he could stay home with the kids and support her. I can't remember, but believe she either worked the day he passed or the day of his funeral. She was meticulous, thoughtful, and prepared. I think she's an amazing person, but a truly noble act would have been to help shift the court away from the conservative legal minds who erode her own goals.
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  • Iris P
    January 1, 1970
    Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg “So now the perception is, yes, women are here to stay. And when I’m sometimes asked when will there be enough [women on the Supreme Court]? And I say when there are nine, people are shocked. But there’d been nine men, and nobody’s ever raised a question about that.”“Women will only have true equality when men share with them the responsibility of bringing up the next generation.” Ruth Bader Ginsburg ************************************** Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg “So now the perception is, yes, women are here to stay. And when I’m sometimes asked when will there be enough [women on the Supreme Court]? And I say when there are nine, people are shocked. But there’d been nine men, and nobody’s ever raised a question about that.”“Women will only have true equality when men share with them the responsibility of bringing up the next generation.” Ruth Bader Ginsburg *********************************************Let me first say that reading Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg didn’t make me a Ginsburg fan, I was already one, so from that perspective author Irin Carmon was really preaching to the choir.But it wasn’t until I read this short, very entertaining biography that I realize how much this woman had accomplished even before she got appointed as only the second woman Justice to the US Supreme Court by former president Bill Clinton.When I thought of Feminist icons the names that came immediately to mind were the likes of Simone de Beauvoir, Betty Friedan, Gloria Steinem or Maya Angelou. I have to say that Ginsburg was not at all on that list. Written by Irin Carmon with the collaboration of blogger Shana Knizhnik - both well known Millennials - I was frankly expecting “Notorious RBG” to be an enjoyable, mildly informative, but ultimately skin-deep account of the life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg.I found the structure of the book a little sloppy and disorganized, but "Notorious RBG" actually ended up exceeding my expectations and providing interesting details about the life and career of Justice Ginsburg. A young Ginsburg with daughter JaneThe moniker Notorious RBG** comes from a Tumblr website launched in 2013 by Shana Knizhnik after the Supreme Court voted to gut an important provision of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Shortly after, the website went viral and Ginsburg became the most unlikely of internet celebrities. She also found herself hailed as the champion of many progressives causes in the United States.During her famous dissent on that VRA case, Ginsburg’s rhetoric was exceedingly critical of the courts' conservative wing, “Hubris is a fit word for today’s demolition of the VRA,” she wrote. Concluding that racial discrimination is a thing of the past made as much sense as “throwing away your umbrella in a rainstorm because you are not getting wet”.I get a kick reading the metaphors Justices use to explain their decisions, particularly Scalia’s, someone should compile them and put them in a book!Please do not let Ginsburg’s height (5’1”) or her pleasant demeanor deceived you. This woman has survived cancer, heart surgery and the death of her beloved husband. During one of the interviews with Carmon, she mentioned that her exercise routine includes doing 20 pushups, although she qualified this by saying that her personal trainer allows her to split the pushups in two sets of ten, ok then!The first few chapters of "Notorious RBG" cover Ginsburg’s family background, the beginnings of her career and her marriage to Martin Ginsburg, who was also a lawyer and died in 2010. The Supremes- The Four Women of the Court From left to right: Sandra Day O'Connor (1rst woman Justice -now retired), Sonia Sotomayor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg & the youngest member of the court, Elena Kagan The Ginsburgs were married for 56 years and had one of those wonderful marriages that also worked as a business partnership. Reading about how they met, the love they shared and how much they complemented each other was very touching and uplifting.Mr. Ginsburg, a successful lawyer in his own right once proclaimed “I think that the most important thing I have done is enable Ruth to do what she has done.” What a guy! I guess is true when they say " behind every great woman, there's a great man", oh no wait...A good portion of the book is dedicated to Ginsburg’s career, touching in some of the landmark cases she has been involved with. This is where you get to learn about her remarkable legacy, particularly in fighting for equal rights for women (and men) in the workplace.I found it fascinating to learn about Ginsburg’s though process to her judicial philosophical approach. She considers herself a “judicial incrementalist”. “General change in our society, is incremental”, she had said, “I think real change, enduring change happens one step at a time”.Her rise as an icon of the left is the more remarkable because in the past her cautious approach has garnished her deep criticism, particularly from some prominent feminist activists. The next chapters cover her 13 years serving on the Court of Appeals; the politics behind her nomination and her final ascend to become the first Jewish American woman on the US Supreme Court. Justice Ginsburg has adopted TV's Judge Judy's custom to wear a lace collar over her black robeNotorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, was an inspiring and entertaining read. This woman is shrewd and fearless and at 82 apparently has no plans of slowing down anytime soon. If you are searching for a full-fledged Ginsburg’s biography, I don’t believe this book is what you are looking for, I’d recommend borrowing a copy from your public library.If on the other hand, you want a primer on the life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg I think "Notorious RBG" is a perfect way to get introduced to this remarkable lady. **If you are un-schooled on all things hip-hop, the title Notorious RBG is a reference to Notorious B.I.G., a famous rapper who was murdered in 1997.Here's a link to the "Notorious RBG" popular Tumblr website:http://notoriousrbg.tumblr.com/
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  • Tamara Kramer
    January 1, 1970
    This delightful book is a love letter to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. A well-written look into the work she has done on behalf of women for the past 55+ years (it was conversational while obviously incredibly well-researched, and as a reformed lawyer I appreciated the way the authors described the legal system in a way that was both accurate AND accessible), as well as a beautiful tribute to her marriage to Marty Ginsburg. I cried several times, was inspired to fight harder for the things I beli This delightful book is a love letter to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. A well-written look into the work she has done on behalf of women for the past 55+ years (it was conversational while obviously incredibly well-researched, and as a reformed lawyer I appreciated the way the authors described the legal system in a way that was both accurate AND accessible), as well as a beautiful tribute to her marriage to Marty Ginsburg. I cried several times, was inspired to fight harder for the things I believe in, and couldn't put it down. Having this story in my life for the past few days has been so much fun.
