Shadow Show
In Shadow Show, acclaimed writers and artists such as Joe Hill, Mort Castle, Audrey Niffenegger, Charles Paul Wilson III, Maria Frohlich, Eddie Campbell, Neil Gaiman, and more come together to pay tribute to the work of the one and only Ray Bradbury. In this collection are stories based on "By The Silver Water of Lake Champlain," "The Man Who Forgot Ray Bradbury," "Backward in Seville," "Weariness," "Live Forever!," "Who Knocks?," "Earth (A Gift Shop)," "Altenmoor, Where the Dogs Dance," and "Conjure."

Shadow Show Details

TitleShadow Show
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 7th, 2015
PublisherDiamond Book Distributors
ISBN-139781631402678
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Fantasy, Short Stories, Fiction, Anthologies

Shadow Show Review

  • Ain Ashura
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating 3.7
  • Amanda [Novel Addiction]
    January 1, 1970
    Like all books of short stories by different authors - some are absolutely amazing and some are just so-so. Overall, this was a three or three point five. Review will be posted on my blog, Novel Addiction, in April 2015.
  • Akkisuitok
    January 1, 1970
    Strong collection of short stories based on Ray Bradbury's own stories, now in comic form. I loved the majority of the 9 stories. Each author also wrote a short afterword explaining their connection to Ray Bradbury and why they chose the story they wrote, and those were interesting and quite touching as well.By The Silver Waters of Lake Champlain – Joe Hill. Art by Charles Paul Wilson III.The Man Who Forgot Ray Bradbury – Neil Gaiman. Art by Maria Frolich.Backwards in Seville – Audrey Neffengger Strong collection of short stories based on Ray Bradbury's own stories, now in comic form. I loved the majority of the 9 stories. Each author also wrote a short afterword explaining their connection to Ray Bradbury and why they chose the story they wrote, and those were interesting and quite touching as well.By The Silver Waters of Lake Champlain – Joe Hill. Art by Charles Paul Wilson III.The Man Who Forgot Ray Bradbury – Neil Gaiman. Art by Maria Frolich.Backwards in Seville – Audrey Neffengger. Art by Eddie Campbell.Live Forever – Sam Weller. Art by Mark Sexton.Weariness. – Harlon Ellison.Who Knocks? – Dave Eggers. Art by Matthew Dow Smith.Earth (A Gift Shop) – Charles Yu. Art by Christine Larsen.Attenmore, Where The Dogs Dance – Mort Castle. Art by S.L Gallant.Conjure –Alice Hoffman. Art by Chris Evenhius.
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  • Zombieslayer/Alienhunter {and so on}
    January 1, 1970
    Zombieslayer/Alienhunter's 31 Days of Hallo-reads:The FINAL review.I couldn't come up with anything better than this to close my own little shadow show with.Nine stories inspired by an in celebration of one of the most loved and cherished American authors. Nine authors- Joe Hill, Neil Gaiman, Audrey Niffenegger, Sam Weller, Harlan Ellison, (a close personal friend of the author on display) Dave Eggers, Charles Yu, Mort Castle and Alice Hoffman pen stories about their inspiration, every one of th Zombieslayer/Alienhunter's 31 Days of Hallo-reads:The FINAL review.I couldn't come up with anything better than this to close my own little shadow show with.Nine stories inspired by an in celebration of one of the most loved and cherished American authors. Nine authors- Joe Hill, Neil Gaiman, Audrey Niffenegger, Sam Weller, Harlan Ellison, (a close personal friend of the author on display) Dave Eggers, Charles Yu, Mort Castle and Alice Hoffman pen stories about their inspiration, every one of them does it with love.You know the drill.By The Silver Waters of Lake Champlain.Joe Hill. Art by Charles Paul Wilson III.Gail and her boy-who-is-a-friend, Joel, make a monumental discovery by the lake's shore.What is it? A creature? A thing? Something to fear?They make it their own, only to face terrible consequences.It's Joe Hill, alright? There's a distinct possibility I would read the dude's grocery list.His magic for story-telling, and his particular knack for depicting the lives of children, is unmatched.The Man Who Forgot Ray BradburyBy Neil Gaiman. Art by Maria Frolich.Depicting a lonely old man's descent into madness- Or so it may seem.He's actively forgetting the author... But it seems everyone else already has. The Firemen aren't using fire anymore.I'm sitting there trying to form a coherent thought after finishing the story, and I realize it was my first Gaiman story.I am dead serious.I didn't even think about it when I picked