The Travels of Daniel Ascher
A sensation in France, this is a story about literary deceptions, family secrets, and a thrilling quest for the truthWho is the real author of The Black Insignia? Is it H. R. Sanders, whose name is printed on the cover of every installment of the wildly successful young adult adventure series? Or is it Daniel Roche, the enigmatic world traveler who disappears for months at a time? When Daniel’s great-niece, Hélène, moves to Paris to study archeology, she does not expect to be searching for answers to these questions. As rumors circulate, however, that the twenty-fourth volume of The Black Insignia series will be the last, Hélène and her friend Guillaume, a devoted fan of her great-uncle’s books, set out to discover more about the man whose life eludes her. In so doing, she uncovers an explosive secret dating back to the darkest days of the Occupation.In recounting the moment when one history began and another ended, The Travels of Daniel Ascher explores the true nature of fiction: is it a refuge, a lie, or a stand-in for mourning?

The Travels of Daniel Ascher Details

TitleThe Travels of Daniel Ascher
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMay 26th, 2015
PublisherOther Press
ISBN-139781590517079
Rating
GenreFiction, Cultural, France, Historical, Historical Fiction, Contemporary, Young Adult

The Travels of Daniel Ascher Review

  • Stacia
    January 1, 1970
    This is a bittersweet, yet charming, little book that I read in one sitting. It's a bit of a mix between Indiana Jones & The Book Thief. It brought a few tears to my eyes but a few smiles too. It also reminds us of a history & humanity we should not forget.I'm not sure if it is meant to be a light adult novel or something for the YA market. Either way, it's one I think quite a few adults & teens would enjoy & appreciate. Recommended for a wide variety of readers.
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  • Jonfaith
    January 1, 1970
    Ugh, that was not the way to wind down the year. The novel appeared interesting as I scanned the cover at the library. I brought it home and was soon disappointed, though I thought I'd push through. Well, it is apparent that YA has infiltrated the New Fiction section at the public library. Do we really need another murky whodunit concerning the Holocaust? Such subject matter should be exempt from the dime store tropes, but alas the expiation continues.Avoid this one.
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  • Maureen M
    January 1, 1970
    I wrote this for the newspaper: A family mystery unfurls as a young woman comes to Paris to stay with her strange great-uncle Daniel. Busy with her studies and a budding romance, Hélène isn’t interested in getting closer to Daniel. She knows him mostly from his unwelcome antics at holiday dinners and the series of children’s adventure books that he wrote and she largely ignored. That changes when she discovers that her college friends, and especially her boyfriend, are huge fans of Daniel’s book I wrote this for the newspaper: A family mystery unfurls as a young woman comes to Paris to stay with her strange great-uncle Daniel. Busy with her studies and a budding romance, Hélène isn’t interested in getting closer to Daniel. She knows him mostly from his unwelcome antics at holiday dinners and the series of children’s adventure books that he wrote and she largely ignored. That changes when she discovers that her college friends, and especially her boyfriend, are huge fans of Daniel’s books.The more she gets to know him, the more she puzzles over his place in the family. The more she learns, the more she suspects that something deep in the past is affecting the present. And where exactly does Daniel go on his travels?This is a debut novel told through our heroine with the clear voice of a young woman. Run-on sentences of dialogue put the reader smack into the conversation. The writer plants clues to mysteries that will be solved later, such as the contrast between giant atlas in Daniel’s apartment and the teeny secret in his shirt pocket. While it’s a satisfying read, the spare writing is at odds with the emotional content of the story. We don’t get to know any of the characters well. Our heroine remains distant, even in her love scenes. Perhaps that’s intentional, to convey the pains of childhood that are hidden in adulthood, but still very much alive.