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  • Jamise // Spines & Vines
    January 1, 1970
    I originally gave this delightful book a 4 star rating. As I started thinking of my review an overwhelming sense of enjoyment came over me as I remembered my feelings as I read this story. Therefore, I'm changing my rating to 5 stars.Notorious RBG gives you a glimpse inside the life and iconic career of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. After reading this book, my level of respect for Justice Ginsburg deepened. She's a true feminist who has lived her life as a die hard champion for civil rights, wome I originally gave this delightful book a 4 star rating. As I started thinking of my review an overwhelming sense of enjoyment came over me as I remembered my feelings as I read this story. Therefore, I'm changing my rating to 5 stars.Notorious RBG gives you a glimpse inside the life and iconic career of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. After reading this book, my level of respect for Justice Ginsburg deepened. She's a true feminist who has lived her life as a die hard champion for civil rights, women's rights and the less fortunate. Her journey is truly amazing given the many struggles she had to triumph. Her perseverance is a reminder to never give up on your dreams, stand up for what you believe is right and keep pressing forward.Honestly, I was initially intrigued by the cover art because seeing Justice Ginsburg wearing that tilted crown instantly reminded me of a photo of The Notorious B.I.G. I picked up the book and when I saw that each chapter was titled after lyrics by the late rapper (one of my favorites by the way), I was sold. My next thought was how can the authors possibly pair these two figures? Well, let's just say the authors did an awesome job marrying the titles to the content that was presented for each chapter. Such a fun book to read while you also gain a little knowledge...."and if you don't know, know you know!"Table of Contents:1. Notorious2. Been in this game for years3. I got a story to tell4. Stereotypes of a lady misunderstood5. Don't let 'em hold you down, reach for the stars6. Real love7. My team supreme 8. Your words just hypnotize me9. I just love your flashy ways10. But I just can't quit
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  • Ian
    January 1, 1970
    I suspect I'm giving 5 Stars to RBG rather than the book. What a woman. I don't cheer at the end of movies. I think it's dumb. I just want to say, "They can't hear you!!!"But I felt like cheering after reading a few of her dissents. She's all class....and I guess the book is okay.
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  • Taryn Pierson
    January 1, 1970
    I had just finished listening to Notorious RBG when news broke of Antonin Scalia’s death, and I’m glad for it, because I had a much more nuanced reaction than I would have had without the benefit of the insider knowledge Carmon and Knizhnik provide about the unlikely friendship between outspoken Reagan appointee Scalia and surprise feminist icon Ginsburg. It would have been much easier to write Scalia off as a blowhard conservative (which part of me still believes he was), but clearly RBG saw so I had just finished listening to Notorious RBG when news broke of Antonin Scalia’s death, and I’m glad for it, because I had a much more nuanced reaction than I would have had without the benefit of the insider knowledge Carmon and Knizhnik provide about the unlikely friendship between outspoken Reagan appointee Scalia and surprise feminist icon Ginsburg. It would have been much easier to write Scalia off as a blowhard conservative (which part of me still believes he was), but clearly RBG saw something in her colleague, because they were good friends despite their frequent and vehement disagreements on the law. I’m increasingly drawn to non-fiction for my audio reading, particularly books that focus on people who have lived extraordinary lives, and RBG has certainly done that. I was both amazed and frustrated to learn how hard she had to work to get where she is—and she still comes up against doubters and naysayers, even after all these years of proving herself. Although I could never match her passion for the law or relentless work ethic, I enjoyed reading about them, in much the same way I'd enjoy a book about an ultramarathoner. It left me with a feeling of, “Wow, I would never in a million years want to live my life that way, but I'm so glad you have!”More book recommendations by me at www.readingwithhippos.com
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book! Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is such an inspiring person — she's spent much of her law career working toward empowering women and seeking gender equality. This book is filled with good stories and photographs about RBG's life. My favorite parts were about her experiences as a female law student, the gender discrimination cases she's worked on, and stories about her marriage to Marty, who was by all accounts an amazing husband and partner. I highly recommend this b I loved this book! Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is such an inspiring person — she's spent much of her law career working toward empowering women and seeking gender equality. This book is filled with good stories and photographs about RBG's life. My favorite parts were about her experiences as a female law student, the gender discrimination cases she's worked on, and stories about her marriage to Marty, who was by all accounts an amazing husband and partner. I highly recommend this book to those interested in the women's movement or the Supreme Court.Favorite Quotes"The study of law was unusual for women of my generation. For most girls growing up in the 1940s, the most important degree was not your B.A., but your M.R.S.""In my life, what I find most satisfying is that I was part of a movement that made life better, not just for women. I think gender discrimination is bad for everyone, it's bad for men, it's bad for children. Having the opportunity to be part of that change is tremendously satisfying. Think of how the Constitution begins. 'We the people of the United States in order to form a more perfect union.' But we're still striving for that more perfect union. And one of the perfections is for the 'we the people' to include an ever enlarged group."
