A Cooked-Up Fairy Tale
From the creators of There Was an Old Dragon Who Swallowed a Knight comes a fun fractured fairy tale about an aspiring chef who mistakenly turns story ingredients into delectable dishes. . . . Uh-oh! In the magical land of fairy tales, William doesn't quite fit in. He'd rather poach pears than pursue princesses, and he values gnocchi over knighthood. . . .When he stumbles on a delivery of food destined for Fairy-Tale Headquarters (a pumpkin, apples, and a few measly beans), he decides to spice things up and whips the paltry ingredients into delectable dishes. But as you might have guessed, Snow White's wicked stepmother doesn't exactly want her magic apple baked and drizzled with caramel.The team that brought you There Was an Old Dragon Who Swallowed a Knight delivers a hilariously fractured, whipped, and souffleed fairy tale that is chock-full of delicious details and jokes to satisfy every appetite!

A Cooked-Up Fairy Tale Details

TitleA Cooked-Up Fairy Tale
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Fantasy, Fairy Tales, Food and Drink, Food, Cooking, Humor

A Cooked-Up Fairy Tale Review

  • Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance
    January 1, 1970
    Penny Parker Klostermann is at it again, with her zany takes on traditional tales. This time William tries to help out with food for Fairy Tale Headquarters. But will his cooking ruin the fairy tales?SPOILER ALERTOf course not. These are fairy tales, of course. They have to end happily ever after. Love this rollicking good twist on some old stories. Wonderful illustrations too.#bookaday
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  • ☕ Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    A COOKED-UP FAIRY TALE written by Penny Parker Klostermann and illustrated by Ben Mantle offered up a hilarious foodie tale that adds a twist to classic fairy tales. With its subtle lesson on accepting what makes you different, this is a story your little ones will giggle over. Young William lives in the magical land of fairy tales but prefers cooking. He tries working in the local shop like the Brick House owned by three little pigs and Gingerbread-on-the-Go but decides it would be better to co A COOKED-UP FAIRY TALE written by Penny Parker Klostermann and illustrated by Ben Mantle offered up a hilarious foodie tale that adds a twist to classic fairy tales. With its subtle lesson on accepting what makes you different, this is a story your little ones will giggle over. Young William lives in the magical land of fairy tales but prefers cooking. He tries working in the local shop like the Brick House owned by three little pigs and Gingerbread-on-the-Go but decides it would be better to cook at home. Finding that his cupboards are bare, he decides to go shopping for ingredients.  On the street, he finds a box with an apple, a pumpkin, and beans.A witch, a young boy, and three little mice show up at Fairytale headquarters in search of their apple, pumpkin, and beans only to discover William has baked them into delicious dishes.Young readers are left to learn what happens. Will their stories end in happily ever after? Will William ever get to be a real chef? Find out in this delightful tale.The illustrations are beautiful, vivid and plentiful. Sophia who is almost three delighted in the story and laughed when familiar fairytale characters were present. When we finished, she wanted to bake in her kitchen, where we enjoyed a make-believe feast.Copy provided by the publisher. This review was originally posted at Caffeinated Book Reviewer
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  • Viviane Elbee
    January 1, 1970
    This is such a funny, clever fractured fairy tale. I love the cooking theme.Kids wanted to read it again.
  • Kirsti Call
    January 1, 1970
    This fractured fairytale hilariously shows the plight of William, who lives in the land of fairytales, yet "prefers pastries to princesses, kitchens to kingdoms, and reciples to the Royal Reporter."Filled with clever references to fairytale food, this book will keep you hungrily turning the pages. This rollicking read-aloud is quirky, and funny and a story you won't want to miss!
