Angels Passing (DI Joe Faraday, #3)
Why did fourteen-year-old Helen Bassam fall to her death from a tower block? DI Joe Faraday is on the case, but almost immediately, he’s fighting for resources. The body of a drug dealer is found hanging from a tree, and the head of the Major Crimes Squad is pulling in all the manpower he can get. Faraday plunges into Portsmouth’s bleak netherworld of wrecked families and children cast adrift. But as he tracks down a ten-year-old boy who may hold the key to Helen’s death, he’s faced with a crisis much closer to home.

Angels Passing (DI Joe Faraday, #3) Details

TitleAngels Passing (DI Joe Faraday, #3)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 1st, 2005
PublisherOrion Publishing
ISBN-139780752849539
Rating
GenreMystery, Crime, Fiction, Thriller

Angels Passing (DI Joe Faraday, #3) Review

  • Dorothy
    January 1, 1970
    The plotting of this book maintained my interest from beginning to end, even though I found the ending perhaps a tad too neat and convenient.Joe Faraday is a complex and interesting character, all too human in his reactions to personal problems. One wonders how a supposedly competent detective can be so bloody blind to clues in his own relationships, but human beings can persuade themselves to turn a blind eye to anything if it is in their self-interest.I hated DC Paul Winter in the first two bo The plotting of this book maintained my interest from beginning to end, even though I found the ending perhaps a tad too neat and convenient.Joe Faraday is a complex and interesting character, all too human in his reactions to personal problems. One wonders how a supposedly competent detective can be so bloody blind to clues in his own relationships, but human beings can persuade themselves to turn a blind eye to anything if it is in their self-interest.I hated DC Paul Winter in the first two books of this series. He seemed to me to exemplify the very worst kind of cop. But in this book, I came to understand him a bit better and, if not to exactly like him, at least to empathize with his viewpoint and to respect his passion for putting the bad guys away by whatever means necessary. The crimes that the coppers are investigating this time involve young people. A 14-year-old girl takes a header off a tall building. A young man, barely in his 20s, is found hanging from a tree, having first been horribly brutalized. And the key to both deaths seems to be hidden in the mind of an elusive 10-year-old feral child who knows far too much about the ugly underbelly of Portsmouth.The way that Hurley weaves these two stories together, at the same time bringing in Faraday's personal problems with his lover and his deaf son, J.J., shows him to be a very skillful writer, mature in his talent. Although police procedurals are not ordinarily my cup of tea, I can't wait to read more about Winter and Faraday.
    more
  • Adam Mills
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent detective novel. All the characters are realistic and completely believable and all have a conflicting mixture of motives. The villains are as wonderfully unpleasant as some of the characters in Dickens . The narrative and description of police procedures is fascinating and the detectives themselves are shown as partially flawed. The description of the sink estates in and around Portsmouth and their inhabitants is grey and bleak. The whole mix produces a very enjoyable novel.
    more
  • Angela Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    Enjoyed reading about a new detective set in a different place. I could relate to some of the places mentioned. There are two investigations, the hunt for a ten year old boy who is linked to the death of a teenage girl and also the death of a small-time crook. As well as the crime the author highlights the way society as a whole is calling apart and how children are undervalued.
    more
  • Houlahan houlahan
    January 1, 1970
    A different kind of police book for me. Very gritty, very realistic, quite dark in places, this features DI Faraday, another struggling cop. There is a bit of social commentary here which...I did not mind. Readable.
  • Troy Hinton-Winrow
    January 1, 1970
    Though it all wrapped up a little too neatly for my personal tastes, I though the detective plotlines were all well written and each POV character was intriguing enough to warrant their own POV, but the personal conflicts - especially around Faraday - felt a little forced.
    more
  • Sall
    January 1, 1970
    Tedious in places but nice to see a strong sign language presence.
  • Doreen Richards
    January 1, 1970
    Gritty. In some ways a very pessimistic book.
  • Joanie Driemeyer
    January 1, 1970
    I never heard of this author, but received it as a gift from my daughter. I enjoyed it. If you like british crime novels, he's one to try.
