We Come Apart
From two acclaimed authors comes an emotional story told in verse about friendship, love, and overcoming unbeatable odds.Authors Brian Conaghan and Sarah Crossan have joined forces to tell the story of Nicu and Jess, two troubled teens whose paths cross in the unlikeliest of places.Nicu has emigrated from Romania and is struggling to find his place in his new home. Meanwhile, Jess's home life is overshadowed by violence. When Nicu and Jess meet, what starts out as friendship grows into romance as the two bond over their painful pasts and hopeful futures. But will they be able to save each other, let alone themselves?For fans of Una LaMarche’s Like No Other, this illuminating story told in dual points of view through vibrant verse will stay with readers long after they've turned the last page.

We Come Apart Details

TitleWe Come Apart
Author
FormatKindle Edition
ReleaseFeb 9th, 2017
PublisherBloomsbury Childrens
Number of pages320 pages
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Romance, Young Adult Contemporary, Poetry, Mystery, Crime, Realistic Fiction, Sociology, Abuse, Fiction, Family

We Come Apart Review

  • Cait (Paper Fury)
    January 23, 2017
    My main confundled feeling with this book is that I don't really know what it was trying to say. Maaaaybe that's just me, so AS ALWAYS, I encourage you to read it for yourself! It's basically by two teens who have awful lives and what they choose to do about it. But their decisions made about as much sense as as the existence of marmalade. (Spoiler: there is no point in marmalade.)ANYWAY.The beginning confused the ACTUAL BRAIN out of me. It's dual narrated. In verse. And doth not deign to tell m My main confundled feeling with this book is that I don't really know what it was trying to say. Maaaaybe that's just me, so AS ALWAYS, I encourage you to read it for yourself! It's basically by two teens who have awful lives and what they choose to do about it. But their decisions made about as much sense as as the existence of marmalade. (Spoiler: there is no point in marmalade.)ANYWAY.The beginning confused the ACTUAL BRAIN out of me. It's dual narrated. In verse. And doth not deign to tell me who's speaking when. No chapter headings. Noooooooooooothing. So like it took me a long time to figure out half of it is by Nicu (who's a POC immigrant from Romania to England) and half by Jess (who is a teenage delinquent from an abusive family). BUT WHY WAS IT SO FREAKING HARD TO LABEL THE CHAPTERS???? And sometimes they'd both narrate in the one chapter so just excuse me while my brain skydives off the edge of the world. You could sort of fumble along adn figure it out because Nicu spoke in broken English. So at least that differentiated him from Jess. But still. #help.And the characters? Well Nicu was adorable. And he had so many struggles! With feeling out of place because of his skin colour, and not speaking much English, and just being attacked hugely because he's different. But he was sweet and happy and took risks to make friends with someone who was like a cold iceblock of Alaska. (Aka Jess.) Jess on the other hand...argh. Like her character development was good? But she was really a brat. She had a really really bad home life so I don't want to be dismissive of that...but I found it hard to root for her.Also: yes. Lots of racism towards Nicu. People can be disgusting honestly.I also felt a bit disjointed because of the verse. That's just me though. Verse/poetry has suited me exactly 0% since the day I was born. I probably wasn't given enough Mozart to listen to as a small child tbh. I just miss the details of world building and the descriptions of characters and emotions and things. #sadfaceAnd that ending? Erm....what and why. (view spoiler)[I mean, they run away together and then Nicu just ABANDONS Jess on the train because it'll be "better for her"??? So she can have a good life and he gets a shitty ending to be forced back to Romania by his parents and forced to marry a girl he doesn't love???? WHY. Jess wanted to be with him?? He wanted to be with her??? TELL ME WHAT'S THE LOGIC HERE. What did the book even achieve? An escape for Jess but zero for Niku? (hide spoiler)]ALL IN ALL: look, I did like the story! But it just wasn't really written in my style and I don't fully understand WHAT the message was or what anyone really achieved?? Character development was A+ and I think the world should pause and hug Niku because he is a precious little cupcake who knows the way to make friends is to offer them chocolate (#winning at life, Niku). It talks about how horrible the world can be. BUT!! It does talk about the power of friendship and love and I like READ IT ALL IN AN HOUR BECAUSE: INVESTED.
