Unflinching
From retired elite sniper Jody Mitic, who lost both of his legs below the knees in Afghanistan, Unflinching is an uplifting memoir on military issues, endurance, and overcoming adversity.Afghanistan, 2007. While on patrol with the 1st Battalion Royal Canadian Regiment deep within enemy territory, sniper Jody Mitic stepped on a land mine and lost both legs below the knee. Though Jody was a dedicated serviceman who had dreamed of a military life since he was a child, it seemed that his fighting days were done. Ever a soldier at heart, Jody was determined to still be of service to his country, and he refused to let his injury hold him back. After only a few short months of rehab, Jody was up and walking again on two prosthetic legs, and only a year later, he was running his first road race. But despite his success in physically recovering from his injury, Jody still struggled to mentally adapt to his new reality. As he experienced first-hand the controversial treatment of Canadian veterans, Jody turned his efforts towards developing programs for wounded veterans and publicly advocating on their behalf. With a renewed purpose to guide him, Jody came to find a new lease on life. An inspirational memoir of resilience and courage in the face of overwhelming adversity, Unflinching is a unique portrait of a man who exemplifies the perseverance, strength, and optimism needed to overcome seemingly unconquerable barriers.

Unflinching Details

TitleUnflinching
Author
ReleaseSep 8th, 2015
PublisherSimon Schuster
ISBN-139781476795102
Rating
GenreNonfiction, War, Military Fiction, Biography, Autobiography, Cultural, Canada, Memoir

Unflinching Review

  • Giselle
    January 1, 1970
    This is a telling story of Jody Mitic's foray into the Canadian Armed Forces as a sniper. It includes some photos, and letters he sent to his father. I knew he didn't write the story but it's obvious someone else did. The pacing of the story is very very quick so there's not a lot of emotions felt. It's more of a telling rather than showing what happened and I felt it lacked the depth of feelings for the reader to silently place their shoes in his. There were tons of military jargon and I was This is a telling story of Jody Mitic's foray into the Canadian Armed Forces as a sniper. It includes some photos, and letters he sent to his father. I knew he didn't write the story but it's obvious someone else did. The pacing of the story is very very quick so there's not a lot of emotions felt. It's more of a telling rather than showing what happened and I felt it lacked the depth of feelings for the reader to silently place their shoes in his. There were tons of military jargon and I was sad to see the glossary by the end which was too late for me to flip through. I really think the publisher should say "Glossary in back" so people know about this. It's a fairly quick read but I also had trouble getting into it as well. Some scenes are more memorable like others like the Taliban using children to scout areas and if they're seen as a threat they would be gunned down. And obviously the part about him losing his feet. I really wanted him to explain more about his recovery and his addiction. I felt like it was glossed over.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    I may get accused of being anti-patriotic for this opinion cuz really, who doesn't like a book by a guy who is an elite member of a CAF sniper team, gets his legs blown off while serving his country, then comes home to run a half marathon on prosthetic legs, gets 2nd place in a reality show, cures himself of Oxy addiction, and basically moves himself through therapy and rehab single-handedly? Well, me.This was the November choice for my book club. Disclaimer: all of the members of my club are I may get accused of being anti-patriotic for this opinion cuz really, who doesn't like a book by a guy who is an elite member of a CAF sniper team, gets his legs blown off while serving his country, then comes home to run a half marathon on prosthetic legs, gets 2nd place in a reality show, cures himself of Oxy addiction, and basically moves himself through therapy and rehab single-handedly? Well, me.This was the November choice for my book club. Disclaimer: all of the members of my club are spouses of serving members of the Canadian Armed Forces. I think this was the book choice in part because most of the military spouses of my fellow clubbers already owned it. I didn't really know Jody's story before reading his book (I don't watch tv, didn't follow the election campaign for his City of Ottawa seat). Clearly he has what it takes to be successful in whatever he puts his mind to and I respect his determination and drive. He's also brought important attention to