Felicity
Mary Oliver, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, celebrates love in her new collection of poems  “If I have any secret stash of poems, anywhere, it might be about love, not anger,” Mary Oliver once said in an interview. Finally, in her stunning new collection, Felicity, we can immerse ourselves in Oliver’s love poems. Here, great happiness abounds.  Our most delicate chronicler of physical landscape, Oliver has described her work as loving the world. With Felicity she examines what it means to love another person. She opens our eyes again to the territory within our own hearts; to the wild and to the quiet. In these poems, she describes—with joy—the strangeness and wonder of human connection.  As in Blue Horses, Dog Songs, and A Thousand Mornings, with Felicity Oliver honors love, life, and beauty. 

Felicity Details

TitleFelicity
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 13th, 2015
PublisherPenguin Press
ISBN-139781594206764
Rating
GenrePoetry, Nonfiction, Environment, Nature

Felicity Review

  • The Serendipity Aegis ~ ☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡ϟ⚡⛈ ✺❂❤❣
    January 1, 1970
    While a number of verses were questionably poetic, some gems are in here as well:Q:Things take the time they take. Don’tworry (c)Q:Some words will never leave God’s mouth,no matter how hard you listen. (c)Q:Do the trees speak back to the windwhen the wind offers some invitational comment? (c)Q:All important ideas must include the trees,the mountains, and the rivers. (c)Q:The point is, you’re you, and that’s for keeps. (c)Q:Love is the one thing the heart cravesand love is the one thingyou can’t While a number of verses were questionably poetic, some gems are in here as well:Q:Things take the time they take. Don’tworry (c)Q:Some words will never leave God’s mouth,no matter how hard you listen. (c)Q:Do the trees speak back to the windwhen the wind offers some invitational comment? (c)Q:All important ideas must include the trees,the mountains, and the rivers. (c)Q:The point is, you’re you, and that’s for keeps. (c)Q:Love is the one thing the heart cravesand love is the one thingyou can’t steal. (c)Q:“Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing there is a field. I’ll meet you there.” RUMIQ:When one is alone and lonely, the bodygladly lingers in the wind or the rain,or splashes into the cold river, orpushes through the ice-crusted snow.Anything that touches.(c)
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  • Cathrine
    January 1, 1970
    Oh reach into the night sky and hand me 5 starsso I can give you a 10 star review!
  • Jeannie
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoy Mary Oliver's poetry. She writes a lot about nature and animals. This book has poems about love. They are beautiful. I Don't Want to LoseI don't want to lose a single threadfrom the intricate brocade of this happiness.I want to remember everything.Which is why I'm lying awake, sleepybut not sleepy enough to give it up.Just now, a moment from a year ago:the early morning light, the deft, sweetgesture of your hand reaching for me.
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  • Ammara Abid
    January 1, 1970
    Humility Poems arrive ready to begin.Poets are only the transportation.For Tom Shaw S.S.J.E. (1945–2014) Where has this cold come from?“It comes from the death of your friend.”Will I always, from now on, be this cold?“No, it will diminish. But alwaysit will be with you.”What is the reason for it?“Wasn’t your friendship always as beautifulas a flame?”