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  • Ellen Klock
    January 1, 1970
    And here we are on a hypothetical archeological dig! On the outside, the world seems normal with a happy family enjoying life and tolerating the eccentric Uncle Daniel. The Travels of Daniel Ascher by French author Deborah Levy-Bertherat is told by Helene who is attending a college in Paris to become an archeologist. Who knew that her major project would be unearthing the family secrets kept so hidden that not even the participants knew all the details. As Helene peels back each layer of her Gre And here we are on a hypothetical archeological dig! On the outside, the world seems normal with a happy family enjoying life and tolerating the eccentric Uncle Daniel. The Travels of Daniel Ascher by French author Deborah Levy-Bertherat is told by Helene who is attending a college in Paris to become an archeologist. Who knew that her major project would be unearthing the family secrets kept so hidden that not even the participants knew all the details. As Helene peels back each layer of her Great Uncle's story, she realizes there is more to discover. The key is Daniel Roche, a famous author of a popular children's book series, The Black Insignia, who has provided the apartment where she lives. He is an uncle who she never quite understood, but now, after his return home from his world travels, she gets to know him better as he slowly discloses his secret personality and mysteriously reveals himself, giving clues to his past life when he was known as Daniel Ascher. Finally she can appreciate his work as author H. R. Sanders, and perhaps use the written word to better understand the man. The sharing of stories and photographs at family gatherings round out her investigation. An interesting premise whose mystery is slowly revealed as if the reader were picking the petals off a flower to reach the center bud. There were a lot of nice little touches, and the background of the holocaust gives the reader a better understanding of Daniel Asher's motivations. The majority of the novel takes place in Paris from 1999 to 2000, an exotic setting which adds to the mystique. I appreciated that Levy-Bertherat kept the book (novella or novelette?) short and to the point instead of dragging out the plot with unnecessary details or repetitions resulting in boredom instead of anticipation. I also enjoyed the ending which was slightly open-ended, yet provided closure. The translation from the original French by Adriana Hunter was problematic at spots, but I was still kept engaged with the text. An interesting read. Three and a half stars.Thank you to Netgalley and Other Press for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Whitney (First Impressions Reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    A story within a story with an author as mysterious as the identity of Lemony Snicket. At first, this could seem like a ditty about a writer and his antics, but as the reader dives deeper they become aware of the multiple dimensions to Daniel (Roche) Ascher. The popularity and adult fandom of The Black Insignia series reminded me of grown-up Harry Potter fans (such as myself) who grew up adoring the series staying just as enthralled as adults. For me, the comparison was amusing.The novel kept my A story within a story with an author as mysterious as the identity of Lemony Snicket. At first, this could seem like a ditty about a writer and his antics, but as the reader dives deeper they become aware of the multiple dimensions to Daniel (Roche) Ascher. The popularity and adult fandom of The Black Insignia series reminded me of grown-up Harry Potter fans (such as myself) who grew up adoring the series staying just as enthralled as adults. For me, the comparison was amusing.The novel kept my interest with an Audrey Tautou, Amelie type character as the narrator. Hélène leads us on a scavenger hunt with clues leading to a well-crafted conclusion. The secret behind The Black Insignia is heartfelt cast behind the horrid backdrop of the Holocaust. The plot moved along at its own pace, allowing the reader to grasp the gravity of the situation and consequences that occurred. The Travels of Daniel Ascher was an excellent translation to a wonderful journey of a novel.
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  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    This was a surprisingly meaty book for being so short. Despite its length, Lévy-Bertherat conveyed a lot with her concise yet descriptive writing. Archaeologist Hélène moves to an apartment in Paris above that of her great-uncle, Daniel Roche (aka H.R. Sanders, author of a popular adventure series). What follows is a rediscovery of childhood (both her own and those of her acquaintances that read her uncle's books), an unearthing of family history (and what our roots say about us), an examination This was a surprisingly meaty book for being so short. Despite its length, Lévy-Bertherat conveyed a lot with her concise yet descriptive writing. Archaeologist Hélène moves to an apartment in Paris above that of her great-uncle, Daniel Roche (aka H.R. Sanders, author of a popular adventure series). What follows is a rediscovery of childhood (both her own and those of her acquaintances that read her uncle's books), an unearthing of family history (and what our roots say about us), an examination of whether reality or our own version defines our lives, and an inquiry into the origin of stories. And yet it could also be read simply as an entertaining story of family mystery if one doesn't want to think deeply. Of course, you'll have to do some thinking, because the author is very subtle and leaves the reader to connect many dots. So I'll summarize this highly gratifying book as I started: a very big book for being so small!The fine print: received ARC from NetGalley.
