Bitch Planet, Vol. 1
Eisner Award-nominated writer Kelly Sue DeConnick (Pretty Deadly, Captain Marvel) and Valentine De Landro (X-Factor) team up to bring you the premiere volume of Bitch Planet, a deliciously vicious riff on women-in-prison sci-fi exploitation.In a future just a few years down the road in the wrong direction, a woman's failure to comply with her patriarchal overlords will result in exile to the meanest penal planet in the galaxy. When the newest crop of fresh femmes arrive, can they work together to stay alive or will hidden agendas, crooked guards, and the deadliest sport on (or off!) Earth take them to their maker?Collects BITCH PLANET #1-5.

Bitch Planet, Vol. 1 Details

TitleBitch Planet, Vol. 1
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 7th, 2015
PublisherImage Comics
ISBN-139781632153661
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Feminism, Science Fiction, Graphic Novels Comics, Dystopia, Fiction

Bitch Planet, Vol. 1 Review

  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    So, I loved the feminist slant, and I loved the in-your-face attitude of the comic. Especially the stuff about body image. LOVED IT!But as far as the actual plot went, I was a little disappointed.Maybe because I'd read so much hype about this one? I'm just not sure.In dystopian future women are arrested and imprisoned for being non-compliant. Just about anything from being overweight to outspoken can result in incarceration on (what is commonly called) Bitch Planet.There's lots of nudity in this So, I loved the feminist slant, and I loved the in-your-face attitude of the comic. Especially the stuff about body image. LOVED IT!But as far as the actual plot went, I was a little disappointed.Maybe because I'd read so much hype about this one? I'm just not sure.In dystopian future women are arrested and imprisoned for being non-compliant. Just about anything from being overweight to outspoken can result in incarceration on (what is commonly called) Bitch Planet.There's lots of nudity in this, but it's not the kind that pays service to drooling fanboys. It takes all the Women in Prison movies, embraces them, and then turns them on their ear.Even the obligatory sexy shower scene, gets a brand new twist.Although, the best part (to me) was reading all of the hilarious advertisements in the back of each issue. Make sure you don't pass these up!Spicy Cinnamon Taco douche...for the girl adventurer!And that's where this volume shines. It was all the small things that it called BULLSHIT on, that made such a huge impact on the story. These are the things that women are told to worry about every day! Does your vag really need to smell like some sort of a chemical flower? I'm gonna step out on a limb, and say...no.It deals with different body types, weight, color, and the general diversity in women, but it also deals with the attitudes towards women with...um, attitude. If you're outspoken and opinionated does that make you a bitch? Yeah, maybe. shrugs But is that a bad thing? Again, going out on that limb to say...no.Alrighty, as far as the story?A group of these Bitch Planet prisoners are going to compete in some sort of game, as the Female team. It's apparently being done to add spice to this Olympic Gamesish competition (<--still a bit unclear). Of course, the deck is stacked against them, there's a conspiracy with the higher ups in government, and public opinion is not in their favor. But the ladies may be able to make a statement (and/or kill a bunch of people in charge) if they make it to the final round of the games.I THINK.Hopefully, I'll get the opportunity to keep reading this one, and maybe by the next volume the main plot will be a little more defined.Overall, though, I thought the message in this was very cool. Recommended for boys and girls of all ages over 18. I received a digital copy from NetGalley and the publishers.Get this review and more at:
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  • Bradley
    January 1, 1970
    This series is SO DAMN REFRESHING. It is an absolute indictment against all kinds of double-standards, it reads like a play-by-play scrapbook of everything that's wrong with PEOPLE. It's not just men versus women. It's everyone against everyone, with the heroes being only those people willing to live by the "I just don't give a fuck anymore," standard. Good for them!Is this a book about modern feminism? Hell Yes. Is it skewering in bright satire everything that's wrong with us? Hell YES.Men are This series is SO DAMN REFRESHING. It is an absolute indictment against all kinds of double-standards, it reads like a play-by-play scrapbook of everything that's wrong with PEOPLE. It's not just men versus women. It's everyone against everyone, with the heroes being only those people willing to live by the "I just don't give a fuck anymore," standard. Good for them!Is this a book about modern feminism? Hell Yes. Is it skewering in bright satire everything that's wrong with us? Hell YES.Men are the obvious targets, of course, but the commentary about women who are complicit in the system is truly scathing. Add all this to a damn brilliant script and effortless character development and fearless willingness to show real women with natural bodies that are nude over practically every other page and equally IJDGAFA because they're on a prison planet designed for women, and you've got yourself a beautiful pink brawl of a graphic novel well on the way to becoming a personal favorite across any genre.Yeah. I'm white and I'm a guy. So the fuck what? It's like I've been waiting for this comic all my life. I've hated the way women are treated and treat themselves ever since I could even think for myself.I hate all the fuckwits that reduce people into tidbits and object lessons and self-reinforcing shamebarrels of defeatism. Most of my issues with YA literature revolves around the way it turns girls and women into the nightmare versions of themselves instead of just REAL PEOPLE.This here comic is putting all the crap thinking on a spotlight, and I love it. Love it. Love it. Love it.If you think I'm joking about the message, then sit down and read the short essays at the end. I'm so fucking proud of these women. All I can really hope for at this point is that it becomes a runaway global success that crushes the patriarchy by the sheer weight of Penny. Or it's own hollow ideals. One or the other, it doesn't matter. It's a WIN, either way.