the state of the CAF and injured soldiers. But, I couldn't shake a growing dislike for the guy and while my opinion of the author should have no bearing on the topic, that distaste affected my opinion of the book.First, the book itself is a quick, easy read but I thought it would have benefited from an merciless edit job.I acknowledge he was an exceptionally skilled member of an elite team of fighters and consequently enjoyed special status among the ranks, but I'd had enough of his self-congratulations 1/2 way through the book. "First thing we snipers did ..." "We snipers were allowed certain freedoms ... " "Snipers have the ability to turn off their emotions ... " "us snipers don't get PTSD" (seriously?? This one makes me particularly annoyed. This totally blames the victim among the ranks - so if my spouse struggles with PTSD, it's because he can't separate himself from the events as Jody claims?) I understand his need to maintain his military and sniper identity that gave him status at one time but OMG it got tiring.I understand that I'm an outsider to military thinking and that they are trained to kill, but the descriptions of "longest kills" bothered me on a fundamental level. I can't help but think of the life gone on the other end of that bullet, and to them it's a contest, about setting a record. I know they are trained to do this and they do what they do to protect human life, and that thinking alters when you are being fired on in return. I truly respect and support the need to be in conflict zones and do what is necessary. I also recognize they need to think this way in order to not lose it mentally themselves, and that this sort of contest among soldiers is as old as armed conflict itself. I know all that. But still ... call me a bleeding heart liberal, I found the descriptions of it all as a "contest" and "breaking a record" hard to get past.I also found it odd that he took such care to omit last names of his crew and cover eyes in the photos, but gave detailed descriptions of the events of one particularly horrific day in Afghanistan, including names and conditions of the bodies of deceased Canadian soldiers. I'd find that pretty hard if I were a family member of the deceased.What I was looking forward to in this book was a description of his drive to succeed translated to his recovery post-injury and create change in the system, and the book fell short on this. For me, the book started on page 201 (out of 229 pages) when he started describing his recovery. In spite of my complaining above, the first part of the book was interesting and made me respect CAF members even more for what they go through on overseas deployments as well as here at home. I know that 98% of his readership will buy the book for exactly all the descriptions of fighting and military life. But I think if he really wants to create change for returning injured veterans, he missed his chance by failing to describe more fully his experience on return and *why* that demonstrates the need for change, and what could be done to actually create change in the system.
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  • Karli Archambault
    January 1, 1970
    I work for Coles, Indigo. When I was at work one day and I heard about this book coming out - I knew I had to have it. I bought "Unflinching: The Making of a Canadian Sniper" the day it came out, and I can honestly say it was one of the best books I have ever read in my life. I am usually not one for Autobiographies, but Jody's story was so inspiring and touching that I knew I had to get my hands on a copy. Military history and war in general are my favourite genre's to read, and even though I I work for Coles, Indigo. When I was at work one day and I heard about this book coming out - I knew I had to have it. I bought "Unflinching: The Making of a Canadian Sniper" the day it came out, and I can honestly say it was one of the best books I have ever read in my life. I am usually not one for Autobiographies, but Jody's story was so inspiring and touching that I knew I had to get my hands on a copy. Military history and war in general are my favourite genre's to read, and even though I have a very strong foundation on military acronyms and protocol, I was impressed to see how Jody wrote his book in a very easy-to-read and understand fashion for the general public. This book captures my attention fully, and I had a hard time putting it down. It truly highlightes the triumphs and the heartbreak in Jody's life and career as a sniper for the Canadian Armed Forces, and the brotherhood and strength of it's service members. If you are looking for a fantastic, true story that is exceptionally written, "Unflinching: The Making of a Canadian Sniper" is the book for you!
