Depression
This book gives new hope to those who struggle with depression, and for the people who love them. Dr. Ed Welch writes compassionately on the complex nature of depression and sheds light on the path toward deep, lasting healing. Welch considers the spiritual, medical, and emotional factors that contribute to depression. Even more important is his insight into the impact of these factors' interaction.

Depression Details

TitleDepression
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 1st, 2004
PublisherNew Growth Press
ISBN-139780976230809
Rating
GenrePsychology, Counselling, Christian, Nonfiction, Christian Living, Religion, Theology

Depression Review

  • Louisa Black
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of the most compassionate and most accurate descriptions on depression I've read so far.I found myself nodding along a lot as the author talked about depression to those who suffer from this illness but also it opened my eyes to what the carer or loved ones of people who suffer from mental illness see or go through.During the time I had this illness, I found it so difficult to read anything. Especially connecting sentences, paragraphs or making any sense at al This is one of the most compassionate and most accurate descriptions on depression I've read so far.I found myself nodding along a lot as the author talked about depression to those who suffer from this illness but also it opened my eyes to what the carer or loved ones of people who suffer from mental illness see or go through.During the time I had this illness, I found it so difficult to read anything. Especially connecting sentences, paragraphs or making any sense at all of what point was being made in the text. I knew, as I read this, if I were in the throes of depression, that this would be something I could have quite happily put together in my mind and understood what was being said because the love and understanding of the author that comes across in his written work. As it stands now, God has been my healer and I'm in a much better place but I have found that I am now using this book and my experiences to help others and to prepare myself and by making personal notes in case of any future episodes.This is a wonderful book for anyone on any side of the fence, so to speak. Or to shine a light for those who may not understand the illness.
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  • Emily Cook
    January 1, 1970
    "God sometimes puts his children to bed in the dark."True enough. But how do we wrap our minds around that? How do we move forward, still in pain, and trust? How is it possible to keep living even in the dark?This book is an honest, yet gentle help for the depressed spirit. While admitting that there are biological components to depression and encouraging medical treatment for them, this author addresses the spiritual questions and struggles that are often intertwined. "God sometimes puts his children to bed in the dark."True enough. But how do we wrap our minds around that? How do we move forward, still in pain, and trust? How is it possible to keep living even in the dark?This book is an honest, yet gentle help for the depressed spirit. While admitting that there are biological components to depression and encouraging medical treatment for them, this author addresses the spiritual questions and struggles that are often intertwined."What depressed people need—what we all need—are daily reminders of spiritual reality. As the truth of Christ is impressed on our hearts, we must offer that to others, and they to us. The target is always Christ and him crucified.""Etch this in stone: if depression gives you an early warning—and it usually does—bring everything you have to the fight. Take your soul to task. Ask for help. Force feed yourself Scripture and words of hope. Be on guard against self-pity, grumbling, and complaining. And keep the cross close at hand."This book is a great resource for those who strive to do that very thing.
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  • Matt Kottman
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent book for those who suffer from depression or those who want to help those suffering from depression. Welch's insights are theologically robust, compassionate, and applied in tangible ways.
  • April Knapp
    January 1, 1970
    Welch's book is some of the most insightful and helpful information I've read about the struggle with depression. He not only addresses those who struggle with depression, but also their loved ones. As a person who struggles with depression, I think this book is an excellent resource for family members, spouses, and friends who want to better understand (or understand at all) the struggle of their depressed loved ones. It's also an excellent resource for those of who struggle/have struggled/will Welch's book is some of the most insightful and helpful information I've read about the struggle with depression. He not only addresses those who struggle with depression, but also their loved ones. As a person who struggles with depression, I think this book is an excellent resource for family members, spouses, and friends who want to better understand (or understand at all) the struggle of their depressed loved ones. It's also an excellent resource for those of who struggle/have struggled/will struggle again. Welch is sympathetic-he does not give a "suck it up" message, but he also unashamedly presents depression in the light of biblical Truth. He gives the much-needed grace that those who struggle with depression need, but he also gives hard truth that we need to hear.This is not a guide on "how to fix your depression" or a "how to fix your loved one's depression." It's more of a "Truths to Cling to When You're Depressed" guide, which is excellent and useful because, as you well know if you've struggled, depression is not a problem that is easily "fixed." In fact, it is something you will probably struggle with to some capacity the rest of your life.Welch emphasizes the theological truths that 1) God is well acquainted with suffering-He has suffered and empathizes with your depression and 2) He is good and generous. He uses scripture to back up all his claims.Though this book is not a "how to fix" guide, Welch gives some practical advice in how to deal with depression. One of the most helpful sections is Ch.11 where Welch helps identify the external and internal causes of depression. He recognizes that depression is complicated and brought on by many factors.