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    William doesn't seem to fit in the fairy tale world in which he was born. All he wants to do is bake and cook, but his efforts to find gainful employment have not been fruitful. When he uses some ingredients necessary for fairy tales in his own concoctions, he inadvertently changes how some of the fairy tales turn out. Readers familiar with Snow White, Jack and the Beanstalk, and Cinderella will get a kick out of how each of these tales are slightly twisted by William's meddling. Ultimately, Wil William doesn't seem to fit in the fairy tale world in which he was born. All he wants to do is bake and cook, but his efforts to find gainful employment have not been fruitful. When he uses some ingredients necessary for fairy tales in his own concoctions, he inadvertently changes how some of the fairy tales turn out. Readers familiar with Snow White, Jack and the Beanstalk, and Cinderella will get a kick out of how each of these tales are slightly twisted by William's meddling. Ultimately, William finds happiness as a chef for the new royal couple, and yes, you guessed it--They all lived happily ever after. Books like this make smile from ear to ear since I love fractured fairy tales. The images will please readers as they are filled with yummy foods and interesting depictions of the stories. Readers looking for a reason to smile will find it in the amusing story about finding one's right place even when it looks as though it might be impossible. Sometimes it takes time to find your bliss or your happy place. I didn't particularly care for the idea of Fairy-Tale Headquarters, but I enjoyed everything else about the book.
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  • Maria Marshall
    January 1, 1970
    So many fractured fairy tales exist that finding a creative take on these perennial favorites is a challenge. But Penny Parker Klostermann not only rose to the challenge, she knocked it out of the park. A COOKED-UP FAIRY TALE is an ingenious mash-up of Sleeping Beauty, Jack and the Beanstalk, and Cinderella, with cameo appearances, orchestrated by Ben Mantle, of many other inhabitants of fairy tale land. Using a common thread in all three tales – food, Klostermann and Mantle create a delicious t So many fractured fairy tales exist that finding a creative take on these perennial favorites is a challenge. But Penny Parker Klostermann not only rose to the challenge, she knocked it out of the park. A COOKED-UP FAIRY TALE is an ingenious mash-up of Sleeping Beauty, Jack and the Beanstalk, and Cinderella, with cameo appearances, orchestrated by Ben Mantle, of many other inhabitants of fairy tale land. Using a common thread in all three tales – food, Klostermann and Mantle create a delicious twist. When William’s love for cooking and dream of being a famous chef conflict with the realities of life in fairy tale land (dangerous stew and cantankerous customers), he makes one last ditch effort to impress Fairy-Tale-Headquarters. However, he’s never read the tales. Will his changes to some important ingredients ruin the happily-ever-after of three tales? The colorful, imaginative illustrations are engaging and full of surprises. Overall, a deliciously fun read aloud twisting of some familiar tales.
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  • Gmr
    January 1, 1970
    Once upon a time, there was a...cook? Chef William was his name and cooking was his game, or rather passion, but what to do when you've been run out of the local kitchens and your own pantry is bare?! Buy ingredients, unless you find a mysterious box of food goodies destined for Fairy Tale Headquarters and can whip up something scrumptious from the simplest (and most familiar) ingredients.Needless to say, what follows is a cook's dream but a fairy tale manager's nightmare, and while things weren Once upon a time, there was a...cook? Chef William was his name and cooking was his game, or rather passion, but what to do when you've been run out of the local kitchens and your own pantry is bare?! Buy ingredients, unless you find a mysterious box of food goodies destined for Fairy Tale Headquarters and can whip up something scrumptious from the simplest (and most familiar) ingredients.Needless to say, what follows is a cook's dream but a fairy tale manager's nightmare, and while things weren't quite the same when Snow White eats a delicious Baked Apple with Caramel Drizzle, Jack has to deal with the giant bean-less but bowl-full, and Cinderella's coach is a little less than the ultimate in beautified transportation, they all turn out pretty darn wonderful in the end. A great twist on the classics that'll make you wonder what other stories could stand a little mixing up...**copy received for review
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  • Read Ribbet
    January 1, 1970
    Clever idea that puts at the center of the story, a young man with a dream to cook his own recipes as a chef who wants to cook happily ever after. He run into difficulty due to the fairy tale contexts in which he has to operate. And just when he thinks his cooking has messed up fairy tales forever, he is recognized by others in a way that let's him achieve his dream. Klosterman weaves other fairy and folk tales characters through out the book (Three Pigs, Three Bears, Cinderella, Jack and the Be Clever idea that puts at the center of the story, a young man with a dream to cook his own recipes as a chef who wants to cook happily ever after. He run into difficulty due to the fairy tale contexts in which he has to operate. And just when he thinks his cooking has messed up fairy tales forever, he is recognized by others in a way that let's him achieve his dream. Klosterman weaves other fairy and folk tales characters through out the book (Three Pigs, Three Bears, Cinderella, Jack and the Beanstalk, and Snow White) that will engage young readers as they find recognizable links to these familiar tales. The universal theme of a boy following his dream is developed well. It would be a good addition to a fracture fairy tale study and provides a great mentor text on how to borrow and disrupt other stories to create your own unique version.