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  • Kelli
    January 1, 1970
    I didn’t love the structure of this book, mostly because it was very reminiscent of a textbook and also, I didn’t really get the Notorious B.I.G. piece. I understood it but I didn’t really get how it added anything. Then again, I’m not the intended audience. RBG is a badass. She deserves all respect, attention, accolades and (potentially) her cult status. I’d rock an RBG t-shirt. I’m not sure why she didn’t in the photos. That would’ve been epic!5 stars for the woman, 3 stars for the book.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    This was a selection of one of my book clubs. I admit it's not a book I would have chosen to read on my own. And it starts off very dry. Still, it does a good job of conveying her ideas on how the law should work and how it should be changed, especially why Roe v. Wade continues to be at risk of being overturned. So many of both the cases she argued and the ones she opined on concern women’s equality issues. The Chapter on her marriage is guaranteed to bring a smile to your face. And then a few This was a selection of one of my book clubs. I admit it's not a book I would have chosen to read on my own. And it starts off very dry. Still, it does a good job of conveying her ideas on how the law should work and how it should be changed, especially why Roe v. Wade continues to be at risk of being overturned. So many of both the cases she argued and the ones she opined on concern women’s equality issues. The Chapter on her marriage is guaranteed to bring a smile to your face. And then a few tears. She was truly blessed to have Marty as a husband, as he was to have her as a wife. The first time I read that at one point in time, women weren't allowed to tend bar, I found it interesting. But after I'd read the same comment from about the fifth time, I wanted to tell the author to find a new point to make. This is a short book and can be read in a few hours. There seems to be more appendix than actual book.
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  • Rachel Reads Ravenously
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars! “The pedestal upon which women have been placed has all too often, upon closer inspection, been revealed as a cage.” It's hard for me to put into words what this book means to me. Many of you know I am a liberal and a feminist, so me enjoying this book is not a great surprise. I am not normally a nonfiction reader, but I devoured this book. I found myself slamming my finger on certain sentences and saying out loud "yes, exactly this" or actually physically rolling my eyes at some of 5 stars! “The pedestal upon which women have been placed has all too often, upon closer inspection, been revealed as a cage.” It's hard for me to put into words what this book means to me. Many of you know I am a liberal and a feminist, so me enjoying this book is not a great surprise. I am not normally a nonfiction reader, but I devoured this book. I found myself slamming my finger on certain sentences and saying out loud "yes, exactly this" or actually physically rolling my eyes at some of the things cited in this book about how women and minorities were (and are) treated.RBG lives a fascinating life, from her roots of being among the first group of women to attend law school, her love story with her husband Marty, the small cases she fought for equal gender writes, to being a lonely woman on the Supreme Court after O'Connor left. Since this was published in 2015 I also became stressed out when reading it because we have had some changes since then and I am worried for what is to come. That a lot of hard work for gender equality will be thrown down the drain.Anyway, I can see why people thought this was dry, the beginning was a slow read. But if you are even slightly interested in learning more about RBG, her life and her beliefs this is a wonderful book to read. “I think that men and women, shoulder to shoulder, will work together to make this a better world. Just as I don’t think that men are the superior sex, neither do I think women are. I think that it is great that we are beginning to use the talents of all of the people, in all walks of life, and that we no longer have the closed doors that we once had.” Follow me on ♥ Facebook ♥ Blog ♥ Instagram ♥ Twitter ♥
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  • Trish
    January 1, 1970