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  • ✘✘ Sarah ✘✘ (former Nefarious Breeder of Murderous Crustaceans)
    January 1, 1970
    Well, well, well, look who didn't like a book everyone else loves!» Blurb: "Think Margaret Atwood meets Inglourious Basterds."» Me: "I don't give a damn about Tarantino, but please don't insult Margaret Atwood." It is the second time I read a graphic novel by Kelly Sue DeConnick. It is the second time that the first thing that comes to my little mind after reading a graphic novel by Kelly Sue DeConnick is: "ERR…"✎ ERR…because most disappointing feminist slant ever. ✎ ERR…because great premise bu Well, well, well, look who didn't like a book everyone else loves!» Blurb: "Think Margaret Atwood meets Inglourious Basterds."» Me: "I don't give a damn about Tarantino, but please don't insult Margaret Atwood." It is the second time I read a graphic novel by Kelly Sue DeConnick. It is the second time that the first thing that comes to my little mind after reading a graphic novel by Kelly Sue DeConnick is: "ERR…"✎ ERR…because most disappointing feminist slant ever. ✎ ERR…because great premise but poor execution.✎ ERR…because bland bland bland, flat flat flat, dull dull dull, one-dimensional characters. ✎ ERR…because barely there, uninteresting, should-have-been-amazing, paper-thin plot.✎ ERR…because, just like in Pretty Deadly, Kelly Sue DeConnick tries too hard to be original, and clever, and cool, and hip, and wow-I'm-so-awesome. And the result is an unsatisfying, jumbled mess.✎ ERR…because I don't like the art. At all. Because it reminds me of outdated 60s/70s B movies. Because the style changes so much from one page to the next you'd think the artist had a personality disorder. And because the color chart is all over the place. There is absolutely no unity here. »» And the moral of this non-review is: either this graphic novel is really a confusing mess, or I've had too much vodka again. I've had it with over-hyped crap. I'm outta here.There is lots of nudity is this one, so if it's not your thing, stay away. Well, given my rating for this delightful masterpiece, I'd tell you to stay away from it, period. But hey, it's your life, you can waste it any way you want.
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  • Nat
    January 1, 1970
    This review contains *spoilers*.I was feeling a bit under the weather these past few days, so this came at the perfect time for me to read and escape into. In a future not so far away, troublesome and offensive women are jettisoned to the off-world penitentiary commonly referred to as Bitch Planet.There's an incredible variety of characters that brought this volume to life, with my personal favorites being Kamau Kogo and Penny Rolle (issue three was my favorite because Penny got to be the star) This review contains *spoilers*.I was feeling a bit under the weather these past few days, so this came at the perfect time for me to read and escape into. In a future not so far away, troublesome and offensive women are jettisoned to the off-world penitentiary commonly referred to as Bitch Planet.There's an incredible variety of characters that brought this volume to life, with my personal favorites being Kamau Kogo and Penny Rolle (issue three was my favorite because Penny got to be the star). Her backstory was one of the most interesting ones!!Meanwhile, Kamau Kogo is tasked with pulling together a team of prisoners to compete in the all-male sport known as Megaton. Yes, you did!The women in this one were definitely the highlight, so when the focus shifted a bit from them, I kept losing my motivation to continue. I just personally loved the volume more when it didn't focus on the tedious men in "charge." And another thing: I wasn't expecting this graphic novel to be so enlightening, but it handled a lot of topics in the most informative way. It's similar to one of my favorite shows - Orange Is the New Black - in that way. They even both had a terrible cliff-hanger at the end... No one is safe.Seriously, damn that ending... the only silver lining is that the next volume comes out in October.And my only other (tiny) complaint is that I would've liked for more of a background on all the incredible women in this volume. So I'm hoping that will happen in volume two.Also, feminism in graphic novels? Yes and more, please. Overall, I'm really glad that I picked up this volume and cannot wait for what's to come next!*Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying Bitch Planet, Vol. 1, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission!* This review and more can be found on my blog.
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  • Elizabeth
    January 1, 1970
    You are non-compliant, prepare for AWESOME.
  • Whitney Atkinson
    January 1, 1970
    This book has such an AMAZING idea. a graphic novel about a prison on a separate planet that women are sent too for being bad mothers, too fat, an accident, etc.? Count me in. It's incredibly diverse, full of powerful women, and is just such a great satire about the patriarchy and I was on my way to loving it.But the execution of it is so sloppy. Half of this story takes place on Earth where men-- who we aren't adequately introduced to-- are just discussing Bitch Planet. I wish we could have foc This book has such an AMAZING idea. a graphic novel about a prison on a separate planet that women are sent too for being bad mothers, too fat, an accident, etc.? Count me in. It's incredibly diverse, full of powerful women, and is just such a great satire about the patriarchy and I was on my way to loving it.But the execution of it is so sloppy. Half of this story takes place on Earth where men-- who we aren't adequately introduced to-- are just discussing Bitch Planet. I wish we could have focused on the women on the planet instead and I got bored any time we were on Earth. Secondly, the way that the panels read was so confusing. Some pages would have you read completely across the spread because both pages made one entire picture, but then you would turn the page and it would go back to reading left to right on each page. It got really confusing in which order I was supposed to read the panels.Finally, the concept was just difficult to grasp. I don't know if it was because this is sci-fi or because it jumps back and forth between Earth and Bitch Planet so often, but I couldn't grasp the storyline at all. There's so much dialogue to slog through that's just so irrelevant and boring and in the end, it doesn't supply anything to the story. I enjoyed reading about the characters' backstories, so I wish we got more of that instead of flashes to Earth. I'm just really upset because I wanted to love this, but it let me down. I would contemplate rereading it one day to see if I can comprehend it better and raise its rating, but the fact that I was so bored during most of this will probably discourage me from trying this ever again :/
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  • Steph Sinclair
    January 1, 1970
    I haven't been reading a lot this year, because Life has been very unkind to my hobbies, but I saw Leigh Bardugo talking about this on instagram one day and so I decided to check it out. So let me start telling you how much you need this in your life immediately. The comic is a work of brilliance. It tackles patriarchy and sexism in a way that will make you angry and empowered simultaneously. It makes you want to give the entire world the one finger salute and while healing it. It made me want t I haven't been reading a lot this year, because Life has been very unkind to my hobbies, but I saw Leigh Bardugo talking about this on instagram one day and so I decided to check it out. So let me start telling you how much you need this in your life immediately. The comic is a work of brilliance. It tackles patriarchy and sexism in a way that will make you angry and empowered simultaneously. It makes you want to give the entire world the one finger salute and while healing it. It made me want to burn shit down and tap dance on my desk. I don't know. I just had a hell of a lot of feelings after reading this. OH OH OH. THE SHOWER SCENE. NO WORDS EXIST THAT CAN EXPLAIN WHAT I'M FEELING. Just read it. You won't be disappointed.