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  • April (Aprilius Maximus)
    January 17, 2017
    This book is definitely coming out at the right time (with what's happening around the world right now) and its message is immensely powerful.It follows two unlikely friends as they meet and get to know each other as a part of a juvenile reform course due to both Nicu and Jess being caught shoplifting. Nicu has recently emigrated to the UK from Romania and Jess lives in an unsafe and abusive home. As this book isn't officially released yet, I'll just list the things that really stuck out for me: This book is definitely coming out at the right time (with what's happening around the world right now) and its message is immensely powerful.It follows two unlikely friends as they meet and get to know each other as a part of a juvenile reform course due to both Nicu and Jess being caught shoplifting. Nicu has recently emigrated to the UK from Romania and Jess lives in an unsafe and abusive home. As this book isn't officially released yet, I'll just list the things that really stuck out for me: - the look into Nicu's mind as he navigates his way in a new country and how hard it is to be in an unfamiliar environment and having to learn a new language, especially when no one gives you a chance (as is often the case in this book).- It's also a glance behind those kids who act up in class. I often always thought as a kid, 'Why don't they just stop and do what they're told? Why are they so naughty?' etc., when there is ALWAYS a reason, even if it isn't always apparent to you. Having a look inside Jess's mind on why she did the things that she did was incredibly eye-opening. - the way that teachers treated Nicu was absolutely despicable. Not even giving him the time of day, not even a smile and always assuming the worst of him was absolutely heartbreaking to read. A teacher can literally make or break a student. - It's told in dual perspective and in verse, and to be honest it felt like the wrong format. I honestly don't understand why it was told in verse and it certainly didn't bring anything to the table for me.- Another thing I was unsure about was the writing from Nicu's perspective. It felt almost wrong to be reading the disjointed English and the innermost thoughts of Nicu when he was written by a white man (I'm assuming Brian wrote Nicu). I'm still unsure how I feel about this because while the message of the book is super important, it just felt a little weird to me if that makes sense. - The ending was absolutely gut-wrenching. Prepare yourself.
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  • Laura
    March 24, 2017
    ‘But I want to stay here.’ I praying to them.‘Here, what is here?’ Tata say. ‘People hate us here.’‘Nicu, people here only see our skin, not the thing within,’ Mamica say, We Come Apart is a very heartbreaking novel beautifully written in verse about friendship and love. The themes of immigration, racism, abuse, and bullying are all very prominent to the story as well. It is a quick read that took me no more than a couple hours. The characters are strong, well-developed and real. While I felt em ‘But I want to stay here.’ I praying to them.‘Here, what is here?’ Tata say. ‘People hate us here.’‘Nicu, people here only see our skin, not the thing within,’ Mamica say, We Come Apart is a very heartbreaking novel beautifully written in verse about friendship and love. The themes of immigration, racism, abuse, and bullying are all very prominent to the story as well. It is a quick read that took me no more than a couple hours. The characters are strong, well-developed and real. While I felt emotions and was invested in the story, I'm still not sure what the authors were trying to say. I can certainly enjoy verse in novels. I loved One by Sarah Crossan, but the verse worked more effectively there. It didn't add anything to the story here. And it made things a little more difficult with Nicu's narration since his was written in broken English to begin with. Some passages did feel very powerful like this one: When I watching television moviesall actorsspeak too speedyfor my comprehending,and I thinkingit be mission impossibleto learn this languagewith fluent.It so much frustratingwhen words can’t escape my head,when peoples notunderstand my meanings.All I wantis for them to see howI am fun,cleverandnice guy.I afraid no oneever know who I am. The story follows two troubled teens whose lives come together in a Reparation scheme they were both put in to avoid criminal records. It is basically community service and self-development sessions. Nicu and his parents emigrated from Romania to England. They are here to earn enough money to pay the family of a bride in Romania and marry Nicu off. Jess lives with her mom and abusive stepdad. Both characters feel stuck in their lives, but when they meet...their lives will change.I love the ending for all it's ambiguity. It would have been nice if there was more of a clear-cut message to take away when such important themes were being discussed. Also, I started the story very confused while trying to figure out who was narrating when. There aren't any names at the beginning or labels on the chapters to let you know who exactly is starting. Once I figured it out, it was fairly obvious. If you enjoy quick stories about friendship that will quite possibly break your heart, you might want to read We Come Apart.