    It is hard to argue with Antonin Scalia when he described Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg as “an intelligent woman and a nice woman and a considerate woman—all the qualities you like in a person.” Add to that, she is a persistent person and a principled person and a fair person—all the qualities you want in a lawyer.This work is an act of homage. When R.B.G. gave two dissents on one day, on June 25, 2013, fans of her opinions started drawing, composing songs, writing poems. She inspire It is hard to argue with Antonin Scalia when he described Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg as “an intelligent woman and a nice woman and a considerate woman—all the qualities you like in a person.” Add to that, she is a persistent person and a principled person and a fair person—all the qualities you want in a lawyer.This work is an act of homage. When R.B.G. gave two dissents on one day, on June 25, 2013, fans of her opinions started drawing, composing songs, writing poems. She inspired many up-coming legal scholars but also many women trying to live their lives in the most fulfilling ways—without the constraints traditionally placed upon their gender, race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation. She is placed next to the rapper B.I.G. in the pantheon of stars because of the contrast: a large black man, young and flashy with strong opinions next to a slight white female octogenarian, restrained but with strong opinions. Both were looking for equal rights under the law.The book is a loosely chronological description of R.B.G.’s upbringing and early schooling. She met Marty, her husband of 56 years at Cornell and they decided to study law together at Harvard. When Marty graduated before her, she moved on to Columbia Law School to earn her degree. The two had a child already by then, but really expected that the two partners in the marriage would share the burdens and joys of parenting equally. Right from the start R.B.G. chose cases that would move the ball forward on rights for both men and women because gender discrimination hurts everyone. Women will never be free unless men are free of their traditional roles as well.That angle, freeing men from the constraints of societal expectations, proved popular in the courts and made it a little easier for her to introduce the obvious “next step” into women’s expectations of equal opportunity. “Present the court with the next logical step,” she would urge her clerks years later. “Don’t ask them to go too far or too fast, or you’ll lose what you might have won.” In a marriage and in a workplace, “sometimes it helps to be a little deaf.” Anger, resentment, and envy are unproductive. Get over it.The book has lots of pictures of R.B.G. at different stages in her career interspersed with the narrative of what was happening at the time. The authors also include portions of important decisions. R.B.G. was not flashy—in her dress or in her writing—but she did make great effort to write for clarity. She wanted interested people who were not lawyers to be able to understand the substance of what had been decided. She aimed for people to be able to read a paragraph once without the necessity of a reread to understand. That’s a great goal right there.The cases the authors seed throughout the narrative are marked up with handwritten notes about what the case meant for plaintiffs, defendants, and ordinary citizens. The authors are out to make this a fun and informative read, and it is. The audio is enhanced: certain sections have added commentary that can be referenced for further information so that the momentum of the whole doesn’t flag. It’s interesting, especially since this kind of attention has never been paid to a Supreme Court Judge. She’s eighty-three, folks, and still going strong.One of the more interesting short sections in the book is a description of R.B.G.'s workout routine. I am not going to tell you what it is that keeps her fit enough to carry on with a high pressure job that requires enormous intellectual wattage—you’ll have to go to the book for that—but it is im-press-ive. Anyway, I found the audio very listenable, but I’d have to say the photos and extras in the book itself were worth paging through. Big high five on the labor of love that reminds us of someone that has done so much to make a difference in the lives of so many.
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  • Jessica Jeffers
    January 1, 1970
    This is a fun, informative examination into the life of one of my personal heroes. It doesn't give the kind of depth that an academic bio would provide, but it gets the job done with humor and admiration. Now there's a coloring book, so I guess I'm gonna have to jump on that trend:
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  • Montzalee Wittmann
    January 1, 1970
    Yes, she is our gal!Notorious RBG is a very informative book about this wonderful, smart, just, remarkable, leader, and beautiful woman! This book takes you through her personal life, education, career, and achievements. It is also packed with pictures, man oh man, she was a beauty not just a brain! She is still very stylish! A true hero for women and men!