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  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    Things take the time they take. Don'tworry.How many roads did St. Augustine followbefore he became St. Augustine?That is how Mary Oliver starts The Journey, the first part of her latest book that goes by the name of Felicity. How brilliantly appropriate, wouldn't you say? Reading this first poem titled Don't Worry on the very first day of a new year. Makes you think about the urgency of the resolutions whispered before midnight...Mary Oliver's voice feels familiar, as if you have been listening Things take the time they take. Don'tworry.How many roads did St. Augustine followbefore he became St. Augustine?That is how Mary Oliver starts The Journey, the first part of her latest book that goes by the name of Felicity. How brilliantly appropriate, wouldn't you say? Reading this first poem titled Don't Worry on the very first day of a new year. Makes you think about the urgency of the resolutions whispered before midnight...Mary Oliver's voice feels familiar, as if you have been listening to it since the moment you took your very first breath. Inner peace in the middle of the turmoil that is life, that's how I would describe her voice. There's a wiseness to it... Not self-proclaimed, though. There's respect, to each her/his own pace. She sees with her heart, her hopes and fears, and she then lays these portraits gently on the page with the help of words.Only if there are angels in your head will you ever, possibly, see one.If I were you, I would buy this book and read a poem a day. I believe it might be one of the ingredients of the recipe to happiness. And if you don't find it in her voice, do not give up. One will come that will resonate with you.And just like that, like a simple neighborhood event, a miracle is taking place.I honestly believe Felicity is the reassuring hand as you take a leap of faith, as you dive in head first into the immense universe that is life. Even through the darkest moments, it will guide you.Every day has something in it whose name is Forever.
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  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    January 1, 1970
    This isn't where I would start with Mary Oliver, and it pains me to give this collection only 3 stars. But they are a bit thin on connection and insight compared to her normal works.Here is my favorite:MomentsThere are moments that cry out to be fulfilled.Like, telling someone you love them.Or giving your money away, all of it.Your heart is beating, isn't it?You're not in chains, are you?There is nothing more pathetic than cautionwhen headlong might save a life,even, possibly, your own.
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  • Tiffany Reisz
    January 1, 1970
    Read at 3am this morning when I couldn't sleep. I'm so glad I had these poems to keep me and Honeytoast, my sad kitty, company in that quiet hour. STORAGE by Mary OliverWhen I moved from one house to anotherthere were many things I had no roomfor. What does one do? I rented a storagespace. And filled it. Years passed.Occasionally I went there and looked in,but nothing happened, not a singletwinge of the heart.As I grew older the things I caredabout grew fewer, but were moreimportant. So one day Read at 3am this morning when I couldn't sleep. I'm so glad I had these poems to keep me and Honeytoast, my sad kitty, company in that quiet hour. STORAGE by Mary OliverWhen I moved from one house to anotherthere were many things I had no roomfor. What does one do? I rented a storagespace. And filled it. Years passed.Occasionally I went there and looked in,but nothing happened, not a singletwinge of the heart.As I grew older the things I caredabout grew fewer, but were moreimportant. So one day I undid the lockand called the trash man. He tookeverything.I felt like the donkey whenhis burden is finally lifted. Things!Burn them, burn them! Make a beautifulfire! More room in your heart for love,for the trees! For the birds who ownnothing—the reason they can fly.
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  • Mahsa
    January 1, 1970
    It seems you love this world very much.“Yes,” I said. “This beautiful world.”And you don’t mind the mind, that keeps youbusy all the time with its dark and bright wonderings?“No, I’m quite used to it. Busy, busy,all the time.”And you don’t mind living with those questions,I mean the hard ones, that no one can answer?“Actually, they’re the most interesting.”And you have a person in your life whose handyou like to hold?“Yes, I do.”It must surely, then, be very happy down therein your heart.“Yes,” It seems you love this world very much.“Yes,” I said. “This beautiful world.”And you don’t mind the mind, that keeps youbusy all the time with its dark and bright wonderings?“No, I’m quite used to it. Busy, busy,all the time.”And you don’t mind living with those questions,I mean the hard ones, that no one can answer?“Actually, they’re the most interesting.”And you have a person in your life whose handyou like to hold?“Yes, I do.”It must surely, then, be very happy down therein your heart.“Yes,” I said. “It is.” Beautiful, touching...
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  • David
    January 1, 1970
    This is the fourth collection of Mary Oliver poems I've read and I'm still completely in awe.
  • Diane Barnes
    January 1, 1970
    I prefer her poems about nature, but still, these are just beautiful. A surprise find at the library when I went in to renew my card.
