Captain Underpants and the Sensational Saga of Sir Stinks-A-Lot (Captain Underpants #12)
George and Harold, and their doubles, Yesterday George and Yesterday Harold, have a good thing going. Two of them go to school, while the other two hide in the tree house and play video games all day -- then they switch! But when their malicious gym teacher, Mr. Meaner, creates a method of mind control that turns their fellow students into attentive, obedient, perfect children, the future of all humanity will be in their hands!

Captain Underpants and the Sensational Saga of Sir Stinks-A-Lot (Captain Underpants #12) Details

TitleCaptain Underpants and the Sensational Saga of Sir Stinks-A-Lot (Captain Underpants #12)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 25th, 2015
PublisherScholastic Inc.
ISBN-139780545504928
Rating
GenreHumor, Childrens, Fiction, Middle Grade, Comics, Superheroes

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Captain Underpants and the Sensational Saga of Sir Stinks-A-Lot (Captain Underpants #12) Review

  • Taco Stocco
    January 1, 1970
    Wow.... The end of an era (perhaps?). Captain Underpants has always had a very special place in my heart. I think Pilkey has crafted very amazing books, especially in helping young boys to learn to read (like myself). It is amazing reading these books as adults, there is so much hidden in there that, much like other "children" media such as Pixar movies, they are actually for "all ages". I think that while this is not the most amazing or fun Captain Underpants adventure, it is probably the most Wow.... The end of an era (perhaps?). Captain Underpants has always had a very special place in my heart. I think Pilkey has crafted very amazing books, especially in helping young boys to learn to read (like myself). It is amazing reading these books as adults, there is so much hidden in there that, much like other "children" media such as Pixar movies, they are actually for "all ages". I think that while this is not the most amazing or fun Captain Underpants adventure, it is probably the most important one. To me, Captain Underpants has never been a silly fun book, but actually has a very serious point. That point is that it is okay to be yourself. Are the two main characters the smartest kids in the school? No. Are they most athletic, no. However, they are passionate about what they love, and take no apologies for that. This is such a special quality, especially since so many other uptight people want to ban the books or say they are not appropriate. I think this idea is no more evident in the book than the scene where homosexuality is mentioned. I think that this how's Pilkey's true view on life, that nothing matters except that if you are happy, and I felt this scene showed this beautifully. In summation I hope this is not the last Captain Underpants book. I feel that Pilkey has created something special and an important commentary on or society today
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    My boys LOVE the Captain Underpants series and have read all the books but this is the first one I've read. I was actually pleasantly surprised. It wasn't nearly as gross as a thought it would be and had some adult humor thrown in that would probably go over most kids heads. For instance, one of the teachers is named Miss Anthrope. There were also some big words (e.g. megalomaniac) that can build up kids' vocabularies. Lastly, I loved that there is a same-sex couple and people of different races My boys LOVE the Captain Underpants series and have read all the books but this is the first one I've read. I was actually pleasantly surprised. It wasn't nearly as gross as a thought it would be and had some adult humor thrown in that would probably go over most kids heads. For instance, one of the teachers is named Miss Anthrope. There were also some big words (e.g. megalomaniac) that can build up kids' vocabularies. Lastly, I loved that there is a same-sex couple and people of different races in this book.I'm not sure my 11 year old cared about any of that. He just thought it was hilarious. And that's okay too.
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  • Nicola Mansfield
    January 1, 1970
    And that's the end of Captain Underpants! It's been a long hilarious, successful journey that has come to a close with little fanfare. I can't say I found this volume as delightful as the usual outings. The silly toilet humour has been pared down and Pilkey sadly sinks to political correctness but it was still a wacky wild ride that tied up the Underpants story while at the same time leaving Harold and George wide open for further adventures ... in time!
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  • Edward Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    Harold is quietly outed.