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  • Bekah Ward
    January 1, 1970
    Took me a long time to read this book, and I'm glad I didn't finish it soon after I started. Easy read, just didn't really want to read it. Lots of problems with the ideas in here. Lots of them may be true, but there's a big difference between theory and practise. You have to buy into the ideas for them to work, but anyone who's deeply depressed would struggle to buy into them (speaking from personal experience). Felt a bit like Welch came close to basically saying being depressed in a sin quite Took me a long time to read this book, and I'm glad I didn't finish it soon after I started. Easy read, just didn't really want to read it. Lots of problems with the ideas in here. Lots of them may be true, but there's a big difference between theory and practise. You have to buy into the ideas for them to work, but anyone who's deeply depressed would struggle to buy into them (speaking from personal experience). Felt a bit like Welch came close to basically saying being depressed in a sin quite a few times. That said, despite being a Christian, Christian based counselling was never going to be for me.Possibly better for Christians who have friends with depression than those who have depression.
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  • Michael Banh
    January 1, 1970
    A really good book on depression and how to understand it! It has taught me a lot about the subject of depression and shown me how to not only deal with it in my own life, but how to respond to others in the midst of depression. There are parts where he could have been a bit more compassionate and sensitive, but overall he does a good job of relating and sympathizing.
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  • Steven Wedgeworth
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really solid book. Good writing, nice mix of exegesis and pastoral presentation. The format was engaging as well. This is one that you should be giving out to folks.
  • Leandro Guimarães
    January 1, 1970
    An useful primer on how to deal with depression, taking into due account both the Biblical (as dominating perspective) and psychological (as in tools and contemporary vocabulary) sources.
  • Clayton Keenon
    January 1, 1970
    Solid book. Lots of good in here. I almost gave it four stars. However, there are aspects of it that I would be concerned about if isolated from the context of the book. For example, Welch sometimes speaks of hopelessness as a sin. There are certain contexts in which that is true. However, I’m not sure that is a helpful, or even true statement in most cases of depression. In fact, that can be pretty damaging. In places where he makes that statement, it is clear that there is some insight about t Solid book. Lots of good in here. I almost gave it four stars. However, there are aspects of it that I would be concerned about if isolated from the context of the book. For example, Welch sometimes speaks of hopelessness as a sin. There are certain contexts in which that is true. However, I’m not sure that is a helpful, or even true statement in most cases of depression. In fact, that can be pretty damaging. In places where he makes that statement, it is clear that there is some insight about the effects of misplaced faith that can lead to hopelessness. I’m sure there are some cases of depression that are complicated by a person’s refusal to find their hope in Christ, but the vast majority of the time a statement like that is going do more harm than good. Overall, the book is compassionate, realistic, and wise. In spite of occasional missteps like that, I’d still recommend it. I just wouldn’t want someone latching on to one idea like that, taking it out of context, and making life harder for themselves or others who are suffering from depression.
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  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    This book is for depressed people and those who love them. Welch looks at what depression is and what can be done to deal with it. I have two minor problems with the book:1. The book assumes that the depressed reader is able to read the book rationally and put the steps into practice honestly and without the depression warping everything, which is not always true of depressed people.2. The book assumes that the depressed person has multiple people in their life who are wi This book is for depressed people and those who love them. Welch looks at what depression is and what can be done to deal with it. I have two minor problems with the book:1. The book assumes that the depressed reader is able to read the book rationally and put the steps into practice honestly and without the depression warping everything, which is not always true of depressed people.2. The book assumes that the depressed person has multiple people in their life who are willing and able to support and help them, which is not always true.Overall, this is a very good book on depression for both those who suffer with depression and those who love someone who is depressed. It would also be a good book for pastors to read, as depressed people often seek out their pastor for advice.