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  • Cody Lasko
    January 1, 1970
    Its a 3-star read that brings out 5-star emotions. Get the average. This book should also serve as profound inspiration to get up, dust off, and soldier on with it. Jody details his life pursuing a military career, desperately working to maintain a military career, and the events leading to him losing his military career (and his legs). But in doing all of that he gains so much more. Its the real life account of a tenacious man fighting to overcome serious odds and in doing so defined exactly It’s a 3-star read that brings out 5-star emotions. Get the average. This book should also serve as profound inspiration to get up, dust off, and soldier on with it. Jody details his life pursuing a military career, desperately working to maintain a military career, and the events leading to him losing his military career (and his legs). But in doing all of that he gains so much more. It’s the real life account of a tenacious man fighting to overcome serious odds and in doing so defined exactly the man he wanted - and needed - to be. His story can inspire your own, just as it has for so many other Canadians. Hell, you don’t even have to be Canadian to find inspiration from it. You just have to be living. And that’s what Jody continues to do. Thank you for your service, and thank you for sharing your story, sir.
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  • Krista
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very readable book, that had a pretty impressive story. Jody's spirit is very evident in this book. A funny coincidence-- I didn't realize I was present at the ceremony when Jody was presented with the sacrifice medal. It was only when I saw the picture in the book that I made the connection. My only complaint was that the pacing of the book seemed slow in the beginning, and then after his accident, we were rushed to the end. Regardless, I admire what he is doing for veterans, and This was a very readable book, that had a pretty impressive story. Jody's spirit is very evident in this book. A funny coincidence-- I didn't realize I was present at the ceremony when Jody was presented with the sacrifice medal. It was only when I saw the picture in the book that I made the connection. My only complaint was that the pacing of the book seemed slow in the beginning, and then after his accident, we were rushed to the end. Regardless, I admire what he is doing for veterans, and making their lives better. Overall, a good read.
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  • Judy Decaigny
    January 1, 1970
    Fascinating. An interesting look inside the modern soldier and this mans journey to becoming a sniper for the Canadian Military. Highly recommended. Fascinating. An interesting look inside the modern soldier and this man’s journey to becoming a sniper for the Canadian Military. Highly recommended.
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  • Jesse
    January 1, 1970
    For this review and more, check out my blog at https://bluedecemberblog.wordpress.com
  • Meag M
    January 1, 1970
    Unflinching was great. It told the story of Jody Mitic's life so far, detailing his triumphs and losses. I could barely put the book down. His undying perseverance is nothing short of inspiring.
  • Jack Allan
    January 1, 1970
    Ben FoxMay 2, 2016CHC2DEMr. Lund History Book ReviewUnflinching The Making of ACanadian Sniper In the book Unflinching the Making of a Canadian Sniper by Jody Mitic, it walks you through the course of the life of Jody Mitic. It tells you the early stages of his life, about him always wanting to be in the army, and how it wasnt easy when his mom and dad split up when Jody was young. It tells you how he changed his life around by joining the army reserves in high school. Then when he joined the Ben FoxMay 2, 2016CHC2DEMr. Lund History Book ReviewUnflinching The Making of ACanadian Sniper In the book Unflinching the Making of a Canadian Sniper by Jody Mitic, it walks you through the course of the life of Jody Mitic. It tells you the early stages of his life, about him always wanting to be in the army, and how it wasn’t easy when his mom and dad split up when Jody was young. It tells you how he changed his life around by joining the army reserves in high school. Then when he joined the regular forces as an infantry soldier and got caught with his friend while he was doing cocaine, although Jody wasn’t doing cocaine he still got into huge trouble. He then redid his army training to get back to being a soldier after almost getting court martialed after his cocaine incident. But his biggest challenge is when he steps on a land-mine in Afghanistan and his legs amputated below the knee. Then he overcomes his addiction of oxycontin after his incident in Afghanistan.The book is motivational in the way that he overcomes many obstacles in his life like having had his legs blown off below the knee and still trained himself to not walk but to run again. It is also motivational because he got addicted to oxycontin after his legs were blown off but had to stop taking the medications even though it would hurt a lot physically and because he did them to cope with emotional side of not having any legs. The main thing that grabbed my attention in this book is that it gives you an insite of what it would have been like to be in the war in Afghanistan. Jody tells you some of the operations he went on like operation Medusa in 2006. He also tells you about various missions with the United States army’s Delta Force special operations unit, something that textbooks are unable to provide. Overall I think I would give this book a four and a half out of five star rating, based on its motivation and what it would be like to be a Canadian sniper in the war in Afghanistan. The only thing that isn’t giving it that full five stars is that I wish it had have spent a little more in depth time in the war in Afghanistan and how it could effect a soldier and give him post traumatic stress disorder. Other than that little thing that's missing I definitely consider reading this book, if you like first hand war stories.
