Dear Martin
Nic Stone joins industry giants Jason Reynolds and Walter Dean Myers as she boldly tackles American race relations in this stunning debut.Justyce McAllister is top of his class, captain of the debate team, and set for the Ivy League next year—but none of that matters to the police officer who just put him in handcuffs. He is eventually released without charges (or an apology), but the incident has Justyce spooked. Despite leaving his rough neighborhood, he can’t seem to escape the scorn of his former peers or the attitude of his prep school classmates. The only exception: Sarah Jane, Justyce’s gorgeous—and white—debate partner he wishes he didn’t have a thing for.Struggling to cope with it all, Justyce starts a journal to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. But do Dr. King’s teachings hold up in the modern world? Justyce isn’t so sure.Then comes the day Justyce goes driving with his best friend, Manny, windows rolled down, music turned up. Way up. Much to the fury of the white off-duty cop beside them. Words fly. Shots are fired. And Justyce and Manny get caught in the crosshairs. In that media fallout, it’s Justyce who is under attack. The truth of what happened that night—some would kill to know. Justyce is dying to forget.

Dear Martin Details

TitleDear Martin
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 17th, 2017
PublisherCrown Books for Young Readers
ISBN1101939494
ISBN-139781101939499
Number of pages224 pages
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult

Dear Martin Review

  • Aila
    March 1, 2017
    4.5 stars, rounded up because that ending was so full of hope and change that I teared (not for the first time while reading)Quick points before posting review:- From the very first chapter, I knew I would love reading from Justyce's point of view. It's a third person limited POV and we see him taking care of his ex-girlfriend who is drunk, despite breaking up recently. I knew from then Jus- debate team captain, scored almost perfect on the SAT+ACT, Yale-bound, boy after my own heart - was a car 4.5 stars, rounded up because that ending was so full of hope and change that I teared (not for the first time while reading)Quick points before posting review:- From the very first chapter, I knew I would love reading from Justyce's point of view. It's a third person limited POV and we see him taking care of his ex-girlfriend who is drunk, despite breaking up recently. I knew from then Jus- debate team captain, scored almost perfect on the SAT+ACT, Yale-bound, boy after my own heart - was a caring and charming and real character. But when that incident leaves him in handcuffs and an officer falsely charging him of car-jacking, he becomes shaken.Justyce's voice is extremely realistic, as his thoughts explore the intricacies of being black in a mostly-white prep school. He's direct and constantly curious, starting up the project "Dear Martin" where he would write letters to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr- "What Would Martin Do?" becomes a part of his daily mantra as he is exposed to constant racist behavior against him and his friends. - I love how Stone explored the relationships in this book, not only from the racist remarks from white to black people, but also black to white. Jus's friend Manny is black but has grown up in privilege, surrounded by white guys who carry racist undertones in their conversation. And yet, each of them are up for "equality"- the equality that only makes sense with their privileged eyes. They don't "see race," an argument we hear all too often despite how much it doesn't make sense. Jus also juggled a burgeoning relationship with his white debate partner - whom his mom would not have approved of - and a mysterious connection to a black gang in the neighborhood. All the while, he balance the thought of not belonging anywhere he goes, as the people at his preppy school will always have veiled racist remarks while the guys in the streets see him as too smart to hang out with them. Is there really a way of winning?- For a book that barely makes 200 pages, it packs a punch. The ending is conclusive and satisfying and almost bittersweet in a way- but that just goes to show how realistic it is. And despite that, there is a glimpse of hope and change. Readers will see a reflection of Jus's experience with what happens in reality. - One thing I would have wanted is more of an exploration with Jus's relationship with his mom and the black gang that takes matters in their own hand in the latter part of the book. There are some elements to those relationships that I feel like, if he applied to his Dear Martin project, would have come out with more learning experiences. - The dialogue was quick and natural and flowed superbly. Each characterization felt like the author took someone in the real world and inserted their character in the book- they were all so down-to-earth and extremely reflective of the attitudes people have today.
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  • Sandhya Menon
    March 9, 2017
    Beautiful, powerful, and nuanced. This is one book every school library NEEDS to have on the shelf, and every parent must have their child read, regardless of race/ethnicity or gender. It would go well paired with The Hate U Give and Jason Reynolds' work. The ending was bittersweet and stayed with me long after I closed the book. Highly recommended.