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  • Sarah
    January 30, 2017
    This was a quick pleasant read. I can't give it more than three stars though because I had quite a few issues with it. It is such a relevant book though and so I think people should read it. I'll start off with the good! Nicu was a lovely character. He was so adorable and sweet, I loved him! I'm not sure which author wrote Nicu's POV but it was amazing. The author completely submerged themselves into writing this character and I found Nicu was done very well. I would like to know who wrote Nicu This was a quick pleasant read. I can't give it more than three stars though because I had quite a few issues with it. It is such a relevant book though and so I think people should read it. I'll start off with the good! Nicu was a lovely character. He was so adorable and sweet, I loved him! I'm not sure which author wrote Nicu's POV but it was amazing. The author completely submerged themselves into writing this character and I found Nicu was done very well. I would like to know who wrote Nicu so if anyone knows, please comment on my review and tell me! I absolutely adored reading the broken English because Nicu put things in such an unusual way and some of it was really beautiful. So Nicu and the writing of Nicu was spot on for me. Another good thing about this book was the way the racism was portrayed. People were so cruel to Nicu because of his skin colour and because he was Romanian. It wasn't just students who were malicious but teachers and adults too. I don't know how people can be so awful to others just because of their skin colour, their religion or their place of origin etc but that prejudice is everywhere these days. So many people are for Brexit, the Muslim ban, the wall etc because they don't want foreigners in their country. It's absolutely ridiculous and this book portrays just a bit of that hate towards Nicu & his family. The mediocre - the writing as a whole. Verse is usually hit or miss with me. This unfortunately was a miss for me. It just didn't add anything to the book. I did like how it was quick. Verse usually skips all the waffle and jumps right into the story and focuses on what's important so I enjoyed that aspect but on a whole, it was just okay. I also didn't really like Jess. She made it hard to like her but I did feel bad for her. I didn't enjoy her chapters as much as I enjoyed Nicu's. The bad - the ending. I just didn't understand it. Maybe I'm not supposed to understand it but I didn't like the end either. While I was reading this, I felt like something like that would happen but I was hoping I was wrong. I would recommend this book if you're in the mood for a fast young adult book. * I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Nicu's cute descriptions - "My hair stick to me like I step out of deep blue sea.""She not believe I am wild animal like other delinquents. Because I not wild animal. I am pussy cat.""And when these TAKING THE PISS things happen, I always search for the special eyes of Jess. Always I search.""My body goes wobbly.""I want to jump, cheer, whoop. Sit on nine clouds.""In movie we touching elbows together: gentleness, delightness. And it feel like voltage speeding through my body.""I dream of my heart beating on top of Jess heart. So we beat like one."~~~~"‘Nicu, people here only see our skin, not the thing within,’"
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  • Maddie (Heart Full Of Books)
    January 11, 2017
    I read this book in one sitting, and that's not just because of the verse form! For a book that has way less words than your average YA, We Come Apart managed to create characters and scenarios with such depth and reality, I was blown away by how much I could empathise, with so few words to go on.I loved both Jess and Nicu's voices and how, together, they found themselves, learning that judging someone by appearance or from a first impression is counterproductive to building meaningful relations I read this book in one sitting, and that's not just because of the verse form! For a book that has way less words than your average YA, We Come Apart managed to create characters and scenarios with such depth and reality, I was blown away by how much I could empathise, with so few words to go on.I loved both Jess and Nicu's voices and how, together, they found themselves, learning that judging someone by appearance or from a first impression is counterproductive to building meaningful relationships.This did deal with some extremely difficult subjects, like domestic abuse, gang violence, xenophobia and bullying, but if a book doesn't tackle difficult things, it's not really doing it's job! This definitely unsettled both the characters, and me, but I was desperate to know how it was going to end.I also read this with my sister, Bee, and she described it as a modern tragedy, which I think is absolutely perfect, so if that sounds like something you'd like, Romeo and Juliet without the double suicide, then I couldn't recommend this more!