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  • JennieWithTheBooks☮️(◕‿◕✿)
    January 1, 1970
    Along with being a role model and a Canadian hero I think you could add an accomplished author to Jody Mitic's list of accomplishments.What an amazing story of a person making the best of himself after the worst experience. A down to earth guy who wrote his story in an easy to read format and he even discussed topics that most books don't talk about and despite the seriousness of it all his humour and compassion shone through and probably because of these traits of his, he has created a whole Along with being a role model and a Canadian hero I think you could add an accomplished author to Jody Mitic's list of accomplishments.What an amazing story of a person making the best of himself after the worst experience. A down to earth guy who wrote his story in an easy to read format and he even discussed topics that most books don't talk about and despite the seriousness of it all his humour and compassion shone through and probably because of these traits of his, he has created a whole new story for himself. Written in a way that civilians can understand. It gave me a better sense of what soldiers go through to keep us safe. The good and bad of being in the Canadian Armed Forces I guess you could say.It's an incredible story of courage. There's no whining about anything in the book. He just tells it like it is. I would like to meet Jody and just spend time listening to him retell some of his adventures. He comes across as tough but humble and he knew/knows what he wants to do. There's an ease to his story-telling.It's an incredibly inspiring book and I would recommend it to anyone. Sacrifices are sometimes made without choice and this book is about what it takes to remake your life when the worst happens. It all boils down to the choices you make about the crap that sometimes comes into your life unexpectedly. A book full of great imagery and I would now love to see his story in a documentary. Should also be required reading in our Canadian school system. I know it would get and keep the kids attention! It's the story of the making of one tough dude and I'm telling you, you'll be missing out if you don't read it! He is one ACCOMPLISHED man. ... "A man of perpetual optimism ... a priceless trait to possess because it has the power to transform people. One person's determination can spread hope far and wide. If he could pick himself up and put his life back together after being a casualty of war, there's HOPE for all of us as we face life's challenges ... " General Rick HillierToday is my #invictusday...the day I chose to remove SUICIDE from the options category in my problem solving strategies. https://youtu.be/8sAEIYEs86IOne of the best non-fiction books I've read lately. Thank you for your service Master Corporal Jody Mitic
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  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    This book was somewhat of a disappointment. I'm giving it 3 stars because Mitic's story at the end regarding his recovery is particularly outstanding. The gist of this book is really about how he picked himself up after being wounded overseas and transitioned into civilian life as a public servant. It's too bad that he waited until the book was almost over to relate that story.Early in the book Mitic goes on and on and on about his Basic Training. Guess what?every soldier's Basic Training This book was somewhat of a disappointment. I'm giving it 3 stars because Mitic's story at the end regarding his recovery is particularly outstanding. The gist of this book is really about how he picked himself up after being wounded overseas and transitioned into civilian life as a public servant. It's too bad that he waited until the book was almost over to relate that story.Early in the book Mitic goes on and on and on about his Basic Training. Guess what?—every soldier's Basic Training stories are exactly the same. There's nothing unique or even entertaining about Mitic's experiences. They're not book worthy. Mitic then goes on to tell us about his Battle School, an uneventful tour of the Balkans, and then about his Sniper Course. Once again, these stories are generic, uninteresting and not worthy of a book. He is honest about some disciplinary issues he had along the way which I give him kudos for.Mitic has tendency to brag and over exaggerate the mettle of him and his fellow snipers while undermining and selling short his fellow soldiers who aren't sniper trained. He talks about how during rocket attacks at the Kandahar Airfield "all the soldiers went running for the bunkers for protection" while the snipers remained calm under fire. Total BS. I am an ex-CAF member with a tour to Kandahar and I can attest to the *fact that no CAF members went "running to the bunkers" during rocket fire. Only civilian personnel went to the bunkers as per protocol. That comment from Mitic was not only disrespectful but false.This book should have focused on his recovery from the beginning and went more into his post-military career of being a city counselor and how he applies lessons learned from overseas into his everyday life as a politician. Maybe he's saving that for a future book?