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  • Eleasa
    January 1, 1970
    A most thorough and compassionate book on depression deeply embedded in Scripture, with a deep love of the Gospel, but also rooted in the grounds of practical psychology and theology. Written to be read by someone who lives with depression, or read together with someone as a helper-friend, chapter by chapter, side by side.
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  • Josh
    January 1, 1970
    Phenomenal. A help and a blessing. And beautiful writing to boot.
  • Beverly Locker
    January 1, 1970
    Depression is difficult to understand and even more difficult to live with. The author uses biblical truths to help the reader look away from despair towards hope. Many people who suffer from depression have a hard time focusing to read; but, strive to finish each chapter. Some of my favorite insights are in the second half of the book.
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  • Donnie II
    January 1, 1970
    The great preacher Charles Spurgeon often battled with bouts of depression. In deep ways he wrestled with a most heinous mental health issue which plagued him most of his life. In the midst of ministering to others he remarked that, "I have sometimes been the means in God’s hand of heling a man who suffered with a desponding spirit.  But the help I have rendered has cost me dearly.  Hours after, I have been myself depressed, and I have felt an inability to shake it off."He continues in ano The great preacher Charles Spurgeon often battled with bouts of depression. In deep ways he wrestled with a most heinous mental health issue which plagued him most of his life. In the midst of ministering to others he remarked that, "I have sometimes been the means in God’s hand of heling a man who suffered with a desponding spirit.  But the help I have rendered has cost me dearly.  Hours after, I have been myself depressed, and I have felt an inability to shake it off."He continues in another place;“I am the subject of depression so fearful that I hope none of you ever get to such extremes of wretchedness as I go to.  But I always get back again by this–I know that I trust Christ.  I have no reliance but in Him, and if He falls, I shall fall with Him.  But if He does not, I shall not.  Because He lives, I shall live also, and I spring to my legs again and fight with my depressions of spirit and get the victory through it.  And so may you do, and so you must, for there is no other way of escaping from it.”Depression, and it's wicked allies, are blind guides. Attaching themselves to the best of us with no regards to gender, education, social status, and leading us down paths we were never intended to travel. In my own battle with Depression, Anxiety, and a host of other issues, few things have helped me in the depths of my most desperate moments.From the moment I picked up, Depression: Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness, I knew I had found a vital resource which would help me to dispel the fog and despair I currently face. Right from the outset I could tell that Ed Welch knew and understood depression unlike many I have read. In the midst of "pray harder" or "God must be punishing you" I found Welch to be a most comforting companion."Depressive speech is poetic. Prose does not capture the experience, so it is either poetry or silence. Depressed people are eloquent, even when they feel empty at their emotional core devoid of personhood."Welch seemed to understand me as an individual made in the image of God and not merely an autonomous person afflicted with a mental health disease. He knew that in the recesses of my darkened heart there lay a seed of hope even if he had to dig past the layers of decay which had been building up the past 33 years. He had a keen awareness of the way I viewed my existence.The only thing you know is that you are guilty, shameful, and worthless. It is not that you have made mistakes in your life or sinned or reaped futility. It is that you are a mistake; you are sin; you are futility.Ugh! My soul groans at the very reading of that quote but he's quite right. It's not that I have made mistakes in the past, though they are many, or that I have sinned, it's that I am the very embodiment of those things. I remember that I