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  • Kelly (Diva Booknerd)
    February 22, 2017
    3.5 Stars.Jessica is a character who has endured torment and abuse, her stepfather a domineering and violent man. Although I've also experienced domestic violence as a child, I couldn't relate to Jessica and her often merciless attitude. Having committed her third offense and Nicu caught thieving, the two teens are both sentenced to the Reparation Program, an initiative to rehabilitate adolescents rather than facing prison.Nicu's narrative was captivating. Having migrated with his parents to the 3.5 Stars.Jessica is a character who has endured torment and abuse, her stepfather a domineering and violent man. Although I've also experienced domestic violence as a child, I couldn't relate to Jessica and her often merciless attitude. Having committed her third offense and Nicu caught thieving, the two teens are both sentenced to the Reparation Program, an initiative to rehabilitate adolescents rather than facing prison.Nicu's narrative was captivating. Having migrated with his parents to the United Kingdom, Nicu and his father are self employed in order to earn an adequate dowry to obtain a wife home in Romania. Although his parents are insistent, Nicu refuses to marry and wants to begin his life in the United Kingdom rather than return home. Nicu is absolutely endearing. His character explored the social injustice of racism and race profiling. It was interesting to see the comparison between both parents, Jessica had been arrested due to her third offense and they were treated with respect. Although it was insinuated that her behavior was a result of defective parenting. I appreciate narratives told in verse, with so few words authors are able to captivate readers and Sarah Crossan is a wonderful storyteller who breathes life into her characters. We Come Apart touches on social issues such as domestic violence, racial profiling and racism. Nicu wants to be accepted and I felt Jessica had taken advantage of his affection, often choosing the cruelty of her unreliable friends and choosing not to asset herself and defend Nicu against their racist remarks.I'm fascinated by stories of immigration and seeking asylum, which is the foundation for many Australians in particular. We Come Apart touches on those same foundations and as Nicu explores thoughts of his new surroundings and learning a new language, I'm dubious as to the validity of the representation.We Come Apart is a touching exploration of friendship and transcending barriers of language and stereotypes. Although I became increasingly frustrated with Jessica's character, the narrative was captivating, immersive and representative of our broken societies.
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  • Emily Mead
    January 9, 2017
    I'm kind of mixed about this one. On the one hand it was a wonderful story of friendship and exclusion and outsiders. But on the other hand, I was only really a fan of Nicu (Jess rubbed me the wrong way) and the ending felt incredibly rushed. Longer review to come soon.