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  • Jupiter's Fury
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating is 3.5 stars.I feel a bit bad about not rating this higher (hence the .5 rating), because I did enjoy this book, but found it a bit lacking in depth. Jody Mitic is an undeniable inspiration who doesn't shy away from his past mistakes, and never makes excuses for the situations he finds himself in. This is a man whose sheer willpower and determination allowed him to reinvent himself over and over, into someone better each time. I'm proud that Jody is a fellow Canuck, and admire him Actual rating is 3.5 stars.I feel a bit bad about not rating this higher (hence the .5 rating), because I did enjoy this book, but found it a bit lacking in depth. Jody Mitic is an undeniable inspiration who doesn't shy away from his past mistakes, and never makes excuses for the situations he finds himself in. This is a man whose sheer willpower and determination allowed him to reinvent himself over and over, into someone better each time. I'm proud that Jody is a fellow Canuck, and admire him for his years of service. The book itself was an easy enough read and I breezed through it in a matter of days. Jody has a frank writing style, no room for flowery prose from this soldier, and it serves the subject matter well. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about his exploits in Afghanistan and felt I got a better understanding of the war more than the media ever could give me. Still, I yearned for more details, especially about his recovery. The last few chapters seem incredibly rushed, and I wish Mitic had slowed the pace down to really delve into what it took to recover after being a double-amputee. I understand this is a chapter of his life he would rather not relive, but I would have loved to see more detail on how his family got him through matters, more detail on his relationship with his wife, and adjusting to life as a civilian. Even 50 extra pages from this man's extraordinary life would have made this book a near perfect experience for me.
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  • Mark
    January 1, 1970
    I very much enjoyed reading this book. I had seen the title a few times and had placed it on my list of books to read. After hearing Jody speak on a couple of podcasts I was even more interested to read this. I am glad I did. I appreciated the honesty and openness of certain incidents that Jody overcame in his early career due to nothing more stubbornness and grit. The efforts upon returning to Canada as an advocate for our wounded veterans, and also taking ownership of his visibility as an I very much enjoyed reading this book. I had seen the title a few times and had placed it on my list of books to read. After hearing Jody speak on a couple of podcasts I was even more interested to read this. I am glad I did. I appreciated the honesty and openness of certain incidents that Jody overcame in his early career due to nothing more stubbornness and grit. The efforts upon returning to Canada as an advocate for our wounded veterans, and also taking ownership of his visibility as an inspiration to others. I have read many books written about Canadian involvement in Afghanistan so was not surprised by what Jody described about his experiences. What I truly enjoyed was how he let us into what the feelings and thoughts of a soldier in the moment was going through, so much so I would love to see Jody write a second book detailing more of what he went through after the explosion and what made him into the man he is today.
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  • Marc D
    January 1, 1970
    Very well done! Probably one of the best books I've read in a long time. Unflinching has something in it for everybody to enjoy and learn from. Jody Mitic is truly an inspiring person who took the crappy hand that was dealt to him and turned it into a Royal Flush. He overcomes adversity, both internal and external, and offers a lesson in perseverance to everyone. The book itself reads like a conversation between you and Jody while sitting at your local Tim Horton's. It is an emotional read; you Very well done! Probably one of the best books I've read in a long time. Unflinching has something in it for everybody to enjoy and learn from. Jody Mitic is truly an inspiring person who took the crappy hand that was dealt to him and turned it into a Royal Flush. He overcomes adversity, both internal and external, and offers a lesson in perseverance to everyone. The book itself reads like a conversation between you and Jody while sitting at your local Tim Horton's. It is an emotional read; you can’t help but laugh out loud (literally) at some points and there are times where you can’t help but tear up. Unflinching should be mandatory reading for all Canadians. I’m so proud to have Jody Mitic as one of our city councillor here in Ottawa.Thank you for sharing and thank you for your service.
