Beyond the Kingdoms (The Land of Stories, #4)
Fairy tales are just the beginning.The Masked Man is on the loose in the Land of Stories, and it's up to Alex and Conner Bailey to stop him...except Alex has been thrown off the Fairy Council, and no one will believe they're in danger.With only the help of the ragtag group of Goldilocks, Jack, Red Riding Hood, and Mother Goose and her gander, Lester, the Bailey twins discover the Masked Man's secret scheme: He possesses a powerful magic potion that turns every book it touches into a portal, and he is recruiting an army of literature's greatest villains!So begins a race through the magical Land of Oz, the fantastical world of Neverland, the madness of Wonderland, and beyond. Can Alex and Conner catch up to the Masked Man, or will they be one step behind until it's too late?Fairy tales and classic stories collide in the fourth adventure in the bestselling Land of Stories series as the twins travel beyond the kingdoms!

Beyond the Kingdoms (The Land of Stories, #4) Details

TitleBeyond the Kingdoms (The Land of Stories, #4)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 7th, 2015
PublisherLittle, Brown Books for Young Readers
Rating
GenreFantasy, Childrens, Middle Grade, Fiction

Beyond the Kingdoms (The Land of Stories, #4) Review

  • Bella Alcott
    January 1, 1970
    OMG I just finished the third book and I am practically going crazy!!! I SO wish that I could go into time!!!! There is such of a cliffhanger!!!!!!!!!!!
  • Bookworm007
    January 1, 1970
    I have glimpsed my future, and I saw myself happy as can be with this book in hand.
  • Fafa's Book Corner
    January 1, 1970
    This book was absolutely wonderful! As usual it was written beautifully and had an amazing plot to boast. The book starts off with the late Fairy-godmother meeting with Hans Christian Anderson. Through their interaction the audience finds out that The Masked Man is in fact her other son Lloyd. They are not twins but instead a few years apart (it's not specified how many). The brothers happen to look exactly like their father so that's why Alex thought it was her father. Through this interaction This book was absolutely wonderful! As usual it was written beautifully and had an amazing plot to boast. The book starts off with the late Fairy-godmother meeting with Hans Christian Anderson. Through their interaction the audience finds out that The Masked Man is in fact her other son Lloyd. They are not twins but instead a few years apart (it's not specified how many). The brothers happen to look exactly like their father so that's why Alex thought it was her father. Through this interaction the Fairy-godmother decides to make a potion that will allow Lloyd to travel into his favorite books. Upon presenting it to him her heart sinks when he says that he has no interest in the potion whatsoever. She decides that the best way to please her son is to go into the hall of dreams and find out what it is that Lloyd desires. She finds that her son wants to overthrow her, become the next god-mother and cause destruction and mayhem. This is all that happens in the first chapter. It was very interesting to read about their adventures traveling into different books! I especially liked how Red was nominated to become the Lost Boy's mother. It was really cute to read. Conner used his magic for the first time without Alex. Bree and Emmerich's point of views come in this book. Alex's thing with King Arthur was unexpected along with Mother Goose and Merlin. I can actually see both couples working out but it's really weird considering that I was hoping that Alex would get back with Rook. Maybe she will, we'll just have to wait and see. I was pretty surprised that Mother Goose chose to stay in Camelot with Merlin. But whatever the case is she seems really happy and she did mention that whenever the twins need her she would come. As a parting gift she gives Alex Lester. When I read about Robin Hood and Peter Pan I was pretty annoyed with them. Peter had this thing for imitating Conner and Robbin Hood had a pretty large ego and yelled rather than speaking. I'm not sure what they are like in the original stories but this is what they are like in this book. The audience also discovers the identity of The Masked Man's son. The villain's for this book were as usual well done. I personally found the witches to be more intimidating than The Masked Man. The villains from the stories didn't play that big of a role. I can't wait to read about Red kicking Morina's (Thank you Alana for correcting me!) ass. Overall I am very excited to read the last book. I can hardly wait!
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  • Elise
    January 1, 1970
    Can't wait- after the end of the third I need to read this!Update-I loved it, the different book characters added a nice touch. I didn't like it quite as much as the first few for some reason, but still a nice continuation of the series
  • Tessa
    January 1, 1970
    I haven't even read it but I know it's gonna be AWESOME!!!!!!!