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  • Stacey (prettybooks)
    January 12, 2017
    One is one of my favourite novels ever (seriously, read it). Like One, We Come Apart is told in free verse but, unlike One, we're introduced to two narrators. Jess's home life is tough and Nicu recently emigrated from Romania. When they're both arrested for theft, Jess and Nicu become unlikely companions. And Jess's friends – who throw racist remarks and abuse at Nicu – won't let them forget it.We Come Apart is very current. It's not about bullying or racism or abuse – it's about Jess and Nicu – One is one of my favourite novels ever (seriously, read it). Like One, We Come Apart is told in free verse but, unlike One, we're introduced to two narrators. Jess's home life is tough and Nicu recently emigrated from Romania. When they're both arrested for theft, Jess and Nicu become unlikely companions. And Jess's friends – who throw racist remarks and abuse at Nicu – won't let them forget it.We Come Apart is very current. It's not about bullying or racism or abuse – it's about Jess and Nicu – but we see how these affect the two teenagers' lives. We Come Apart is also incredibly sweet. I love books about friends and We Come Apart sees a close friendship develop at different rates. Nicu wants to know more about Jess once he first sets eyes on her whereas Jess needs a little more convincing about Nicu. Due to the free verse and the book's length, the story is fast-moving and we quickly become wrapped up in the lives of these two underdogs.If a dual-perspective, in my opinion, is done well, we should be able to tell who's speaking without checking. In We Come Apart, there's no need for character headings; it's always easy to tell Nicu's passionate broken English apart from Jess's indignant thoughts. I loved switching between them seamlessly. Poignant, beautiful and captivating, We Come Apart is a short hit straight to the heart.Thank you to the publisher for providing this book for review!I also reviewed this book over on Pretty Books.
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  • Gabriela Pop
    January 17, 2017
    I feel so bad to give this book such a low rating,but rating it any higher would feel like a fraud since my reading experience was terrible and I did not really enjoy it one bit.I understand if people do find it likeable and I certainly can appreciated some of the ideas that the authors tried to get across,but overall I was enraged from page 1.As a Romanian emmigrant myself,I found this rather rare representation of others in this position to be infuriating.Again,I do appreciate some of the thin I feel so bad to give this book such a low rating,but rating it any higher would feel like a fraud since my reading experience was terrible and I did not really enjoy it one bit.I understand if people do find it likeable and I certainly can appreciated some of the ideas that the authors tried to get across,but overall I was enraged from page 1.As a Romanian emmigrant myself,I found this rather rare representation of others in this position to be infuriating.Again,I do appreciate some of the things the book tried to explore,such as the issues faced by immigrants and the hardships they faced,but I found this representation to be such a painful,overused stereotype.Never in my life have I questioned my identity before,yet this book made me consider who I am as a person and the role my nationality plays in that and for a short moment it made me question and doubt who I am,which is the lowest I have felt about who I am and where I come from and I'm not sure if I'll actually manage to fully pick myself back up after this.While I'm sure the demographic represented in the book exists and should be represented,I did feel like it was a shameful generalization.Homestly,you mean to imply I worked my ass off getting a diploma of proficiency in the English language and educating myself in all areas that I can just to be perceived as a brute?Because that is disgusting.My personal experience/connection aside,I didn't really care much for the characters,if at all.I also found the writing style to be very bland.Overall,really not my cup of tea.
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  • Bridget
    January 8, 2017
    The individual voices in this story, Niku and Jess, are distinct and different to anything I've read. I loved them. I swallowed this book in a big gulp in one sleepless night. Jess has a horrific homelife, she is fighting to stay in her home but the bully her mother is living with is terrorising her and her mum. She is forced to watch her mum get beaten. Niku is Romanian and has come to England with his family, he cannot speak English and is treated badly by his classmates but along with these s The individual voices in this story, Niku and Jess, are distinct and different to anything I've read. I loved them. I swallowed this book in a big gulp in one sleepless night. Jess has a horrific homelife, she is fighting to stay in her home but the bully her mother is living with is terrorising her and her mum. She is forced to watch her mum get beaten. Niku is Romanian and has come to England with his family, he cannot speak English and is treated badly by his classmates but along with these struggles, he is being forced into marriage to a girl he has never met back in his home country. It sounds dreadful, it is dreadful, but it is a story which has hope. It also has one of the most shocking endings, it left me open mouthed with shock. Buy it for your high school library, this is quality literature and I highly recommend it.