was once alive and vibrant chasing after God. Now, when I think of my status before the Almighty, pain floods in knowing that I am no longer so.I spend countless hours remembering the passion which once ran through my veins like fire. I remember that I was once enjoying a closeness with God that has now been severed, or seemingly so. I trust in the sovereignty of the triune God of the Bible who sits enthroned on the seat of heaven but I wrestle with questions of suffering and his goodness. I wrestle with the reason he chose to play things out in the way they have.What has helped most, in addition to the Scriptures, are the Confessions and Catechisms in which my doctrine finds adequate summary. I find in the Heidelberg Catechism a powerful remedy for the despair I face when walking through my darkest of days.Q. What is your only comfort in life and in death? A. That I am not my own, but belong - body and soul, in life and in death - to my faithful Savior, Jesus Christ. He has fully paid for all my sins with his precious blood, and has set me free from the tyranny of the devil. He also watches over me in such a way that not a hair can fall from my head without the will of my Father in heaven; in fact all things must work together for my salvation. Because I belong to him, Christ, by his Holy Spirit, assures me of eternal life and makes me wholeheartedly willing and ready from now on to live for him. What a remarkable confession to utter when walking in the valley of the shadow of depression. The very utterance of them can make the faintest heart return with life. Surely there are days when I can barely concentrate or where the anxiety is worse than usual, but I remember that G, in his infinite wisdom, "knit me together and formed all my inward parts." (Psalm 139:13-14)Welch echoes the words of the confession in various places warming even the coldest soul. He comments that "Hope is risky" and quite rightly follows that up with an explanation why;"Underneath depression's veil of passivity is a heart that is busy making choices. Sometimes you prefer hopelessness. You want it. You aspire to it. Isn't that a reasonable way to explain why you are so immune to encouragement? You hear the words and understand them, but you don't want them. Even though self-pity and your attempts to kill hope are not working well, you are loyal to your hope-killing strategy."Can you see why Hope is risky? Hope is risky because it gives opportunity for failure. Hope can be dashed and trampled on the floor, that is, if hope lies on what is seen and what can be gained through our own efforts. We have a mediator in heaven who will never leave our hopes unfulfilled. Depression may be full of paradox at every turn and yet God works in ways we cannot understand this side of eternity. What works the best in the midst of relentless pain and suffering is a relentless love. "Depressed people, like all of us, are aware of kindness and love that is willing to sacrifice. Love always leaves its mark. As a result, depressed people who do best are cushioned by preserving love."We as Christians know of a relentless, pursuing, and preserving love. We have seen it in the face of a man bloodied and hanging on a cross. We have seen it in the very act of the Christ who stepped down from heaven, taking on our very nature, and yet was without sin. We see this love in a suffering servant who. though despised and rejected, bore our sicknesses and carried our pains. A man crushed because of our iniquities and pierced at the very act of our rebellion. Love has none great than that servant who laid his life down for his sheep. In the midst of your darkest pain, in the groaning of your most deepest suffering there is hope. Not merely a hope for right now but a hope which lasts into a glorious eternity with the author of that very hope. I will leave you here with the grace-soaked words which Welch himself concludes his most compelling volume yet;"Your own heart has much to say, but let Jesus have the final word. 'Grace' is the shorthand. In that one word, God takes us out of ourselves and turns our attention onto him, the One who showers forgiving love on us even when we don't realize all that he has forgiven. It is brimming with promises and guarantees....In your battle with the manifold features of depression, Grace to you."  