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  • Adam
    January 1, 1970
    2 1/2 stars would probably be more accurate, but eh. Ginsburg is an excellent subject for a biography, but I get the feeling that the author of this book just didn't want to work very hard. Which, you know, fine, it's called "Notorious RBG" so it's obviously not supposed to be the last definitive word or anything, but a bit more depth would be nice.Here's an example: one chapter ends with Ginsburg leaving America for Sweden to live for a year and research a book on Swedish civil procedure. This 2 1/2 stars would probably be more accurate, but eh. Ginsburg is an excellent subject for a biography, but I get the feeling that the author of this book just didn't want to work very hard. Which, you know, fine, it's called "Notorious RBG" so it's obviously not supposed to be the last definitive word or anything, but a bit more depth would be nice.Here's an example: one chapter ends with Ginsburg leaving America for Sweden to live for a year and research a book on Swedish civil procedure. This section is about 3 pages long, and concludes "It would be a few years before RBG realized just how much she had learned in Sweden. It would change her life." Hope you weren't hoping to hear what all that was, though. Because Sweden is mentioned only two more times over the rest of the book, both in passing. Whatever it is she learned in Sweden that changed her life will have to be a mystery to us!The whole book is like this, really. It errs on the side of telling us the stories that were super easy to research (SCOTUS opinions, fashion choices) and stays away from anything more substantive or new. You definitely don't leave this book with the impression that the author interviewed more than a handful of people. It's super short and padded with pages and pages of photographs and drawings. Basically: if you were actually hoping to learn something about a really, really fascinating person, you came to the wrong place.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    https://guninactone.wordpress.com/201...A few things I took away from this delightful book that should convince you to read about an amazing woman.RBG is in her 80’s and does 20 push-ups a day. 20 PUSH-UPS A DAY. If that doesn’t tell you she’s a bad-ass that you should want to read about, read on. This woman was a mother of a 1 year-old, 1 of 9 women in her class at Harvard law when her husband Marty was diagnosed with cancer. Marty was also a law student, a year ahead of RBG at Harvard. RBG cam https://guninactone.wordpress.com/201...A few things I took away from this delightful book that should convince you to read about an amazing woman.RBG is in her 80’s and does 20 push-ups a day. 20 PUSH-UPS A DAY. If that doesn’t tell you she’s a bad-ass that you should want to read about, read on. This woman was a mother of a 1 year-old, 1 of 9 women in her class at Harvard law when her husband Marty was diagnosed with cancer. Marty was also a law student, a year ahead of RBG at Harvard. RBG came home from law school every day, spent time with her child, typed up the notes she had other students take for Marty while he was being treated and then did her own law school work. She’s super human.RBG cooked her last meal in 1980. Her daughter is quoted as saying “Mommy does the thinking and Daddy does the cooking.” RBG is an opera lover (something she shares with Justice Scalia in a truly fascinating friendship) and has said “If I had any talent that God could give me, I would be a great diva.” Notorious RBG, Supreme Court Justice to opera diva, amazing.RBG and Marty had what appears to have been a true partnership. What an amazing couple. I cried an embarrassing amount on the train while reading his last letter to her after more than 50 years of marriage. I think everyone can only hope to be so lucky in love and friendship.As an attorney she argued for equal gender rights not just for women, but for men – and this book shares her written opinions with legal commentary, not just her personal life. This is a fast read, but not all fluff. She taught law and worked for the ACLU before donning her judge’s robes. RBG has done amazing work to help to empower everyone – not just women.You can’t spell Truth without RUTH.Read this! If you haven’t had enough RBG check out the Tumblr site that was the inspiration for the book. You will soon find yourself shopping for Notorious RBG merchandise like me! My daughter calls my RBG tote my “King Bag” I need to work on reminding her that RBG is way cooler than a king!5 stars! Thank you Dey Street Books for this advance copy in exchange for an honest review.All quotes taken from an uncorrected galley copy in advance of publication.
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  • Heather K (dentist in my spare time)
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars for the woman, 3 stars for the book.The book itself was a bit dry with an awkward structure and a dull narrator, but the content was fascinating. I started this audiobook to try to learn more about RBG and I certainly accomplished that. However, I think the formatting could have been a bit more compelling. I think I'll continue reading more about RBG as her personal and professional career is #inspiration. goodreads|instagram|twitter|blog
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  • Jill Mackin
    January 1, 1970
    It’s RBG, of course, it was an amazing read. The author included a number of Justice Ginsburg’s decisions. What a trail blazer she is for the rights of women.
  • Connie G
    January 1, 1970
    Co-author Shana Knizhnik created a blog in 2013 devoted to the Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The millennial NYU law student set up the blog as "fan-nonfiction" after Ginsburg read several liberal dissents from the bench. The late Notorious BIG was a famous rapper, and the blog name "Notorious RBG" is a play on his name. The blog was fresh, colorful, and celebrated Ginsburg's contributions to feminism, equal rights, and voting rights. The blog led to the publication of this book seve Co-author Shana Knizhnik created a blog in 2013 devoted to the Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The millennial NYU law student set up the blog as "fan-nonfiction" after Ginsburg read several liberal dissents from the bench. The late Notorious BIG was a famous rapper, and the blog name "Notorious RBG" is a play on his name. The blog was fresh, colorful, and celebrated Ginsburg's contributions to feminism, equal rights, and voting rights. The blog led to the publication of this book several years later.This book is a collaboration between Knizhnik and Irin Carmon, a journalist who interviewed Ginsburg for MSNBC. Irin Carmon wrote the book while Knizhnik curated