  • Addy Lee
    January 1, 1970
    This was a GREAT book, but Chris Colpher needs to HURRY UP!!! There is to big of a cliff hanger to be contained any longer. Please FINISH THE BOOK SO I CAN READ IT!!! It is an amazing series, keep writing Chris.
  • Jess Cullity
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so excited for this book to come out!! I have read the first three and can't wait till the fourth! It is a great series, I recommend it for 9-13 years of age!!
  • Aaron
    January 1, 1970
    Can not wait!!! This series is the best!!!! Loved the ending in the last book! But is it really there dad or a twin?
  • Lila Webb
    January 1, 1970
    I cannot wait for the next book!!! I wish this series could go on forever!!!
  • Jillian Daniels
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. It was more of a filler book leading to the final battle in the last book with the masked man. I am glad we found out that the masked man is not the twins father, but it was equally saddening to find out that he is in fact dead. I enjoyed the new characters in the novel, and loved reading through many fairy tales that Disney has made movies for. I just really liked this book. I wish there was more action which is why it's missing the .5 stars, but I still really loved it. Also, Alex's 4.5 stars. It was more of a filler book leading to the final battle in the last book with the masked man. I am glad we found out that the masked man is not the twins father, but it was equally saddening to find out that he is in fact dead. I enjoyed the new characters in the novel, and loved reading through many fairy tales that Disney has made movies for. I just really liked this book. I wish there was more action which is why it's missing the .5 stars, but I still really loved it. Also, Alex's new love interest is perfect but I love her old one as well and now I'm very conflicted and don't know who I like. If I can't pick, how is Alex going to!!!! Can't wait for the last book!!!
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  • Gwendlyn
    January 1, 1970
    The 3rd book left me in suspense, so I'm way excited to read the 4th!!! Here's a giveaway to the ending...the dad is still alive!!!!!!!!
  • Mimi 'Pans' Herondale
    January 1, 1970
    Despite this being my least favorite from the series... I STILL LOVE IT!!
  • Evelyn
    January 1, 1970
    I have to be careful I don't slip into an excitement coma.
  • Chelsea
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not sure if this one was a bit lacking compared to the first two, or it was just me, but I found this one to be mostly filler.There was around 100 pages of set up alone. I wasn't necessarily interested in that; I wanted to see Neverland and Oz!I know I've said this before, but it really bothers me that every single word with even slight significance to what's happening is italicized. I just feel like that could be toned down quite a bit.I mean, I still really like characters- especially Red! I'm not sure if this one was a bit lacking compared to the first two, or it was just me, but I found this one to be mostly filler.There was around 100 pages of set up alone. I wasn't necessarily interested in that; I wanted to see Neverland and Oz!I know I've said this before, but it really bothers me that every single word with even slight significance to what's happening is italicized. I just feel like that could be toned down quite a bit.I mean, I still really like characters- especially Red! She's quite hilarious and I really enjoy every scene she's in.I really enjoyed book three, but I didn't feel like much happened in this one. As far as advancements in plot, twists and turns, it felt very lackluster.I really hope I'm not outgrowing books like these, since I do enjoy reading middle grade once in a while. I hope the next one steps it up a bit, and I bet it will, being that we're preparing for battle by the end!
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  • Adiva
    January 1, 1970
    I NEED THIS BOOK! IT HOLDS THE KEY TO MY HAPPINESS! CHRIS WRITES LIKE NO ONE ELSE!!