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  • Bernie Charbonneau
    January 1, 1970
    If you are Canadian, you may remember Mr. Mitic from the reality show, Amazing Race Canada from a couple of years ago. He was the double amputee who was competing with his brother and finished second. A very sentimental favorite for this reader to win but considering this was my first time ever seeing this television series, second place was enjoyable to watch. Anyways, this is his story of his career as a Canadian Veteran of the Afghanistan conflict. I have been an admirer of Mr. Mitic when I If you are Canadian, you may remember Mr. Mitic from the reality show, Amazing Race Canada from a couple of years ago. He was the double amputee who was competing with his brother and finished second. A very sentimental favorite for this reader to win but considering this was my first time ever seeing this television series, second place was enjoyable to watch. Anyways, this is his story of his career as a Canadian Veteran of the Afghanistan conflict. I have been an admirer of Mr. Mitic when I first read about this Canadian soldier who was severely wounded during an excursion but once relatively rehabilitated, applied to continue his mission in Afghanistan. I continued to follow Mr. Mitics news and when I heard of this book, I Immediately purchased this hero’s story. An enthralling read and recommended to anyone interested in the insight of a Canadian soldier during conflict.
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  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! Lots of emotion for this one. I'm truly inspired by all Jody Mitic has overcome and has done in his still young life. I'm proud of him and all our soldiers who give so much to protect our country! I'm shocked and embarrassed by the lack of support our wounded veterans receive. Truly we need to do better.This is a book that one really can't put down once started. I was even reading it on Wednesday October 14 while listening to the Jays capture their ALDS title. The storytelling is Wow! Lots of emotion for this one. I'm truly inspired by all Jody Mitic has overcome and has done in his still young life. I'm proud of him and all our soldiers who give so much to protect our country! I'm shocked and embarrassed by the lack of support our wounded veterans receive. Truly we need to do better.This is a book that one really can't put down once started. I was even reading it on Wednesday October 14 while listening to the Jays capture their ALDS title. The storytelling is enthralling and gives a civilian a little glimpse into the lives of our military personnel. While the descriptions are vivid, I'm sure that it is no where near the true horror of what our soldier's see. I can't really put into words the effect the book has had on me. It is a must read for anyone.
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    I first became interested in this book after hearing Jody defending Nostalgia by MJ Vassanji on Canada Reads 2017. I had recently read Waiting for First Light by Romeo Dallaire, and was interested in stories of modern war. Unflinching definitely provided that story. Jody's story of his advancement through the military structure to sniper, and the struggles within that, and then his struggles after he got injured in Afghanistan. The book was very easy to read, and had good momentum and provided I first became interested in this book after hearing Jody defending Nostalgia by MJ Vassanji on Canada Reads 2017. I had recently read Waiting for First Light by Romeo Dallaire, and was interested in stories of modern war. Unflinching definitely provided that story. Jody's story of his advancement through the military structure to sniper, and the struggles within that, and then his struggles after he got injured in Afghanistan. The book was very easy to read, and had good momentum and provided good detail. I think I expected a bit more of the story than was provided - his recovery and learning to walk in prosthetics was probably more difficult than the book made it seem, but it was still an excellent read.