  • Clare
    January 1, 1970
    I can't believe this is the last one in the series! Surely not?! My boys have loved all of these, and I have to admit that I was the driving force behind choosing them as bedtime stories. There is something for everyone in these stories. I have heard that there are certain districts (?) in the U.S. That have banned these books, which I find utterly bizarre and rather sad. It's hardly graphic violence or pornography, and one can always chose not to buy a book. It's not like it's forced into a chi I can't believe this is the last one in the series! Surely not?! My boys have loved all of these, and I have to admit that I was the driving force behind choosing them as bedtime stories. There is something for everyone in these stories. I have heard that there are certain districts (?) in the U.S. That have banned these books, which I find utterly bizarre and rather sad. It's hardly graphic violence or pornography, and one can always chose not to buy a book. It's not like it's forced into a child's hand and they're forced to read it (Clockwork Orange style, with eyelids pinned open, tied to a chair). Why people feel the need to impose THEIR opinions on others and force their way of life on others, this is something that I will never comprehend. And it invariably backfires on the enforcer. But hey, that's my opinion. For me and my family: we love these books. There's nothing better than getting into bed with my sons, one on each side, reading these books and laughing at all the silly jokes. That's what I'll remember when my boys tell me they're too old for bedtime stories (how does 30 years from now sound?!).
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  • Adrienne Pettinelli
    January 1, 1970
    "Before we get into all of that, I should point out that it's impolite to use the word heck. These books have been criticized for their inappropriate language, and we're going to put a stop to that sort of thing once and for all. From how on**, you won't be reading any more words like heck, or tinkle, or fart, or pee-pee."I hope Dav Pilkey never stops making these wonderfully subversive books.
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  • Stacey
    January 1, 1970
    These were so good early on...this one was horrible! My rating is one star but Finian would probably give it five! ;-)
  • Sara Rad
    January 1, 1970
    I was unaware of this book being banned by several school districts in the U.S. until I researched it. But, I remember growing up and Captain Underpants being one of the funniest and most creative books that kids thoroughly enjoyed. The Captain Underpants series I believe was banned because it could have encouraged disobedience with children and had an inappropriate taste to it, which made it hard to suit for a certain age group. This particular book, the twelfth addition in the series, concern I was unaware of this book being banned by several school districts in the U.S. until I researched it. But, I remember growing up and Captain Underpants being one of the funniest and most creative books that kids thoroughly enjoyed. The Captain Underpants series I believe was banned because it could have encouraged disobedience with children and had an inappropriate taste to it, which made it hard to suit for a certain age group. This particular book, the twelfth addition in the series, concerned teachers and parents because there were some references to Harold being gay, which parents didn't want their kids reading into. Personally, I also didn't like how in every book there was comically bad spelling. It is aimed towards kids and how they would sound out the words, but I think it could influence students to spell the same way as they are in this book.
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  • Josh Blatt
    January 1, 1970
    This book was about Harold and George and their quest to take down Mr. Meaner. Mr. Meaner had created a spray that would turn kid to all be good and obedient. George and Harold probably being the reason because they were the biggest pranksters and Mr. Meaner hated it. MR. Meaner had first tried it on George and Harold's Clones, Old George and Old Harold. They noticed it when they got home to the tree-house and Old Harold and Old George had brought home and huge amount of home work.So George and This book was about Harold and George and their quest to take down Mr. Meaner. Mr. Meaner had created a spray that would turn kid to all be good and obedient. George and Harold probably being the reason because they were the biggest pranksters and Mr. Meaner hated it. MR. Meaner had first tried it on George and Harold's Clones, Old George and Old Harold. They noticed it when they got home to the tree-house and Old Harold and Old George had brought home and huge amount of home work.So George and Harold Got to thinking and went into the future to see themselves, except now they were thirty. Even though they were older they still remembered how to take down Mr. Meaner and eventually they did. I like reading these books because there funny and adventurous. It reminds me of what i kind of used to do as a kid, except they were way better and there pranks were way worse. One thing about reading this book is there was a beginning middle and end. The climax of the book deals with a teacher making there own inventions trying to stop George and Harold from there cruel pranks. As you want every story to end there is always a happy ending. I like how there is always a good guy, bad guy situation and the good guy always wins. Over all this book is good for people who just wanna have a fun read, and have a good laugh.