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  • Sherri Rivers
    January 1, 1970
    What a fun book. You know right away ole William is not a run of the mill tyke. When he tries to fulfill his cooking dreams, he encounters danger, hard-to-please diners, and other runaway delicacies. When he comes upon some odd food items, he goes to work, but some fairy tale characters aren't happy. All ends well, though, and the clever food words sprinkled throughout give it another level--"feast for my eyes," "a recipe for disaster," "was in a pickle," "cooked up enough trouble," etc. Lots of What a fun book. You know right away ole William is not a run of the mill tyke. When he tries to fulfill his cooking dreams, he encounters danger, hard-to-please diners, and other runaway delicacies. When he comes upon some odd food items, he goes to work, but some fairy tale characters aren't happy. All ends well, though, and the clever food words sprinkled throughout give it another level--"feast for my eyes," "a recipe for disaster," "was in a pickle," "cooked up enough trouble," etc. Lots of little extras in the illustrations.
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  • Juliana Lee
    January 1, 1970
    William lived in the land of fairy tales, but he didn't know much about them because he was focused on cooking. He tried working as a cook at the Pig's Brick House, The Three Bear's Bistro, and The Gingerbread on the Go bakery. None of these jobs suited him. Then one day he found a box of ingredients that had fallen out of a passing truck. He used the ingredients to make a delicious dinner not realizing that they were essential to the bedtime stories for that night. To help make things right, Wi William lived in the land of fairy tales, but he didn't know much about them because he was focused on cooking. He tried working as a cook at the Pig's Brick House, The Three Bear's Bistro, and The Gingerbread on the Go bakery. None of these jobs suited him. Then one day he found a box of ingredients that had fallen out of a passing truck. He used the ingredients to make a delicious dinner not realizing that they were essential to the bedtime stories for that night. To help make things right, William works to incorporate his food into the stories so that everything ends happily ever after!
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  • Gio
    January 1, 1970
    This book was perfect cause is a fairy tale and the title was A Cooked - Up Fairy Tale and there is another book that this story pronounced while I read and it's the dragon who ate a knight and it's a fairy tale.
  • Ireadkidsbooks
    January 1, 1970
    I was with it until the line, "But may I suggest you can have your pie and your princess, too?" For a story that otherwise scrambles fairy tale tropes, the possessive tone of this interaction fell flat as a pancake for me.
  • Tracy Hora
    January 1, 1970
    If you love fractured fairy tales, you will love this one! It's a mash-up of delicious fun! Review can be found here:http://onceuponashelf.blogspot.com/20...
  • Edward Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    A fun foodie tale with a fractured fairy tale twist.
  • Elaine
    January 1, 1970
    A fun cooked-up fairy tale for foodies everywhere! This book will keep you turning the pages, hungry for more. A really funny story that you won't want to miss! Highly recommend!
  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this. Different and fun way to interact with fairy tales.
  • Jillian Heise
    January 1, 1970
    This was cute. A perfect addition to a fractured fairy tale collection.
  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Great fractured fairy tale(s) for the classroom
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