  • Thibaut Nicodème
    January 1, 1970
    Well. That took a surprisingly dark turn.But…you know, this book is great. Also, I love that it's basically tying together elements from the entire series and building up. Yay for no more fetch quest! (Well, there's still one, because tradition, but it only takes a couple chapters)There's just so much for the next book to pay off on, though. That's one huge escalation compared to the previous, mostly self-contained books. And I love it so much.Aside from that, it bears repeating that Chris Colfe Well. That took a surprisingly dark turn.But…you know, this book is great. Also, I love that it's basically tying together elements from the entire series and building up. Yay for no more fetch quest! (Well, there's still one, because tradition, but it only takes a couple chapters)There's just so much for the next book to pay off on, though. That's one huge escalation compared to the previous, mostly self-contained books. And I love it so much.Aside from that, it bears repeating that Chris Colfer's writing and humor speak to me, so I really have no complaints there. Though I am curious just how much this book is really still a children's book, and not in a "it's good and I like it as an adult so it can't be a child's book" way (I love plenty of children's stuff, and they're children's stuff) but more in a "can children really appreciate this sort of jokes/deviation from the original?" kind of way. Oh well.I have but one complaint to make, and it's this: did Alex really need another love interest? And another doomed one at that? (Though I guess he could always come back. There would be room—and justification—for it.)Anyway, this book is great, this series is great, go read it.
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  • Andis / Slytherin 🐍
    January 1, 1970
    Chris Colfer did it again
  • Sriya Mudumba
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVE THE LAND OF STORIES SERIES
  • Karla
    January 1, 1970
    Ok, siempre que termino un libro de esta saga digo que lo devoré, pero esta ocasión fue mucho más rápido que las anteriores; amé como el autor combino los cuentos de hadas con historias clásicas como “El Rey Arturo” y “Robin Hood”. Me encantan todos los personajes, la trama, la forma en que todo va desarrollándose y ese final fue de 😱 quiero ya el quinto libro, creo que me comeré las uñas de los nervios, lo que me pone algo melancólica es que ya me acerco al final de esta saga que se ha converti Ok, siempre que termino un libro de esta saga digo que lo devoré, pero esta ocasión fue mucho más rápido que las anteriores; amé como el autor combino los cuentos de hadas con historias clásicas como “El Rey Arturo” y “Robin Hood”. Me encantan todos los personajes, la trama, la forma en que todo va desarrollándose y ese final fue de 😱 quiero ya el quinto libro, creo que me comeré las uñas de los nervios, lo que me pone algo melancólica es que ya me acerco al final de esta saga que se ha convertido sin duda alguna en una de mis favoritas para toda la vida ❣️
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  • Corey
    January 1, 1970
    The Land of Stories: Beyond The Kingdoms is the fourth book in The Land of Stories series. It is about twins, Alex and Conner Bailey. In this book Alex and Conner are looking for the Masked Man, who Alex thinks is their deceased father. They are looking for him because he possesses a magical and powerful potion that turns any book it touches into a portal that leads into that certain book. The overall goal of the Masked Man is to gather an army of literature’s worst villains so that he can overt The Land of Stories: Beyond The Kingdoms is the fourth book in The Land of Stories series. It is about twins, Alex and Conner Bailey. In this book Alex and Conner are looking for the Masked Man, who Alex thinks is their deceased father. They are looking for him because he possesses a magical and powerful potion that turns any book it touches into a portal that leads into that certain book. The overall goal of the Masked Man is to gather an army of literature’s worst villains so that he can overthrow the Land of Stories. Because of this, Alex and Conner gather a group of friends to help look for him. With this group of friends, Alex and Conner follow the Masked Man through the Land of Oz, Neverland, Camelot, etc. Will they catch up with the Masked Man? Or will they be too late? I personally, really liked this book. I liked this book because of the plot. I liked the plot because it was easy to follow. For example, each chapter is about a different subject, making it easy to know what is going on at all times. I also liked this book because of the characters. I liked the characters because they were people/creatures from storybooks. For example, some of the characters were Mother Goose, Jack (from “Jack and The Beanstalk”), Goldilocks, Red Riding Hood and many others. To me, this writing is powerful. It is powerful because in the book there is a set of boy and girl twins named Alex and Conner, and I am a twin with a girl, just like Conner. Also Alex’s names starts with an A and my twins name Abby, starts with an A and Conner’s name starts with a C and my name Corey, starts with a C. I would recommend this book to anyone that likes adventure, action, or fantasy. I will continue to read The Land of Stories series, when the next book comes out. Overall, I think The Land of Stories: Beyond The Kingdoms is a great book, with an amazing storyline, that anyone should read if they are interested in adventure, action, or fantasy.