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  • Murphysarah
    February 23, 2017
    I really liked this book and I thought that it was quite different to most teen romance novels. I however did not like the ending as I thought it was a bit cliche.Even though the book was about two teenagers who love each other it surprisingly did not make me cringe which is always a plus !!!
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  • Karen Barber
    January 12, 2017
    A powerful read that really shows just how loaded verse can be. Crossan and Conaghan combine to give us the voices of Jess and Nicu. Both fifteen years old, our protagonists have their own troubles and seem to be struggling to work out how to break free from their respective chains.Jess has a troubled home life and has to put up with a violent step-dad. Nicu and his family have come over from Romania, and Nicu is determined to stay in Britain rather than go through with the planned marriage.The A powerful read that really shows just how loaded verse can be. Crossan and Conaghan combine to give us the voices of Jess and Nicu. Both fifteen years old, our protagonists have their own troubles and seem to be struggling to work out how to break free from their respective chains.Jess has a troubled home life and has to put up with a violent step-dad. Nicu and his family have come over from Romania, and Nicu is determined to stay in Britain rather than go through with the planned marriage.The two characters meet as they are forced to take part in a reparation scheme, and they slowly learn to let their barriers down.As with 'One' there is a horrible sense of inevitability to this book, but I really was surprised at just how bad it got. Both characters grow and develop through the story, but there's a sense that they cannot change their lives, no matter what they try.Thanks to NetGalley for the advance copy.
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  • George Lester
    November 20, 2016
    Absolute perfection! If this isn't on all of your lists for next year, you are doing life wrong! What a book!!
  • Jenna
    December 22, 2016
    Review to come.
  • Adele Broadbent
    March 4, 2017
    Jess is tough, caring about nothing or no one - at least that's what she wants people to think. She resents authority, steals and bunks off school, thinking it doesn't matter. Jess believes her life with her abusive stepfather and punching-bag mum will never change for the better. It never does for people like her.Nicu is from Romania. His family has moved to the UK to make enough money to 'pay' for a wife for him. This is a Romanian custom and he believes there is no way out of getting married Jess is tough, caring about nothing or no one - at least that's what she wants people to think. She resents authority, steals and bunks off school, thinking it doesn't matter. Jess believes her life with her abusive stepfather and punching-bag mum will never change for the better. It never does for people like her.Nicu is from Romania. His family has moved to the UK to make enough money to 'pay' for a wife for him. This is a Romanian custom and he believes there is no way out of getting married young to someone he has never met. Despite constant racial abuse from fellow students and teachers alike, Nicu wants to learn English, do well and stay in the UK for a chance at a proper life. But his father rules with his fists.Both are sent to community service for shoplifting, and this is where their story begins to entwine. At first Jess ignores the boy with the strange name. Nicu thinks Jess is pretty and ignores her initial negativity towards him. But he is kind and helpful and so different from the others on their 'punishment'. His funny way of talking is endearing and she begins to try and teach him how to talk properly. An uncertain friendship builds as the tension builds in both Jess' and Nicu's homes. Can they escape their lives?Written in a poem format, this story is succinct, powerful and compelling. The use of language in this format shows the changes in Nicu's speech with just the right word at just the right time. It portrays Jess' anger, frustration and ever-so-slow softening and letting down of her walls. Their characters are full, real and heartbreaking in the briefness of poem, with their feelings, speech and thoughts seamlessly interwoven. Two award winning authors = Pure Wow!
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  • Weronika Zimna
    March 23, 2017
    Wanna read something written by Sarah Crossan? Pick up "The Weight of Water" or "One". These books are much better than "We Come Apart" which is... only fine.
  • Emma Carroll
    February 3, 2017
    Perfectly original, refreshing, heartwarming. And heartbreaking.
  • Ellen Brickley
    February 21, 2017
    My favourite thing about this book was that it examined working-class characters that don't often get much screen-time in YA. The language is wonderful, especially the use of Nicu's broken English.