  • James
    January 1, 1970
    Mary Oliver's latest collection is a rumination on love. Unfortunately, it takes her away from the natural world, searching a bit more in the ephemeral. Her strongest work has always been about looking at little moments and finding deeper meaning there. Without that connection to the physical world, there is something just self-helpy and feel good without feeling substantial. There are, of course, some beautiful moments because she's a wonderful writer and poet, but this thin book (the poems are Mary Oliver's latest collection is a rumination on love. Unfortunately, it takes her away from the natural world, searching a bit more in the ephemeral. Her strongest work has always been about looking at little moments and finding deeper meaning there. Without that connection to the physical world, there is something just self-helpy and feel good without feeling substantial. There are, of course, some beautiful moments because she's a wonderful writer and poet, but this thin book (the poems are printed on every other page) is a disappointment.
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  • Martha
    January 1, 1970
    I so enjoyed this "fix" of Mary Oliver's poetry. It is spare but never sparse, and full of awe. This explores love. As I read my heart rate slowed and a great, thinking calm came over me.
  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    "Beauty can both shout and whisper, and still/ it explains nothing."I am a fan of Mary Oliver and was thrilled to receive this book from Goodreads as a first-reads giveaway. So many of Oliver's poems lay down a moment and then end with an unexpected line that works like a perfect meditation, which is why I love her work. This collection is focused around God, nature, and love split into three parts entitled The Journey, Love, and Felicity. The Journey is written with Oliver's pastoral tradition "Beauty can both shout and whisper, and still/ it explains nothing."I am a fan of Mary Oliver and was thrilled to receive this book from Goodreads as a first-reads giveaway. So many of Oliver's poems lay down a moment and then end with an unexpected line that works like a perfect meditation, which is why I love her work. This collection is focused around God, nature, and love split into three parts entitled The Journey, Love, and Felicity. The Journey is written with Oliver's pastoral tradition of being in the outdoors. Many of these poems contain questions, exclamations, and there is some occasional preachiness--an experienced life telling the reader to let go, lighten up, trust without worry, pay attention to nature, and other truisms. When the poems are in the moment, when they cut through with precision and pause, the poems are lovely. But some poems felt too easy and ambiguous, leaving me with a sense of dissatisfaction that I am not accustomed to when reading Oliver's work. I enjoyed the Love section, which is more precisely a sharing of gratitude for love between the self and another. Here, the poems felt more personal. And happy in a kind of shared-private-moment way.My favorite poems in this collection were "Roses," "Leaves and Blossoms Along the Way," "I Know Someone," "What a This is Not," and "The Pond," I was disappointed by the unfinished or lacking quality of "Meadowlark," "The Wildest Storm," "Cobb Creek," "Humility," and "This and That."
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  • Beth Bonini
    January 1, 1970
    If pressed to name a favourite contemporary poet, Mary Oliver is nearly always the name I reach for. To be honest, though, this is not her strongest collection. It’s surprisingly lightweight - both in the structure and complexity of the poems. Some of the poems, especially those which focus on love and kissing, are actually a bit (I feel bad about saying this) banal. I think of Mary Oliver primarily as a nature poet. She has a notable sense of the ecstatic, and nature is nearly always the inspir If pressed to name a favourite contemporary poet, Mary Oliver is nearly always the name I reach for. To be honest, though, this is not her strongest collection. It’s surprisingly lightweight - both in the structure and complexity of the poems. Some of the poems, especially those which focus on love and kissing, are actually a bit (I feel bad about saying this) banal. I think of Mary Oliver primarily as a nature poet. She has a notable sense of the ecstatic, and nature is nearly always the inspiration for her finest poems. She also connects the sublimity of nature with the (inferred) existence of God (or the divine, or the eternal, or the soul).The Persian poet Rumi - associated with ‘joy and love’ - is referred to frequently in this collection, and usually to good effect. In the final of three sections in the collection, the one title ‘Love’, Oliver leads with a Rumi poem: “Someone who does not run/toward the allure of love/walks a road where nothing lives.” There is a repeated theme of taking chances and flinging oneself headlong into experiences. My favourite of these poems is the poem ‘Moments’. ‘Storage’ and ‘That Tall Distance’ were also standout poems for me. Overall, I liked this collection in bits - in stanzas, or individual thoughts - but I wouldn’t wholeheartedly recommend it to someone who wants to read Mary Oliver’s work for the first time.