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  • Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    I NEED to read this one. I WILL go CRAZY if I don't.
  • Leona Carstairs
    January 1, 1970
    Real Rating: 3.5 starsMy least favorite from the series, but it was still an enjoyable adventure!
  • Davidv42
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was a great book with a lot of adventure.
  • Devon Flaherty
    January 1, 1970
    The Land of Stories series, by Chris Colfer, published from 2012-2015 by Little Brown. The series consists of four books so far, and Colfer says the series will end with the fifth book, assumed to be published in 2016. I read the series because my daughter–and just about every other kid her age–is in to the series, and there was no way she was waiting until next year to read the first four.The series is: The Wishing Spell The Enchantress Returns A Grimm Warning Beyond the Kingdoms An un-announce The Land of Stories series, by Chris Colfer, published from 2012-2015 by Little Brown. The series consists of four books so far, and Colfer says the series will end with the fifth book, assumed to be published in 2016. I read the series because my daughter–and just about every other kid her age–is in to the series, and there was no way she was waiting until next year to read the first four.The series is: The Wishing Spell The Enchantress Returns A Grimm Warning Beyond the Kingdoms An un-announced fifth book At least three spin-offs, coming out later this yearI really don’t like giving scathing reviews. But I don’t know if there is any other way for me to do this. I want to be all nice and give Chris Colfer a pat on his talented back, but for this, I can not. Absolutely. Can. Not.I’m not exactly sure what it is about this series: the idea, the cover art, the marketing… but you want to like it. In fact, even as you are reading it, you still want to like the story. But there are so many obstacles, so many many obstacles, which begin with predictable and been-done. I knew almost all of the outcomes from near the beginning. I love the GoodReads review from Brett Axel, that asks, “What if C.S. Lewis, instead of honing his writing skills, watched lots of Shrek and Hoodwinked movies?” We are already getting to the point where we’ve seen way too much fractured fairy tale, and this one takes the been-done cake.Which in itself would not be terrible. Doing something “old” well justifies itself if you do it well enough. But this one, not even close. Let’s just jump right in.CHRIS COLFERMy daughter mentions frequently that mostly girls are drawn to the series. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that only girls are going to tolerate all the outfit descriptions. Every time we encounter a new character, action pauses and Colfer gives a straight-forward, bland description. Example: “The Snow Queen was a tall woman with a large white fur coat, a snowflake crown, and a cloth wrapped around her eyes. Her skin was so pale and frostbitten it was practically blue. She had a strong jaw and tiny jagged teeth.” (By the way, where are the serial commas in that?) Mostly what a reader gets from this book series are prompts to imagine the story along with the writer. Mostly girls are going to enjoy this type of visual, especially about skin tone, clothing, and hair, not to mention the castles, throne rooms, and thrones. Then couple all that with the terrible action scenes. No, really terrible, and boys just aren’t going to be quite as interested.But that’s just the tip of the iceberg, a random introduction to the issues with this series. Here’s a list of some of the many, many things that constantly distracted me from enjoying the books (and yes, I read every word of the available books): Remedial writing. I just couldn’t get past it. I would swear Colfer wrote this as a teenager, or even a junior-higher. Distracting and over-used adverbs Slang. Modern, timely phraseology and expressions Dangling pronouns Inconsistencies Misused words, like “got ahold of” and “dived” Terrible action scenes (which don’t always make spatial sense) Abbreviated heightened-tension areas and drawn out other areas Confusion Swear words? (Colfer has intimated that this series is for the kid in us grown-ups, but it is clearly written for a middle grades audience) Geographical issues Hyperbole! Lots of “always,” “never,” mixed with “almost never,” and “nearly always,” etc. Telling, not showing: like the worst I’ve seen Passive verbs Passive language Coincidences! not obstacles Mixed prepositions Complete lack of flow (writing intuition) Jarring perspective shifts Unrealistic reactions Timing issues (especially while characters are conversing) Hackneyed conversation A blatant lack of editing, including obvious spelling and grammar mistakes. Chandler is printed as “chandelier”?!?If you