The Surrender Experiment
From the author of the New York Times #1 bestseller The Untethered Soul comes this thought-provoking, inspirational memoir on the magic that happens when you just let goSpirituality is meant to bring about harmony and peace. But the diversity of our philosophies, beliefs, concepts, and views about the soul often leads to confusion. To reconcile the noise that clouds spirituality, Michael Singer combines accounts of his own life journey to enlightenment—from his years as a hippie-loner to his success as a computer program engineer to his work in spiritual and humanitarian efforts—with lessons on how to put aside conflicting beliefs, let go of worries, and transform misdirected desires. Singer provides a road map to a new way of living not in the moment, but to exist in a state of perpetual happiness.

The Surrender Experiment Details

TitleThe Surrender Experiment
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 2nd, 2015
PublisherHarmony
ISBN-139780804141109
Rating
GenreSpirituality, Nonfiction, Self Help, Philosophy, Autobiography, Memoir

The Surrender Experiment Review

  • Justin
    January 1, 1970
    I was really torn between giving this a 2-star and a 4-star.Pros - it's very well written. It's also a powerful concept - of acknowledging the limit of our control, not being committed to a single outcome, but rather being open to where life takes us and letting things unfold as they do. The 2-page "premise" section sums this up beautifully, and the repetition of examples in the book are helpful.Cons - it's really hard for to relate to someone who has an epiphany at age 22 and then never varies I was really torn between giving this a 2-star and a 4-star.Pros - it's very well written. It's also a powerful concept - of acknowledging the limit of our control, not being committed to a single outcome, but rather being open to where life takes us and letting things unfold as they do. The 2-page "premise" section sums this up beautifully, and the repetition of examples in the book are helpful.Cons - it's really hard for to relate to someone who has an epiphany at age 22 and then never varies from his vision or convictions. Yes, he tells the story in a way in which you see his personal growth and personal struggle, but the heart of this story is - I committed at age 22 to surrendering to life, and did that the rest of my life and it worked out great. There are no real counterexamples to give this depth - he's obviously not saying yes to everything, he turns down a fulltime teaching position, he must have had countless requests that he turned down, so telling a story of "yes to everything" doesn't seem right. It's also not relatable for me - where is the struggle, the loss of faith, the self doubt, the errors and failures - this image of perfection doesn't inspire, for me it creates doubt or a feeling of inauthentic self description.I think about it's message a lot, but based on the cons it's hard to go above 3 stars.
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  • Kate
    January 1, 1970
    Ultimately, this book is about the art of allowing...of radical freedom, really. It's about following your passions and then lining up with whatever circumstances life places before you. Here are some of my favorite lines:"The sharp line I had drawn between spiritual and nonspiritual had begun to fade. The energy I experienced while teaching my classes...was the same energy I was dealing with in my yoga and meditations.""Every time I got into or out of my car, I would slow down my breath and vis Ultimately, this book is about the art of allowing...of radical freedom, really. It's about following your passions and then lining up with whatever circumstances life places before you. Here are some of my favorite lines:"The sharp line I had drawn between spiritual and nonspiritual had begun to fade. The energy I experienced while teaching my classes...was the same energy I was dealing with in my yoga and meditations.""Every time I got into or out of my car, I would slow down my breath and visualize Earth spinning through outer space. Before opening a door, any door, I would remember that I was walking through a door on this tiny planet in the vast emptiness of space.""My formula for success was very simple: Do whatever is put in front of you with all your heart and soul without regard for personal results. Do the work as though it were given to you by the universe itself--because it was.""Challenging situations create the force needed to bring about change. The problem is that we generally use all the stirred-up energy intended to bring about change, to resist change. I was learning to sit quietly in the midst of howling winds and wait to see what constructive action was being asked of me.""When push comes to shove, I don't care what it takes, just free me from myself.""No matter what, life is going to put us through the changes we need to go through. The question is: Are we willing to use this force for our transformation?""The more I let go, the freer I became. It was not my responsibility to find what was binding me; that was life's job. My responsibility was to willingly let go of whatever was brought up within me.""Once you are willing to let go of yourself, life becomes your friend, your teacher, your secret lover. When life's way becomes your way, all the noise stops, and there is great peace."
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  • Uwe Hook
    January 1, 1970
    I was hoping for a book that expanded on the wisdom of the Untethered Soul, which I thought was brilliant and life changing. I did enjoy the beginning of the book where Mr. Singer discusses the beginnings of his spiritual seeking and how his life fell into place in so many ways. I loved hearing about the spiritual commune he started and the spiritual teachers that he met and learned from. But I was caught off guard when he began to discuss developing his medical software billing empire. It becam I was hoping for a book that expanded on the wisdom of the Untethered Soul, which I thought was brilliant and life changing. I did enjoy the beginning of the book where Mr. Singer discusses the beginnings of his spiritual seeking and how his life fell into place in so many ways. I loved hearing about the spiritual commune he started and the spiritual teachers that he met and learned from. But I was caught off guard when he began to discuss developing his medical software billing empire. It became a major focus for the majority of this book. What a waste! It just went on and on and had virtually nothing to offer the reader who might be seeking spiritual awakening. If you enjoy hearing about computer software and business development and land acquisition, then this is for you. If you want a book about spiritual development then look elsewhere.