  • KittyKat
    February 24, 2017
    *This book was received via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review*I really didn't enjoy this book. The plot was weird and I don't know what exactly the author was trying to say with the narrative; to me the whole book didn't make sense, it didn't seem to have a beginning middle and end. Also, the ending felt rushed and unfinished as all the action was just occurring when suddenly the book ended. I didn't like the main character Jess. Nicu seemed at one moment naive but the next too mature f *This book was received via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review*I really didn't enjoy this book. The plot was weird and I don't know what exactly the author was trying to say with the narrative; to me the whole book didn't make sense, it didn't seem to have a beginning middle and end. Also, the ending felt rushed and unfinished as all the action was just occurring when suddenly the book ended. I didn't like the main character Jess. Nicu seemed at one moment naive but the next too mature for his age; this was really disconcerting. Overall, this was an okay read which had a seemingly meaningless plot (not much really happened) but was redeemed by the fact that some parts of it were intriguing.
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  • Debbi
    February 23, 2017
    This book... This book...I loved it. But I felt like the verse/poem-structured layout is redundant. Then again, Sarah Crossan is well-known for her way of writing. I think I would like it a lot more if everything was more detailed and descriptive.We Come Apart is a very, very, very important book with the whole Brexit and Trump's presidency thing going on. There are so many ignorant and racist people out there... sadly, even in books.
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  • hizatul akmah
    February 18, 2017
    the relationship between Nicu and Jess is everything . despite how bloody sad most parts of this book were, i really enjoyed reading it to the bits. both of the authors have done some gentle jobs at young literature. i'm really impressed by how complicated and joyous this very same book could be. highly recommended for the fans of One and Apple and Rain (both are my faves, btw!) ✨✨✨
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  • Megan (YABookers)
    January 6, 2017
    I received this free from the publishers via NetGalleyWE COME APART tells the story of a working class girl called Jess and a Romanian boy named Nicu whose path cross when taking part in a Reparation scheme after both get caught for theft. Nicu struggles to find his place in his new home – a country where he faces prejudice and racism. Jess faces abuse in her home life, and wishes to escape. Both find comfort in each other and bond over their pain and their friendship turns to romance and they s I received this free from the publishers via NetGalleyWE COME APART tells the story of a working class girl called Jess and a Romanian boy named Nicu whose path cross when taking part in a Reparation scheme after both get caught for theft. Nicu struggles to find his place in his new home – a country where he faces prejudice and racism. Jess faces abuse in her home life, and wishes to escape. Both find comfort in each other and bond over their pain and their friendship turns to romance and they see hope in each other.WE COME APART is a free verse novel, which therefore made it a quick read. I can’t say I enjoyed it as much as Sarah Crossan’s other free verse novel ONE, but it was an okay read. I felt that the characterisation was lacking is places, perhaps due to it being such a sort read, so I felt that the characters and the romance were not as fleshed out as they could have been.Nicu is Romani, originally from Romania. I can’t speak for this representation, but I was uncomfortable with how often the g**** slur was used, even when considering the context it was used in, as racism against Romani people is rife in Britain. The book featured this slur to highlight this racism - especially prevalent in a post-Brexit Britain - and while it was sometimes called out in the text, I still feel like it could be harmful to some readers. I liked the fact that Jess was a working class British girl, something we don’t see very often in UKYA, but I didn’t enjoy this book as much as I hoped, especially considering how much I loved Sarah Crossan’s other novel.
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  • Laura-Jayne
    February 11, 2017
    Original. Insightful. You really feel for these characters.