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  • Alex
    January 1, 1970
    veary funny book lots of action
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    I only ever read the first book in this series, but wanted to read this one because I heard that the future version of Harold has a husband! I was able to follow along even though I haven’t read most of the other books, but oh my gosh - the pace of this book made me feel like I was on meth. The basic plot: the gym teacher, Mr. Meaner, invents a spray solution that makes kids into mindless rule-followers. Harold and George are safe because they have colds and can’t smell, but they know their cold I only ever read the first book in this series, but wanted to read this one because I heard that the future version of Harold has a husband! I was able to follow along even though I haven’t read most of the other books, but oh my gosh - the pace of this book made me feel like I was on meth. The basic plot: the gym teacher, Mr. Meaner, invents a spray solution that makes kids into mindless rule-followers. Harold and George are safe because they have colds and can’t smell, but they know their colds won’t last forever. They decide they need trustworthy adults to help them, and the only ones that fit the bill are their future selves. So they hop in a time machine (from a previous book, I guess) and travel 20 years into the future to appeal to their adult selves (this is where we learn that future Harold has a husband, and it’s a complete non-issue - yay!). Future Harold and George travel back in time, and defeat Mr. Meaner with a little help from Captain Underpants. I liked that Pilkey pokes fun at the people who challenge his books. The whole book was pretty irreverent towards adults, and normally I’m cool with poking fun at pretty much anything. But the thing that got under my skin just a little bit was the fact that pretty much all of the teachers in the book are portrayed as evil bumbling idiots who aren’t deserving of respect. In my opinion, it bordered on mean-spirited...but maybe it was more tongue-in-cheek than I perceived it to be. Regardless, I’m so glad that books like this exist, if for no other reason than it proves that freedom of speech is alive and well!And I loved the flip-o-rama - I did each one, like, a lot. They really do look animated! And now I need to go take some downers to recover from this book. :P
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    It seems as if this is the end of the Captain Underpants series - oh no! Our hearts sank as we read that the scatological humour was to be toned down in this book (we though that was a joke, but there really is less of it than usual). Never fear - the series is brought to a highly satisfying conclusion. Time travel machinations are dealt with as adeptly as ever, the problem of having two versions of George and Harold is resolved, and we even get to meet a grown up George and Harold. My kids and It seems as if this is the end of the Captain Underpants series - oh no! Our hearts sank as we read that the scatological humour was to be toned down in this book (we though that was a joke, but there really is less of it than usual). Never fear - the series is brought to a highly satisfying conclusion. Time travel machinations are dealt with as adeptly as ever, the problem of having two versions of George and Harold is resolved, and we even get to meet a grown up George and Harold. My kids and I thought it was great that future Harold has a husband - my ten-year-old noted how rare gay characters are in mainstream children's books, and how fantastic that Pilkey would include this detail. As an English teacher, I love the use of sophisticated vocabulary in this series, the complex plots and the way the writer plays with genre and structural devices. And of course, the books get kids reading - my seven-year-old will sit down for hours absorbed in her Captain Underpants collection. The fact that they are the most banned books in America is insane - they should be in every school library.
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  • Alan 김 승 주
    January 1, 1970
    The ending... Some weird piece from the remains of "Smart Earth" has been eaten by Harold and George's gym teacher, and he has become super smart. What is going to happen? Will Mr. Meaner take over the world with his smelly starch spray in order to make children his slaves? Or will the future versions of George and Harold and George and Harold and Captain Underpants stop them? What if a combination of food create Mr. Meaner in a powerful sludge-like substance.
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  • Jenni Frencham
    January 1, 1970
    This was my first foray into the world of Captain Underpants, and I ended up enjoying it much more than I expected. If my to-read list weren't already miles long, I'd probably go back and read the first 11 volumes.
  • Nick
    January 1, 1970
    I got halfway until it was revealed Harold was gay. I immediately put the book down and got rid of it. Not okay in a children's story. I felt the rest was good clean fun, but this added nothing to the story and is not something that should have been brought up in these books.
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  • Carlos
    January 1, 1970
    IT was good how the future kids came to the past and helped to destroy sir stink a-lot .