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  • Tina
    January 1, 1970
    Let me start off by saying that I love the idea behind this book - the reason I purchased it. I want to better understand how to surrender to life, so my review and rating have nothing to do with the subject matter.Obviously, this is Singer's story and it is his to tell, but I got absolutely nothing out of this book at all, which *might* have been acceptable if this were a third rate thriller, not a book which was obviously written as an enlightenment tool/read. While I did not expect to get a " Let me start off by saying that I love the idea behind this book - the reason I purchased it. I want to better understand how to surrender to life, so my review and rating have nothing to do with the subject matter.Obviously, this is Singer's story and it is his to tell, but I got absolutely nothing out of this book at all, which *might* have been acceptable if this were a third rate thriller, not a book which was obviously written as an enlightenment tool/read. While I did not expect to get a "revelation" reading this book, I at least expected to enjoy it or find some tiny nuggets of wisdom and I did not. Frankly, I am wondering if I read the same book as all those people who left positive reviews.The first part of the book, while idealistic, does not reflect real life - at least not the real life of anyone I know (including myself) so I could ABSOLUTELY NOT identify at all - which makes it very hard to gleam some kind of "wisdom" to apply to my own life. I am not sure how many of us can live in a van and meditate all the time, instead of you know - living in the real world.I am also constantly amazed at how this person puts absolutely no effort into being a contributing part of society (other than to spend most of his time in his temple) and yet, everyone wants him and everything is drawn to him.I think this book was already written a long time ago, by someone who actually left some kind of literary mark on the world and the book was called WALDEN.You know, maybe the problem is me and that I just did not get the concept or whatever behind this book, but honestly, I am annoyed that I spent the money. More power to those who got something out of this one.
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  • Lisa Guevara
    January 1, 1970
    Like some other readers, I was excited by the idea of this book--surrendering to the way life unfolds and attempting to step away from the ego and concept of "self" which often gets in our way. But I was a bit disappointed. I wanted more depth, more of an idea of Micky's day to day life--how DOES this surrender concept really work. I also couldn't help but wonder what his wife and child think of it all, what their experience has been. Obviously, this is his story, his version of what "surrenderi Like some other readers, I was excited by the idea of this book--surrendering to the way life unfolds and attempting to step away from the ego and concept of "self" which often gets in our way. But I was a bit disappointed. I wanted more depth, more of an idea of Micky's day to day life--how DOES this surrender concept really work. I also couldn't help but wonder what his wife and child think of it all, what their experience has been. Obviously, this is his story, his version of what "surrendering" to the flow of life looks like--but I was so curious as to how that surrender plays out in the context of family and intimate relationships. There is a great deal of focus on the business success but I was left wanting more.
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  • Nicole D. Lybrand
    January 1, 1970
    This book ebbs and flows in sometimes awkward increments, but the overall message and story are quite incredible. It is a wonderful reminder of how little control we have and how much we torture ourselves with the illusion of control. Written from the heart it is a worthwhile read. Highly recommend!
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  • Vivian Adram
    January 1, 1970
    Loved The Untethered Soul and now I love this one too. Given the rubbish judicial system currently in my country, I think some of our judges should also have a read.
  • Pam Mooney
    January 1, 1970
    An amazing case study! I believe in the premise and loved the authors insight to his own spirit as well as his support of others. He is sure to inspire others and continue to thrive with his open heart and spirit. I am excited to recommend this for those at a crossroads or just need to gain knowledge and inspiration. Although the author may have a bit of an advantage with a doctorate and being obviously highly intelligent. Of course, that is what we want from our natural leaders and advisors.