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  • Melki
    January 1, 1970
    Imagine a society where men make all the rules regarding women's rights and behaviors . . . and they want all women to be seen and not heard. They want them to look like FOX News bimbos, spout the party line, and have no opinions of their own. They want women to be compliant.Imagine . . . Sadly, it's not that hard to do.Welcome to Bitch Planet, gals, where it seems you'll spend half your life walking around nekkid. (At least you'll be allowed to have pubic hair - I found that surprising.) This i Imagine a society where men make all the rules regarding women's rights and behaviors . . . and they want all women to be seen and not heard. They want them to look like FOX News bimbos, spout the party line, and have no opinions of their own. They want women to be compliant.Imagine . . . Sadly, it's not that hard to do.Welcome to Bitch Planet, gals, where it seems you'll spend half your life walking around nekkid. (At least you'll be allowed to have pubic hair - I found that surprising.) This is where they send all the women who don't fit in . . . women who dare to pack on the pounds, women who object to their husbands cheating on them, women who refuse to sit down, and shut up; women who nevertheless persist. It's sort of like Orange Is the New Black here, but you don't take electric shop or sew panties. What you do get is a chance to fight the guards in a televised event, and you can just imagine what a fair and balance fight that's going to be!This was a five-star review for me until we got to the Megaton game; it was too much like The Longest Yard, only with no funny ha-ha stuff. Otherwise, I LOVED it. Carry on, ladies. Tug on your pussy-hats, and overthrow the patriarchy.Be NONCOMPLIANT!And remember, if someone calls you a bitch . . . you must be doing something right.
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  • ☆♥☆Kotyonok꧁꧂
    January 1, 1970
    Disgusting. Toxic feminity is rampant in this.My reviews for this volume issues#1-5, where I try to break down my thoughts on this repulsive version of equality where violence on men- specifically white men- is glorified, blatant over exaggeration of real life issues and just all-around ridiculousness.Issue#1- 1 starIssue#2- 2 starsIssue#3- 2 starsIssue#4- Did not rateIssue#5- 1 star
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  • GrilledCheeseSamurai
    January 1, 1970
    It's good. It's smart. I'm a dude. Doing any kind of review on this kind of scares me. Yeah. I'm intimidated. fuck you.The truth is, besides being scared, I just don't think I'm smart enough to review this properly. I mean, I'm smart, I just...I dunno. I'd just end up shitting my pants.So fuck it.Without getting into what this comic should mean to people...human rights, feminism, and all those smart ideas, I can say that beyond that, after all that, this is still a fuck-ton of fun to read. What It's good. It's smart. I'm a dude. Doing any kind of review on this kind of scares me. Yeah. I'm intimidated. fuck you.The truth is, besides being scared, I just don't think I'm smart enough to review this properly. I mean, I'm smart, I just...I dunno. I'd just end up shitting my pants.So fuck it.Without getting into what this comic should mean to people...human rights, feminism, and all those smart ideas, I can say that beyond that, after all that, this is still a fuck-ton of fun to read. What I mean to say is, even as important as it is, even without the agenda of a message, this comic is hella fun. The art is wicked - I loved every page - and the covers...every one of them is so badass. The characters scare the shit out of me. Both the people on earth and on Bitch Planet. The story doesn't pull any punches and, frankly, makes me feel kind of uncomfortable reading it.And I guess that's the point.DeConnick nails it. I applaud her and the success that this book is so deservedly getting.That said...with the way this volume wraps up, for the love of shit...can we please get the next one...!
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  •  ⚔ Sh3lly ⚔
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars - I expected to like this a whole lot more than I actually did. Expectations.I see why people like this. The stuff about body image and unruly women and women not being allowed to be "too" this or that. I get it totally. There was just something in the execution that fell flat for me.The illustrations were a bit meh and the storylines were meh too.Oh well! :)
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  • Char
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this feminist-driven volume!Imagine a woman being rude, or fat, or insubordinate. During this time period, women must be perfect at all times and if not, off to the Bitch Planet they go. I liked this more than I thought I would and am going to continue with this series.