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    2.5. This was fairly disappointing. First off, I'm sure there were many things that were lost in translation. However, there is very little depth to the characters which makes remembering them difficult when the author brings them up later. I found myself re-reading many sections, trying to figure out how everything was playing out. It wasn't a terribly difficult book to follow, it was just a sign of how I was not at all into the book. My mind drifted when I read quite a bit. The structure of th 2.5. This was fairly disappointing. First off, I'm sure there were many things that were lost in translation. However, there is very little depth to the characters which makes remembering them difficult when the author brings them up later. I found myself re-reading many sections, trying to figure out how everything was playing out. It wasn't a terribly difficult book to follow, it was just a sign of how I was not at all into the book. My mind drifted when I read quite a bit. The structure of the dialogue was terrible. Instead of quotes or using "he said/she said" to mark dialogue, it was just one long string of dialogue, broken up by commas, which made it very difficult to follow.As a whole, this book felt like a draft of what could have been a really good book. Instead, it wound up being very average and completely forgettable.
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  • Mainlinebooker
    January 1, 1970
    This slim novella is really a gem of a book but I didn't really appreciate it until 1/3rd of the way through. Simplistically, this is the story of a great great niece whose Jewish uncle was a famous author of swashbuckling adventure stories. He was adopted by the family during wartime when his own family was taken from him. As an older adult she attempts to unravel her uncle's complicated history and finds a treasure trove of meaning in his books, his life, and his family. The real issues are id This slim novella is really a gem of a book but I didn't really appreciate it until 1/3rd of the way through. Simplistically, this is the story of a great great niece whose Jewish uncle was a famous author of swashbuckling adventure stories. He was adopted by the family during wartime when his own family was taken from him. As an older adult she attempts to unravel her uncle's complicated history and finds a treasure trove of meaning in his books, his life, and his family. The real issues are identity and race,a discourse on memory and the ability of the written word to change how we feel about ourselves..A smash hit in France, it will profoundly affect you after the last page has been devoured.
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  • Tony
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Net Galley for the ARC. That place is awesome. Cheers.This is a really interesting idea. The mysteries of a family are told in flashbacks, novelizations, family stories and pictures. There are some touching moments in here. The translator decided to have everyone talk in one paragraph without quotation marks. I have no idea if this is how the original book was written, but I would recommend that it have those before final publication in the States. It is what we are used to and it can Thanks to Net Galley for the ARC. That place is awesome. Cheers.This is a really interesting idea. The mysteries of a family are told in flashbacks, novelizations, family stories and pictures. There are some touching moments in here. The translator decided to have everyone talk in one paragraph without quotation marks. I have no idea if this is how the original book was written, but I would recommend that it have those before final publication in the States. It is what we are used to and it can get confusing. I would hate to have someone put it down because that is hard to get past. It was a quick read. I got through it in almost one sitting. Thanks again Net Galley.
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  • Ryan Mishap
    January 1, 1970
    My library labeled it a mystery. Not in the traditional sense. A blurb on the book called it "YA" and promised it would soon be a sensation. The simple language and hand drawings do not make it a Young Adult novel--it is just a novel. I can understand why the label makers are confused, though--it is an odd duck, combining an unadorned narrative style and quiet protagonist with the elements of family history, historical tragedy, and the mystery of figuring out who people really are (including one My library labeled it a mystery. Not in the traditional sense. A blurb on the book called it "YA" and promised it would soon be a sensation. The simple language and hand drawings do not make it a Young Adult novel--it is just a novel. I can understand why the label makers are confused, though--it is an odd duck, combining an unadorned narrative style and quiet protagonist with the elements of family history, historical tragedy, and the mystery of figuring out who people really are (including oneself).Recommended.
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  • Beth Lind
    January 1, 1970
    3 1/2 stars. Originally written in French, some of the translations and punctuation didn't translate well in English which is minor but did cause some confusion at times. Overall, the story of Daniel is a thoughtful one and brought home the concept of how hard it would have to be to go on living a good life after a great loss.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    VERDICT: A literary novel dealing with the place and importance of fiction to help you cope with your past, it is also a unique way of reconsidering the German Occupation in Paris. Highly recommended if you enjoy discovering new promising authors.my full review is here:http://wordsandpeace.com/2015/06/27/b...
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  • Samantha
    January 1, 1970
    A charming single-sitting read, more a children's book for adults than a "YA novel, " whatever that is. It's appropriate that it's about, among other things, the child-self retained by the adult. It was quite enjoyable and not too cloying, if a bit too simplistic to be a real favorite. 3.5 stars, and liked the little illustrations.