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  • Alec Lurie
    January 1, 1970
    Some really great poems about love, earth, and life in general. It's a little Jesus-y though.
  • Arlitia Jones
    January 1, 1970
    This is the last book I will read in 2016. I chose it specifically because it is a book about love and gratitude and engaging with the world, our fellow humans, the trees, the clouds, the dolphins and it's everything we need at the close of this dark passage. Thank you Mary Oliver. I am ready for connection, for a headlong life. 2017, you unknown expanse of time and happening, new books and true hearts, I promise to defend, fight, cherish, resist and celebrate in service of making you the year w This is the last book I will read in 2016. I chose it specifically because it is a book about love and gratitude and engaging with the world, our fellow humans, the trees, the clouds, the dolphins and it's everything we need at the close of this dark passage. Thank you Mary Oliver. I am ready for connection, for a headlong life. 2017, you unknown expanse of time and happening, new books and true hearts, I promise to defend, fight, cherish, resist and celebrate in service of making you the year we learn to love. Here we go.
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  • Kris - My Novelesque Life
    January 1, 1970
    FELICITYWritten by Mary Oliver2015; 96 PagesGenre: poetry★★★★★(I received an ARC from the NETGALLEY in exchange for an honest review.)I heart Mary Oliver! I discovered this poet last year and I have loved every poem she has written. There is something so innocent yet realistic. I enjoy reading the poetry out loud as the words are so beautifully put together. She has become not just a favourite writer but someone I look to for inspiration in my own writing.
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  • South Buncombe Library
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars and if I could just slip a copy to every patron who checks out anything at my library I think we'd all be better people for taking a few minutes to read through Mary Oliver's latest collection. -Sarah"The roses laughed softly. 'Forgive us,'they said, "but as you can see, we arejust now entirely busy being roses.'"
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  • Akylina
    January 1, 1970
    A very beautiful collection of poems which were inspired by nature, personal experiences and life itself. The images they evoked were marvelous and the language the poet used was mesmerising. An instant favourite.A copy was very kindly provided to me by the publisher via NetGalley.
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  • Emily Graham
    January 1, 1970
    On the cusp of a two star rating, but I think my dissatisfaction largely stems from the distance between my mid-twenties existence and her contented reflection from the happy vantage of eighty odd years.
  • Ashley Olson
    January 1, 1970
    Note to self and others: read this when blindly in love. If read when harboring a momentary distaste for love, this book may cause you to think "tell me about love later, Mary Oliver because right now I don't entirely believe you."
  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this book of poetry. Still reading some again, and will buy it soon.
  • Alexandria Gryder
    January 1, 1970
    From That Little Beast"But sometimes, when I'm thinking about you,and no doubt smiling,it sits down quietly, one paw under its chin,and just listens."So, so pretty.
  • Darren
    January 1, 1970
    I won this book as part of a giveaway on a site called read it forward. It is a book of poems. I enjoyed reading it. They are well written poems. I hope to read more books by this author.
  • Kara
    January 1, 1970
    I feel like I can confidently say that I have a favorite poet! This is a beautiful book. I'll definitely be reading it again - and I want to read everything Mary Oliver has ever written.