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  • Jean Menzies
    January 1, 1970
    This volume did not let me down. I expected it to be very aggressively in your face with references to sex violence and lots of nudity because I'd been forewarned but generally speaking I think all of this worked perfectly. I thought the tone of the whole volume was really engaging. About mid way through a plot point was introduced that was essentially a rip off of The Longest Yard, this might irritate some (I'm somewhat indifferent although I did roll my eyes at the time) but I think it's going This volume did not let me down. I expected it to be very aggressively in your face with references to sex violence and lots of nudity because I'd been forewarned but generally speaking I think all of this worked perfectly. I thought the tone of the whole volume was really engaging. About mid way through a plot point was introduced that was essentially a rip off of The Longest Yard, this might irritate some (I'm somewhat indifferent although I did roll my eyes at the time) but I think it's going to be an important choice in moving the story along in future volumes.
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  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    January 1, 1970
    Imagine a world where the white men in power, rather than making and enforcing laws equitable for everyone, just remove the people they don't want to have to deal with from their vicinity, for any level of infraction. This is real life! In the news this week, it is people from specific countries and religions even with legal residency status in our country, barred from re-entry. In this graphic novel, it is "non-compliant" women, relocated to another planet. I decided to read it, thinking perhap Imagine a world where the white men in power, rather than making and enforcing laws equitable for everyone, just remove the people they don't want to have to deal with from their vicinity, for any level of infraction. This is real life! In the news this week, it is people from specific countries and religions even with legal residency status in our country, barred from re-entry. In this graphic novel, it is "non-compliant" women, relocated to another planet. I decided to read it, thinking perhaps it would feel like a balm, but instead it was a little too close for comfort.Politics aside, I felt a little dumped into the story, while recognizing that as typical comics strategy... but I could benefit from a little more back story and context to really understand everything that confronted me on the page. If a graphic novel is trying to tell a feminist story, do we still need pages filled with nudity? I'm no prude but it felt like overkill. There are other themes going on here, the performative expectation on female bodies, body image, and even the rankings within groups of women by race. I appreciate graphic novels but I think for this particular story I would have preferred a longer narrative like a novel. But I can give the authors and artists the space to further develop the story in their chosen form and see what happens.
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  • Jeannette Nikolova
    January 1, 1970
    Also available on the WondrousBooks blog. Ha ha ha. I can't  believe the time for me to review this finally came. You know, considering the fact that I read it half a year ago and I kind of never found the time and motivation to write this review. Except that now it is exam time, so of course there is time to write random reviews. Uh-uh.When I was introduced to the story of Bitch Planet by my comic book guru, I thought "That sounds so cool!" Yeah... about that.It was too much for me on so many Also available on the WondrousBooks blog. Ha ha ha. I can't  believe the time for me to review this finally came. You know, considering the fact that I read it half a year ago and I kind of never found the time and motivation to write this review. Except that now it is exam time, so of course there is time to write random reviews. Uh-uh.When I was introduced to the story of Bitch Planet by my comic book guru, I thought "That sounds so cool!" Yeah... about that.It was too much for me on so many levels. So much, in fact, that I once fell asleep while reading it.Bitch Planet is very harsh, kind of vulgar and trying to be hardcore, while failing to a certain degree. I swear, I have never in my life seen so many boobs. Even if I look at mine 50 times a day, I would still not see as many boobs in a day as there are in Bitch Planet. And do not be fooled into believing that those are boobs from hot sex scenes. They are just random boobs. Everywhere. Night of the Prison Beewbs.The overall feel of the characters for me was disappointing. I could care less for all of them. They were all depicted as tough bitches with basically no personality traits, aside from that. They were their toughness and their respective looks to set them apart from one another.And my problem with the story was that as cool as the idea is(and can still become), it wasn't clear what it was trying to be. Is Bitch Planet a thriller? Action? Horror? Some weird mix of Andy Warhol and noire detective novel? All of the above? What?But the art was overall undeniably pretty. It had a charm and a grit that I did appreciate. (But too many boobs.) And as much as this was an unsatisfactory first volume, it could possibly serve at least as a good stepping stone for the continuation of the series, which I am kind of looking forward too, because I have put this on my lookout list and I do believe there is a future in this story. (God... I say this every time. I am too big of an optimist. Eek.)
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  • David Schaafsma
    January 1, 1970
    I very much like the energy and originality and edginess of this comic's first volume. Women who do not fit into society's ideal image for women--physically, emotionally, and so on--get sent to Bitch Planet, and as they say on the cover, these women are "caged and [justifiably] enraged." Men take a hit in this one, of course, but women take their fair share of abuse, for buying into and helping reinforce societal standards. There's plenty of humor with the political commentary, which is perhaps I very much like the energy and originality and edginess of this comic's first volume. Women who do not fit into society's ideal image for women--physically, emotionally, and so on--get sent to Bitch Planet, and as they say on the cover, these women are "caged and [justifiably] enraged." Men take a hit in this one, of course, but women take their fair share of abuse, for buying into and helping reinforce societal standards. There's plenty of humor with the political commentary, which is perhaps primarily feminist, but also points to increased societal standardization/othering. Fake ads on how women can become acceptable and "in compliance" accompany each issue in the volume, and are funny and insightful and right on. Sometimes collected volumes leave out such "extras" but here they are smart to include. Matt Kindt does this fake commercials thing, in Mind Mgmt, and probably lots of others do, too, but this is to the point in the larger send-up of advertising/media in the world of women's image-making. The feel of it you can see from enlarging that cover. It has a retro feel (i.e., see my hippie phrase "right on," above) :) as if calling forth the Women's Liberation movement of the sixties, but there's updating to the present, too. There's also this retro feel of it from fifties films about women in prison, but it turns that sort of s/m "caged women"purpose of those films (made for men, natch, primarily) on its head and shows you women who are not just trapped sex kittens but really angry ass-kicking women. The presentation is very inviting. DeConnick's writing is solid and engaging, but Valentine De Landro's artwork is even a more attractive aspect of this one so far; funky and attractive, really inventive, and like I said, edgy. Not much happens in this first volume except world-building, to see what happens on Earth and what happens on Bitch Planet. We get to meet expected asshole creepy guys who send women away for being non-compliant with men's rules. You get some back story about a favorite character, the extra extra large Penny, but not so much about other specific characters yet. But it's a great start to this series, which reminds me a bit of other women-forced-into-servitude stories, such as The Stepford Wives (okay, that's different, I know) and Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale and so on, though this one is wilder, for sure.