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  • Eva
    January 1, 1970
    Jody Mitic has written a powerful account of his life serving in the Canadian military in Unflinching: The Making of a Canadian Sniper. The reader gains an understanding of his years as a young teen and follows his journey when he joins the reserves. Throughout his tours of duty overseas, he shares his frank observations. They illustrate the role training has helped to develop these young members of the military into quick thinkers. After he loses both his legs, his life undergoes significant Jody Mitic has written a powerful account of his life serving in the Canadian military in “Unflinching: The Making of a Canadian Sniper.” The reader gains an understanding of his years as a young teen and follows his journey when he joins the reserves. Throughout his tours of duty overseas, he shares his frank observations. They illustrate the role training has helped to develop these young members of the military into quick thinkers. After he loses both his legs, his life undergoes significant changes; he struggles with an addiction to painkillers while becoming a father at the same time. Fortunately, Jody overcomes his demons and continues in public service as a politician.Thank you GoodReads for the book.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    If you are a member of my family who will be in NB for Christmas, please stop reading now!I loved this book. I don't know if it has to do with my mood when reading, the time that I read it, or what, but I really, really enjoyed it. I gave it 5 stars b/c I think it is amazing. I loved reading about Mitic's career in the CF, from beginning to end, his training, his attitude and his tours in Afghanistan. He writes clearly, concisely, and with some humour where appropriate. He is at times humble, If you are a member of my family who will be in NB for Christmas, please stop reading now!I loved this book. I don't know if it has to do with my mood when reading, the time that I read it, or what, but I really, really enjoyed it. I gave it 5 stars b/c I think it is amazing. I loved reading about Mitic's career in the CF, from beginning to end, his training, his attitude and his tours in Afghanistan. He writes clearly, concisely, and with some humour where appropriate. He is at times humble, and at times, aware of how cocky he may be have been. It was a joy to read this book, and will make you feel proud of anyone that you know in the CF.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a different novel for me, but I have to say I really enjoyed it. Too often us Canadian's take "war" and "peace keeping" for granted, but our deployed soldiers are put in harms way every day. We should be thankful that not more casualties occur.Unflinching gave me the insight of a soldier in active duty. It also re-energized confidence and pride of our Canadian military - who WANT to serve and are committed to our country.Before reading, I had no idea who Jody Mitic was. I was even This was such a different novel for me, but I have to say I really enjoyed it. Too often us Canadian's take "war" and "peace keeping" for granted, but our deployed soldiers are put in harms way every day. We should be thankful that not more casualties occur.Unflinching gave me the insight of a soldier in active duty. It also re-energized confidence and pride of our Canadian military - who WANT to serve and are committed to our country.Before reading, I had no idea who Jody Mitic was. I was even more excited when I read the afterward and found out about how Jody was working today in making a difference for those injured soldiers who cannot return to active duty.
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  • William
    January 1, 1970
    An amazing book I couldn't put down down and did so only when I had to sleep. What an inspiring story of a true Canadian warrior who pulls no punches and never sugar coats his life. I 'm going to buy this book. I'd seen it in the bookstore and was fortunate to discover it at my local library. The author has such a honest and straightforward approach and positive attitude. I read it over the course of about one day and one night when I woke up and couldn't get back to sleep. An amazing book and a An amazing book I couldn't put down down and did so only when I had to sleep. What an inspiring story of a true Canadian warrior who pulls no punches and never sugar coats his life. I 'm going to buy this book. I'd seen it in the bookstore and was fortunate to discover it at my local library. The author has such a honest and straightforward approach and positive attitude. I read it over the course of about one day and one night when I woke up and couldn't get back to sleep. An amazing book and a must read for those interested in our Canadian warriors and their contribution worldwide to United Nations as well as NATO operations. Read this book!!!!
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  • Ietrio
    January 1, 1970
    The scary story of a terrible psychopath. He does not even kills for direct pleasure. He kills for the pleasure of receiving orders and being congratulated the same way you would congratulate an obedient dog after bringing a toy. He has killed probably more people than the worst of the serial killers. And to make the story even scarier, he is congratulated by people who should protect the general public from such dangerous types. To add ridicule to the scene, he is a hero. A hero that saved The scary story of a terrible psychopath. He does not even kills for direct pleasure. He kills for the pleasure of receiving orders and being congratulated the same way you would congratulate an obedient dog after bringing a toy. He has killed probably more people than the worst of the serial killers. And to make the story even scarier, he is congratulated by people who should protect the general public from such dangerous types. To add ridicule to the scene, he is a hero. A hero that saved Canada from speaking Pashto to the Queen.
