The Teacher's Pet
When a class pet proves to be more than a handful, the students agree they cannot keep him, but how will they convince their teacher, Mr. Stricter, who loves the strange creature?On the day the tadpoles hatch, the whole class is amazed—they've never seen their teacher so excited. Mr. Stricter has always wanted a pet, so he tells the students they can keep just one. The class chooses Bruno, the smallest of the bunch. But Bruno doesn't stay small for long. Soon he's grown into a giant, classroom-wrecking creature: He eats desks, farts for show-and-tell, and sneezes slime all over everything! Everyone can see that Bruno is trouble. Everyone except Mr. Stricter.With their teacher blinded by love for the pet, the students must step up and take matters into their own heroic hands.

The Teacher's Pet Details

TitleThe Teacher's Pet
Author
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Storytime, Pre K

The Teacher's Pet Review

  • Oona
    June 28, 2017
    Hilarious picture book! What a joy to read. It's a great mentor text for teaching irony. So much of the good stuff of this book is what happens "between the pages," what readers will think and talk about as they are reading and looking closely at the illustrations. It's also a wonderful introduction to learning about leadership skills. When their ingenuous teacher can't accept reality, the students schedule a meeting at recess to discuss how to solve the issue. That part is certainly believable. Hilarious picture book! What a joy to read. It's a great mentor text for teaching irony. So much of the good stuff of this book is what happens "between the pages," what readers will think and talk about as they are reading and looking closely at the illustrations. It's also a wonderful introduction to learning about leadership skills. When their ingenuous teacher can't accept reality, the students schedule a meeting at recess to discuss how to solve the issue. That part is certainly believable. This one is my favorite Zachariah Ohora book yet. The illustrations really capture the irony of the situation.
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  • Alex Ward
    June 26, 2017
    I really wanted to like this one, but it sends an irresponsible message about pet ownership to kids. Domesticated animals aren't just our play things that eventually get released in the wild; usually this is detrimental to their happiness, much less survival. And when our pets misbehave, that doesn't mean we give them up. We work to train them and care for them like responsible pet owners. Also, when they "chose one" tadpole, what happened to the others? I bet a bad pet owner like Mr. Stricter f I really wanted to like this one, but it sends an irresponsible message about pet ownership to kids. Domesticated animals aren't just our play things that eventually get released in the wild; usually this is detrimental to their happiness, much less survival. And when our pets misbehave, that doesn't mean we give them up. We work to train them and care for them like responsible pet owners. Also, when they "chose one" tadpole, what happened to the others? I bet a bad pet owner like Mr. Stricter flushed them all down the toilet.
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  • Edward Sullivan
    May 1, 2017
    Mr. Stricter is the only one in the classroom who can't see that Bruno is a hippopotamus, not a frog.
  • Virginia
    June 21, 2017
    I was so excited to receive my copy of THE TEACHER'S PET in the mail! I love Zachariah OHora's work and the idea sounded so funny and child-appealing. I wasn't disappointed. Anica Mrose Rissi's story is very funny. The tadpole turn hippo was a great surprise and Mr. Stricter was as lovable as his oversized pet. I hope the swallowing of the teacher doesn't upset children. Although I suppose as a teacher myself, I may be more nervous than they are. This picture book is LOTS OF FUN!
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  • Gmr
    June 25, 2017
    What begins as a class lesson in evolution and change, becomes a big BIG problem! While definitely an adventure, there is a heavy dose of imagination and fantastical-ness used here because really...I'm pretty sure that's how the particular pet they end up with actually comes to life. Just sayin'. Still, the trouble that follows will have kiddos in stitches as Little Bruno outgrows his name, his bowl, the room, and then some....A fun read for school days (or not) and a great way to explain why Su What begins as a class lesson in evolution and change, becomes a big BIG problem! While definitely an adventure, there is a heavy dose of imagination and fantastical-ness used here because really...I'm pretty sure that's how the particular pet they end up with actually comes to life. Just sayin'. Still, the trouble that follows will have kiddos in stitches as Little Bruno outgrows his name, his bowl, the room, and then some....A fun read for school days (or not) and a great way to explain why Suzy can't have a pony when you live in an apartment.
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  • Paul Orsino
    May 11, 2017
    Mr. Stricter's class has just finished studying the life-cycle of the frog. After their tadpoles had matured, the class returns them to the wild. When Mr. Stricter decides to keep one as a classroom pet, the class gets more than they bargained for. This book is full of surprises and silly humor! It makes a wonderful read aloud. Zachariah OHora's signature illustrations are as vibrant and beautiful as ever.
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  • Rochelle
    June 12, 2017
    The premise of this story is fantastical and reminiscent of The Ugly Duckling. Each member of Mr. Stricter's class, including Mr. Stricter, has a frog egg that has just hatched. Mr. Stricter's egg does not hatch into a tadpole, but a hippopotamus! Mr. Stricter has always wanted a pet and keeps the hippo, who the class names Bruno, and trouble ensues. This is a sweet tale where kids are the ones with common sense, and the ones who must make the adult see reason. The struggle for the perfect pet i The premise of this story is fantastical and reminiscent of The Ugly Duckling. Each member of Mr. Stricter's class, including Mr. Stricter, has a frog egg that has just hatched. Mr. Stricter's egg does not hatch into a tadpole, but a hippopotamus! Mr. Stricter has always wanted a pet and keeps the hippo, who the class names Bruno, and trouble ensues. This is a sweet tale where kids are the ones with common sense, and the ones who must make the adult see reason. The struggle for the perfect pet is real in this story, and the difficulties of letting go of a loved one are sweetly developed.
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  • Maheen
    June 3, 2017
    It is a very interesting story
  • Kirsti Call
    April 26, 2017
    I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. What I liked: The idea of an inappropriate classroom pet is hilarious. This book is filled with surprises in the text and the colorful illustrations really enhance the fun of the story. The title is a clever word play that makes perfect sense, yet will make parents chuckle. I especially love the diverse cast of children, animals, and of course, the oblivious adult. I love how the kids are the characters in the bo I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. What I liked: The idea of an inappropriate classroom pet is hilarious. This book is filled with surprises in the text and the colorful illustrations really enhance the fun of the story. The title is a clever word play that makes perfect sense, yet will make parents chuckle. I especially love the diverse cast of children, animals, and of course, the oblivious adult. I love how the kids are the characters in the book that understand and know what to do, whereas the teacher is clueless. People of every age will love this rollicking read aloud.
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  • Angela
    April 17, 2017
    Unsuitable Pets: This time it's the teacher in denial instead of a kid. A good reversal of this trope.
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