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  • Donovan
    January 1, 1970
    "Hey Kids, Patriarchy!"Okay, I finally get it. I mean, I "got" what Kelly Sue DeConnick was trying to do last time, but on this reread, because I'm that dedicated to understanding, I really got it. And I actually laughed because it's absolutely absurd. "Earth is the father. And your father... has cast you out."Try to imagine the utmost patriarchal society. I bet it's not as patriarchal and bigoted as Bitch Planet, because in this book sexism has won. Women have "complied" and become crazy dietin "Hey Kids, Patriarchy!"Okay, I finally get it. I mean, I "got" what Kelly Sue DeConnick was trying to do last time, but on this reread, because I'm that dedicated to understanding, I really got it. And I actually laughed because it's absolutely absurd. "Earth is the father. And your father... has cast you out."Try to imagine the utmost patriarchal society. I bet it's not as patriarchal and bigoted as Bitch Planet, because in this book sexism has won. Women have "complied" and become crazy dieting, body-obsessed, subservient subordinate suburban slaves. And if they refuse or, you know, try to be thinking individuals, they're shipped off to Bitch Planet, the bitches! "Skins. They like 'em big like that. It's in their animal nature--big asses, big lips. You ever fuck a skin? Wild."It's no coincidence that Penelope Rolle, a (gay?) black obese woman, is singled out from the very beginning by the guards, and yet also by DeConnick because she's such a tough character. One of my favorite parts is when the Fathers have Penelope in custody and discuss her "treatment." They tell her she's insubordinate, aesthetically offensive, wantonly obese, and has disfigured hair, whatever that means. The guards hook her up to electronics which project her ideal self into a mirror, and she's exactly the same! The Fathers are incredulous. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it," Penny says. So yeah, this book does terrible things to women by a woman writer to illustrate how terrible women are actually treated in real life. They aren't shipped off to an otherworld prison, but women are still treated like shit. Paid less. Judged by their hair, weight, diet, makeup, clothing. Judged by their skin and sexual orientation. Objectified. Demoralized. Raped and blamed for being raped. Bodies controlled by legislation. Women's suffrage isn't even a HUNDRED YEARS old yet in America. And I'm a father now to a sweet little daughter, so this shit is really an active concern. I worry about her heading out into the insanity we call the "real world.""To peace, my friends...and god bless the bloodthirsty rites that help us to keep it."While DeConnick makes some very serious points with satire, it's also intermittently funny because it's insane. An offworld female prison? Nuts. Total compliance to men? Wacko. And the ad pages. These remind me of The Goon. Because they're in theme and totally ridiculous. Niagra libido pills? Spicy cinnamon taco douche spray? Hilarious!As a man with somewhat feminist ideals, this was a tough read (which required two reads) because women are treated so abhorrently. It's hard to watch what they go through. But that's the point. And as long as it's disturbing and obvious as bad behavior, it's okay to disassociate and laugh and be entertained. It's fucking terrible, right? But sometimes truth is stranger than fiction, because in some ways this book is spot on. I really enjoyed DeConnick's writing and humor this read through, and Valentine De Landro's illustrations (and covers especially) are fantastic.
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  • Macarena Yannelli
    January 1, 1970
    "Sos... ¿muy gorda? ¿Muy flaca? ¿Muy ruidosa? ¿Muy tímida? ¿Muy sexual? ¿Muy negra? ¿Muy lo que sea que quieran juzgar? Entonces tal vez pertenezcas al... ¡¡Bitch Planet!!" Clasificada M por contenido maduroEsta novela gráfica es una hipérbole del Patriarcado. Es tanto así que las mujeres "no complacientes" son enviadas al Bitch Planet un planeta/cárcel para mujeres. Las mujeres en este mundo solo sirven para el gusto de los hombres. Que hoy en día es una hipérbole que estamos tratando de alej "Sos... ¿muy gorda? ¿Muy flaca? ¿Muy ruidosa? ¿Muy tímida? ¿Muy sexual? ¿Muy negra? ¿Muy lo que sea que quieran juzgar? Entonces tal vez pertenezcas al... ¡¡Bitch Planet!!" Clasificada M por contenido maduroEsta novela gráfica es una hipérbole del Patriarcado. Es tanto así que las mujeres "no complacientes" son enviadas al Bitch Planet un planeta/cárcel para mujeres. Las mujeres en este mundo solo sirven para el gusto de los hombres. Que hoy en día es una hipérbole que estamos tratando de alejarnos lo más que podemos pero que en pequeños focos todavía existen, además de otras maneras de violencia de tipo psicológica como "imagen corporal perfecta" entre otras.Es una novela de gran interés. Te abre los ojos a las pequeñas cositas del patriarcado interiorizadas en nuestra cultura... ¡Espero que la lean! Yo me estoy comprando el volumen dos, ahora mismo :D Reseña completa en mi blog próximamente.
