Mike's Place
There's a rule at Mike's Place: never, ever talk politics or religion. At this blues bar on the Tel Aviv beachfront, an international cast of characters mingles with the locals, and everyone is welcome to grab a beer and forget the conflict outside. At least, that's the story Jack and Joshua want to tell in their documentary.But less than a month after they begin filming, Mike's Place is the target of a deadly suicide bombing. Jack, Joshua, and the Mike's Place family survive the only way they know how-by keeping the camera rolling.Written by filmmakers Jack Baxter and Joshua Faudem and illustrated by award-winning cartoonist Koren Shadmi, Mike's Place chronicles the true story of an infamous terrorist attack in painstaking detail. Rarely has the slow build to tragedy, and the rebirth that follows, been captured with such a compassionate and unflinching eye.

Mike's Place Details

TitleMike's Place
Author
ReleaseJun 9th, 2015
PublisherFirst Second
ISBN-139781596438576
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Nonfiction, History, Autobiography, Memoir

Mike's Place Review

  • Nicola Mansfield
    January 1, 1970
    A true story based on the authors' experience in Israel, 2003. It centres around two men who are making a documentary about Mike's Place, a bar where all people, of any religion or politics are welcome, but the same are always left outside the door as Mike's is a place where people let it hang loose and be themselves, getting along with each other as fellow people. Just by looking at the cover of the book the reader knows something horrific is going to happen and most of the book leads up to thi A true story based on the authors' experience in Israel, 2003. It centres around two men who are making a documentary about Mike's Place, a bar where all people, of any religion or politics are welcome, but the same are always left outside the door as Mike's is a place where people let it hang loose and be themselves, getting along with each other as fellow people. Just by looking at the cover of the book the reader knows something horrific is going to happen and most of the book leads up to this point so the reader has an impending sense of doom waiting for that to happen. Writing about the Middle East is a difficult topic to cover seeing most people are heavily one side or the other with current events. The authors have managed to show us though how Arabs and Jews living on the same street, sitting in the same bar, can and do get together, talk, are friends, and have lives where they don't think about politics and religion all the live long day. "Normal" life does exist in there behind it all. We are also shown the appreciation they have for the country itself. The beautiful weather, beaches and landscapes. A place where people should want to live. After the bombing there are poignant moments as everyone deals with what happened in their own way, but ultimately for the greater good.
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  • Jon
    January 1, 1970
    I finished reading Mike's Place, a graphic novel about a terrorist attack at a Tel Aviv, the night before a shooting occurred at a bar in that city. While it's a strange coincidence, these acts of terror are all too common in Israel and it's important for the world to understand these senseless attacks are not singularities. Despite the fact that Israel and its people live under the constant threat of terrorism, the characters at Mike's Place are hopeful and determined. One of the characters co I finished reading Mike's Place, a graphic novel about a terrorist attack at a Tel Aviv, the night before a shooting occurred at a bar in that city. While it's a strange coincidence, these acts of terror are all too common in Israel and it's important for the world to understand these senseless attacks are not singularities. Despite the fact that Israel and its people live under the constant threat of terrorism, the characters at Mike's Place are hopeful and determined. One of the characters comments that in Israel, one needs to have a short-term memory and not dwell on the past. Mike's Place is a bar where it does not matter if you're Jewish, Muslim or a foreigner, everyone is welcome to have a beer. Baxter and Faudem show the ferocity of the people of Israel and beautifully paints a hopeful picture of co-existence and unity. This is not a political novel, despite the fact that the act is caused by radical Islamic terrorists who deplore Israel. Mike's Place is a story about people: people like you or I who merely want to live peacefully with their neighbors but are unable to do so. The mainstream media is always quick to paint Israel as the enemy and demonize its citizens, but that's so problematic and ugly. It was interesting to see the land of Israel from both of the perspectives of foreigners and its residents because it gave readers a real, comprehensive look at a controversial place. All this being said, Mike's Place is an excellent novel that recounts the before and after of a terrible tragedy. The illustrations are top-notch, intricate and capture the beauty of Israel and its citizens. I loved all the details that went into the scenes at the Western Wall (Kotel) and the drawings were so vivid that it brought me back to my last trip there. I highly recommend this graphic novel and would love to see more literature set in Israel in the future.
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  • Vojtěch
    January 1, 1970
    Chceš zachytit dojemný, citlivý, drsný a opravdový příběh? Tak toč dál. Toč, ať se děje cokoliv. Protože jedině tak získáš to pravé autentické cosi, co z tvého příběhu udělá pecku. A tohle pecka je. Mike's Place jako komiks sice kdovíjak neuchvátí svojí vizuální stránkou, ale v kombinaci s obsahem se z něho stává dílo, které jde do hloubky. Tak, že si budete říkat, jaké krutosti jsou lidé schopni.
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  • Aya
    January 1, 1970
    4,5*Hodně silný příběh, ale trochu kostrbatá kresba. Jak si mám oblíbit někoho, kdo na každém obrázku vypadá jinak?http://www.kniznibanket.com/mikes-place
  • Marcela
    January 1, 1970
    Po té hrůze, která si říká studium literatury, jsem si řekla, že bych mohla začít něčím odlehčenějším.Komiks o teroristickém útoku? No krása.