name a writing rule, it was broken ten ways.I have to mention it again–and I also want to point out that I have company in this opinion–that I really felt like I was reading the work of a very determined teenager. And while I applaud the effort, I would rather see the content in someone’s more capable hands. Or not at all… I mean, this story has been told before, and it wasn’t nearly as cheesy the first time around.What I really wonder–and was even distracted by the thought as I read–was if Colfer should have written this series as a screenplay, instead. Especially when you read sentences like this: “Reruns of a dramatic television show set in outer space did nothing to stop his procrastination.” Or, “The Enchantress forced out a theatrical laugh that did little to comfort him.” Dramatic television show? Theatrical laugh? This would be great for staging direction.And the thought is furthered by all the telling, instead of showing. Like this: “The Evil Queen looked down at him coldly. She had no sympathy left inside her for anyone.”By the time I got to the second book, I was hoping the writing had drastically improved with the series’ popularity. Even the first couple paragraphs have you going. But then right there, near the beginning, I was sad to be submitted to a terrible (and slightly insulting), in-no-way-covert attempt at arguing with his critics. Colfer highjacks a character to argue for him that writing does not need to be “high” writing, as long as it has passion. But let’s be honest. Simple writing includes the likes of Ernest Hemingway and William Carlos William’s wheelbarrow poem. The distinction between “simple” writing and “high” writing is not one between “good” and “bad,” or even between “passion” and “dispassion,” so Colfer is arguing oranges and apples, and doing it in the wrong place, besides. Passion may be a boon, but it does not make up for other things, like hard work, practice, education, natural talent, quality, etc. It’s like Colfer’s arguing for the participation award. Let’s compare these “simple” sentences:“so much depends / upon // a red wheel / barrow // glazed with rain / water // beside the white / chickens.” -William Carlos Williams, “The Red Wheelbarrow”“‘They’ll keep out of my way,’ she insisted. ‘It takes two to make an accident’” -F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby“‘Fish,” he said softly, aloud, ‘I’ll stay with you until I’m dead.'” -Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea“Aunty had a way of declaring What Is Best For The Family, and I suppose her coming to live with us was in that category.” -Harper Lee, To Kill a MockingbirdAnd I’ll have you know, as beautiful as all this writing is, Colfer has better ratings just about anywhere. Oh. My. Goodness.I was so frustrated at one point, reading the book, that I stopped on the sentence I was at and asked, how would I re-write this? The sentence then went from “What had once been an imposing structure was just a massive pile of stone bricks and pieces of wood now,” to: What was once a majestic fortress had been reduced to a mountain of broken stone and splintered wood. Do you need me to walk you through the problems with the first sentence? It’s weak, imprecise, choppy, anachronistic (dimension-speaking), and distracting. I could do this to any sentence in the whole series, except for (maybe) the first paragraph of the third book, which Colfer seems to have polished up especially well… that is, until a carriage is shooting “like a cannonball” through a dense forest with a narrow, curvy path.The real battle here is NOT whether or not Colfer’s style is simple, but whether it’s bad or worse and whether or not that means we should avoid reading it and discourage our children as well. Should we swallow a very popular book and all its bad art with its vaguely intriguing story and color-matching faeries in order to have some entertainment? One of the things that can really drive a person crazy in the arts biz is just this quandary. Because, while people swallow bad art in the name of being entertained (or titillated) every day, there are so many artists out there willing and trying to provide a product that is both beautiful and entertaining. In this sense, it matters more who holds the keys to the kingdom and not who’s making royalty-worthy art.And why aspire to great, or even good art, anyhow? What if no one wants it? Is the aesthetic a value unto itself? Is it a question of truth? Or reality? Or physicality: symmetry and alliteration? Or a Platonic form or God-ward longing? Are truth and beauty their own rewards? And am I in the position to encourage others to find the gems among the rough and discourage the fool’s gold?Yes, I suppose that is exactly why I write reviews. After all, I don’t get paid for telling you if a book series stinks or if a novel deserves a standing