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  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t even really know what to say about this book, other than you should probably read it.I was a bit skeptical going in to Bitch Planet, despite glowing reviews, because I’d read Kelly Sue DeConnick’s other non-superhero ongoing comic, Pretty Deadly, earlier this year, and was pretty unimpressed with it at the least, actively turned off at worst. Still can’t decide which at this point. (The art was gorgeous, though.) But holy crap, I shouldn’t have been worried. This was AWESOME. Like, I nee I don’t even really know what to say about this book, other than you should probably read it.I was a bit skeptical going in to Bitch Planet, despite glowing reviews, because I’d read Kelly Sue DeConnick’s other non-superhero ongoing comic, Pretty Deadly, earlier this year, and was pretty unimpressed with it at the least, actively turned off at worst. Still can’t decide which at this point. (The art was gorgeous, though.) But holy crap, I shouldn’t have been worried. This was AWESOME. Like, I need posters on my walls. I’m not quite at the point where I’m gonna get myself a Non-Compliant tattoo, but perhaps I am close.You’ve definitely got to be into this sort of thing, though. “This sort of thing” being an intensely feminist, profane, satirical dystopian exploitation riff where women are sent to prison on another planet for being “non-compliant” (a phrase which can be stretched to accommodate all manner of behaviors–let’s just say if I lived in this world, I would have been sent to Bitch Planet long, long ago). And it’s funny! And sad. And gross! And my favorite character is the legit best, but I don’t want to spoil it, but it’s soooo good.Valentine De Landro’s art wasn’t drop your pants gorgeous like Emma Rios’ in Pretty Deadly, but its pulpy style with limited color palette works perfectly with the tone of the story, and it has fun with itself, while still managing to convey some heady stuff. I think I actually prefer it to Rios’, even though Rios’ is so beautiful. I mean, just look at that mother of a cover. Right up in your face with those birds. The whole thing is like that. Not for the easily offended, but fun and smart and incisive. Lots of nakedness and unruly wimminfolk.Where’s she supposed to put it, you guys???My only warning to anyone interested, be prepared for waits in between issues. Even though the first three issues were published consecutively, it was five months in between issues four and five, and two months in between three and four. They didn’t issue the first trade until almost a year after the first issue was originally published. Issue six comes out in January. If the pattern holds, we won’t have the next trade until November of 2016. I didn’t know any of this when I picked it up. Perhaps I would have waited if I did. It’s even worse than the wait in between Saga’s![4.5 stars]
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    So- I recently read Y, The Last Man and it was the first graphic novel I ever read. I was surprised I enjoyed it as much as I did. It was a much needed break from my regular reading. It spurned me to go check out what other graphic novels I might enjoy (as I wait for book 2 to become available).I found Bitch Planet at my library and was immediately intrigued. I really enjoyed the art work- which includes full page advertisements for silly things like “signatures” or “garbage removal”. It was kin So- I recently read Y, The Last Man and it was the first graphic novel I ever read. I was surprised I enjoyed it as much as I did. It was a much needed break from my regular reading. It spurned me to go check out what other graphic novels I might enjoy (as I wait for book 2 to become available).I found Bitch Planet at my library and was immediately intrigued. I really enjoyed the art work- which includes full page advertisements for silly things like “signatures” or “garbage removal”. It was kind of hard to follow along at first. The only thing that is immediately obvious is that the world is a hardcore patriarchy straight outta the 40s and 50s. Women are expected to stay thin and beautiful. They wear makeup and pretty clothes and lingerie to please their husbands. They raise the kids and cook and clean. If they are NC (non-compliant) they get sent to jail. One woman’s offense is literally obesity. Another woman’s? Dishonor. Poor motherhood. Unpermitted birth. For a short graphic novel- there is an overload of things to think about. There are even discussion questions in the back. When I started reading this, it seemed at first like a satire. The more I read, the more the truth of it sort of settled in. By the end of it, it didn’t feel like a satire at all.All in all I really enjoyed it and highly recommend it.Content warnings: (view spoiler)[ Graphic violence against women. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    I don't read a lot of comics or graphic novels, but Bitch Planet is the best I've ever read. I'm not sure if it's because it's the only feminist comic I've ever read, but I'm officially addicted and need more. The art is fantastic, the banter is wonderful, and the messages are perfect. And at the end of each comic there are ads, but not the regular marketing ads, but Bitch Planet ads. I loved this touch, and it really makes you feel like you're in this world. Some ads are messages from people in I don't read a lot of comics or graphic novels, but Bitch Planet is the best I've ever read. I'm not sure if it's because it's the only feminist comic I've ever read, but I'm officially addicted and need more. The art is fantastic, the banter is wonderful, and the messages are perfect. And at the end of each comic there are ads, but not the regular marketing ads, but Bitch Planet ads. I loved this touch, and it really makes you feel like you're in this world. Some ads are messages from people in the story. Some are for the "guard gear" that the guards of Bitch Planet wear. Some are just blatant reminders of the "non-compliant" women's places in this world. This is a dystopian future where women who are not "compliant" are sent to Bitch Planet to live out their lives. The women have a vast array of reasons to be sent to this planet prison. Some women are sent there from just not pleasing their husbands. This bind up has the first five volumes in this world: Issue #1: This comic is basically just setting up the world for you. You will learn the hard way that