  • Christie
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book to see if it was appropriate for my 6 year old after she checked it out at school. In a lot of ways, it wasn't, but not for the reasons I expected. I expected tons of gross-out humour, but what there is is a lot of jokes about politics and media that would mostly go right over a kid's head. I never could decide who the audience for this book really is, because so many of the big jokes are definitely for adults. What kid will get why the critters are named Orlando, Tony, and Dawn I read this book to see if it was appropriate for my 6 year old after she checked it out at school. In a lot of ways, it wasn't, but not for the reasons I expected. I expected tons of gross-out humour, but what there is is a lot of jokes about politics and media that would mostly go right over a kid's head. I never could decide who the audience for this book really is, because so many of the big jokes are definitely for adults. What kid will get why the critters are named Orlando, Tony, and Dawn? And, despite agreeing with the author's viewpoint regarding politics, I felt a children's book was entirely the wrong venue for such specific humour. I mean, he actually names Fox News and The Huffington Post in his jokes! Once the editorial ended and the story actually started it was not as good as I would have expected after the Dogman books. The reader is expected to know quite a lot about the previous books. It opens with a sort of recap, but for me it is not enough to explain some of the weird things that happen. Overlooking the terrible morals of the two main characters (which is pretty difficult as a parent), the story is a hodge podge apparently thrown together to end the series and move on to his Dogman books. Dogman even features heavily in the story in a shameless plug that is just annoying. What, or who, rather, didn't feature heavily in this book, was Captain Underpants. When he did make his appearance it wasn't for long and it was quite underwhelming. Maybe it was supposed to be? This is my first Captain Underpants book so I really don't know. Some of the messages of this book were kind of disturbing to me as a parent. I hate the idea that my daughter may think that we would be happy with a brainwashed version of her that behaved perfectly, just because this book implies that this is what all parents want. I have talked to her about it but I'm not sure she's convinced that we prefer her the way she is. After all, we keep trying to teach her manners and such, right? :( I get that "kids good, grownups bad" is a popular trope to use for children's books, but this one really goes a bit too far. The ending was perfectly satisfying in that all of the plot points had been taken care of, but I can't say I found it to be happy.SPOILERSThe kids take the time machines and leave their lives and families behind forever, leaving their duplicates in their place. To me, that is very sad. I mean, yeah, they'll get to have all kinds of adventures, but what kind of sociopaths must they be? I guess at this point it should be obvious that they must be sociopaths or something to do the things they do and apparently feel glee rather than guilt over, though I do understand the author's need to keep things light and silly.In summation, I infinitely prefer the Dogman books and hope my girl will steer clear of this series in the future. It's a shame because the writer has such a way with words--if he wrote for adults he would be taking home big awards and classed alongside P.G. Wodehouse and Douglas Adams.
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  • Utena
    January 1, 1970
    This is the end...?Wow I am not sure whether to celebrate a wonderful set of books or cry because it is the end of a fun series. I have to admit it was the movie's trailer that brought down the path of these books. The movie looked fun and I was certain the books would probably be just as fun. I was not disappointed when I picked up the first one that it kept bringing me back for more of Captain Underpants alongside George and Harold. These books kept me in stitches and were the wonderful source This is the end...?Wow I am not sure whether to celebrate a wonderful set of books or cry because it is the end of a fun series. I have to admit it was the movie's trailer that brought down the path of these books. The movie looked fun and I was certain the books would probably be just as fun. I was not disappointed when I picked up the first one that it kept bringing me back for more of Captain Underpants alongside George and Harold. These books kept me in stitches and were the wonderful source of reading material I went to when I came home from a long day at work.I am going to miss Harold and George. Those two mischievous kids who took us on adventures either on this time line or in the past. I hope in the future we might see these two once again. Maybe a bit older and still having Mr. Krupp running around in his under - oh, right, he does! xD I have to admit seeing him older as Captain Underpants was hilarious and even sweet to see Harold had a husband and that they were both very happily married. :D That was a nice added bonus and that they could still do things their younger versions could do.This book focuses on the P.E. coach who has concocted a potion that will turn children and even adults into obedient and mindless zombies. He uses this to his advantages and unfortunately Yesterday George and Yesterday Harold end up being caught into the trap. George and Harold have to find a way to break the potion's spell and they end up once more traveling into the past.With this being the last hooray, you get to see how the future is for both boys. Both seem to be living happy lives with their families but they are both willing to put them aside for the moment to help out. This only goes to show their younger versions that they haven't changed even when they are older. Of course, seeing Mr. Krupp a bit older and out in his underwear is pretty hilarious, if not a mental image once does not really one floating in their head.This series was great and one I would recommend to anyone with a kid. There is going to be potty-humor but you will find yourself in stitches over this book and I am quite sure the kids will enjoy it.
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  • Stacey
    January 1, 1970
    I read this book as a bedtime story to Brodi. We've read books in the beginning of the series, and missed a few in the middle. But Brodi spent his money on this book at the book fair, so we decided to read it anyways. Brodi enjoyed it. Me, not as much... I found it less fun than the previous books we've read. Although I love a good fictional book, this one seemed way too far fetched. Bouncing around from present to future, made it difficult to keep track of the regular character vs. the future o I read this book as a bedtime story to Brodi. We've read books in the beginning of the series, and missed a few in the middle. But Brodi spent his money on this book at the book fair, so we decided to read it anyways. Brodi enjoyed it. Me, not as much... I found it less fun than the previous books we've read. Although I love a good fictional book, this one seemed way too far fetched. Bouncing around from present to future, made it difficult to keep track of the regular character vs. the future ones. I do enjoy how the author pokes fun at his critics. There's always someone that will disagree with something in literature. Whether its the word "heck" used in a kid's book or Harold's future husband; I didn't really care as none of it seemed to matter to my son. He was more interested in the story. Plus, there's a fair amount of adult humor that my son missed-as is typical with a lot of children's books and movies. I love how Dav Pilkey keeps the books and interesting series coming. He is one of the few authors that my son will avidly read. He is a resistant reader, and I will pretty much do anything to keep him interested in reading-as is the case with many parents.