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  • Kimball
    January 1, 1970
    I read The Untethered Soul: The Journey Beyond Yourself twice a few years ago and thoroughly enjoyed that. It was the book that made me recognize and understand The Inner Voice that we all have. Michael takes us back in time to tell how he discovered that inner voice and his struggle to free himself from its incessant yakking. If you're familiar with The Secret this is another take one it. It's neat how many people rip on that book yet the principles it teaches are in so many other "tolerable" b I read The Untethered Soul: The Journey Beyond Yourself twice a few years ago and thoroughly enjoyed that. It was the book that made me recognize and understand The Inner Voice that we all have. Michael takes us back in time to tell how he discovered that inner voice and his struggle to free himself from its incessant yakking. If you're familiar with The Secret this is another take one it. It's neat how many people rip on that book yet the principles it teaches are in so many other "tolerable" books.Alright. Where to start.The first 40% or so of the book I was loving it. Then the weekend came and I started to listen to Catch Me If You Can: The True Story of a Real Fake (which I will do a review of in a few days) and got a little distracted from this book. Plus the story changed from his young personal life to his business endeavors and all the financial trouble he got in while he was with WebMD. I'm lost on that part; did he invent WebMD or what exactly happened? Why did the government get so involved with all the dumb court cases? I must have tuned out a critical chapter and didn't pick it up. He glossed over the part where he became this terrific programmer and I'm amazed that he was as successful as he was considering that in his early 20's he was just a hermit living in his hippy VW van down in Mexico and in the woods of the Deep South. I'd like to hear how mediation has helped him learn to program. The focus must be key cuz I can't focus at all when I sit down and try to do it.Thoughts on the book:He describes a force field that comes from his meditative experience. It reminded me of the force field that Bella has in Breaking Dawn. That out of body experience he had reminded me of Nephi's experience in The Book of Mormon: Another Testament of Jesus Christ. I don't know how one doesn't get lost when they are having an experience like that. What pulls them back to reality? Hunger, thirst, a leg that fell asleep?Michael talked a lot about being alone and mediating for hours. I understand that about Meditation and focusing on solitude by being alone and finding yourself. But what about sharing those experiences with others? I get the impression that he thinks it is better to be alone than to taint yourself with other people and their thoughts. Is it not possible to have an enlightened mind unless you escape into solitude? What do extroverts do about that? It'd be nice to be able to go off and do these experiences but someday you run out of money and will have to come back to the real world. I wanted to know how much money he had saved up and how he paid for gas or food or car repairs. I have mixed feelings about this part. I was surprised that he got remarried. I thought he'd be the type of guy that'd think marriage wasn't for him after the first one ended badly (and he was pretty tore up about it). I appreciated that he wasn't a die-hard atheist/agnostic that rips on traditional religion. That gets old after a while. Yes, I'm looking at you stupid Bill Nye The Science GuyYoga is the science of channeling all energies upward, until they merge together at the highest point.I liked the part where he said he reached such a mental state that he didn't even want to smoke pot. I often hear people saying that one of the "joys" of smoking pot is to reach a different state of mind. But this clearly shows how cheap and unnecessary smoking pot really is. The mind is capable of doing things on its own without external stimuli. For example, if you want to stay awake don't drink a energy drink, tell your mind that you don't need one and to stay awake on its own. I did that when I was police officer and haven't looked back to energy drinks since. Of course, it's not easy doing it on our own and requires a lot more time than quick fixes but since when do worthwhile things come easy?This book made me think a lot about life's purpose and why we're on earth; the purpose of a body. I got the impression that Michael thinks our body is limiting. In a way he's right. The way he wrote his research paper for graduate school in basically one week was because he had a clear, truly unpressured mind. Think of all the necessary and unnecessary pressures we put on ourselves and then imagine what we can accomplish if they weren't there and we could focus on the Greater Good and Self Improvement.A good quote from the book: "The scared person inside of me was holding back from where I so desperately wanted to go. I needed to be free of him." Boy, does that ever describe me perfectly. Here's another goodie: "To be there when a person is soaring high is an easy relationship; to be there during hard times requires deep friendship." Someday I'll expand my thoughts on the critical need of true, deep friendship because it is so non-existent today. So does his Surrender Experiment mean that basically he's a "Yes, Man" now? Michael talks a lot about letting life just run its course and surrendering to it (as if it wasn't obvious by the title). But when does life cease being life, what are the parameters that make life, life? If I let life do whatever it wants, does that mean I become a Yes, Man? Do I let people walk all over me? I needed this to be explained in greater detail since he is the expert on it and teaching college courses and all.I'd like to visit his Temple of the Universe.All in all, it was a great book for the self-help/enlightenment/meditation genre. It left me with a lot more questions than before, which I think is good when a book does that. One of the reasons why we shouldn't just read non-stop, pointless drivel fiction our whole lives. Nonfiction and fiction should be split 50/50, but I'll save that rant for another day.