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  • Ireneherz
    January 1, 1970
    Hard to written about without giving away the story.This is a book about survival, guilt, secrets, memories and familial love. Helene learns more about her somewhat buffoons great uncle and about her family's past. A wistful and sad story.
  • Aime'
    January 1, 1970
    What a beautiful little book.
  • Sarah-Hope
    January 1, 1970
    A recent translation from the French, The Travels of Daniel Ascher reminds me a bit of I Called Him Necktie, one of my favorite books of 2014. The similarity isn’t one of theme. Rather, each of these books seems deceptively simple at the beginning, a pleasant enough read, but perhaps not much more. Then comes the moment of sudden revelation about two thirds of the way through: this isn’t just a good read; it’s a remarkable read. And from that moment on the book becomes un-put-downable. One simul A recent translation from the French, The Travels of Daniel Ascher reminds me a bit of I Called Him Necktie, one of my favorite books of 2014. The similarity isn’t one of theme. Rather, each of these books seems deceptively simple at the beginning, a pleasant enough read, but perhaps not much more. Then comes the moment of sudden revelation about two thirds of the way through: this isn’t just a good read; it’s a remarkable read. And from that moment on the book becomes un-put-downable. One simultaneously feels compelled to race through it and mourns the fact that its end is approaching page by page.The Travels of Daniel Ascher focuses on Hélèn, an archaeology student, and her uncle Daniel, a writer of a well-known children’s adventure series. When Hélèn begins her studies, she moves into a small room at the top of the building in which Daniel has his apartment. She’s glad for the room, but uneasy about living this close to her uncle, who she’s always found a bit off-putting: larger than life in a rather childish way, describing his adventures in dramatic fashion as though he were the hero of his own series.Over time Hélèn begins to realize how little of her uncle’s story she knows, and she begins to question him and other family members. The first revelation is that Daniel was a Jewish boy adopted by a French gentile family during World War II. As Hélèn continues her research, she becomes less and less certain of who her uncle is, as he seems to have two very different life stories.This is the sort of book one can give one’s self as a gift when a day or a weekend opens up and the lure of “a book and a quiet nook” is irresistible. It can easily be read in a day—or in two evenings—but it will stick with the reader much longer. The Travels of Daniel Ascher balances its mix of family secrets, 20th Century European history, and bibliophilia nicely. The reader wonders; the reader mourns; the reader also enjoys. Keep your eye out for this title and don’t hesitate to pick it up when you cross its path. You’ll be surprised by the richness packed into its 160 pages.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    What a wonderful little book! An intensely packed story, charming line drawings, bibliography of the "Black Insignia" book series all in one novella. We meet young Helene as she starts her studies at the Institute of Archaeology in Paris. Luckily, her Great Uncle Daniel has supplied her with a bedroom/apartment in the building he owns. He's seldom in town as he travels the world gaining inspiration for his wildly popular children's adventure book series, "The Black Insignia." Helene strikes me a What a wonderful little book! An intensely packed story, charming line drawings, bibliography of the "Black Insignia" book series all in one novella. We meet young Helene as she starts her studies at the Institute of Archaeology in Paris. Luckily, her Great Uncle Daniel has supplied her with a bedroom/apartment in the building he owns. He's seldom in town as he travels the world gaining inspiration for his wildly popular children's adventure book series, "The Black Insignia." Helene strikes me as snobby, stand-offish. Uncle Daniel embarrasses her with his wild stories at family gatherings, where he relates much better with the children than the adults. She couldn't make it through the first book in his series as a child, and now as a young adult she tries to avoid Daniel when he is back in town. But as a reader, I felt very sympathetic to Daniel, and when Helene's new boyfriend is exuberantly enthusiastic to learn the author H.R. Sanders is really Daniel Roche, her uncle, Helene slowly begins to open her eyes as she is exposed to Daniel's wide friendships and contacts in the city. She begins a special kind of "archaeology." As the story progresses, the children's adventures seem to have more and more serious plots. Could any of them really be based on reality? Helene learns from elder family the background of Daniel's story, from when he was a child and taken in by them in 1942. Of course, Helene had known he had been adopted and his last name had been Ascher, but she has so much to learn, so much to discover about him, with settings and characters right out of one of his mysterious adventure tales. Once again, a new and wonderful take on the theme of The Power of Story in our lives.