  • Lainy
    January 1, 1970
    Blurb from goodreadsWhy did fourteen-year-old Helen Bassam fall to her death from a tower block? DI Joe Faraday is on the case, but almost immediately, he’s fighting for resources. The body of a drug dealer is found hanging from a tree, and the head of the Major Crimes Squad is pulling in all the manpower he can get. Faraday plunges into Portsmouth’s bleak netherworld of wrecked families and children cast adrift. But as he tracks down a ten-year-old boy who may hold the key to Helen’s death, he’ Blurb from goodreadsWhy did fourteen-year-old Helen Bassam fall to her death from a tower block? DI Joe Faraday is on the case, but almost immediately, he’s fighting for resources. The body of a drug dealer is found hanging from a tree, and the head of the Major Crimes Squad is pulling in all the manpower he can get. Faraday plunges into Portsmouth’s bleak netherworld of wrecked families and children cast adrift. But as he tracks down a ten-year-old boy who may hold the key to Helen’s death, he’s faced with a crisis much closer to home.My ReviewYet another I am torn between a 2 or 3 star rating! A 14 year old is found dead from either jumping or being pushed from a tower block. A drug dealer is found dead hanging from a tree and so the investigations begin. The story started off fine however I found it had loads of characters in it and two of the officers had similar names (both begining with W) so that was both confusing and off putting. I found it really hard to connect with the characters and kept mixing up who was who.There is a lot I felt in the story that wasn't required and was more padding than offered any substance to the story. Had it been half as thick it might have been much easier to read and more enjoyable. You are also left with some unanswered questions and one in particular to the 14 year old girl which really urked me. The last few chapters really picked up and most of the story came together but by that point I was almost at giving up so a 2/5 for me. This was my first time reading this author and it wouldn't put me off trying another as I have read some really positive reviews for this story, I think it must just be another marmite book.
    more
  • Rob Kitchin
    January 1, 1970
    Hurley is probably the foremost British proponent of gritty, social realist police procedurals. His books vividly capture the methods, personalities and personal relationships, and the politics of policing, as well as the people, places and situations the police deal with on a daily basis. Hurley provides a warts and all portrayal of Portsmouth, its micro-geographies and social divisions, and its bleak underbelly. In Angels Passing, the fourth book in the DI Faraday series, the tale weaves toget Hurley is probably the foremost British proponent of gritty, social realist police procedurals. His books vividly capture the methods, personalities and personal relationships, and the politics of policing, as well as the people, places and situations the police deal with on a daily basis. Hurley provides a warts and all portrayal of Portsmouth, its micro-geographies and social divisions, and its bleak underbelly. In Angels Passing, the fourth book in the DI Faraday series, the tale weaves together two main plot lines, one concerning the death of a teenage girl, the other the murder of a low-level criminal. Where the book excels is in charting the police investigations, noting their complexities and their inherent internal tensions and games, in the characterisation of police, victims and criminals, and in the sense of place. Both main plotlines were interesting, coupled with a nice subplot concerning Faraday’s domestic life, though the denouement felt a little too contrived. Nonetheless, Angels Passing is a compelling, gripping and gritty read, though probably not recommended by Portsmouth’s tourist offices.
    more
  • Denise
    January 1, 1970
    Two investigations running simultaneously. Both investigations are set in Portsmouth describing the environment and lifestyle of both the middle class as pertaining to the death of the fourteen year old girl, and the criminal class surrounding the events of the murder. The author takes you through the emotion and intricacies of family life, and the tangle of criminal relationships. Not to mention the emotion and life of the investigating officers. I enjoyed this read, visualising the environment Two investigations running simultaneously. Both investigations are set in Portsmouth describing the environment and lifestyle of both the middle class as pertaining to the death of the fourteen year old girl, and the criminal class surrounding the events of the murder. The author takes you through the emotion and intricacies of family life, and the tangle of criminal relationships. Not to mention the emotion and life of the investigating officers. I enjoyed this read, visualising the environment, and living life through these characters. ....lives that I never want to live in reality!
    more
  • Sandra
    January 1, 1970
    The more I read of Graham Hurley the more I like and admire his workmanlike style. I began reading detective fiction in order to find ut how to do it; many writers' styles are sufficiently idiosyncratic (and far superior to anything I could attempt) so as to be thoroughly enjoyable to read but beyond me to emulate. Which is not to say Graham Hurley lacks at all, just that I could far more easily learn from him. And intend to.And with each succeeding book in the series his characters become more The more I read of Graham Hurley the more I like and admire his workmanlike style. I began reading detective fiction in order to find ut how to do it; many writers' styles are sufficiently idiosyncratic (and far superior to anything I could attempt) so as to be thoroughly enjoyable to read but beyond me to emulate. Which is not to say Graham Hurley lacks at all, just that I could far more easily learn from him. And intend to.And with each succeeding book in the series his characters become more rounded.
    more
  • Gary Van Cott
    January 1, 1970
    I did not like this book as much as the previous two. One thing I did like is that it is told entirely from the point of view of detectives although it switches from person to person rapidly throughout. It did tend to get a bit tedious in parts and at bit preachy. It also uses some British/Portsmouth(?) slang I was unfamiliar with and couldn't find in my British dictionary. I would like to see the female detectives with a larger role. I also don't understand why Faraday's deaf son doesn't appear I did not like this book as much as the previous two. One thing I did like is that it is told entirely from the point of view of detectives although it switches from person to person rapidly throughout. It did tend to get a bit tedious in parts and at bit preachy. It also uses some British/Portsmouth(?) slang I was unfamiliar with and couldn't find in my British dictionary. I would like to see the female detectives with a larger role. I also don't understand why Faraday's deaf son doesn't appear to have any marketable skills.