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    What a fascinating and pretty crazy life story this author had! Really interesting premise about how surrendering to the flow of life's events created a pretty incredible and interesting life for the author. I was a big fan of his prior book and this was a good follow-on book.A few notes/quotes I highlighted: * Every day, we give precedence to our mind’s thoughts over the reality unfolding before us. We regularly say things like, “It better not rain today because I’m going camping” or “I better What a fascinating and pretty crazy life story this author had! Really interesting premise about how surrendering to the flow of life's events created a pretty incredible and interesting life for the author. I was a big fan of his prior book and this was a good follow-on book.A few notes/quotes I highlighted: * Every day, we give precedence to our mind’s thoughts over the reality unfolding before us. We regularly say things like, “It better not rain today because I’m going camping” or “I better get that raise because I really need the money.” Notice that these bold claims about what should and shouldn’t be happening are not based on scientific evidence; they’re based solely on personal preferences made up in our minds. Without realizing it, we do this with everything in our lives—it’s as though we actually believe that the world around us is supposed to manifest in accordance to our own likes and dislikes. If it doesn’t, surely something is very wrong. This is an extremely difficult way to live, and it is the reason we feel that we are always struggling with life. * Since most of us only feel good when things are going our way, we are constantly attempting to control everything in our lives. * There must be another, more sane way to approach life. For example, what would happen if we respected the flow of life and used our free will to participate in what’s unfolding, instead of fighting it? What would be the quality of the life that unfolds? Would it just be random events with no order or meaning, or would the same perfection of order and meaning that manifests in the rest of the universe manifest in the everyday life around us? * If that inner voice could speak in Spanish and you immediately understood what it was saying, then you were fluent in Spanish. If, however, the Spanish words made no sense to you until you did the mental work of translating them so that the voice would repeat them in English, then you were not fluent in Spanish. * When my mental voice had something to say, I now had a choice—pay attention to the voice or keep focusing on the inner flow of energy. I eventually realized that if I didn’t want to listen to the mental chatter, all I had to do was slightly increase my concentration on the energy flow to my brow. The thoughts would then pass right by without disturbing me. Letting the thoughts go became a game to me. All of life was a lighter experience than before. * For example, there was the notion that you have to die to be reborn. That is exactly what I had been trying to do, die of the personal to be reborn in the spiritual. I * The rules of the experiment were very simple: If life brought events in front of me, I would treat them as if they came to take me beyond myself. If my personal self complained, I would use each opportunity to simply let him go and surrender to what life was presenting me. * I no longer saw the lower aspect of myself, with all his personal issues and melodramas, as the enemy that had to be destroyed. I looked at him now with a new understanding. I needed to use all these disturbed personal energies for my ascent. It was perfectly clear to me that since he was the problem, he was also the solution. * “You can come out now." that scared, troubled person in there whom I had been watching and judging was indeed a person. The psyche is a person with feelings and thoughts, hopes, fears, and dreams. He is not to be locked in a room and constantly told to shut up. There are much more constructive ways to deal with these disturbed, self-centered energies. * I had to learn to surrender more, instead of struggling so much. I had already determined to surrender to life’s flow, even if I couldn’t understand where it was taking me. * Done properly, yoga is the science of channeling all energies upward until they merge together at the highest point—Oneness. * The number of tasks life was giving me was out of control, but I was surrendering to it. My morning and evening meditations were my refuge. Throughout the day I took every opportunity to quiet myself and center within. * My formula for success was very simple: Do whatever is put in front of you with all your heart and soul without regard for personal results. Do the work as though it were given to you by the universe itself—because it was. * Right from the beginning, I resolved to use the whole situation to finally free myself from whatever was left of that scared person inside who had always held me back. This was my entire journey—liberation at any cost. * How could I possibly explain the great freedom that comes from realizing to the depth of your being that life knows what it’s doing? Only direct experience can take you there. At some point there’s no more struggle, just the deep peace that comes from surrendering to a perfection that is beyond your comprehension. Eventually, even the mind stops resisting, and the heart loses the tendency to close. The joy, excitement, and freedom are simply too beautiful to give up. Once you are ready to let go of yourself, life becomes your friend, your teacher, your secret lover. When life’s way becomes your way, all the noise stops, and there is a great peace.
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  • Marla
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent book, excellent practice, evidence in the power of acceptance of what is and perfect example of flow. A fast read, very compelling. It's funny, because I lost my job a year ago and have not really "embraced" my new lifestyle, working with my fiance in his small business, in the back of my mind another job in my field was bound to show up, but in reality my chosen field has been flooded. I am fearful of not having steady income and have realized, because of this book, that I need to emb Excellent book, excellent practice, evidence in the power of acceptance of what is and perfect example of flow. A fast read, very compelling. It's funny, because I lost my job a year ago and have not really "embraced" my new lifestyle, working with my fiance in his small business, in the back of my mind another job in my field was bound to show up, but in reality my chosen field has been flooded. I am fearful of not having steady income and have realized, because of this book, that I need to embrace what is, by saying "Yes!" to this new path to allow the Flow to carry me with it instead of trying to swim against it. The funny thing is I have wished for so long to be able to work from home and now that it's here, I'm freaking out because I have no insurance and can't afford to pay my bills yet. So I think it's time to stop testing the waters with my toe and jump all in and go with the flow! Wish me luck!
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  • carmen tavernia
    January 1, 1970
    Going with the flowIncredible life story of what it means to let go and go with the flow, to trust life and to fully experience what life brings. It's filled with example after example of surrendering to life and being amazed at what unfolds. Untethered Soul defined the "inner" dynamics, understanding the internal, Surrender Experiment, puts that internal knowledge into practice with the outer world, life.
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  • Anne Kadet
    January 1, 1970
    This book is just way, way, way too weird to review.
  • Joanie
    January 1, 1970
    ONE OF THE MOST TRANSFORMATIVE BOOKS I'VE EVER READ: My new guiding life philosophy.