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  • Merle
    January 1, 1970
    Deborah Levy- Bertherat has written this short but fascinating story. It has been translated from the French by Adriana Hunter. What a wonderful story of a great uncle who travels around the world and writes adventure stories for children. Great-uncle Daniel is the life of the kids table at family holiday meals. All the children in the family are reading his books and following the heroic journeys of Peter Ashley-Mill, in the Black Insignia series. All the children except Helene. She never liked Deborah Levy- Bertherat has written this short but fascinating story. It has been translated from the French by Adriana Hunter. What a wonderful story of a great uncle who travels around the world and writes adventure stories for children. Great-uncle Daniel is the life of the kids table at family holiday meals. All the children in the family are reading his books and following the heroic journeys of Peter Ashley-Mill, in the Black Insignia series. All the children except Helene. She never liked the books as a child. She also was very critical of her uncle, who wrote under the pen name H.R. Sanders. Now she is living in the upstairs apartment owned by Great- uncle Daniel Roche or is it Daniel Ascher? When a postcard he sends her from one of his trips turns out to be false, she starts to search for her uncle and uncover his past. This book takes a very subtle approach to the Holocaust and the Jews escape or capture from Germany. Without too much detail of the atrocities of war this beautiful story makes clear what happened to Jewish families and how some people were able to escape while others were not. The book also shows how their war experience can affect them for the rest of their life.
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  • Magdelanye
    January 1, 1970
    Perhaps this is a book whose merit has been lost in translation.It started strong and clear. The odd rhythms and punctuation swept me up into the atmosphere of rural France and the time of the telling. At first I was patient and interested as I flipped back to corroborate some detail, but gradually I began to be annoyed. Even with chapter headings and delightful illustrations, there is little for the reader to flag attention to details that may or may not be crucial. In fact, it began to seem th Perhaps this is a book whose merit has been lost in translation.It started strong and clear. The odd rhythms and punctuation swept me up into the atmosphere of rural France and the time of the telling. At first I was patient and interested as I flipped back to corroborate some detail, but gradually I began to be annoyed. Even with chapter headings and delightful illustrations, there is little for the reader to flag attention to details that may or may not be crucial. In fact, it began to seem that many of the crucial details are not there, as if they have left out or the entire thing was poorly abridged. On the other hand, in such a short work, there are parts that take up quite a bit of detail that has absolutely nothing to add.Perhaps this story ultimately makes sense in the original. As I neared the end though, I did not have the heart (or motivation) to try to figure out what was hinted at because it never came together for me. It is always disappointing when a book that originally charmed loses its focus. Or was it me that lost my focus here when it seemed to go from clear to arbitrary?
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  • Dorie - Traveling Sister :)
    January 1, 1970
    For me this book started out a little slowly but as soon as Helen moves into a small apartment in a building that her uncle owns things start to move along. About half way through I found that it got very interesting as she finds out about her uncle's history. She actually knew very little about him. She uncovers his struggles during WWII through many sources, flashbacks, pictures and stories told by other family members. What was very interesting to me was the adventure series that Daniel write For me this book started out a little slowly but as soon as Helen moves into a small apartment in a building that her uncle owns things start to move along. About half way through I found that it got very interesting as she finds out about her uncle's history. She actually knew very little about him. She uncovers his struggles during WWII through many sources, flashbacks, pictures and stories told by other family members. What was very interesting to me was the adventure series that Daniel writes, "The Black Insignia" which I think helps him to deal with his past and helps others understand how the Holocaust affected everyone's lives. I found Ms. Levy-Betherat's writing to be concise, very descriptive and the plot flowed beautifully.I ended up really enjoying this book.
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  • Andrew Porteus
    January 1, 1970
    The Travels of Daniel Ascher is a beautifully written short book detailing the journey of discovery undertaken by Hélène, a student who came to Paris to study archaeology and stays in an apartment building owned by her Uncle Daniel. Daniel is the author, under the nom de plume H. R. Sanders, of a series of adventure much beloved by, amongst a great many others, Guillaume, Hélène's boyfriend. As she reads the series for the first time she comes to realize how these adventures relate to her rememb The Travels of Daniel Ascher is a beautifully written short book detailing the journey of discovery undertaken by Hélène, a student who came to Paris to study archaeology and stays in an apartment building owned by her Uncle Daniel. Daniel is the author, under the nom de plume H. R. Sanders, of a series of adventure much beloved by, amongst a great many others, Guillaume, Hélène's boyfriend. As she reads the series for the first time she comes to realize how these adventures relate to her remembrances of Daniel. Hélène starts investigating Daniel's and her family's past, unearthing family secrets dating back to traumatic events in World War II.A fascinating read, enhanced by line drawings of scenes in the book, as little by little the story is unfolded.