    more
  • Spuddie
    January 1, 1970
    Another interesting entry in this British police procedural series set in and around Portsmouth. DI Joe Faraday, once again being sought for promotion, is too busy investigating the death of a teenage girl who may or may not have thrown herself off the roof to even consider it. Meanwhile some of his team are seconded to Major Crimes to work on a hanging death. Faraday's personal life is also in an uproar and he tries to deal with that as well.As usual, quite a page turner, with a good balance of Another interesting entry in this British police procedural series set in and around Portsmouth. DI Joe Faraday, once again being sought for promotion, is too busy investigating the death of a teenage girl who may or may not have thrown herself off the roof to even consider it. Meanwhile some of his team are seconded to Major Crimes to work on a hanging death. Faraday's personal life is also in an uproar and he tries to deal with that as well.As usual, quite a page turner, with a good balance of the police cases and personal details of the various characters.
    more
  • Bekki Phillips
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Unlike most crime novels, this one focused solely on the police and the work they do to solve a crime, even when resources are slim and the crime isn't a crime. it was very interesting to see things from this point of view and I enjoyed the characters immensely. Getting an insight into the home life of Farraday, his deaf son and his errant girlfriend added colour to what might otherwise have been a dull recounting of everyday police work but really, there was noth I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Unlike most crime novels, this one focused solely on the police and the work they do to solve a crime, even when resources are slim and the crime isn't a crime. it was very interesting to see things from this point of view and I enjoyed the characters immensely. Getting an insight into the home life of Farraday, his deaf son and his errant girlfriend added colour to what might otherwise have been a dull recounting of everyday police work but really, there was nothing everyday about this book. Well worth reading and full of enjoyment
    more
  • Yvette
    January 1, 1970
    I found it difficult to rate this book, I hesitated between 2 or 3 stars. It's well written, the characters are realistic, the story is ok and plausible. But I also like crime novels to be real whodunits, in this case the 2-pronged investigation being linked in the last pages was too much of a deus ex machina.. Also, I've seen the story described as gritty, but I'd rather describe it as grimy... this is not an England I'd like to live in...
    more
  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Very good--these mysteries rankle the traditionalist in me just a bit, as Detective Winter works waaay on the edges of the law. But Farday and company always seem to be involved in very interesting, complex mysteries...
  • Aileen
    January 1, 1970
    A good crime story set in Portsmouth, what induced a 14 year old girl to jump from the top of a 23 storey block, and what part did a 10 year old boy play in it? Add in a few of the local villains appearing to be murdering each other, and the police are overstretched.
    more
  • Julia
    January 1, 1970
    Gritty, convincing story of detectives and villains set as usual in Portsmouth, with excellent plotting and characters. Graham Hurley is my favourite crime writer at the moment and I'm moving straight on to another of his.
  • Denise Hartman
    January 1, 1970
    If you like grim, gritty British police procedurals, you'll really like this book. The main character Farraday is a good accompaniment to the police work. Hurley is a good solid writer. The only reason it's not more stars is my personal taste, a little dark for where I'm at right now.
    more
  • Carl Snelgrove
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent read, the police procedural element and politics are brilliantly crafted. Faraday tries hard to balance the job with politics with his personal life and at times you feel his angst trying to do the right thing. A great read
  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    Very good. I know Portsmouth and identified everywhere!
  • Andrea Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Great fast paced procedural police crime novel.
  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    It seems the darker these books get as the series progresses the more I'm gripped.
  • Jo
    January 1, 1970
    Two stories intertwine as Faraday and Winter follow separate enquiries. I'm beginning to like Winter more and more.
  • Jane Westbrook
    January 1, 1970
    Like Rebus, but it's Portsmouth not EdinburghGreat, gritty detective fiction. Faraway is a great lead character - with a tragic past. Can't wait to read the next one....
  • Kaylol
    January 1, 1970
    The plot is good, the ending is ok but the style of writing did not do the story justice. I had to force myself to keep reading it. Some readers might love it, I found it a bit boring though.
  • Myrna
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5 stars.
  • Roxane
    January 1, 1970
    The third book in the DI Joe Faraday series and he is back on track. Excellent read...
  • Helen Almond
    January 1, 1970
    Joe Faraday number three. Didn't enjoy this, not read another yet.
Write a review