  • Dor
    January 1, 1970
    An enjoyable and inspiring read that slowly devolves into the chronicles of a top-tier businessman who's into meditation and letting go but not enough to stop reminding us (and himself) he's surprised to have found himself at that level even though he's just a ponytail woodhippy. I appreciate the message, and Michael's attitude and some events are conveyed in a convincing manner - enough to make me want to nudge more towards surrender in my day to day life - but on the whole, it's very incomplet An enjoyable and inspiring read that slowly devolves into the chronicles of a top-tier businessman who's into meditation and letting go but not enough to stop reminding us (and himself) he's surprised to have found himself at that level even though he's just a ponytail woodhippy. I appreciate the message, and Michael's attitude and some events are conveyed in a convincing manner - enough to make me want to nudge more towards surrender in my day to day life - but on the whole, it's very incomplete. It feels as though Michael exposes us to his life in a very selective manner, where it would have been much more appealing if he had shown us some of the negatives of this attitude. Or were there no negatives? No edge cases? No people wanting things that were appalling to him, or simply not right for the time? No people coming to him with requests for all his money once he became famous, or random women (or men) propositioning him? Perhaps his kids asking something very immature or downright dumb?The only example we get is him choosing to stop teaching despite being asked, a decision he waved off without exploring how it, at least partially, negates his surrenderful attitude. Apparently there are some likes and dislikes still and they govern his life quite a bit. :)A major issue I have with the book is that despite Michael realizing at some point it's an exercise in torture and futility to suffocate "the voice" and the self, he still talks about "eroding" it more and more. Eastern wisdom teaches us that the "self" or any of its components are not to be negated or destroyed; rather seen through for what they are. And while that may weaken their effect in many situations, these parts surrendering to the love and harmony inherent in non-attachment, that's not the attitude I glean from Michael's words.Generally speaking, to anyone interested in this path of surrendering to life, the universe, and everything, and letting go of the compulsions of the self, the Buddhist path offers a much more complete manual. Instead of simply "surrendering to what's present" - a seemingly simple-enough formula, until tested against reality - there is a toolbox of practices and attitudes to adopt that leads to where Michael is pointing himself, and the reader, at. The person isn't required to simply say "yes" to everything or do the opposite of his immediate response, but rather use their ever-growing wisdom to choose the action that they believe will lead to liberation for themselves and others.
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  • Henrique Moody
    January 1, 1970
    When I started this book it was a little bit hard for me because I couldn't really relate to the author's life. Everything seemed so distant from my reality that I didn't think it had something in there for me.I'm glad I didn't give up, because Mikey's life story made me reflect a lot about how I've been dealing with my life, about how much I've been fighting against everything around me and how unnecessary and harmful that is.I feel that something was changing inside of me while I was reading t When I started this book it was a little bit hard for me because I couldn't really relate to the author's life. Everything seemed so distant from my reality that I didn't think it had something in there for me.I'm glad I didn't give up, because Mikey's life story made me reflect a lot about how I've been dealing with my life, about how much I've been fighting against everything around me and how unnecessary and harmful that is.I feel that something was changing inside of me while I was reading this book and I feel that in both my personal and professional life. I don't know if that's good or bad, but somehow I don't think I should care and that's definitely something I got from this book.
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  • Cornmaven
    January 1, 1970
    This one about does it for me on memoirs. While I understand the benefits of meditation on one's health and well-being, Singer's story, as he tells it, seems to imply that embracing full zenness is essential for getting good things in life and being successful. So here's my take:1. Singer had the advantage of an upper middle class existence at the time that he "discovered" his ideology. No responsibilities, plenty of money to "tune in, drop out", and basically take a sabbatical from the real wor This one about does it for me on memoirs. While I understand the benefits of meditation on one's health and well-being, Singer's story, as he tells it, seems to imply that embracing full zenness is essential for getting good things in life and being successful. So here's my take:1. Singer had the advantage of an upper middle class existence at the time that he "discovered" his ideology. No responsibilities, plenty of money to "tune in, drop out", and basically take a sabbatical from the real world. If he had had a child, or been born without a silver spoon in his mouth, he would not have been able to drop out of graduate school - the money would have been too important for his survival.2. He keeps talking about becoming separate from himself, and observing life as it passes by, tamping down/ignoring his inner voice, as if this was a bad thing. I have never bought that concept. I have always wondered why some say it is such a bad thing to pay attention to your inner voice because I think that voice is important. I have also never understood why it is so important to detach oneself from reality. I am much more comfortable with the notion that we need to learn to live with reality and become comfortable with it, WITHOUT detachment. What Singer seems to be dealing with is anxiety, and yes, meditation can help with that, but so can therapy and medication; meditation isn't the only path.3. I made it through about 8 chapters, then skipped around on the digital copy, coming upon the story about land across from his temple basically falling into his lap. But, it didn't. The landfill dump that was slated for the land wasn't a great thing, and he did something about it by galvanizing neighbors and appealing to the city council. And, as luck would have it, they voted against issuing a permit. It could have easily gone the other way, with the council voting for it. The land falling into his lap, right across from the temple, and so perfect, was not due in ANY way to his spiritual practice.4. In the amount of the book I listened to, Singer only once acknowledged the force of luck in how things turned out for him. He starts a statement about some incident with "as fate would have it." And there you go. Fate, luck, chance are big players in our lives, and have nothing to do with our spiritual practice, how much we meditate, how strongly we believe. Just ask all the soldiers on Omaha Beach that never made it through the day, or even out of the water. If we don't acknowledge the work of luck in our lives, we would be forced to believe that some people are more deserving than others of success, wealth, and fortune, and that those who experience misfortune are somehow reaping what they sow. Not always. And that's the paradox of life.I just got bored with another self-serving tome about someone's discovery being the be all and end all of life. My experience is that clinging to that notion is baloney. Singer is right that life throws you curve balls and how you respond will affect you in many ways. But his response method is not a one size fits all. I guess my DNA just won't fit with eastern philosophy as well as I or anyone else would like it to fit. :-)Namaste!