  • Joshie
    January 1, 1970
    With all these "poems" popping in and out of the so-called Tumblr site, is there anyone as good as Mary Oliver when it comes to writing poems at present? "Do the trees speak back to the wind when the wind offers some invitational comment? As some of us do, do they also talk to the sun? I believe so, and if such belief need rest on evidence, let me just say, Sometimes it’s an earful. But there’s more. If you can hear the trees in their easy hours of course you can also hear them later, crying out With all these "poems" popping in and out of the so-called Tumblr site, is there anyone as good as Mary Oliver when it comes to writing poems at present? "Do the trees speak back to the wind when the wind offers some invitational comment? As some of us do, do they also talk to the sun? I believe so, and if such belief need rest on evidence, let me just say, Sometimes it’s an earful. But there’s more. If you can hear the trees in their easy hours of course you can also hear them later, crying out at the sawmill."-- Mary Oliver, Do the Trees Speak?A painter of words, an architect of emotions and a sculptor of vivacity. A lover of the environment and a celebrator of life and love; nature is mostly the backbone, that fine-tuning rhythm of her poems about a number of themes. And they blend well with one another (in catastrophe, cynicism and certainty). In her simple words, which create the unforgettable, are where unfathomable set of emotions get born out of and they stir desire, anguish and nostalgia all at once; they leave a deep impression both as a form of self-realization and self-awareness. But be warned that Felicity is a poetry collection which deserves to be savored, to be read more than once and to have the words sit on one's palate until looking at the same thing means something entirely different. Experience it and open your eyes again but this time to a more beautiful world with your fellow complicated, beautiful people.
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  • Mark Robison
    January 1, 1970
    Oliver does not dive into nature like usual, but instead writes love poems here. Her style is so different, I would barely know it’s her. They are short, sometimes cryptic, but generally always include her way of inserting universal truth into the smallest observations. At this point, I’d rank this in the lower third of her books for deciding which ones to re-read. But there may be something here I’m not seeing just yet so consider my rating provisional. I do love the way each poem is like a mom Oliver does not dive into nature like usual, but instead writes love poems here. Her style is so different, I would barely know it’s her. They are short, sometimes cryptic, but generally always include her way of inserting universal truth into the smallest observations. At this point, I’d rank this in the lower third of her books for deciding which ones to re-read. But there may be something here I’m not seeing just yet so consider my rating provisional. I do love the way each poem is like a moment of tenderness seen through a sheer curtain that obscures everything but the intent of the people on the other side. “I don’t want to lose a single thread/ from the intricate brocade of this happiness./ I want to remember everything./ Which is why I’m lying awake, sleepy/ but not sleepy enough to give it up./ Just now, a moment from years ago:/ the early morning light, the deft, sweet/ gesture of your hand/ reaching for me.” Grade: B
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    "No, I'd never been to this countrybefore. No, I didn't know where the toadswould lead me. No, I didn't intend toturn back."Not wholly what I was expecting, but still lovely lyrical writing and meditations on three themes: 'The Journey', 'Love', and 'Felicity'. I was expecting more, after all of the accolades. However, I hear that Oliver's nature poems are her true brilliance, so I will give those a try with one of her other collections. Read for Book Riot's 2016 Read Harder challenge - a book 1 "No, I'd never been to this countrybefore. No, I didn't know where the toadswould lead me. No, I didn't intend toturn back."Not wholly what I was expecting, but still lovely lyrical writing and meditations on three themes: 'The Journey', 'Love', and 'Felicity'. I was expecting more, after all of the accolades. However, I hear that Oliver's nature poems are her true brilliance, so I will give those a try with one of her other collections. Read for Book Riot's 2016 Read Harder challenge - a book 100 pages of less
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  • metaphor
    January 1, 1970
    Your heart is beating, isn’t it?You’re not in chains, are you? *Will I always, from now on, be this cold?“No, it will diminish. But alwaysit will be with you.”What is the reason for it?“Wasn’t your friendship always as beautifulas a flame?”*When did it happen?“It was a long time ago.”Where did it happen?“It was far away.”No, tell. Where did it happen?“In my heart.”What is your heart doing now?“Remembering. Remembering!”
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  • Collin
    January 1, 1970
    Read this in one 45-minute sitting. Lovely
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