ovation. And not that I am always correct in my reading. But while on one hand I want to be gentle and kind, I also feel excited to exalt the worthy or to push the mediocre to rise to the occasion.So in the end, I find this extremely popular series to be terrible to a fault. My daughter reads it. No, she loves it. She is ten, and she anxiously awaits the next book, which I will buy for her. I would not say that reading bad literature is exactly harmless fun, but I will point out that I survived far worse than Land of Stories, and I expect my daughter to–through a life of reading and conversations with myself and others–eventually see the series for what it really is. She’ll probably fall in line with the rest of us, War and Peace under one arm and a battered old copy of The Wishing Spell under the other.***REVIEW WRITTEN FOR THE DEVON TREVARROW FLAHERTY/STARVING ARTIST BLOG***
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  • ella
    January 1, 1970
    There were a few flaws, but overall, Beyond the Kingdoms will be rated five stars. It's one of my new favourites, and it keeps you wanting to keep turning the pages.In the fourth book in the Land of Stories series, Alex and Conner are about fifteen years old. The timing takes place about five months after the events in a Grimm Warning, the third book. In this book, we travel from Oz and meet the "heartless" Tin Woodman, to Wonderland, but I don't think we meet anyone there, to Neverland, where w There were a few flaws, but overall, Beyond the Kingdoms will be rated five stars. It's one of my new favourites, and it keeps you wanting to keep turning the pages.In the fourth book in the Land of Stories series, Alex and Conner are about fifteen years old. The timing takes place about five months after the events in a Grimm Warning, the third book. In this book, we travel from Oz and meet the "heartless" Tin Woodman, to Wonderland, but I don't think we meet anyone there, to Neverland, where we meet Peter and the Lost Boys, to the world of King Arthur, where we meet Merlin and Arthur and Robin Hood, where we meet Robin Hood and the Merry Men. This book contains a cliffhanger, just not as extreme as the third book. Here are some good things about the book. Firstly, the adventure. I loved hearing about all the places, although the time in Wonderland was shorter. My favourite was probably Oz, or Neverland, or King Arthur... I can't choose, I loved them all! Then, the drama. I was practically dead during Red and Froggy's wedding when You-Know-Who showed up. Not Voldemort, another You-Know-Who. And then what the woman did to Froggy... oh my god! It wasn't nesscessarily drama, but there was a lot of 'dramatic' romance between Arthur and Alex. Especially the way they described Alex walking away from him. It was like a soap opera. Also, the ending. I really wished that there was more, this book being the least amount of pages, but it's still a really exciting ending. I can't wait to see Conner's book characters. One last thing about all the other things I could share that would make this an even longer review was the visualisation. Getting into the books, the way it was described looked so awesome. If I had the capability of using the Portal Potion, I'd have a million books to go into and characters to meet. And now for a few flaws. It was annoying to read Robin Hood's speech. His speech was always in cap locks, which made it kind of annoying to read. Apparently he shouts when he speaks, but still, I didn't find the cap locks very neescessary. Another thing was the italics. Oh my gosh, there was so much italics in places that it didn't need. It will make it seem like the characters were emphasizing everything they said. "Most ancient civilizations were influenced by creatures that are considered mythical today. The ancient people paid tribute to these beings in their art, stories, and sometimes even worshipped them. Despite the obvious presence of these creatures, historians have labeled their existence as mythology - simply because they don't meet the biological standards of animals today.""Ancient Asia was majorly influenced by dragons, Europe is crawling with legends of fairies and trolls living in its forests, the Vikings claimed to witness merpeople as they sailed across the oceans and that's only naming a few."I know that might not be that bad, but if you read the whole book, you'll realize this is overused.Other than those couple of things, Beyond the Kingdoms is rated 5 stars. It's one of my favourite books, and obsessions. I highly recommend it. Once I finish the last book next year, I'm going to die. This book, this series, really should be a movie. It's so awesome, awesome, and did I say awesome, and would be a really awesome movie if it's made well. I love the series!!!!!! Also, feel free to join the Land of Stories group if you're a fan!