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  • Josiah
    January 1, 1970
    A sound and deeply compassionate look at depression from a Christian counseling perspective. Through careful exegesis of Scripture, tender searching of the heart's issues, and a sound grasp on what depression is and what it is not, Welch pierces to the most important issues that are present, looking at the heart issues that depression reveals rather than simply focusing on trying to get rid of depression. With one of the better approaches to dealing with medication that I've seen in this topic ( A sound and deeply compassionate look at depression from a Christian counseling perspective. Through careful exegesis of Scripture, tender searching of the heart's issues, and a sound grasp on what depression is and what it is not, Welch pierces to the most important issues that are present, looking at the heart issues that depression reveals rather than simply focusing on trying to get rid of depression. With one of the better approaches to dealing with medication that I've seen in this topic (focusing on wisdom rather than a simple right/wrong dichotomy) and a really helpful section on what those who have struggled with deep depression have found helpful from their friends and what they have found unhelpful, this book is an excellent look at the various issues that can surround and complicate depression. Rating: 4.5 Stars (Excellent)
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  • Tara
    January 1, 1970
    Good stuff. Even more applicable than the Addictions book we read. More...gracious? than I was expecting for a Christian book on depression...i.e. it went deeper than "What's the problem? Just rejoice in the Lord always!" Favorite quotes: "Don't just speak the prayers so that your depression can lift. Speak them because they are true and because they are evidence of Christ's work in you." (60)"Your goal is to get into a manna rhythm. Seek his grace today, be faithful to the tasks in Good stuff. Even more applicable than the Addictions book we read. More...gracious? than I was expecting for a Christian book on depression...i.e. it went deeper than "What's the problem? Just rejoice in the Lord always!" Favorite quotes: "Don't just speak the prayers so that your depression can lift. Speak them because they are true and because they are evidence of Christ's work in you." (60)"Your goal is to get into a manna rhythm. Seek his grace today, be faithful to the tasks in front of you, and trust him for tomorrow. Then, when you look back and see that he was faithful, your faith will be 'fed' for the next day." (150)And best of all..."Instead of thinking that you are oppressed by the expectations that others have draped over you, recognize that the heart chooses to live under the standards of others." (177) OH SNAP.
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  • Dean
    January 1, 1970
    I would give ten stars if I could.This is one of the best books I ever have read in my entire life.Read it, if you want to became more mature and not childisch. If you want to know more about the hidden maschinery that we call human being.I would say the issue of Depression is only the gate to introduce you to a world in wich joy and peace are attainable.With the Word of God and in the power of the Spirit here in this book we find really a weappon againstDepression. I would give ten stars if I could.This is one of the best books I ever have read in my entire life.Read it, if you want to became more mature and not childisch. If you want to know more about the hidden maschinery that we call human being.I would say the issue of Depression is only the gate to introduce you to a world in wich joy and peace are attainable.With the Word of God and in the power of the Spirit here in this book we find really a weappon againstDepression.So, I recommend strongly this book for every Person, specially believers in Christ Jesus.Don't miss this book!!!It will bring you Forward without doubt.Recommendation to the outermost for every Person who is open and searching.What about 1000 stars!!!Again, read this book People.... don't miss it.
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  • Larksinger
    January 1, 1970
    Reading this book to shed light on depression for myself, family members, and eventually helping people through postpartum in Lactation Consulting. No one can be happy all the time - when do you know that you are fighting depression? Looking for helpful anwswers in this book.*************Update after finishing***************I really appreciate this book. Especially the end on humility, hope, and joy. Even at the worst times in our lives there are things to be thankful for Reading this book to shed light on depression for myself, family members, and eventually helping people through postpartum in Lactation Consulting. No one can be happy all the time - when do you know that you are fighting depression? Looking for helpful anwswers in this book.*************Update after finishing***************I really appreciate this book. Especially the end on humility, hope, and joy. Even at the worst times in our lives there are things to be thankful for and things to find joy in. This book breaks down what causes depressive states and shows us that it all hinges on how we think and feel about ourselves and God and I think this is totally right on. Not only does it give causes to dark times but practical ways to induce joy and hope in every day life.
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  • Julie Gentino
    January 1, 1970
    I would recommend this book to anyone who has either suffered from depression or is close to someone who suffers from depression. I appreciate Welch's balanced perspective: he does not take a hard stance against medication, yet he does firmly believe that wise counsel and the Word of God are essential in ministering to the deep heart issues surrounding depression. He is gifted at showing Scripture's relevance to suffering. I also appreciate how extremely practical this book is - every chapter gi I would recommend this book to anyone who has either suffered from depression or is close to someone who suffers from depression. I appreciate Welch's balanced perspective: he does not take a hard stance against medication, yet he does firmly believe that wise counsel and the Word of God are essential in ministering to the deep heart issues surrounding depression. He is gifted at showing Scripture's relevance to suffering. I also appreciate how extremely practical this book is - every chapter gives concrete ways to practice what you learn.