up the book. I've been meaning to read his work for years (*cough* and Bradbury's. *cough*) but I didn't exactly mean for this short story to be my first.Happy accidents, right?I met Joe Hill in a short story, too. I have a feeling my and Mr. Gaiman's relationship may end up being similar.Backwards in SevilleAudrey Neffengger. Art by Eddie Campbell.On a small cruise ship, halfway through her life and watching a father face the end of his, a daughter sacrifices the unthinkable.Haunting, with minimalistic art that captures the story.Live ForeverSam Weller. Art by Mark Sexton.When sitting down to speak with his childhood hero, a writer sees cogs and springs everywhere, and wonders what's always been there.Maybe my favorite story. Definitely my favorite art.Weariness.Harlon Ellison.Boy, and I thought Backwards in Seville had minimalistic art.A conversation at the end of the stars, with one man who was lucky enough to know one of them before he burned out.Who Knocks?Dave Eggers. Art by Matthew Dow Smith.A dark night, a dark lake. A lonely rowboat, a young girl dreaming.Knock, knock.Earth (A Gift Shop)Charles Yu. Art by Christine Larsen.Earthlings on a destroyed planent try to sell you useless crap.Honestly just frakking hilarious...Until it's not.Attenmore, Where The Dogs DanceBy Mort Castle. Art by S.L Gallant.A little boy's faithful little companion leaves our world. To comfort him, his grandfather tells him stories about Attenmore, the magical land where animals go when they can't be with us anymore. How cats and dogs dance and sing, and pigs play Dixie.It takes a bit of energy- a healing touch- to send an old friend there.Grandpa did it for Rusty, the good old dog.We've all lost a good pet or two. I have an old dog now. And when I think about what it'll be like when she's not here anymore, Attenmore, where the dogs dance, will be a comforting thought.Without a doubt my favorite story presented.ConjureAlice Hoffman. Art by Chris Evenhius.On a hot August night in a small American town, someone who isn't supposed to be there is.Is he friend or foe?Angel or demon?Lovely story. Generic art that I didn't *love*. But nonetheless, gorgeously written, and unforgettable.curtain fallI feel just a little bit cheated. The only Bradbury work I've read is Fahrenheit 451. And even if I did love it, I did only read it so I wouldn't fail English.Without a doubt, Shadow Show will sit on the coveted re-read shelf (on which sits about three books, counting this) to be experienced again after I've educated myself a little more.Welp. That's all she wrote.Thanks for reading, everybody.keep it spooky...
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  • Dimitris
    January 1, 1970
    Do you like mystery? Great artwork? Fantasy? Stories that will leave you endlessly wondering what happened? Chills all over your body when you reach that last page? Bradbury's books? How about Neil Gaiman and Joe Hill? Well, you're in for a good read.So many great little stories. Some of them amazing, some of them great, and some of them good. Also had one or two that didn't do it for me, but still. A Great little collection of mysteries that will have you wanting for more when you're done readi Do you like mystery? Great artwork? Fantasy? Stories that will leave you endlessly wondering what happened? Chills all over your body when you reach that last page? Bradbury's books? How about Neil Gaiman and Joe Hill? Well, you're in for a good read.So many great little stories. Some of them amazing, some of them great, and some of them good. Also had one or two that didn't do it for me, but still. A Great little collection of mysteries that will have you wanting for more when you're done reading. I especially loved the "Who knocks?" story. That was just pure darkness. Everything about this story was completely over the top. Many congratulations to the team. I'll definitely give it a second read in the future and recommend the graphic novel for THIS STORY ALONE to everyone. Goosebumps everywhere!Hill's story was great with lots of sadness and Gaiman's story was just brilliant, I also listened to his audiobook of the same story, but seeing it in comicbook form is just wonderful. It really is a next-level storytelling about reading and books. Truthfully, I don't really have adequate language to describe the whole thing. You just need to read it and be there without any disturbance. It was really deep and it was something that you need to read twice while agreeing with everything our "character" is saying. Totally recommend this collection!