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  • Eve
    January 1, 1970
    I loved the first three Land of Stories. Especially Alex, who was such a fun and relatable character. However, I think that she's changed into a different character than what she was.But, before I get into that, let me just say that this book has a much darker feel than any of the other three. It felt more like YA than suitable for 8-12 year olds. The h-word and d-word were both used. Tension between Alex and Connor was disappointingly high in the beginning. Later on, POOF it was gone, not that I loved the first three Land of Stories. Especially Alex, who was such a fun and relatable character. However, I think that she's changed into a different character than what she was.But, before I get into that, let me just say that this book has a much darker feel than any of the other three. It felt more like YA than suitable for 8-12 year olds. The h-word and d-word were both used. Tension between Alex and Connor was disappointingly high in the beginning. Later on, POOF it was gone, not that it had been resolved or anything. It just disappeared, which didn't make sense to the story. Alex and Connor should have had a scene where they resolved their negative thoughts about each other.Alex was a different person. Colfer had tried to recreate a child turning into a teen, but created a different character altogether. 'No one understands me' and 'Why is the world out to get me,' were frequently disturbances in her character. After she had the heartbreak of a lifetime just months before, she decided to flirt with a stranger, Arthur, and kissed him within 24 hours of their meeting.Red changed for the better, thankfully. Instead of being the spoiled princess used to having everything given to her, she became a strong-willed maiden who could tame the lost boys and cope with heartbreak. Probably the biggest redeeming quality in this novel.All in all, the book was so different from the other books, and made no sense as children's novel. I know that I'm not the only one who noticed this. BUT I STILL LOVE TLOS!
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  • Ava P.
    January 1, 1970
    Alex and Conner Bailey are twins from the fairytale world. There is a man on the loose called the Masked Man because of the mask he wears to hide his face. This Masked Man is trying to create an army of evil villains from famous fairytales such as Alice in Wonderland, The Wizard of Oz, and Peter Pan. The Masked Man can travel into these books because of a magic potion he stole from the late fairy godmother. It is up to Alex, Conner and some of their fairytale friends to stop this Masked Man. Ale Alex and Conner Bailey are twins from the fairytale world. There is a man on the loose called the Masked Man because of the mask he wears to hide his face. This Masked Man is trying to create an army of evil villains from famous fairytales such as Alice in Wonderland, The Wizard of Oz, and Peter Pan. The Masked Man can travel into these books because of a magic potion he stole from the late fairy godmother. It is up to Alex, Conner and some of their fairytale friends to stop this Masked Man. Alex who was the fairy godmother and Conner get so close but end up in one of the Masked Mans traps. They get separated into different stories and need to make the same potion the Masked man has to get out. By the time they get out disaster has arose.I strongly recommend this book to readers who love the feeling of suspense in a book and love fairytales. This is the fourth book in the series so to fully understand this book I recommend reading the books before this one.
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  • Hayley
    January 1, 1970
    I FINALLY FINISHED A BOOK!!!I HAVE CONQUERED THE SLUMP!! 💪 And this book did not disappoint! No it did not!I. ATE. IT. UP.I loved the characters introduced into this book, some of my favourite fairytale and childhood stories blended together to create this spectacular story. The character development in this, well done Mr Colfer! I applaud you good sir, 👏 👏 🎩 The twists and turns of this story took me on the rollercoaster of all adventures for middle grade literature!This is one of my favourites I FINALLY FINISHED A BOOK!!!I HAVE CONQUERED THE SLUMP!! 💪 And this book did not disappoint! No it did not!I. ATE. IT. UP.I loved the characters introduced into this book, some of my favourite fairytale and childhood stories blended together to create this spectacular story. The character development in this, well done Mr Colfer! I applaud you good sir, 👏 👏 🎩 The twists and turns of this story took me on the rollercoaster of all adventures for middle grade literature!This is one of my favourites so far in the series.ROLL ON BOOK 5!
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  • Yash
    January 1, 1970
    Just finished the book! best best book ever! Only one downside discovered by me, it has an abrupt stop. I mean it is still an amazing book from my point of view. Here comes the spoiler, they're "undead" dad is actually Uncle Lloyd! Lloyd's dream is to destroy the fairy-tale world and rebuild it in his own glory.Hope all of the people who read this will try the book and like this review!!!!-Yash
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  • Tryg
    January 1, 1970
    This book is about Alex struggling with finding her powers and Conner finding surprising things about himself. This book is an awesome and amazing book that will keep you reading (like it did for me) till the end. I would recommend this book to anyone.
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