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  • Anna Priemaza
    February 9, 2017
    I thought this book would make me sad and angry--and it did, many times, but not in the big picture way I expected. I actually came away from the book feeling uplifted. Because DEAR MARTIN is a book that again and again asks, “why?” and then again and again answers, “because we're human.” Which is a sad, heart-wrenching thing, but also such a beautiful thing. Every single character in this book is just so profoundly human.DEAR MARTIN is a deeply philosophical book, but it doesn’t feel like one. I thought this book would make me sad and angry--and it did, many times, but not in the big picture way I expected. I actually came away from the book feeling uplifted. Because DEAR MARTIN is a book that again and again asks, “why?” and then again and again answers, “because we're human.” Which is a sad, heart-wrenching thing, but also such a beautiful thing. Every single character in this book is just so profoundly human.DEAR MARTIN is a deeply philosophical book, but it doesn’t feel like one. The entire read was fast and effortless; I felt like I blinked and it was over. And I didn’t want it to be over. I fell in love with teens Justyce and Manny as they struggled to figure out what it means to be black in a world of white. I fell in love with SJ and her brilliant, badass way of speaking up. I even fell in love with characters that I wanted to hate. I also loved the way the story was told. Interspersed throughout the narrative were news stories and the Dear Martin letters and scenes that were only dialogue, like a script. I swoon over good dialogue, and DEAR MARTIN basically had me pinned to a fainting couch. I loved it all.
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  • Stefani Sloma
    February 26, 2017
    Raw, emotional, authentic, and honest. Nic is such a fantastic author. Her dialogue is seriously on point. More later.
  • Scott Wisdom
    December 3, 2016
    Got to read a nearly finished version of DEAR MARTIN this week, and I was so impressed with what Nic Stone could do in this book. The experiences of ignorant racism and blatant racism Justyce deals with every day in school is something I see as a teacher. A Black kid decides to try and wake people up when their ignorance is showing, and those white kids get uncomfortable and angry. They've never been made to see past their privilege before.I love how Justyce tries to walk in the steps of Dr. Kin Got to read a nearly finished version of DEAR MARTIN this week, and I was so impressed with what Nic Stone could do in this book. The experiences of ignorant racism and blatant racism Justyce deals with every day in school is something I see as a teacher. A Black kid decides to try and wake people up when their ignorance is showing, and those white kids get uncomfortable and angry. They've never been made to see past their privilege before.I love how Justyce tries to walk in the steps of Dr. King while trying to discover the person he's going to be, the person who he wants to be. I also love how he struggles to find a way to engage with a world where he will have to deal with racism and ignorance no matter how successful he is. I love the way Justyce mirrors Dr. King, but also veers and questions, and finds himself making allies in unexpected places and ways.Phew, I said LOVE a lot in that last paragraph. No regrets. I can't wait for my students to be able to read this book.
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  • KT
    January 10, 2017
    I may add to this review later, because I'm still processing, but this has been my most anticipated read of 2017, and it delivered in every way. DEAR MARTIN should be required reading for teens (and maybe humanity as a whole). Compelling, nuanced, and thought-provoking, this is the kind of book that can open people's minds and, hopefully, even change them. Nic Stone did an outstanding job seeing and approaching the issue of racial profiling from multiple different perspectives. She treated the m I may add to this review later, because I'm still processing, but this has been my most anticipated read of 2017, and it delivered in every way. DEAR MARTIN should be required reading for teens (and maybe humanity as a whole). Compelling, nuanced, and thought-provoking, this is the kind of book that can open people's minds and, hopefully, even change them. Nic Stone did an outstanding job seeing and approaching the issue of racial profiling from multiple different perspectives. She treated the matter with respect, showing the myriad shades of gray that surrounded the events that occurred in Justyce's life. And Justyce--I ached for him. His voice tugged at my heart, and every new thing he learned and experienced because of his race made him a richer (if tragically so) character. Yet, the book isn't without hope. There is growth and beauty among the injustice and rage. Doc and SJ leapt off the page almost as well as Justyce did, and I wanted to hug Justyce's best friend Manny about twenty-three different times.I could go on for hours, but I won't. The fact is, you should read this book. Yes, you.
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  • Jillian Heise
    March 4, 2017
    A powerful debut that grabs the reader from the start and doesn't let go. An important book to add to the conversation about police brutality and race relations in America and how it impacts the lives of black teen boys. Pair this with All American Boys & The Hate U Give, and open up conversations with teens, and adults, in your life.
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  • Gwen Cole
    February 19, 2017
    This book will make you think. This book will make you see things you thought you already saw. This book will stay with you long after you've read it. Couldn't recommend it more.
  • Ryy
    September 8, 2016
    I had the pleasure of being a sensitivity reader for this novel, and I must say. It is breath taking a full forward of the book can be found herehttps://dembooksdoee.wordpress.com/20...
  • Andrew Jason
    April 24, 2016
    YOOOO, this book has an African-American character!!! And deals with the current real world problem of police brutality, but set in the times of MLK. This book is every bit of important, diversity-wise and reality-wise!
  • Meleika
    October 6, 2016
    Can it be 2017 already?? I need this book in my life right now. The hype is real.
  • Ashley
    September 27, 2016
    Get ready to be woke all the way up. Amazing characters, moving plot, unforgettable story.
  • Robin
    March 7, 2017
    It felt a little rough at the beginning, then suddenly I was done with the book! I raced through it, and feel like I may need to go back and read it again to pick up all the things I'm sure I missed. Well done.