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  • Robert
    January 1, 1970
    And, I'm done.The series finished on mostly an upbeat after a couple rough outings.A mixture of soda, pop rocks, and something else caused an explosion from far away. Bits and pieces of that explosion went off throughout the galaxy. One piece crashed through the roof of the pysch ward where all the teachers were housed. Mr. Meaner, the gym teacher, touched it and gained powers. He was now evil and turned the teachers evil too.The yesterday George and Harold were given Mr. Meaner's Rid-a-Kid. The And, I'm done.The series finished on mostly an upbeat after a couple rough outings.A mixture of soda, pop rocks, and something else caused an explosion from far away. Bits and pieces of that explosion went off throughout the galaxy. One piece crashed through the roof of the pysch ward where all the teachers were housed. Mr. Meaner, the gym teacher, touched it and gained powers. He was now evil and turned the teachers evil too.The yesterday George and Harold were given Mr. Meaner's Rid-a-Kid. The became quite obedient. In order to get rid of this power, the real George and Harold travel in time to find their old selves. They are graphic novelists and illustrators in the future! Their story is Dog Man. Yes, there are advertisements for the new series.They travel back in time, snap their fingers to conjure Captain Underpants, and the battle with begins. Success!And then things seem to be back to normal. Real normal. Mr. Krupp is no longer Captain Underpants. The teachers are regular. Yesterday George and Harold are back to themselves. Regular George and Harold survey the scene. The decide to leave well enough alone. They get into the time machine and head away from this world leaving it "perfect". Who knows where real George and Harold will go?The end!
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  • Ian
    January 1, 1970
    The finale to the epic series of Captain Underpants was an epic journey! George, Harold, and Captain Underpants were finally at peace, they thought. A new enemy emerged, there gym teacher. He had able to get powers by a mysterious rock that came from another planet in space. He had a plan to stop all kids from being annoying, and disrespectful. He was turning kids into nice respectful slaves with a spray that only effects kids. George, Harold, and Captain Underpants had to stop him from turning The finale to the epic series of Captain Underpants was an epic journey! George, Harold, and Captain Underpants were finally at peace, they thought. A new enemy emerged, there gym teacher. He had able to get powers by a mysterious rock that came from another planet in space. He had a plan to stop all kids from being annoying, and disrespectful. He was turning kids into nice respectful slaves with a spray that only effects kids. George, Harold, and Captain Underpants had to stop him from turning every kid into slaves. However, George, and Harold couldn't do it, and couldn't get Captain Underpants. They had 1 plan. They when't to the future, and met there 2 future selves. They explained everything, and they when't on a rush to save the world. Then, Captain Underpants was able to arise. The gym teacher had the future George, and Harold. Captain Underpants swooped in, and saved them. Eventually, with the power of team work, and friendship they were finally able to stop the gym teacher. However, a liquid got all over Captain Underpants after they defeated the gym teacher. Captain Underpants was lost, and he was permanetly turned back into a regular human as George, and Harolds principal, Mr. Krupp! The adventure had ended, but it was an amazing experience, Tra La Laaaaaaa!