  • Zoe
    November 4, 2016
    I loved this funny, honest, complex, surprising novel.It's very beautifully written, with all that magic that poetry has to say so much more than prose often can with just a few words. Somehow, in a way that I find mind boggling, the dialogue in broken English is even more startling, breath-catching and full of moments that make you read lines again and wonder at their ability to make you see things with a clarity you haven't had before.Unusual, engaging and utterly believable characters are set I loved this funny, honest, complex, surprising novel.It's very beautifully written, with all that magic that poetry has to say so much more than prose often can with just a few words. Somehow, in a way that I find mind boggling, the dialogue in broken English is even more startling, breath-catching and full of moments that make you read lines again and wonder at their ability to make you see things with a clarity you haven't had before.Unusual, engaging and utterly believable characters are set against a backdrop that makes you reflect on your own circumstances and values. A book that will help lots of readers navigate the complexities of the world we live in (including me!), unpicking demonisation of otherness, giving us strength to trust ourselves enough to stand up for what we believe in, especially in the face of fear, at the same time as powerfully acknowledging that life is never easy, and we don't all get to have fairy tale endings.
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  • Tara
    January 21, 2017
    I am generally not a big fan of verse novels, although this one was very easy to read. It was a short, 2 hour read but in the time covered some horrific and heartbreaking topics.This one is a three and half staff read for me, I felt the authors were able to bring the two characters, Jess and Nicu together in a seamless way but I wasn't able to really connect with either of them, and I think this is because of non preference for verse novels. The ending - I was expecting a big bang of an ending b I am generally not a big fan of verse novels, although this one was very easy to read. It was a short, 2 hour read but in the time covered some horrific and heartbreaking topics.This one is a three and half staff read for me, I felt the authors were able to bring the two characters, Jess and Nicu together in a seamless way but I wasn't able to really connect with either of them, and I think this is because of non preference for verse novels. The ending - I was expecting a big bang of an ending but was left a bit underwhelmed.Thanks to Bloomsbury for the ARC via Netgalley.
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  • Helen Corcoran
    February 5, 2017
    Read the UK ARC, which is different from the final U.K. published novel. Will be reading that later this week to see what changed.EDIT: 7/2/17 - Having now read the published edition, some tiny changes have made a big difference, like Nicu referring to his parents in Romanian, for example. First time I've seen so many changes and rewrites between ARC and finished copy, interesting.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 2017
    4.5
  • Michelle (Fluttering Butterflies)
    January 16, 2017
    I didn't think this would hit me as emotionally as it did!
  • Katie
    March 26, 2017
    I decided to read this book after reading One by Sarah Crossan and really enjoying it. I saw Brian and Sarah talking about this jointly written novel written in verse on an Epic Reads facebook video and immediately ordered it. The book details how Nico and Jess meet on a young offenders community service programme and battle abuse and racism in order to bring out the best part of each other. A must read for all interested in deep relationships. The book is a quick read due to the fact it is writ I decided to read this book after reading One by Sarah Crossan and really enjoying it. I saw Brian and Sarah talking about this jointly written novel written in verse on an Epic Reads facebook video and immediately ordered it. The book details how Nico and Jess meet on a young offenders community service programme and battle abuse and racism in order to bring out the best part of each other. A must read for all interested in deep relationships. The book is a quick read due to the fact it is written in verse- i read it in 3 hours and it is kind of impossible to put down. I look forward to any future collaborations between these two authors.
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  • Megan
    February 6, 2017
    Jess and Nicu are two teens growing up in the harshest of conditions. Both are battling to stay afloat in a cruel world and find an unlikely partnership in each other. Written in alternating POVs, in short chapters, and with completely unique voices, this quick read was unlike anything I have ever read before. It was intense, sad, uplifting, heartbreaking, eye-opening ... so many things! This is the kind of story that should be read in schools; so many teens could benefit from reading such an im Jess and Nicu are two teens growing up in the harshest of conditions. Both are battling to stay afloat in a cruel world and find an unlikely partnership in each other. Written in alternating POVs, in short chapters, and with completely unique voices, this quick read was unlike anything I have ever read before. It was intense, sad, uplifting, heartbreaking, eye-opening ... so many things! This is the kind of story that should be read in schools; so many teens could benefit from reading such an important book with a clear message about acceptance, abuse, bullying and more. I highly recommend this unique and powerful read that ended all too soon.
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