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  • Eugene
    January 1, 1970
    Somewhat entertaining, but not great; I have a strong feeling that the book didn't (or wouldn't) translate well, not in the sense that it was poorly done but that it couldn't be, emotionally/culturally. There were elements I did really like, especially the line drawings throughout - 68 years old, and I'm still a sucker for "picture books." Some have criticized the lack of quotation marks and run on voices for dialogue, but I didn't find that troublesome at all, it created a sort of fugue state f Somewhat entertaining, but not great; I have a strong feeling that the book didn't (or wouldn't) translate well, not in the sense that it was poorly done but that it couldn't be, emotionally/culturally. There were elements I did really like, especially the line drawings throughout - 68 years old, and I'm still a sucker for "picture books." Some have criticized the lack of quotation marks and run on voices for dialogue, but I didn't find that troublesome at all, it created a sort of fugue state for the characters that seemed appropriate. Hélène's voyage of discovery was well done and captivating, Daniel's...not so much. Short, at less than 200 pages, and worth a look.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    This was short & quick - I read it in 3 days - but I think I would have to read it again more closely (not in the carpool line at Camp Apachi!) to understand it better. The back cover describes it as a "story about literary deceptions, family secrets, and a thrilling quest for the truth" and "a real thriller." It was interesting and I was compelled to finish it but I didn't find it all that "thrilling." The pencil illustrations are charming and the physical book looks like a middle grade nov This was short & quick - I read it in 3 days - but I think I would have to read it again more closely (not in the carpool line at Camp Apachi!) to understand it better. The back cover describes it as a "story about literary deceptions, family secrets, and a thrilling quest for the truth" and "a real thriller." It was interesting and I was compelled to finish it but I didn't find it all that "thrilling." The pencil illustrations are charming and the physical book looks like a middle grade novel so I couldn't figure out who the intended audience is - children, YA, or adults.
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  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Touching, creative, lovely novel. It tells the story of a child of the Holocaust in a unique manner. There’s a story within a story. French author Deborah Levy-Bertherat provides splendid descriptions of present day Paris as well as Paris during the Nazi occupation. It’s a wonderful translation by Adriana Hunter. The Travels of Daniel Ascher proves to be mysterious, adventurous and moving.full review at Entertainment Realm: http://entertainmentrealm.com/2015/05...
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    At first this book felt like an adolescent read, the main character a silly, easily embarrassed girl. But as the story evolved and she started to understand her great uncle, the story shows how long ago evil, and random choices, affects generations, how family, history and identity can be complicated. In the end I enjoyed this book and appreciated how the main character evolved as the story unfurled.
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  • Estelle
    January 1, 1970
    Helene, a student of archaeology, gradually uncovers the story of her Uncle Daniel, whose history Helene knows only sketchily. He has always been a favorite of the family, a writer of adventure tales about a hero who travels the world. This sad but sweet story unfolds slowly, as Helene discovers a family secret. Stylistically, there are long phrases strung together by commas, where I would prefer separate sentences. Nevertheless, a tale to be savored.
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  • Zoidberg
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley for an honest review.This is a lyrically haunting novel that flows easily through time, relationships, and narrative. Helene's reading of The Black Insignia series of novels progresses as she discovers more about he uncle and the suffering caused because of the Holocaust. Read this book!
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  • Diane Adams
    January 1, 1970
    Needed a book translated from another language for my reading challenge. This fit the bill, and was particularly enjoyable because it mentioned locations we visited last spring. History, mystery, and more.
  • Sarah Goewey
    January 1, 1970
    The characters are well-developed and sympathetic, the plot is suspenseful and exciting, the language is beautiful, the images are vivid, and the damn thing is less than 200 pages long. I call that impressive.
  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent. A little too short. So good it could be longer. Translated from french. The story goes between modern day and Helene who has come to Paris to study archaeology and 1940s Paris when her great-uncle Daniel was a boy hiding from the Gestapo.
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