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  • Holli Keel
    January 1, 1970
    We accidentally read this one out of order, so it was confusing in parts, since it was a continuation of the previous book we haven't yet read. Without spoiling anything, I loved that Pilkey introduced a man and his husband without fanfare or commentary. Just another relationship like any other. 👍🏼 I've read reviews where parents are like, "I don't want to have to explain that to my kid!" Or "what am I supposed to say to my kid about this?!" I didn't have to say anything. One guy had a wife, the We accidentally read this one out of order, so it was confusing in parts, since it was a continuation of the previous book we haven't yet read. Without spoiling anything, I loved that Pilkey introduced a man and his husband without fanfare or commentary. Just another relationship like any other. 👍🏼 I've read reviews where parents are like, "I don't want to have to explain that to my kid!" Or "what am I supposed to say to my kid about this?!" I didn't have to say anything. One guy had a wife, the other had a husband, and my son got it and didn't think anything of it. I guess Pilkey must get criticized a lot by parents and other adults about the "potty" humor in his books, which I get must be frustrating for him. But the book could have done without the barely disguised criticism of those people. Those of us who love his books won't be going anywhere, potty humor and all, so I thought the criticism was overkill. It seems that this was Harold and George's last adventure, which is kind of sad, but we loved the ending! Both mine and my eight-year-old's minds were blown. We might have to start over at the beginning of the series and enjoy the books all over again. They're just so fun!
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  • Tranylle
    January 1, 1970
    ...Where to begin with this one. It started out good, had an interesting plot and funny characters. But then we get almost to the end, when George and Harold go find their future selves for help... and it shows that Harold has a husband. Call me whatever you want, but despite the times we live in, I still find that inappropriate for a children's book. When we got to that bit, my 6 year old stopped me and asked if he had heard that right, so we had a little discussion about it. Which is fine, we' ...Where to begin with this one. It started out good, had an interesting plot and funny characters. But then we get almost to the end, when George and Harold go find their future selves for help... and it shows that Harold has a husband. Call me whatever you want, but despite the times we live in, I still find that inappropriate for a children's book. When we got to that bit, my 6 year old stopped me and asked if he had heard that right, so we had a little discussion about it. Which is fine, we've talked about this subject before. It just has me worried about what else might be in children's books that he will eventually read without me. Is there going to come a time when I will have to read children's books before he can, to make sure it doesn't have adult content in it? I found Pilkey's humor to be funny, and I laughed right along with my kids throughout the series. These were cleverly done, but I'm relieved that this seems to be the last one, unless you count the Dogman and cavemen ones.
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  • Marcos Kopschitz
    January 1, 1970
    Dav Pilkey (1966) é um autor americano que faz sucesso com várias séries para crianças, como Ricky Ricota , Capitão Cueca e Coelhos Tapados , às vezes em parceria com ilustradores.Basta olhar os títulos do Capitão Cueca para ter uma ideia do tipo de humor da série. É pum pra lá, fedor pra cá, meleca, privada e por aí vai. Isso faz sucesso com meninos desde sempre, eu acho. Quem não se lembra do concurso de pum do filme do Menino Maluquinho , de Ziraldo? Pode até não ser um grande sucesso co Dav Pilkey (1966) é um autor americano que faz sucesso com várias séries para crianças, como Ricky Ricota , Capitão Cueca e Coelhos Tapados , às vezes em parceria com ilustradores.Basta olhar os títulos do Capitão Cueca para ter uma ideia do tipo de humor da série. É pum pra lá, fedor pra cá, meleca, privada e por aí vai. Isso faz sucesso com meninos desde sempre, eu acho. Quem não se lembra do concurso de pum do filme do Menino Maluquinho , de Ziraldo? Pode até não ser um grande sucesso com meninas, ou com adultos, mas tenho um sobrinho de dez anos que está destruindo a série a um ritmo de vários livros por dia! E vai me dando informações importantíssimas, como “A identidade secreta do Capitão Cueca é tão secreta que nem ele mesmo sabe!”