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  • Ntandem_wTina
    January 1, 1970
    Advance Reader CopyMichael Singer never disappoints me! This is so characteristic of a great master to follow with an almost workbook like companion to his previous book, The Untethered Soul. I will look forward to a boxed set for holiday book giving this year. This is a deep personal exploration into his psyche and choices that only he can provide without the tedium one would imagine. It can feel microscopic but not narrow in focus; at once simple and yet prophetic as illustrated in the line th Advance Reader CopyMichael Singer never disappoints me! This is so characteristic of a great master to follow with an almost workbook like companion to his previous book, The Untethered Soul. I will look forward to a boxed set for holiday book giving this year. This is a deep personal exploration into his psyche and choices that only he can provide without the tedium one would imagine. It can feel microscopic but not narrow in focus; at once simple and yet prophetic as illustrated in the line that sticks best as a prescription to all – “…the best I can say is that I let go of myself and allowed what was meant to be – to be.” When I reflect on the number of self-improvement books, inspirational poems and even movies that belt out smoothly crafted life advice around the notion that we are the masters of our destiny, captains of our ships, it is no wonder that Michael Singer’s revelry is a spiritually invigorating moment to exhale. Right out the gate he refocuses life’s journey not on the resistance we tend to cultivate only then to ponder on the chaos that ensues but upon that which sounds counterintuitive and yet essential to our growth:“If the natural unfolding of the process of Life can create and take care of the entire universe, is it reeally reasonable for us to assume that nothing good will happen unless we force it?” (p. 12)Truly a question for all time. For as he perfectly puts it, “everything in life has something to teach you and that is all for your growth.” (p. 39) In adopting our masters of the universe personas, we often fail to grasp what MAS so richly deciphers for us, “we go through life thinking I knew what was good for me, but life itself seemed to know better.” (p. 59). This allows us to accept, redefine and gain a better perspective of all we encounter in its best and most positive light and aid us in remaining in that “flow” first introduced to me by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi as the secret to happiness in life and allows us to be harmonious in seeking our ultimate purpose. We do this because “The Universal Plan [is] always much more expansive than [our] mind [can] imagine.” (p. 112)And just when the naysayer in all of us perches on our shoulder to cast dispersions and doubt to the very concept that we do know better than the Universe or that all this hippie talk would only apply to a sheltered colony life, MAS presents the most daunting tales in which he illuminates exactly how “…a handful of moments in your life define your destiny. (p. 128) and reminds us how fundamentally, everything is fair game for a miracle.When life gives you lemons and you’re about to make lemonade, don’t make it the usual way, grab Michael A. Singer’s The Untethered Soul for new ingredients plus The Surrender Experiment for the uncommon recipe!***Read in tandem with Empire of the Summer Moon.
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  • Sojourner
    January 1, 1970
    “…the processes that determine the flow of life around us did not begin when we were born, nor will they end when we die.”A book which the writer named “life” to be its real author, The Surrender Experiment: My Journey into Life's Perfection by Michael A. Singer is a deeply searching and rousing biography of the man who wrote the path-breaking and inspirational book, The Untethered Soul. It is a book that shows you what life can bestow on you when you answer its call.This amazing memoir which de “…the processes that determine the flow of life around us did not begin when we were born, nor will they end when we die.”A book which the writer named “life” to be its real author, The Surrender Experiment: My Journey into Life's Perfection by Michael A. Singer is a deeply searching and rousing biography of the man who wrote the path-breaking and inspirational book, The Untethered Soul. It is a book that shows you what life can bestow on you when you answer its call.This amazing memoir which details his transformative journey and the mind-numbing predicament he encountered when a full-blown raid was conducted by the FBI in 2003 is an insightful read, guaranteed to enlighten any serious reader with an open mind. The FBI raid that hung over Michael A. Singer’s head like the sword of Damocles for a number of years revolved around fifty-three kickback schemes devised by Bobby Davids and his accomplices through which they stole $5.4 million over a five-year period.Though disorienting, Michael A. Singer emerged from the crises stronger, and the book devoted ample space to that episode. Michael writes, “…we are not powerless in the face of the events unfolding around us. We have been gifted with the power of will. From deep inside, we can determine how we want something to be and apply the power of our minds, hearts, and bodies in an attempt to make the outside world conform.”The Surrender Experiment: My Journey into Life's Perfection by Michael A. Singer is insightful, stirring and hugely inspiring. Though nearly three-hundred pages, I was able to read through the nine sections spanning fifty-six chapters in one sitting. This is a book that won’t disappoint you.