  • Sonia
    January 7, 2017
    I read this book faster than most anything I've read in a long time, because I was so absorbed in Justyce's story and the fierce and beautiful way it's told here. To say that DEAR MARTIN feels relevant to our current times and our country's history of racism and prejudice and oppression is an understatement. It is a mirror, and the reflection is not something we all like to see. But this sort of reality check is absolutely what we need during this time of twisted "facts" and political bullshit, I read this book faster than most anything I've read in a long time, because I was so absorbed in Justyce's story and the fierce and beautiful way it's told here. To say that DEAR MARTIN feels relevant to our current times and our country's history of racism and prejudice and oppression is an understatement. It is a mirror, and the reflection is not something we all like to see. But this sort of reality check is absolutely what we need during this time of twisted "facts" and political bullshit, and it's exactly the kind of clear-eyed perspective that teenagers are often able to offer. I kept thinking, while reading this, how many of the youth I work with would love this book and would relate, and how much it would mean to them to have a book that represents the sorts of things they experience every day. I'm just so glad this exists in the world (or that it will very soon).
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  • S.F. Henson
    March 6, 2017
    DEAR MARTIN is so utterly fantastic that I can't put it into words. This story is real and raw and heart-breaking and thought-provoking and fury-inducing and heart-warming, all at once. It will make you think and rage and cry and swoon, and when it's over you'll immediately want to flip back to the beginning and start again. Justyce is the kind of character you don't want to leave. His journey through this book is one that I think a lot of readers will relate to. I think this book will start a l DEAR MARTIN is so utterly fantastic that I can't put it into words. This story is real and raw and heart-breaking and thought-provoking and fury-inducing and heart-warming, all at once. It will make you think and rage and cry and swoon, and when it's over you'll immediately want to flip back to the beginning and start again. Justyce is the kind of character you don't want to leave. His journey through this book is one that I think a lot of readers will relate to. I think this book will start a lot of needed conversations, change a lot of lives, and open a lot of hearts. It should be required reading for everyone!
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  • Claire
    March 21, 2017
    Nic Stone has created an excellently crafted window on the brutal challenges that young black boys and men face socially and in interactions with police. Justyce McAllister, age 17, among the top 4 of his private boarding school in Atlanta is accosted, cuffed and arrested while helping a friend- the assumption is that a young black man could only be trying to harm someone. Initially shocked, he realizes that no matter what he achieves he will have to face systemic racism. The first person narrat Nic Stone has created an excellently crafted window on the brutal challenges that young black boys and men face socially and in interactions with police. Justyce McAllister, age 17, among the top 4 of his private boarding school in Atlanta is accosted, cuffed and arrested while helping a friend- the assumption is that a young black man could only be trying to harm someone. Initially shocked, he realizes that no matter what he achieves he will have to face systemic racism. The first person narrative traverses a very difficult and painful year as Justyce ruminates on tragic and challenging events. Stone and her editor keep a laser focus on this one subject to keep the message clear. I could not put the book down. This would be an excellent book group book. In the future I would like to see another story that addresses Brad's situation, a white member of the Black Jihad a book that speaks to the socio-economic facet of police and social prejudice that all races face.
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  • Amy
    March 14, 2017
    Another important read. Should be read widely and discussed. The key is to have conversations that make us uncomfortable and acknowledge our built in prejudices, by standing, and how we can empower our students to do the same.
  • Sarah
    March 2, 2017
    I was lucky enough to get my hands on an early copy of this, and I can't recommend it highly enough. Penned half in narrative, half in letters, Dear Martin follows main character Justyce as he weaves his way through moral complexities inspired by a number of national news events. From page one, you know you're dealing with a good guy navigating an array of complicated relationships...social, academic, familial, societal...and I predict you'll fly through this book. It's totally gripping, and eve I was lucky enough to get my hands on an early copy of this, and I can't recommend it highly enough. Penned half in narrative, half in letters, Dear Martin follows main character Justyce as he weaves his way through moral complexities inspired by a number of national news events. From page one, you know you're dealing with a good guy navigating an array of complicated relationships...social, academic, familial, societal...and I predict you'll fly through this book. It's totally gripping, and every time I thought the stakes were as high as they could get, I was wrong. Be forewarned: I experienced moments of complete joy reading this book...I also sobbed. Read it, then take it to school and make your English, Debate and Social Studies teachers read it. Pass it to your friends so you can talk/argue about it. When you're done, read The Beautiful Struggle by Ta-Nehisi Coates if you haven't gotten to it yet. I'm going to be sharing Dear Martin all over the place, and I can't wait to see what Nic Stone does next.
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  • Holly
    May 23, 2016
    *Definitely* one of my most-anticipated for 2017. Can't wait for this one.
  • Jennifer
    January 28, 2017
    This story is important. This voice needs to be heard. More to say when it gets closer to release date.
  • jasmine
    July 28, 2015
    just the summary has me sitting here like :O because how real i want this a lotttt wow
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