the images and fact-checked. Chapter names come from rapper Notorious BIG's lyrics. The text covers Ginsburg's life, key legal cases, and important Supreme Court decisions. There are also some lighthearted chapters that cover subjects like her late husband Marty's culinary skills, Ginsburg's collection of lace collars, her sessions with her personal trainer, and how she and the late Justice Scalia shared a love of opera. The book includes a wonderful collection of photographs, letters, and memorabilia. It also has images that are fun--cartoons, Halloween costumes, T-shirts, tattoos, posters, mugs, poems, and other tributes that Ginsburg's fans have created.The book has obviously been written by admirers of Ginsburg who is left of center in a conservative Supreme Court. It shows an extremely intelligent woman carving a path for future women as a law student, a lawyer, and a judge. Ginsburg first gained fame working with the Women's Rights Project at the ACLU. If someone is looking for a detailed history of the Supreme Court, this is not the book to read. This book covers the legal highlights of Ginsburg's career, especially cases involving equal rights. It's engaging and will appeal to the general reading public, including high school students. "Notorious RBG" can serve as a steppingstone to more detailed books about the Supreme Court. Who would have believed that an 84 year old studious justice would become such a cultural icon?Message from Connie: It's important for us to know about the history of many rights that we take for granted today. People should take great care when they vote for President and our senators-- they are choosing the people that will nominate and confirm the judges for the United States Courts of Appeals and the Supreme Court justices.Archives from the Notorious RBG blog: http://notoriousrbg.tumblr.com/archive
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  • Kelly Hager
    January 1, 1970
    I knew before I read this book that I liked Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. But I wasn't very familiar with her before she became a justice on the Supreme Court. (Given her age and the fact that she was only the second female justice---and the fact that there have only been four---I knew she was a trailblazer, but I didn't understand just how amazing her life has been.)The book includes excerpts of opinions she's written and has a lot of pictures, but the real joy (for me) is in learning more about I knew before I read this book that I liked Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. But I wasn't very familiar with her before she became a justice on the Supreme Court. (Given her age and the fact that she was only the second female justice---and the fact that there have only been four---I knew she was a trailblazer, but I didn't understand just how amazing her life has been.)The book includes excerpts of opinions she's written and has a lot of pictures, but the real joy (for me) is in learning more about her personal life. Her marriage to Marty GInsburg is an actual inspiration and if I could find a lady like Marty (or like Ruth, that'd be pretty awesome, too), I'd be incredibly lucky. Their marriage was fantastic and I love the fact that they each didn't seem to have an ego where the other was concerned. Neither of them felt the need to be the one in charge. (I also love the fact that Marty pitched in at home while Ruth was working. It seems like that's still rare now, so you can imagine how rare it was decades ago.)If you need or want to know more about "Notorious RBG," this is the book for you.Highly recommended.
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  • Don Bradshaw
    January 1, 1970
    An amazing book about a totally remarkable individual who has given so much to this country. Her devotion to the constitution is unfailing. There are numerous pictures that follow RBG through her life. At 83 she has faced monumental adversity yet came back stronger and more determined every time. With no desire to retire from the bench, I can only look forward to great things from this irrepressible woman.
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  • Marta
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a joy to read - beautiful, educational, inspirational, and lovingly written by enthusiastic young admirers of this fascinating woman."Fight for the things you care about, but do it in a way that will lead lead others to join you." RBG has spent her entire life working for equality for everyone. She argued that discrimnitation based on sex hurts both women and men. She tirelessly, case by case worked on removing each obstacle, building precedents, following her principle of increment This book is a joy to read - beautiful, educational, inspirational, and lovingly written by enthusiastic young admirers of this fascinating woman."Fight for the things you care about, but do it in a way that will lead lead others to join you." RBG has spent her entire life working for equality for everyone. She argued that discrimnitation based on sex hurts both women and men. She tirelessly, case by case worked on removing each obstacle, building precedents, following her principle of incremental change. RBG is not a revolutionist - she works within the system, and chips away at laws standing in the way of personal freedom and equal opportunity, one at a time, educating us, and her fellow justices, along the way.RBG has graduated as one of only nine women at Columbia law school. She was top in her class but could not get a job as a lawyer, so she went into public service at ACLU and never looked back. Since she became a supreme court justice, she has been a consensus maker, a leader, an educator, defender of hard-fought freedoms, and for a while, as the only woman on the court, a representative of women's perspective in a male-dominated world.The personal details of her life are also fascinating. Her husband was very supportive of her carreer - a rarity at the time - and they enjoyed a harmonious, happy and equal love affair for fifty-six years. She is an opera-lover, and a long-time close friend of justice Antonin Scalia - showing how deep respect and friendship can exist between people of opposing political views. The bits about her style and her workout are also fun. She is eighty-two and can do twenty push-ups! The fans inject some modern, hip anecdotes and pictures of "The Notorious R.B.G." internet phenomenon. The charts with side-bars and arrows, the layout, the embedded pictures all exude a young and fresh vibe - which is quite amazing, considering the book is about an octogenarian and lots of law.I loved this book and highly recommend it to everyone! Tip: get the print edition. The layout is designed for print and loses quite a bit in both e-book and audio form.