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  • Emily Blake
    January 1, 1970
    Such a fantastic book. I felt so empowered against depression while I was reading it. Constantly as I read it I was thinking of all the people I wanted to loan it to. Welch does a REALLY good job of dispelling some of the myths about depression and looking at the real causes and solutions. He integrates scripture so smoothly and appropriately to back his writing. Even if you've never struggled with depression I would read this book anyways. It will prepare you to help friends and for your own ba Such a fantastic book. I felt so empowered against depression while I was reading it. Constantly as I read it I was thinking of all the people I wanted to loan it to. Welch does a REALLY good job of dispelling some of the myths about depression and looking at the real causes and solutions. He integrates scripture so smoothly and appropriately to back his writing. Even if you've never struggled with depression I would read this book anyways. It will prepare you to help friends and for your own battle to come.
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  • Libby
    January 1, 1970
    A book that drew me back to read it again. Welch doesn't give pat answers or simple solutions but draws sufferers of depression to examine heart issues and leads them to find true hope in spite of the pain. Very wise.
  • Cristine Braddy
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great book for everyone not just those that struggle with depression. I found some life changing thoughts and challenges.
  • Adam Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    "The heart is the real battleground during suffering, and it deserves your utmost attention" (190). This is one of the convictions that lies behind this book, where Welch is particularly concerned with "listening to depression," and then responding with gospel truth. In the central section of the book, he explores the thoughts and heart attitudes that are thrown up when depression of all kinds comes upon Christian believers. As such, this isn't just a book for those with diagnosed clinical depre "The heart is the real battleground during suffering, and it deserves your utmost attention" (190). This is one of the convictions that lies behind this book, where Welch is particularly concerned with "listening to depression," and then responding with gospel truth. In the central section of the book, he explores the thoughts and heart attitudes that are thrown up when depression of all kinds comes upon Christian believers. As such, this isn't just a book for those with diagnosed clinical depression; other believers would benefit from Welch's insights.At the same time, I would be cautious about recommending this to someone with moderate to severe depression. It's quite an intense read, at a point where someone might not want to read at all! It is particularly intense because, contrary to the title, a lot of the book encourages readers to "look in", which could produce unhelpful introspection for some - and a few of Welch's remarks could easily be misheard by a depressive mind. I would also take issue with some of Welsh's reservations about medication and non-Christian treatments. Even so, if you're a depressed Christian looking for something good to read, you might still want this book. And the best way to use it would probably be to go through it slowly with a trusted friend, when the mental storm is not raging quite as much. In the process, you will learn a lot more about yourself - and you'll be reminded to look to the Lord, however dark things get.
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  • Sarah Norton
    January 1, 1970
    If you are looking for a comprehensive and "easy" to read guide to depression this is it. Welch takes the reader through the different realms of depression, how it's caused, how it feels, how it can manifest through anger, fear, failure, shame and more. All the while pointing the reader to God and the Word for our hope, foundation, and joy. I took a year to read this book because it's perfect for studying with a friend (or two). Each chapter is only 10-12 pages long but Welch packs a ton in! I c If you are looking for a comprehensive and "easy" to read guide to depression this is it. Welch takes the reader through the different realms of depression, how it's caused, how it feels, how it can manifest through anger, fear, failure, shame and more. All the while pointing the reader to God and the Word for our hope, foundation, and joy. I took a year to read this book because it's perfect for studying with a friend (or two). Each chapter is only 10-12 pages long but Welch packs a ton in! I called is "easy" to read from a reading level perspective, not from a truth perspective. Be ready to be challenged, rebuked, and gently led away from your depression and sin into the light of Biblical truth and God's enduring love. (depression isn't always sin, but often sin plays a part)Welch ends the book by saying "The fact that Jesus Christ came to earth to die in our place is his resounding "I love you." Since his love is dependent on himself rather than on you, you are not in danger of being unloved on those days when you feel utterly faithless." p. 274 What a sweet truth for those who struggle with depression and often feel like a complete failure before God and unloved by him. This book is for those who struggle with depression and those who don't. If you have a loved one who is struggling this is a great book to help you better understand what they might be feeling and going through.