successful men can pretty much do away with their wives at the drop of a hat. Having a mistress is completely okay. Just send your wife to Bitch Planet. Issue #2: We learn more about our star, Kamau Kogo! She's an ex-professional athlete, who is wanted for Megaton; which is two teams, with the allowance of 2,000 pounds, who will fight to the death, while playing a game for the world to see. One team will be made of the guards of Bitch Planet, the other will be a team made by Kamau. Issue #3: This was my favorite issue, because it was all about my favorite character; Penelope Leona! She is the embodiment of loving your body, no matter what. I know it might sound crazy, but I connect with this character more than I connect with books I read full series of. Hell, I connect more with Penelope than real life humans. And the ending of this issue was nothing short of perfection. Issue #4: Kamau really shows how strong she is. Obviously she is physically strong, but she also showcases her mental strength by forming a new alliance (even if it was by brute force). We also learn that Kamau has a weak spot that will probably be exploited. Issue #5: This comic is the first game of Megaton. It becomes very apparently, very quickly, how the games are going to go, and how the guards care nothing about the lives of the Bitch Planet prisoners. Bitch Planet surprised the hell out of me. My only regret is that I didn't read it sooner, or that there is only one more single issue out as of today. It will make you angry, it will make you think, it will make you want to do something. I can't think of the last time I've felt so strongly about a graphic novel, because I never have before. Bitch Planet is what every girl should be reading.Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Youtube | Twitch
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  • Sesana
    January 1, 1970
    (Received from Netgalley for review.)The title kind of put me off this one for a bit. I don't know about you, but I don't relish carrying around a book with "bitch" in huge letters on the cover. But I heard so many great things about this book, and I love the cover, and I generally trust DeConnick. So I jumped at the chance to get it from Netgalley, and I'm very glad I did.Bitch Planet is a deeply feminist take on "women in prison" exploitation media, and it's damned good. It has all the action (Received from Netgalley for review.)The title kind of put me off this one for a bit. I don't know about you, but I don't relish carrying around a book with "bitch" in huge letters on the cover. But I heard so many great things about this book, and I love the cover, and I generally trust DeConnick. So I jumped at the chance to get it from Netgalley, and I'm very glad I did.Bitch Planet is a deeply feminist take on "women in prison" exploitation media, and it's damned good. It has all the action it would need to be entertaining, while seamlessly folding in the social commentary that makes it more than just a women in prison comic. See, you get sentenced to "bitch planet" by being a non-compliant woman. By being fat or a lesbian or getting in the way of your husband marrying his younger mistress or anything that would make you less than a perfect little woman. It's dystopian, to be sure, but some of the things said are uncomfortably close to things said every day. Which is, of course, what makes it effective.To me, the single best issue is the one that focuses on Penny, an unapologetically and happily big woman. It's perceptive and carefully written and powerful. The moment when it's confirmed that Penny really does love herself as is was one of the most joyful things I've read in comics in a long time. There's more than a bit of nudity in this book, which actually didn't bother me. The nudity is resolutely non-sexual, and I appreciate the diversity in body types represented. I think that it was included because it's such an integral part of women in prison exploitation, and DeConnick and De Landro wanted to desexualize the situation. And it works, partly because the women don't all look alike, and they definitely don't all look conventionally attractive.I was hoping that I would like this, but I was surprised with just how much that I love it. I am kind of disappointed that the essays that were at the back of the original issues weren't included in the trade. I would have loved to read those, too.
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  • Red Panda
    January 1, 1970
    I'm very much pro-sexual equality, because I'm not a cretin, but having a feminist message doesn't guarantee a good review from me, I'm afraid.Despite this book's overall message, I just found it to be a little too much Orange Is The New Black in space, despite the bait-and-switch of principle protagonist early on in the story... which was too much of a blatant 'Look! We're not really just doing OITNB in space!' moment for my tastes.Also, didn't Dark Horse do this exact concept in their (admitte I'm very much pro-sexual equality, because I'm not a cretin, but having a feminist message doesn't guarantee a good review from me, I'm afraid.Despite this book's overall message, I just found it to be a little too much Orange Is The New Black in space, despite the bait-and-switch of principle protagonist early on in the story... which was too much of a blatant 'Look! We're not really just doing OITNB in space!' moment for my tastes.Also, didn't Dark Horse do this exact concept in their (admittedly hit-and-miss) Grindhouse book just last year?Then the sport plot kicks in and, I'm afraid, for this old-as-the-hills reader, that just turned it into a copy of Harlem Heroes but with the racial issues swapped out for gender issues. Most of this book's readers will probably be far too young (or not British enough) to remember Harlem Heroes, so the creative team probably won't lose any sleep over that one.So, essentially, Bitch Planet scores very low in the originality stakes and the execution (which can often make even a derivative concept worth reading) wasn't good enough to elevate it beyond 'pretty entertaining'. Still, worth a read. The fake adverts on the back covers are hilarious (although that, too, is somethings that's been done before).
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  • Bee (Heart Full of Books)
    January 1, 1970
    This was recommended to me by one of my seminar tutors, and I'm so glad I picked it up! It was awesome and powerful, and I can't wait for Vol. 2!