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  • Sara Thompson
    January 1, 1970
    I can't say that I have read Ray Bradbury but I have loved the movies made from his books. I love the authors that contributed to this collection. With that in mind, I'd recommend this graphic novel.I don't know how it compares to Ray Bradbury's stories but I enjoyed the majority of the stories in this collection. As it goes with collections, it's difficult to judge this as a complete book. The art varies from story to story. Most of the art is pleasant and easy on the eyes. I didn't love all of I can't say that I have read Ray Bradbury but I have loved the movies made from his books. I love the authors that contributed to this collection. With that in mind, I'd recommend this graphic novel.I don't know how it compares to Ray Bradbury's stories but I enjoyed the majority of the stories in this collection. As it goes with collections, it's difficult to judge this as a complete book. The art varies from story to story. Most of the art is pleasant and easy on the eyes. I didn't love all of it, just as I didn't love every story.But you have Joe Hill and Alice Hoffman who make me feel this is a worthwhile read. The fact that they bookend the book is even better.
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  • Maggie Gordon
    January 1, 1970
    Shadow Show the graphic novel is an odd collection. Originally, it was a novel without the pictures, until the creators decided that they needed to release an illustrated version? There are a few standouts in the volume (Alice Hoffman for one), but I feel like the stories were shortened too much to be as powerful as their predecessors, and many of them simply were not designed to be visual. In any case, it was an enjoyable enough read that has prompted me to consider reading the original stories Shadow Show the graphic novel is an odd collection. Originally, it was a novel without the pictures, until the creators decided that they needed to release an illustrated version? There are a few standouts in the volume (Alice Hoffman for one), but I feel like the stories were shortened too much to be as powerful as their predecessors, and many of them simply were not designed to be visual. In any case, it was an enjoyable enough read that has prompted me to consider reading the original stories.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    In this book is a treasure-trove of stories to pay tribute to Ray Bradbury. The editors managed to have stories that remind me of Bradbury's stories.It was interesting to read this as it is a graphic collection of these stories. It is illustrated by excellent top-notched artists. I recommend this book if you like short stories and even if you don't!Disclaimer: I received an arc of this book free from the author/publisher from Netgalley. I was not obliged to write a favorable review, or even any In this book is a treasure-trove of stories to pay tribute to Ray Bradbury. The editors managed to have stories that remind me of Bradbury's stories.It was interesting to read this as it is a graphic collection of these stories. It is illustrated by excellent top-notched artists. I recommend this book if you like short stories and even if you don't!Disclaimer: I received an arc of this book free from the author/publisher from Netgalley. I was not obliged to write a favorable review, or even any review at all. The opinions expressed are strictly my own.
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  • Jon
    January 1, 1970
    Very nice collection. Charles Yu’s “Earth (A Gift Shop)” was perhaps my favorite, capturing that jubilant yet absolutely scathing humor that Bradbury frequently delivers with ease. Joe Hill and Neil Gaiman’s words regarding Bradbury’s influence are as engaging as the stories showcased here. Audrey Niffenegger’s offering is quietly touching, while Eggars offers a delightfully spooky campfire tale in the vein of urban legends passed down since forever. All together this is indeed a nice tribute to Very nice collection. Charles Yu’s “Earth (A Gift Shop)” was perhaps my favorite, capturing that jubilant yet absolutely scathing humor that Bradbury frequently delivers with ease. Joe Hill and Neil Gaiman’s words regarding Bradbury’s influence are as engaging as the stories showcased here. Audrey Niffenegger’s offering is quietly touching, while Eggars offers a delightfully spooky campfire tale in the vein of urban legends passed down since forever. All together this is indeed a nice tribute to a singular voice in American literature. No one is like Bradbury, and the range of tales herein reiterate that truth. We’re damn lucky to have had him.
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  • Quentin Wallace
    January 1, 1970
    This is a graphic novel adaptation of the short story collection of the same name (which I haven't read.)I thought the stories did a great job of capturing the essence of Ray Bradbury and his writing. The settings, the characters, the art, even the language used reminded me of Bradbury. It was also interesting to see how the different writers picked up on different parts of Bradbury's storytelling, showing that his writing can influence writers in a variety of different ways.If you're a Ray Brad This is a graphic novel adaptation of the short story collection of the same name (which I haven't read.)I thought the stories did a great job of capturing the essence of Ray Bradbury and his writing. The settings, the characters, the art, even the language used reminded me of Bradbury. It was also interesting to see how the different writers picked up on different parts of Bradbury's storytelling, showing that his writing can influence writers in a variety of different ways.If you're a Ray Bradbury fan and also enjoy graphic novels, I'm sure you'll enjoy this.