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    I had a difficult time deciding what rating to give this book. On the one hand, I try hard to reserve my five star reviews for books that are among my absolute favorites and for things that I would readily term literary masterpieces. Staring at the rating button for this book, debating which of the little line of stars I should highlight, I very nearly selected 4 stars instead of 5. In the end, however, I realized that this book actually is a new favorite, and, if I were trying to find critiques I had a difficult time deciding what rating to give this book. On the one hand, I try hard to reserve my five star reviews for books that are among my absolute favorites and for things that I would readily term literary masterpieces. Staring at the rating button for this book, debating which of the little line of stars I should highlight, I very nearly selected 4 stars instead of 5. In the end, however, I realized that this book actually is a new favorite, and, if I were trying to find critiques in order to justify a lower rating, I would have a very difficult time of it.You see, while I might normally point out that parts of this book are incredibly lighthearted to the point of being downright silly, I can hardly call that a fault when it's an intentional and, indeed, vitally important, characteristic. Furthermore, I could note that this book is a wee bit biased in favor of decidedly liberal views and against certain decisions and persons, but considering it's a book which unabashedly declares its purpose as celebrating Ruth Bader Ginsburg, criticizing the authors for doing exactly that would be illogical. Even better, while it is clear where the authors' personal beliefs may lie, they do an exceedingly good job of exploring opposing arguments and providing background information for the various views or decisions they would likely argue against. Even their most partial discussions remain professional, cordial, and thoughtful, and I cannot praise this quality enough.In the end, I have to say that I was completely drawn in by such an unapologetically over the top and, for lack of a more academic term, fun depiction of a woman who is, without doubt, one of the most incredible legal minds of our time (or our history). I would urge anyone with even the slightest interest in the Court and Justice Ginsburg to pick it up, and I am incredibly happy to have read it myself.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I had to put this down quite a few times and choke down rage over the legal and social discrimination women (and men) faced, but I'd pick it up again and then be relieved to see how RBG came at the cases methodically, working incrementally to dismantle a system that saw women as property or less worthy (or men as less worthy of being caretakers!). I had no idea she'd been with the ACLU, and her decades-long love affair with her husband was beautiful to read about. I really, really recommend this I had to put this down quite a few times and choke down rage over the legal and social discrimination women (and men) faced, but I'd pick it up again and then be relieved to see how RBG came at the cases methodically, working incrementally to dismantle a system that saw women as property or less worthy (or men as less worthy of being caretakers!). I had no idea she'd been with the ACLU, and her decades-long love affair with her husband was beautiful to read about. I really, really recommend this as an introduction to an amazing woman and pioneer in gender equality.
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  • Moonkiszt
    January 1, 1970
    Notorious RBGThere is no truth without “ruth” . . . . one of my favorite take-aways! I’ve always been a fan of this woman, and after reading this know why. She’s remarkable, forthright and clear. You won’t have doubts where she stands. I love that about her. I am grateful for her service to our country and her willingness to sacrifice the many hours of her life that she could have spent on her own private choices. We have so many public servants who work their lives out for us, and we don’t have Notorious RBGThere is no truth without “ruth” . . . . one of my favorite take-aways! I’ve always been a fan of this woman, and after reading this know why. She’s remarkable, forthright and clear. You won’t have doubts where she stands. I love that about her. I am grateful for her service to our country and her willingness to sacrifice the many hours of her life that she could have spent on her own private choices. We have so many public servants who work their lives out for us, and we don’t have the privilege of getting even a small window into their sacrifices. . . .in this book we do. I enjoy heroes from every walk of life, and getting to celebrate them.RBG is one of my super-heroes!
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  • Jean
    January 1, 1970
    When the Supreme Court reported its verdict in Shelby County v Holder which discarded a crucial provision of the Voting Rights Act; Justice Ginsburg read her dissent from the bench, which has been reported as the equivalent of shaming your spouse in front of dinner guests. More unusual still was that she’d read two other dissents from the bench the day before.The event triggered law student Shana Knizhnik to begin a blog called “Notorious RBG.” It seemed that suddenly Ginsburg became a star, wit When the Supreme Court reported its verdict in Shelby County v Holder which discarded a crucial provision of the Voting Rights Act; Justice Ginsburg read her dissent from the bench, which has been reported as the equivalent of shaming your spouse in front of dinner guests. More unusual still was that she’d read two other dissents from the bench the day before.The event triggered law student Shana Knizhnik to begin a blog called “Notorious RBG.” It seemed that suddenly Ginsburg became a star, with stickers, posters, greeting cards, t-shirts, Halloween costumes, bobble heads etc. were being sold. Washington D.C. was plastered with posters saying “Can’t spell the truth without Ruth.” Knizhnik teamed up with Irin Carmon, a journalist to write this book.I have read a number of biographies about Ruth Bader Ginsburg but this one is a bit different. The authors are young and bring a different view point of the life of Ginsburg. The book makes no claims of being unbiased; it is an obvious fan book. The book is well written and well researched. There are lots and lots of pictures and copies of letters and other material with the book. The audiobook has pictures in a pdf file. The authors cover the usual biographical information as other books but also devote more time to Ginsburg’s current life, for example a whole chapter is devoted to Ginsburg’s exercise routine. There is lots of trivia information such as Ginsburg was a big Nancy Drew fan as a child; she has a lifetime habit of being a voracious reader. The authors spend time discussing the discrimination that Ginsburg endured as a woman and as a Jew. They also spent time covering the Ginsburg’s marriage and quoting Sheryl Sandberg’s dictum “The most important career choice you’ll make is who you marry.” This book may catch the imagination and inspire more young women than the standard biography. Audi Arndt does a great job narrating the book. This is a book you should buy as a hardback and keep as a reference book.