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  • Abby
    January 1, 1970
    This book rates a solid 4 stars. This is a powerful story of one man's journey through the ranks of the Canadian Armed Forces to train, ultimately as a sniper. Along the way, you as the reader, come to understand the dedication and sacrifice each soldier must make and be willing to lay their life down for their country. This is also Mr. Mitics personal journey home after a devastating injury and his road to recovery, both emotional and physically. This book shows even under the most daunting and This book rates a solid 4 stars. This is a powerful story of one man's journey through the ranks of the Canadian Armed Forces to train, ultimately as a sniper. Along the way, you as the reader, come to understand the dedication and sacrifice each soldier must make and be willing to lay their life down for their country. This is also Mr. Mitic’s personal journey home after a devastating injury and his road to recovery, both emotional and physically. This book shows even under the most daunting and extreme hardships can someone find inspiration to move forward.
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  • E.R. Yatscoff
    January 1, 1970
    The author has found the 'voice' that many aspiring authors wish they could get. His is a very natural storytelling. For the most part it is a good story. I wanted a bit more about Afghanistan, though. For instance a bit about the Afghan Army who I have heard a lot of things about. The one instance they're mentioned in here, they ran off. Also, no emotions or mention of the Taliban he did kill. Very little is mentioned on the prosthetic for his legs--like how they're attached. Straightforward The author has found the 'voice' that many aspiring authors wish they could get. His is a very natural storytelling. For the most part it is a good story. I wanted a bit more about Afghanistan, though. For instance a bit about the Afghan Army who I have heard a lot of things about. The one instance they're mentioned in here, they ran off. Also, no emotions or mention of the Taliban he did kill. Very little is mentioned on the prosthetic for his legs--like how they're attached. Straightforward bio from school to sniper town councilor .
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  • T. Fowler
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great book as it gives a rare inside look into the life and mind of a soldier whose greatest ambition is to participate in the combat mission. The reader follows his life path, from his early days when, as a young boy, he dreams of enlisting, to the time when he is fully trained as a sniper, an elite category with the combat arms, and finally through the agony of rehabilitation following his injury from an IED. The book is well-written, keeping the reader's interest throughout.
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  • Megan Frowley
    January 1, 1970
    Jody's story was truly inspiring for me; I've thought greatly about joining the CAF, and his drive and determination solidified my goal to pursue a career with the army. I'm training and keeping in mind the positive aspects of life that the CAF will provide to me once I achieve them. I highly recommend this book to anyone who is looking for guidance on how to overcome any obstacle that life may throw at you.
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  • Melony Joy
    January 1, 1970
    Not only did this book make me feel so proud of our men and women in the Canadian Forces, I learned a lot more than I expected to about the rigors and training required to become a sniper. This book would make a great gift to any young person needing a strong Canadian role model or any patriotic person looking for a great read. Jody Mitic has a very nice writing style and I hope to see more from him in the future.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Jody Mitic made an impression on me when I saw him on Amazing Race Canada so when I saw that he had written a book, I had to read it. Most of the book is about his time in the Armed Forces, which is really not my thing, and only the last bit is about his recovery after he lost his lower legs. However, the way he writes is entertaining and easy to understand so I found that I enjoyed the book more than I thought I would.
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  • Allie Harris
    January 1, 1970
    A simply written, matter of fact novel, but entertaining. I'm not usually interested in war stories, and I don't relate to people who want to be soldiers and shoot guns, but maybe that'd why I enjoyed it. Jody tells a real authentic story from a perspective I don't normally get to hear. I bought the book after Jody got elected as the new city councilor in my ward, and I watched back episodes of The Amazing Race that he and his brother competed on. A truly remarkable person, and a good read.
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  • Rachel Ball
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed reading this book. A detailed and fascinating story of a Canadian sniper in Afghanistan. Mitic writes candidly about his experiences in the Canadian Armed Forces and overcoming extreme hardships. He is an inspiring Canadian. Similar to Soldier Girls, I really enjoyed an insiders view of military life.
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