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  • Dawn
    January 1, 1970
    (3.5*)I really wanted to love this book, as I love the work of Ray Bradbury, but I found it very much a mixed bag; and was disappointed with a few of the sories.In my mind the best stories are: 'Conjure' by Alice Hoffman & 'Live Forever!' by Sam Weller. Both of which, I think, show the style of stories Bradbury himself wrote.And the artwork overall is pretty great, especially the story opening pictures by Shawn Pierce.
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  • Rob
    January 1, 1970
    I don't usually review comic books, (I'd have thousands to review) but I only found this one because it was linked to authors I enjoy on this site. Short story books are my favourite because of the variety, and in this case both in artists and writers-but themed on Ray Bradbury. I enjoyed all of them, and I think most people would!
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  • Wilde Sky
    January 1, 1970
    This book contains a series of short graphic stories.The vast majority of these stories didn't really go anywhere and read like ideas rather than complete works.Overall rating 2.5.Reading time roughly an hour.
  • Art
    January 1, 1970
    As a Ray Bradbury fan, I enjoyed these stories.
  • Ralph Carlson
    January 1, 1970
    Graphic adaptations of stories celebrating Ray Bradbury.
  • Ben
    January 1, 1970
    A little hit and miss, but that's how I felt about the anthology also. There's definitely artistry here, both in the visuals and the text, but it's not an essential tribute to the man.
  • Will Cooper
    January 1, 1970
    Anthology series with various authors and the best ones dealt with immortality via memory and stories. Some fun horror ones in here, but nothing extraordinary.
  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    eARC reviewThis kind of feels like critiquing a eulogy and as a work of admiration and love, I cannot make any judgements (well…there are probably ways one could, irreverent as it may be/seem, but I won't). However, I can critique the work as a comics anthology. What follows on is exactly that.These comics were written by some (purportedly) brilliant writers working with comic artists to make these comics 'in celebration of Ray Bradbury'. It seems like a good idea at first, but comic writing and eARC reviewThis kind of feels like critiquing a eulogy and as a work of admiration and love, I cannot make any judgements (well…there are probably ways one could, irreverent as it may be/seem, but I won't). However, I can critique the work as a comics anthology. What follows on is exactly that.These comics were written by some (purportedly) brilliant writers working with comic artists to make these comics 'in celebration of Ray Bradbury'. It seems like a good idea at first, but comic writing and novel writing are two different ball games and I don't find that these novelists transfer well to comics. Many of the images aren't interesting, just descriptive of the text adding nothing of their own.The first story is good even if the art was just okay. (2 stars)The second, by Neil Gaiman, was a great concept with good enough artwork, but it felt like the art wasn't serving any purpose really; like it was unnecessary. (2 stars)The third story's adaptation to comic format (I can't imagine in any way this could have been made for the comic form) is terrible. The art is kind of…awful. And the lettering (if it can be called that) is just plain lazy. Niffenegger's text is plentiful and weighs heavily on each page so as to make it unwelcoming at a glance and a chore when you have to wade through. The story is okay. It could even be quaint maybe but having to plough through the comic format was just not a good thing for this story. (1 star)The fourth story works well in comic format, though the pacing is rushed at times and things are just accepted meeting no resistance - perhaps this is Bradbury-esque though? (2.5 stars)The fifth comic is not a comic at all. As a story in and of itself, it is not one I would pick up so I don't want to rate it really… But as part of (what I understood to be) a comic anthology, it is unwelcome here for me. I like that it doesn't try in vain to convince us it is a comic like the Niffenegger "comic", but it just doesn't fit…AND I'm not a fan of the story. I can appreciate the rant about the use of words like "brother" and "awesome" though it sounds bitter and pedantic… It was an interesting anecdote and this story will probably be really, really appreciated by fans of Ellison and/or Bradbury... But I was indifferent on the whole and not keen due to initial confusion (a particularly subjective 1 star)The sixth comic was kind of fun in the way a story from Necronomicon is kind of fun. (2.5 stars)I really liked the art in the seventh comic. The illustrations are fun and say more than the words. They add to the script which is the purpose of the comic format. The story is funny, slightly dark and works perfectly as a comic. This is the calibre I wish the whole collection was at. (5 stars)The eighth comic was okay. The first half (with Marky and Rusty and Grandpa) was a little bland, but it could be described as sweet excusing the sterility. The second half of the story with Abbey and Cate feels out of place and very stiff and sort of…just…I don't know how many times I can rolls my eyes at so few pages. I'm not a fan of the artwork either - I find that as stiff as the way the story is told - but I am sure it will have its fans. (2 stars)>>NB. I can only assume these are actually two different stories (and I would probably rate rate the latter slightly lower than the former), but it wasn't too clear and I couldn't find the titles or end/start to confirm anything for myself after a cursory look. Either way, none of my ratings change and I have addressed each story.This collection would have worked better as short stories with occasional illustrations rather than comics.If you are a particular fan of any of the writers or have a keen interest in Ray Bradbury, you may yet find something to like in this collection of shorts. As for me, I was unimpressed.My official overall star rating is an averaging of the stories: 2.25 stars. My unofficial rating is 1 star (excluding the seventh comic which was great).