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  • Lorna
    January 1, 1970
    Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a delightful biography with endearing photographs and graphics, and described as a collaborative process by Irin Carmon with Shana Knizhnik. The authors interviewed Ruth Bader Ginsburg as well as her family, close friends, colleagues and clerks, in addition to extensive research into the archives at the Library of Congress. There is also extensive research into the legal career of RBG and her continuous championing of equal rights for Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a delightful biography with endearing photographs and graphics, and described as a collaborative process by Irin Carmon with Shana Knizhnik. The authors interviewed Ruth Bader Ginsburg as well as her family, close friends, colleagues and clerks, in addition to extensive research into the archives at the Library of Congress. There is also extensive research into the legal career of RBG and her continuous championing of equal rights for all of us. What comes through is that the justice is proud and humbled to be part of this movement, not only for women's rights but for civil rights that she began fighting, even as she graduated from Columbia Law School, and like former colleague Sandra Day O'Connor, faced gender discrimination in the legal field. Ruth Bader Ginsburg has long been one of my heroes and I continue to rely on her strong and inimitable voice on the Supreme Court. "As a marshal cries 'Oyez, oyez, oyez!' watch Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, known around the court as RBG, as she takes her seat at the winged mahogany bench. Look around her neck. When the jabot with scalloped glass beads glitters flat against the top of RBGs black robe, it's bad news for liberals. That's her dissent collar.""Announcing a majority opinion in the court chamber is custom, but reading aloud in dissent is rare. It's like pulling the fire alarm, a public shaming of the majority that you want the world to hear.""As it sunk in that the court had, in the words of civil rights hero and Congressman John Lewis, put 'a dagger in the heart of the Voting Rights Act,' progressives felt a mix of despair and fury, but also admiration for how RBG had spoken up.""Going through 'innumerable drafts,' the goal is to write an opinion where no sentence should need to be read twice. 'I think that law should be a literary profession,' RBG says, 'and the best legal practitioners regard law as an art as well as a craft.'"
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't know anything about this book at the outset, only noticed it had a long wait at the library - so I jumped on that bandwagon. I assumed it was a graphic novel/comic book. Actually turned out to be a biography of the Justice told from a feminist viewpoint for an audience of millennials. The hagiography was thick and some of it was really dumbed down/simplified; I could have done without the chapter on Ginsburg's sartorial choices and fashion accessories. But in the end I learned many thin I didn't know anything about this book at the outset, only noticed it had a long wait at the library - so I jumped on that bandwagon. I assumed it was a graphic novel/comic book. Actually turned out to be a biography of the Justice told from a feminist viewpoint for an audience of millennials. The hagiography was thick and some of it was really dumbed down/simplified; I could have done without the chapter on Ginsburg's sartorial choices and fashion accessories. But in the end I learned many things I didn't know about "RBG", e.g., that the Justice apparently embraces that name (and "Notorious RBG"), although I still cringe to repeat it. I also liked that many of her majority opinions and blistering dissents are quoted verbatim (with explanatory glosses). Lastly, intrigued me that the only other Justice never discussed, merely named just once (I believe), is good old Clarence Thomas. So although I still have no evidence-based idea what Ginsburg thinks of him, the omission leaves me believing what I have always assumed. But now with more to back it up.
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  • Antoinette Perez
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, my heavens. RBG is a fave. This book, although it read more like a textbook than a bio, does her life and her career justice. (Hahahahaha. ???) I didn't think I could adore her more, but I do after reading this. And, thanks to the journalistic style of writing, I actually understand more of the nuances of cases past (Roe v. Wade) than I did before.My big takeaways: Believe with conviction, and act strategically, collegially. Play the long game. Feminism is truly for everyone's benefit. I wil Oh, my heavens. RBG is a fave. This book, although it read more like a textbook than a bio, does her life and her career justice. (Hahahahaha. ???) I didn't think I could adore her more, but I do after reading this. And, thanks to the journalistic style of writing, I actually understand more of the nuances of cases past (Roe v. Wade) than I did before.My big takeaways: Believe with conviction, and act strategically, collegially. Play the long game. Feminism is truly for everyone's benefit. I will be much smarter about my dissents from now on.
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