. Interesse garantido.Além de histórias com elementos clássicos (super-heróis, identidades secretas, cientista maluco, viagens no tempo e suas implicações etc.), há a parte muito pouco correta, como os professores serem chatos, malvados (como o professor Edomal, neste volume 12) e perseguirem os alunos. Mas a esta altura, quem está preocupado? Já estão todos rindo!As histórias, no entanto, não são apenas humorísticas, refletem pontos de vista interessantes do autor, que é portador de ADHD (sigla em inglês), isto é, hiperatividade. De modo que há reflexões sobre crianças e seu relacionamento com o mundo, com a escola etc. O autor, como outros, propõe ver a ADHD de maneira positiva! De fato, Dav Pilkey (David, e o apelido “Dav” deve ser lido como “Dave”) começou a bolar o Capitão Cueca ainda na escola, em 1973! E outras reflexões sobre importantes questões sociais atuais, como neste volume 12 – mas vamos deixar para os leitores, sem entregar nada.A tradução do volume 12 é de Luiza Mello Franco. É boa e acerta especialmente ao adaptar trechos conhecidos de canções brasileiras como títulos de capítulos (“Meu coração, não sei por que, bate feliz quando soco você”, ou “Pela estrada afora, eu vou bem fedido”!). Mas deixou sem traduzir (intencionalmente?) algumas coisas como nomes de professores, perdendo as piadas feitas com trocadilhos, que representam a rebeldia dos alunos contra os professores. “Mrs. Guided” ficou sendo “Sra. Guided”. Em inglês, “Mrs. Guided” soa como misguided, “errada”, “perdida”. Se fosse para traduzir, poderia ser “Dona Trasada” ou algo assim, já que aqui praticamente não se chamam professoras de Senhora. “Srta. Fitt” também não diz nada em português – onde é que se chama a professora de Senhorita?? “Miss Fitt” é um trocadilho com misfit, “desajustada”, desajeitada”. Que tal “Tia Tolada”? Este 12º volume, publicado em 2015 tanto nos EUA quanto no Brasil, parece indicar que seria o último da série, iniciada em 1997. Mesmo que isto ocorra, não faltam outras séries e livros de Dav Pilkey, como a do Superbebê Fraldinha, supostamente escrita pelos personagens Jorge e Haroldo!O formato é de um livro ilustrado, com cerca de metade de todas as páginas com texto e a outra metade com ilustrações, com alguns capítulos intercalando quadrinhos – tudo em preto e branco. Pois é, aí você vai ver, e é o próprio autor quem confirma:“Meu objetivo foi fazer um livro em capítulos que PARECESSE um livro ilustrado. Então escrevi capítulos muito curtos e tentei preencher cada página com mais imagens que palavras. Eu queria criar um livro que crianças que não gostam de ler iam querer ler.” – Dav PilkeyUma coisa bem interessante é que algumas páginas possibilitam uma pequena animação com uma antiquíssima técnica quadro a quadro com folhas de papel. Bom para apresentar essa ideia para crianças. Aqui, recebe o ótimo nome de “Vire-o-game”!Quem publicava o Capitão Cueca por aqui era a Cosac Naify, importante casa que revolucionou o mercado editorial brasileiro. Infelizmente, anunciou o encerramento de suas atividades ao final de 2015. Então, os títulos tendem a se esgotar com o tempo e não serem reimpressos. Assim, é aconselhável adquiri-los enquanto estão disponíveis.ReferênciaÓtimo site do autor, em inglês, com detalhes de todos os volumes, biografia do autor etc.http://pilkey.comA série do Capitão Cueca1. As aventuras do Capitão Cueca2. Capitão Cueca e o ataque das privadas falantes3. Capitão Cueca e a invasão das incrivelmente malvadas garotas da cantina do outro planeta4. Capitão Cueca e o perigoso plano secreto do Professor Fraldinha Suja5. Capitão Cueca e a fúria da facinorosa mulher tentacular6. Capitão Cueca e a grande e desagradável batalha do Menino Biônico Meleca Seca (parte 1): a noite das repugnantes melecas de narina7. Capitão Cueca e a grande e desagradável batalha do Menino Biônico Meleca Seca (parte 2): a revanche dos robôs melequentos ridículos8. Capitão Cueca e a sina ridícula do Povo do Penico Roxo9. Capitão Cueca e o aterrorizante retorno do Caído Tilintar das Calças10. Capitão Cueca e a revoltante revanche da Robocueca Radioativa11. Capitão Cueca e a terrível retaliação da Privada Turbo 200012. Capitão Cueca e saga sensacional de Fedor, o Grande *** ROutros livros de Dav Pilkey:Ricky Ricota e seu Super-Robô - Volume 1 (também uma série) *** RO Menino Entregador de Jornal (ilustrado a cores pelo próprio autor) *** R*** R – veja resenha
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  • Kelly Paradise
    January 1, 1970
    Rereading this series as an adult has been fun. The little political quips included in earlier books for the adults were fun. Plodding through 5 chapters of political commentary/"take that stereotypes of people who hate my books!" that isn't as witty as it thinks it is before actually getting to the story? Decidedly not fun. I found myself so irritated by this volume being so focussed on insulting strawmans of the people who won't read it any way that I didn't even care what happened to my child Rereading this series as an adult has been fun. The little political quips included in earlier books for the adults were fun. Plodding through 5 chapters of political commentary/"take that stereotypes of people who hate my books!" that isn't as witty as it thinks it is before actually getting to the story? Decidedly not fun. I found myself so irritated by this volume being so focussed on insulting strawmans of the people who won't read it any way that I didn't even care what happened to my childhood heroes. Hopefully, the upcoming movie I've been preparing for only covers the earlier part of the series from before it apparently became about Pilkey's ego.