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  • Wayne McCoy
    January 1, 1970
    'Shadow Show: Stories In Celebration of Ray Bradbury'would seem to be a graphic novel adaptation of the book 'Shadow Show: All-New Stories in Celebration of Ray Bradbury.' The content has been greatly reduced, but the stories are still good.We meet a young boy and girl that find something strange on a beach, and we meet a man who has forgotten Ray Bradbury. There are story homages from famous writers like Dave Eggers and Audrey Niffenegger. There is a strange rambling bit in the middle from Harl 'Shadow Show: Stories In Celebration of Ray Bradbury'would seem to be a graphic novel adaptation of the book 'Shadow Show: All-New Stories in Celebration of Ray Bradbury.' The content has been greatly reduced, but the stories are still good.We meet a young boy and girl that find something strange on a beach, and we meet a man who has forgotten Ray Bradbury. There are story homages from famous writers like Dave Eggers and Audrey Niffenegger. There is a strange rambling bit in the middle from Harlan Ellison that seems more wordy and doesn't seem to match the rest of the book. The stories are good and seem to be adapted well, I'm just not sure why I'd recommend this over the original book with about 4 times the number of pages. This is probably a case where the graphic novel feels a bit superfluous, especially in light of all the content that didn't make it to this graphic novel. I enjoyed almost all of the stories, and the art, but I think I would recommend the book that it's based on first.I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Diamond Book Distributors, IDW Publishing, and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.
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  • Cale
    January 1, 1970
    As with any anthology, the stories here are a mixed bag, and some are pieces I was already familiar with (although I did appreciate seeing an illustrated adaptation of Neil Gaiman's wonderful 'The Man who forgot Ray Bradbury). None are outright horrible (although Earth: A Gift Shop did not work for me at all), and a couple are pretty special. Alice Hoffman's entry was the one I liked the most, it feeling the most like a Ray Bradbury story rather than just being a paean to the man. And Harlan Ell As with any anthology, the stories here are a mixed bag, and some are pieces I was already familiar with (although I did appreciate seeing an illustrated adaptation of Neil Gaiman's wonderful 'The Man who forgot Ray Bradbury). None are outright horrible (although Earth: A Gift Shop did not work for me at all), and a couple are pretty special. Alice Hoffman's entry was the one I liked the most, it feeling the most like a Ray Bradbury story rather than just being a paean to the man. And Harlan Ellison's story (barely illustrated) is striking in its look at death and what comes after, although his introduction makes for a more enjoyable read. I'd say there are more hits than misses, and the artwork is strong througohut. Your mileage may vary based on how much you enjoy each of the writers included and your familiarity with Ray Bradbury - I find it a little odd that the book intro and one of the stories actually repeat the same story about the man, but that's a minor niggle in an otherwise fine celebration.
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  • Frannie Pan
    January 1, 1970
    Shadow show is an anthology of peculiar and quite dark (sometimes creepy) short illustrated stories to celebrate the writer Ray Bradbury. It was a refreshing experience, for I had never encountered something like that.As always, when it comes to graphic novels, you must express different judgements on the art and on the story separately and then together. I wasn't a fan of the stories. 3 out of 8 entertained and moved me, had a well defined plot and characters; the others were dull or too much c Shadow show is an anthology of peculiar and quite dark (sometimes creepy) short illustrated stories to celebrate the writer Ray Bradbury. It was a refreshing experience, for I had never encountered something like that.As always, when it comes to graphic novels, you must express different judgements on the art and on the story separately and then together. I wasn't a fan of the stories. 3 out of 8 entertained and moved me, had a well defined plot and characters; the others were dull or too much confusing, too dreamlike in a negative way.However, the art was impressive. It was impressive not just seeing the art itself but observing how each different story had its own art and how each art specifically fit and blend in with its respective story. Needless to say, Joe Hill was my favorite.