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  • Joann
    January 1, 1970
    Having some health issues has pretty well put me in the dumps. Thankfully, I have a wonderful Christian daughter-in-law who recommended this insightful book. It is written by Ed Welch who certainly is an intelligent man but he still was able to get down to the nitty gritty and not have his words fly over your head. The author writes compassionately on the complex nature of depression and sheds light on the path toward deep, lasting healing. Dr. Welch considers carefully the spiritual, medical, a Having some health issues has pretty well put me in the dumps. Thankfully, I have a wonderful Christian daughter-in-law who recommended this insightful book. It is written by Ed Welch who certainly is an intelligent man but he still was able to get down to the nitty gritty and not have his words fly over your head. The author writes compassionately on the complex nature of depression and sheds light on the path toward deep, lasting healing. Dr. Welch considers carefully the spiritual, medical, and emotional factors. Yes, even the medical! Reading this book helped me in so many ways and really spoke to me in certain chapters. Dr. Welch, a counselor, shares the main premise, purpose, and suggestions for using his book. He is writing for both the depressed person and to the one who loves the depressed person. That is a pretty awesome combination to get across in a book but he achieved that goal.
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  • Jo
    January 1, 1970
    Helpful for understanding depression and what it can look like. My biggest takeaway was that even though depression may not have a spiritual cause, it is always good have a spiritual aspect to the way you treat it. As with any kind of suffering, people will need to deal with how they feel about God in the midst of their trial, and what sorts of new temptations they are dealing with in this season of life. Welch encourages a lot of spiritual soul-searching, even in conjunction with other treatmen Helpful for understanding depression and what it can look like. My biggest takeaway was that even though depression may not have a spiritual cause, it is always good have a spiritual aspect to the way you treat it. As with any kind of suffering, people will need to deal with how they feel about God in the midst of their trial, and what sorts of new temptations they are dealing with in this season of life. Welch encourages a lot of spiritual soul-searching, even in conjunction with other treatments people might choose to deal with depression. Chapters are short and there are questions for reflection at the end of each; I think it would be helpful for both people dealing with depression and for those around them who want to understand and give support.
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  • Amy Kannel
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent. Ed Welch is one of my very favorite authors. I believe this is at least the fourth counseling/psychology book of his that I've read, and his counsel and the tone with which it's presented are consistently so very winsome and wise. You know a book is powerful when you have over 100 Kindle highlights. I had a hard time getting into it at first, in large part because of being mired in that "stubborn darkness." But in the end I found it quite valuable. I definitely need to go back through Excellent. Ed Welch is one of my very favorite authors. I believe this is at least the fourth counseling/psychology book of his that I've read, and his counsel and the tone with which it's presented are consistently so very winsome and wise. You know a book is powerful when you have over 100 Kindle highlights. I had a hard time getting into it at first, in large part because of being mired in that "stubborn darkness." But in the end I found it quite valuable. I definitely need to go back through my highlights and keep chewing on them. I would recommend this to those struggling with depression and those who love someone struggling with depression (which is probably most of us, even if we don't realize it).
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  • Steve Long
    January 1, 1970
    Ed Welch is a rare breed. Unlike Dobson and his clones, Welch is a Christian first and then a Psychologist. He doesn't use the Scriptures whenever they support a conclusion forced by Freud. His counsel is firmly based upon the Gospel. Unfortunately, his influence is pretty limited to those interested in counseling. Every pastor would benefit from this book. If you have someone struggling with depression this would help you minister to them.
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  • Michael Willis
    January 1, 1970
    By far the best Christian book on depression that I have read. I rarely underline or highlight books, but I did so freely in this one as there are so many helpful remarks and statements that I'd like to go back to again and again. It's not an easy read: if you're looking for something to indulge and coddle, this isn't it. It is heart-searching and penetrating, at the same time warm and understanding. Read, be challenged, and be helped.