  • Tori (InToriLex)
    January 1, 1970
    Find this and other Reviews at InToriLexThis was an awesome Mashup of satire, humor, truth and awesome visuals. I recommended this for mature readers over 18.  In this dystopian future women are sent to Bitch Planet for non-compliance=not following the manipulative script the ruling men, have decided all women must follow. The visuals are fantastic, and there's gems all over the place taking aim at all the crap society tell women they must be. Loving yourself for who you are in this world, is a Find this and other Reviews at InToriLexThis was an awesome Mashup of satire, humor, truth and awesome visuals. I recommended this for mature readers over 18.  In this dystopian future women are sent to Bitch Planet for non-compliance=not following the manipulative script the ruling men, have decided all women must follow. The visuals are fantastic, and there's gems all over the place taking aim at all the crap society tell women they must be. Loving yourself for who you are in this world, is a radical rebellion that is punished harshly. Most of this issues focus on meeting the main characters who will be forming a Bitch Planet team to compete in Megaton/ Duemila, a national violent sport that usually only involves trained athletes. But we also see glimpses of how warped the society at large is. It is dangerous to value woman as more than shells used for the service of men, and anyone trying makes themselves a target. There's  social commentary about how luxurious it is for the people who can exercise power over others to act all knowing, while the people they enslave are just struggling to survive. In this too familiar future, everything seems to be for sale, while violence is used unfairly and often. There is a lot of nudity in this comic, but it shows the many ways a woman's body can look rather than what's passes in our society as the standard. There's so much goodness to unpack, and I'm really looking forward to how the plot develops in future issues. I'm also interested in how race is addressed in this world. The back of each issue has awesome ads, that poke fun at normalized ads telling women that what is natural and normal, should be changed. This is a delight that pulls no punches, and should be a joy for all comic lovers and readers who enjoy feminist satire.
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    Gorgeous art, arresting premise, good storytelling. I have the great fortune to live in Portland, where Kelly Sue either (a) lives or (b) has stationed an incredible LMD to keep us fooled. I have gone out for nearly every signing that Kelly Sue has held, and taken the time to get to know her as a person (almost moreso than as a writer).Kelly Sue's a fascinating person - opinionated and generous, painfully self-critical and talented and expressive as soon as she gets out of her own way. Successfu Gorgeous art, arresting premise, good storytelling. I have the great fortune to live in Portland, where Kelly Sue either (a) lives or (b) has stationed an incredible LMD to keep us fooled. I have gone out for nearly every signing that Kelly Sue has held, and taken the time to get to know her as a person (almost moreso than as a writer).Kelly Sue's a fascinating person - opinionated and generous, painfully self-critical and talented and expressive as soon as she gets out of her own way. Successful in ways I could only envy - every time I see her table at one of the Portland comics shows, the lineup of people waiting to see her gets longer and more daunting. (Hell, at the last Rose City Comicon, I almost walked straight up to her table because I assumed the line of 30+ people was waiting for the bathroom. Barely walked away with my life.)The stories of Kelly Sue's that I like best as weird/dark and sarcastic as hell, expressing a point of view that is fuelled by incredibly personal feminism and socialism, without becoming that kind of smash-you-over-the-head screed that unsubtle creators throw at us when they're new to the gig. (I still remember my brother taking me to see one of his Toronto theatre idols do a one-man show about politics that couldn't have been more political and tone-deaf if it was written by a ten-year-old. We were both disappointed to the point of drink.)This book has all the markings of near-future sci-fi, and some great characters who I'm instantly interested in (and in the case of Penny, instantly in love with).
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  • Cat (cat-thecatlady)
    January 1, 1970
    note from re-read in may 17: still as good as I remember.THIS IS SO GOOD! so witty. feminism and science fiction, count me in!!full review here: https://catshelf.wordpress.com/2015/1...
  • Sabrina
    January 1, 1970
    Not in love with the story yet, but this comic deserves all of the props for unabashedly tearing down the patriarchy and celebrating intersectionality. The latter is particularly important because it is often neglected in more popular feminist works (Caitlin Moran's How to Be a Woman, for instance). I really liked issue 3 in particular, and wish it was more indicative of the comic as a whole. I also enjoyed a lot of the retro ads, which were funny and depressing. I wish the feminist essays that Not in love with the story yet, but this comic deserves all of the props for unabashedly tearing down the patriarchy and celebrating intersectionality. The latter is particularly important because it is often neglected in more popular feminist works (Caitlin Moran's How to Be a Woman, for instance). I really liked issue 3 in particular, and wish it was more indicative of the comic as a whole. I also enjoyed a lot of the retro ads, which were funny and depressing. I wish the feminist essays that I've heard were in the single issues were found here :[
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  • Crystal Starr Light
    January 1, 1970
    Bullet Review:This was awesome! I love the in-your-face, unabashed feminism. I love the diversity of characters. I LOVE PENNY.Kick some @$$ NCs!!!OH and it's ACTUALLY a dystopia! DO NOT FAINT!
  • Carla Estruch
    January 1, 1970
    ¿Qué pasaría si todo lo que el patriarcado nos impone socialmente fuera obligatorio por ley? Esto es: es ilegal estar gorda, cortarse el pelo de forma extravagante, ser más fuerte que un hombre, ser mala madre, ser irrespetuosa.Lo que pasaría es Bitch Planet.O las cazas al vuelo, o no las pillas. Fíjate en los detalles, en lo que esconde el diálogo principal. Siente los puñetazos de Penny y la velocidad de Meiko. Y odia al padre Tierra.*relectura en febrero de 2018*Me ha venido bien releerlo par ¿Qué pasaría si todo lo que el patriarcado nos impone socialmente fuera obligatorio por ley? Esto es: es ilegal estar gorda, cortarse el pelo de forma extravagante, ser más fuerte que un hombre, ser mala madre, ser irrespetuosa.Lo que pasaría es Bitch Planet.O las cazas al vuelo, o no las pillas. Fíjate en los detalles, en lo que esconde el diálogo principal. Siente los puñetazos de Penny y la velocidad de Meiko. Y odia al padre Tierra.*relectura en febrero de 2018*Me ha venido bien releerlo para fijarme en todos los detalles escondidos, en los colores y en la personalidad de cada una.
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