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  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    Reprinted from the original collection of illustrated or graphic homages to Bradbury, this spread starts with some quality and big names, hits form later on with Dave Eggers, but mostly drifts into being pretty poor indeed. It must be just a standard third of the original, reproduced as a part 1/3, for this couldn't possibly be the pick of the crop. Harlan Ellison is pretty naff, some of the stories don't really take you anywhere, but then the brief – do something riffing off the inspiration in Reprinted from the original collection of illustrated or graphic homages to Bradbury, this spread starts with some quality and big names, hits form later on with Dave Eggers, but mostly drifts into being pretty poor indeed. It must be just a standard third of the original, reproduced as a part 1/3, for this couldn't possibly be the pick of the crop. Harlan Ellison is pretty naff, some of the stories don't really take you anywhere, but then the brief – do something riffing off the inspiration in any way – was probably too broad. On the whole it looks fine, and I didn't begrudge it much, but it could have been a whole lot better.
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  • Justin
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book in exchange for an honest review. This book contains stories inspired by Ray Bradury written and illustrated by several top notch artists. I am not familiar with mostof Bradury's work, I've only read Fahrenheit 451. I was hoping the stories here would be in that vein, but found them to be quite different in style and purpose.The writing style is in general very good, but not excellent. I also found the stories less engaging then the graphic novels I usually read (mainly Alan I received this book in exchange for an honest review. This book contains stories inspired by Ray Bradury written and illustrated by several top notch artists. I am not familiar with mostof Bradury's work, I've only read Fahrenheit 451. I was hoping the stories here would be in that vein, but found them to be quite different in style and purpose.The writing style is in general very good, but not excellent. I also found the stories less engaging then the graphic novels I usually read (mainly Alan Moore). However, I think this is more due to the story length then the actual writing style. The artwork was in general excellent.
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  • tyto
    January 1, 1970
    I received this from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.This is a collection of illustrated, adapted short stories from a collection inspired by Ray Bradbury. As in most collections, there are several good stories and others that are not so successful. I was pleased to see a story by Harlan Ellison, and I also enjoyed the story by Charles Yu. The art styles are extremely varied, but many of them are delightful. Other all, a decent collection.
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    Dear Neil Gaiman,Why do you have to like Ray Bradbury? Seriously, that guy sucks, and even though I do want to read your contribution to this book, I really don't want to read a bunch of stories dedicated to him. Can't you write about someone good, like George Orwell, or J.D. Salinger? Of all the authors you could've chosen to admire, why did it have to be Ray Bradbury?-Mike
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    I usually find it difficult to review collections of short stories but honestly, this book was amazing. I think half the fun was that I was listening to it so each story had a well chosen narrator based on the story/author/voice. There were only two stories that I felt were only "okay" but that's still not bad and so many were AMAZING! I've been inspired to read more Bradbury, mostly because I didn't realize how much I hadn't actually read yet. Bring on the audio books of short stories!!!
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  • Juddy
    January 1, 1970
    I'm conflicted, some of the stories were great and some others not so much. I guess there's also the fact that I've only seen a movie base on a Ray Bradbury book, so I don't know the man, so I probably wasn't the target audience for this book. Nevertheless, it was still entertaining. Joe Hill's story was by far my favourite one.
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  • Thebruce1314
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not really very familiar with Bradbury's work, to be honest... I picked this up because the mix of contributing authors appealed to me. After reading these stories inspired by Bradbury's work, and the tributes included, I may just seek out some of the inspiration.
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  • Juan
    January 1, 1970
    Out of 9 stories I would say roughly 5-6 were to my liking. Visuals definitely give the stories a new dynamic although I did not read the original source material. At least 2 of the stories art made the comic format irrelevant though. I would still say the volume gives me some motivation to read the original story book collection.
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  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    A beautifully illustrated graphic novel based on selections from the short story collection Shadow Show. Several of today's notable authors (including Neil Gaiman & Alice Hoffman) who have been inspired by Ray Bradbury celebrate his life and work with stories of their own. Each author writes a short explanation of their story and the mark Bradbury has left on their lives and work.
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