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  • Harold Cameron
    January 1, 1970
    The book Depression – Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness, written by licensed psychologist, faculty member at the Christian Counseling & Educational Foundation, (CCEF), and author Dr. Edward T. Welch, Ph.D. is a most helpful guide to better understanding depression and possible options for the treatment of depression. On the back cover of the book the question is posed, “Where Is God in the Struggle” in regards to depression. And being an individual who lives with 2 brain tumors and exper The book Depression – Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness, written by licensed psychologist, faculty member at the Christian Counseling & Educational Foundation, (CCEF), and author Dr. Edward T. Welch, Ph.D. is a most helpful guide to better understanding depression and possible options for the treatment of depression. On the back cover of the book the question is posed, “Where Is God in the Struggle” in regards to depression. And being an individual who lives with 2 brain tumors and experiences unpredictable mood swings, (a Bi-Polar type condition) I can tell you that I personally am no stranger to the condition. But I can also testify that God is indeed in the midst of our struggle with depression if we know him as our God and have a relationship with him through faith in his son Jesus Christ.Dr. Welch has divided his book into 4 different parts with an Introduction at the beginning of the book and an invaluable Scripture Index at the end of the book. The 4 parts of his book are as follows: Depression is Suffering, Listening to Depression, Other Help and Advice, and finally Hope and Joy: Thinking God’s Thoughts. In each part of the book there are then Chapters that provides information regarding the topic that the particular part is about. For example, in the Introduction section of his book there are three chapters: The Path Ahead, How Depression Feels, and Definitions and Causes. This information is vitally important to understanding Depression as well as sets the stage for what Dr. Welch is going to write about in the rest of his book.In Part 2 there are seven chapters that address the issue of Depression as suffering and offers spiritual insights as to the condition of depression and how believers should respond to it. In Part three Dr. Welch writes in Chapter 12 about the fact that “Depression Has Its Reasons: Culture, and then addresses some of the correlative matters and feelings that accompany Depression such as the “Heart of Depression” and the “Heart Unveiled” as well as the emotions of Fear, Anger, Shame, Guilt, and in Chapter 20 Death and how they all relate to Depression.It is in part 3 of his book that Dr. Welch offers objective and beneficial “Help and Advice” concerning possible medical treatments for Depression, Advice for Families and Friends; writing in Chapter 23 What Has Helped and finally in Chapter 24 What To Expect.Finally, in Part 4 and in Chapters 25 and 26 author Welch offers much needed encouragement that there indeed is a reason to hope in the midst of dealing with Depression and about the matter of hope specifically and how that through having humility and by expressing thankfulness and choosing an attitude of joy, even when we don’t feel like it, we can experience a greater degree of freedom and victory over depression. And I can personally testify it is true. When I recognized that Depression is suffering and I became thankful to God for who he is and for all he has done for me and in my life and chose to express joy – even when I did not feel like it, I was able and have been able to live a much more Christ-Centered and joy filled life. I still receive medical treatment and take medications for my condition; however, they are just one aspect of my approach to dealing with my condition of Depression. I give the glory to God and praise him for the experience of joy and for the life that I now enjoy more fully in him because I have learned what Dr. Welch writes in his book and have applied it to my own life personally.Depression, Looking Up from the Stubborn Darkness is a very practical and easy to read and understand book for people suffering with Depression. In the book there are a good number of Scripture references to help us learn God’s perspective on life, suffering, Depression, humility, thankfulness and joy. Also there are a number of personal stories from people who have struggled with Depression and we can learn from their experiences as to what to do and what not to do in our quest to find healing over Depression.If you or someone you love or know is battling Depression and are looking for Biblically sound, sensible, and practical answers and advice as to how to deal with the condition of Depression then this book is for you or them. And I need to caution you that this book offers no quick fix or 5 easy steps to healing over Depression as no such fix and no such steps to healing exist that I know of anyway, and anyone who writes or states otherwise, is in grave error, at least in my humble opinion. However, for someone who is willing to read the book prayerfully with an open heart and open Bible, and is prepared to take one step at a time by God’s grace, strength and help in dealing with the issue of Depression in their life, this book next to the Word of God, provides the greatest degree of insight, wisdom and help that I have found in any books written about the condition of Depression.Disclosure of Material Connection: I received the book at no cost from the New Growth Press for review purposes. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
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