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  • Ted
    January 1, 1970
    Incredible philosophy This is one of those stories that if it were fiction would be to incredible to be believed. The author’s unique philosophy lead to an unimaginable life. The book is a bit redundant and the writing is a bit tedious but it is a fascinating thought provoking read.
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  • Moira Mallison
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this quick read. A bit repetitive in that it is story after story about "x just appeared at the right time" and/or "y challenge occurred and I just surrendered into life's flow and everything worked out"
  • Lisa Shultz
    January 1, 1970
    Singer's book Untethered Soul was one of my top 3 reads of all time, so I was most interested in this one. It is essentially a biography, which I found fascinating. I also felt peaceful while reading it. I am now much more aware of surrendering in my own life with whatever comes up.
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    A strong 3.5 stars. An interesting story of a meditating yogi/hermit gone corporate executive by submitting his will to the universe. He was obviously dripping with smarts and talent for this to happen, but his process of letting go and not worrying about things was really unique and refreshing. The best take-away was already shared with me at book club:"Life rarely unfolds exactly as we want it to. And if we stop and think about it, that makes perfect sense. The scope of life is universal, and A strong 3.5 stars. An interesting story of a meditating yogi/hermit gone corporate executive by submitting his will to the universe. He was obviously dripping with smarts and talent for this to happen, but his process of letting go and not worrying about things was really unique and refreshing. The best take-away was already shared with me at book club:"Life rarely unfolds exactly as we want it to. And if we stop and think about it, that makes perfect sense. The scope of life is universal, and the fact that we are not actually in control of life’s events should be self-evident. The Universe has been around for 13.8 billion years, and the processes that determine the flow of life around us did not begin when we were born, nor will they end when we die. What manifests in front of us at any given moment is actually something truly extraordinary—it is the end-result of all the forces that have been interacting together for billions of years. We are not responsible for even the tiniest fraction of what is manifesting around us. Nonetheless, we walk around constantly trying to control and determine what will happen in our lives. No wonder there’s so much tension, anxiety, and fear. Each of us actually believes that things should be the way we want them, instead of being the natural result of all the forces of creation.Every day, we give precedence to our mind’s thoughts over the reality unfolding before us. We regularly say things like, “It better not rain today because I’m going camping” or “I better get that raise because I really need the money.” Notice that these bold claims about what should and shouldn’t be happening are not based on scientific evidence; they’re based solely on personal preferences made up in our minds. Without realizing it, we do this with everything in our lives—it’s as though we actually believe that the world around us is supposed to manifest in accordance to our own likes and dislikes. If it doesn’t, surely something is very wrong. This is an extremely difficult way to live, and it is the reason we feel that we are always struggling with life.”My interpretation: Seek Heavenly Father's will, and don't freak out when things don't go as planned in your mind (they rarely do). Wait for things to work themselves out, because they always do some way or another, and often the outcome is something better than you could’ve imagined.
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  • Iona Stewart
    January 1, 1970
    This is a sequel to the author’s best-seller ”The Untethered Soul”, which I haven’t read.When Mickey Singer was 22 years old, he was sitting with his friend when he had a momentous experience: he discovered that he was watching his thoughts being created. There was an awkward silence between him and his friend, and he was quietly watching the activity of his mind trying to fix it. This experience changed his life.This starts a process where he continually observes the voice in his head and longs This is a sequel to the author’s best-seller ”The Untethered Soul”, which I haven’t read.When Mickey Singer was 22 years old, he was sitting with his friend when he had a momentous experience: he discovered that he was watching his thoughts being created. There was an awkward silence between him and his friend, and he was quietly watching the activity of his mind trying to fix it. This experience changed his life.This starts a process where he continually observes the voice in his head and longs to shut it up.He comes across a valuable book entitled “Three Pillars of Zen” by Philip Kapleau (which I’ve just begun to read myself).The book was about how to stop the voice from talking. Meditation was the solution. Sit down in a quiet spot, watch your breath go in and out, and mentally repeat the sound Mu.Mickey started to do this meditation. On a camping trip he sat under a tree to meditate and had a powerful experience. He sat for hours until his legs hurt and he heard a stern, booming voice that said: “Do you or do you not want to know what is beyond you?”Then he was “gone”. He experienced being “locked in perpendicular energy flows”. He came to a deep place without any sense of self-awareness. Then he was “gone” again and didn’t know where he went.He was in a peaceful, elevated state, and there was absolute silence. There was no voice, just awareness of being.When he came back, there was simply awareness.His body was quiet, and there were no thoughts at all. Every movement of his body was like a ballet – there was a graceful flow.This state lasted for weeks. Though his deep inner peace began to fade, he never fully returned to his normal state.Outer changes happened in his life, beginning with his wife leaving him.He bought a piece of land and built a hut.He decided to surrender his resistance and let the flow of life be in charge. He would let go of his personal self and surrender to what life was presenting him with.He called this “the surrender experiment”.All sorts of things happened to him and he was presented with things he didn’t want to do – but he did them anyway because he had surrendered to life. Other spiritual masters teach us that we should only do what we really want to do – it is our feelings that should decide -, but not this author.He built a whole community of huts and a Temple, where he held regular services, attracting more and more people, He became a disciple of Yogananda and Sai Baba.He also started a construction company, Built with Love, became a professional programmer and launched something called “The Medical Manager”; I never understood what this really was, since he neglected to explain it. I found the parts of the book dealing with the author’s spiritual growth and surrender interesting, but the business deals and all the company “stuff” I found boring, and to a certain extent incomprehensible.Thus, I was disappointed by the book, and can’t really recommend it. I did manage to get through it, however, so it wasn’t that bad.