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  • Abdulrahman M.
    January 1, 1970
    Book Title: Captain Underpants and the sir stinks-a-lotAuthor: Dav PilkeyGenre: fictionRecommendation:And he saves the world. He can hop tall buildings. Oh I’m sorry i was so caught in the book I forgot about this. It is like eating the most expensive food. It is filled with flavor. This is a really fun book and it has a lot of humor. If you are the kind of guy/girl that likes fun, adventure, and humorous books than you will love this book because it is filled with all of those things. I think t Book Title: Captain Underpants and the sir stinks-a-lotAuthor: Dav PilkeyGenre: fictionRecommendation:And he saves the world. He can hop tall buildings. Oh I’m sorry i was so caught in the book I forgot about this. It is like eating the most expensive food. It is filled with flavor. This is a really fun book and it has a lot of humor. If you are the kind of guy/girl that likes fun, adventure, and humorous books than you will love this book because it is filled with all of those things. I think that everyone should be reading these books.Recommended by: [Abdulrahman Mohamed]
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  • Chris Schaben
    January 1, 1970
    This series has really evolved over the years. It started out as a wildly immature and goofy series full of potty humor to a less gross and more serious outlook on society and the struggles for children. I especially love how Pilkey took risks and revealed his liberal beliefs through the satire of the GOP (Grumpy Old People) and the nonchalant reveal that Harold is married to a man in the future. The book strongly implies that this is the last book of the series, but it doesn't outright say that This series has really evolved over the years. It started out as a wildly immature and goofy series full of potty humor to a less gross and more serious outlook on society and the struggles for children. I especially love how Pilkey took risks and revealed his liberal beliefs through the satire of the GOP (Grumpy Old People) and the nonchalant reveal that Harold is married to a man in the future. The book strongly implies that this is the last book of the series, but it doesn't outright say that it is. We may see more, but even if we don't, it has been a very fun ride for people like more who have grown up reading the series and seeing it grow up as well.
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  • Ellon
    January 1, 1970
    A perfect conclusion to the Captain Underpants series! The last few books weren’t as laugh out loud funny as the first ones in the series but this one was pretty good. I loved the chapter titles that were puns of popular songs. The whole “Rid-o-Kid” plot was meaningful and sends an important message about adults wanting kids to listen.I was impressed that Pilkey decided to make one of the main characters gay but then again, I gues pilkey has never shied away from things just because he was worri A perfect conclusion to the Captain Underpants series! The last few books weren’t as laugh out loud funny as the first ones in the series but this one was pretty good. I loved the chapter titles that were puns of popular songs. The whole “Rid-o-Kid” plot was meaningful and sends an important message about adults wanting kids to listen.I was impressed that Pilkey decided to make one of the main characters gay but then again, I gues pilkey has never shied away from things just because he was worried about what some grumpy adults would say.
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  • Nicola
    January 1, 1970
    It's been a bit under two months and we have now finished all 12 books of the Captain Underpants series (and gone on to Dog Man, Ricky Ricotta etc.) Hard to believe that some kids have grown up reading these given the way Miss 3 has devoured these at bedtime each night! A satisfactory wrap-up and a nice lead in to Dog Man.Miss 3 and I like to explore different books and authors at the library, sometimes around particular topics or themes. We try to get different ones out every week or so; it's f It's been a bit under two months and we have now finished all 12 books of the Captain Underpants series (and gone on to Dog Man, Ricky Ricotta etc.) Hard to believe that some kids have grown up reading these given the way Miss 3 has devoured these at bedtime each night! A satisfactory wrap-up and a nice lead in to Dog Man.Miss 3 and I like to explore different books and authors at the library, sometimes around particular topics or themes. We try to get different ones out every week or so; it's fun for both of us to have the variety and to look at a mix of new & favourite authors.
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  • Jon
    January 1, 1970
    This book is genius! It’s got a cartoonishly complicated plot about an exploding planet (Smart Earth) that makes a gym teacher into an evil genius who wants to placate kids into being obedient pod people. There is time travel with character doubles (and triples) and the author pulls it off with dexterity. Along with that there’s some fun potty humor along with more sophisticated laughs—entertained me as much as my 8 year old nephew.
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