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  • Mehrsa
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED Untethered Soul, but this one was so super annoying. The theory is excellent--let go of your desires and ambitions and just go with it. But this is about how he became a millionaire by letting go and he didn't actually let go--he highlights all the interesting coincidences and miracles that happened to him (After the 10th "I would never have imagined that such a thing would happen," you start to wonder whether he has no memory). But he talks about how the business had worries and plans a I LOVED Untethered Soul, but this one was so super annoying. The theory is excellent--let go of your desires and ambitions and just go with it. But this is about how he became a millionaire by letting go and he didn't actually let go--he highlights all the interesting coincidences and miracles that happened to him (After the 10th "I would never have imagined that such a thing would happen," you start to wonder whether he has no memory). But he talks about how the business had worries and plans and they worried about their lawsuits and their competitors--what does it mean to surrender? I mean, he fought the case against him, right? He pushed his company to compete against other companies, right? I think what he means is just to be open to new things. Read Untethered Soul. Though I wish I hadn't read this one because now I just don't like him at all.
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  • Jahnavi Jha
    January 1, 1970
    This book drew me in so deeply that I didn't want to finish it but read a little every day! My first read of 2019 and what a perfect way to begin the year. Michael Singer's story is extremely inspiring for curious souls like me who ask difficult questions about life. I have learnt so much from this book and have even been inspired to meditate. Recognising my inner voice and how to not let it rule me but to work with it. Looking forward to picking up The Untethered Soul in the future. All ties in This book drew me in so deeply that I didn't want to finish it but read a little every day! My first read of 2019 and what a perfect way to begin the year. Michael Singer's story is extremely inspiring for curious souls like me who ask difficult questions about life. I have learnt so much from this book and have even been inspired to meditate. Recognising my inner voice and how to not let it rule me but to work with it. Looking forward to picking up The Untethered Soul in the future. All ties into me working on the art of letting go, being open, being positive and enjoying this journey. :)
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  • Frederico
    January 1, 1970
    I opened this book completely at random, without any prior knowledge of its author. And I was rewarded with a nice tale of openness and endurance in the face of long legal battles. It was the perfect book for me at this point in my life, when I'm feeling quite bogged down by worldly pressures. Yes, openness. Yes, surrender. Yes, inner core, inner peace, inner faith. This read isn't saccharine. It isn't a guide. What appealed to me was what turned many readers here off: building a company and sub I opened this book completely at random, without any prior knowledge of its author. And I was rewarded with a nice tale of openness and endurance in the face of long legal battles. It was the perfect book for me at this point in my life, when I'm feeling quite bogged down by worldly pressures. Yes, openness. Yes, surrender. Yes, inner core, inner peace, inner faith. This read isn't saccharine. It isn't a guide. What appealed to me was what turned many readers here off: building a company and subsequently being investigated and prosecuted by the DOJ for seven years, all the while keeping one's spiritual center and purpose. If anything, I wish this book was longer.
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  • Vikash
    January 1, 1970
    Once in a while a book becomes precious to you, so precious that you don't want to lose it. In this book's case it was so precious that i didn't want it to end. This is not a usual biography in which the author tells the ups and downs he has been through to reach pinnacle of his success. However in this book he humbly claims that he has let life pass through him, letting it flow with least amount of restraints. Want to believe in miracles? Read this book, it's not less than one.
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  • Leslie Goddard
    January 1, 1970
    Intriguing idea presented with thoughtfulness and insight. I'm not sure it's life-changing for me, and I can't get over the doubts -- there must be some negatives he didn't list. But the ideas got me thinking and I think it'll grow on me the more I think about it.
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  • Shahira Zahran
    January 1, 1970
    “If the natural unfolding of the process of life can create & take care of the entire universe, is it really reasonable for us to assume that nothing good will happen unless we force it to?It is to the exploration of this intriguing question that this book is devoted.”
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