  • Stewart Tame
    January 1, 1970
    As the subtitle says, a true story. Mike's Place is a blues bar in Tel Aviv, and was the site of a suicide bombing. The story covers the events leading up to--with plenty of foreshadowing--and including the bombing, as well as the aftermath, as life gradually returns to normal. By focusing on a single event in such detail, this graphic novel packs more of an emotional punch than a hundred nightly news reports ever could. At times harrowing, this book is definitely worth reading for anyone trying As the subtitle says, a true story. Mike's Place is a blues bar in Tel Aviv, and was the site of a suicide bombing. The story covers the events leading up to--with plenty of foreshadowing--and including the bombing, as well as the aftermath, as life gradually returns to normal. By focusing on a single event in such detail, this graphic novel packs more of an emotional punch than a hundred nightly news reports ever could. At times harrowing, this book is definitely worth reading for anyone trying to wrap their head around the issue of terrorism. This project apparently grew out of an award-winning documentary, Blues On the Beach, which I'm going to have to track down. In fact this book is, in part, the story of the filming of that documentary, which was in progress when the bomb went off. Highly recommended!
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  • Breanne
    January 1, 1970
    This is everything I want from a nonfiction graphic novel. Learning about something I may not have known before, a compelling storyline, illustrations that capture the mood as well as the events, a moving resolution. I read it all in one sitting, putting it down wasn't really an option. I do have a couple of criticisms - one relationship in the book was a bit too one-dimensional and soap-opera-y and didn't feed back into the heart of the story as much as it should have: it made it feel coinciden This is everything I want from a nonfiction graphic novel. Learning about something I may not have known before, a compelling storyline, illustrations that capture the mood as well as the events, a moving resolution. I read it all in one sitting, putting it down wasn't really an option. I do have a couple of criticisms - one relationship in the book was a bit too one-dimensional and soap-opera-y and didn't feed back into the heart of the story as much as it should have: it made it feel coincidental to the main events. But mostly this was excellently done. This is one of the better NF graphic novels out there and I will be reading the others recommended by First Second in the back of the book.
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  • Derek Royal
    January 1, 1970
    This is one of the books we're reviewing this coming week on The Comics Alternative. An engaging story, but one that is fragmented in places..but necessarily so, in that it's not the story of just one or two people but a group of friends/patrons of a popular bar in Tel Aviv. My only hesitation as to artistic decision is the representation of the Islamic terrorist. As the creators mention in the book's Epilogue, this is purely speculation on their part. So why include it, why try to focalize even This is one of the books we're reviewing this coming week on The Comics Alternative. An engaging story, but one that is fragmented in places..but necessarily so, in that it's not the story of just one or two people but a group of friends/patrons of a popular bar in Tel Aviv. My only hesitation as to artistic decision is the representation of the Islamic terrorist. As the creators mention in the book's Epilogue, this is purely speculation on their part. So why include it, why try to focalize even tentatively through the bombers? What would this narrative been without those sections?
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  • Christina Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    At Mike’s Place, the blues bar on the Tel Aviv beachfront, patrons -- both renowned and local -- gather to forget the conflict outside. At least, that's what indie filmmakers Jack and Joshua want to convey in their documentary; however, shortly after filming begins, the bar is targeted in a gruesome suicide bombing. Lovers of realistic and historical narratives will not only find this to be an interesting read but also the ways that the Mike’s Place family copes with their tragedy intriguing as At Mike’s Place, the blues bar on the Tel Aviv beachfront, patrons -- both renowned and local -- gather to forget the conflict outside. At least, that's what indie filmmakers Jack and Joshua want to convey in their documentary; however, shortly after filming begins, the bar is targeted in a gruesome suicide bombing. Lovers of realistic and historical narratives will not only find this to be an interesting read but also the ways that the Mike’s Place family copes with their tragedy intriguing as well as heart-wrenching at the same time.
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  • Maya
    January 1, 1970
    Naprosto! Bomba!Popravdě ani z mangy, kterou jsem jeden čas žrala jsem nebyla natolik odvařená jako z tohoto příběhu. Hrůzostrasnější na tom je, že je podle skutečné události. Nechci to tu moc rozebírat jinak by moje review bylo plné spoilerů. Zkrátka označení plným počtem bodů Vám musí stačit.Vřele doporučuji.
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  • Edward Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    The true story about a 2003 suicide bombing in Tel Aviv, the first time such an attack was carried out by foreign nationals inside Israel.
  • Dalen Garris
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting book from a unique perspective. This is my first graphic novel, so I wasn't expecting the depth that I found. The characters became real to me and their emotions and feelings were easily felt. The story line took a very unpredictable turn with the bombing. Not that it wasn't expected, considering the title, but the abrupt corner it took opened up the story into a broader vista than the original direction was leading to.There are some interesting subplots that could be followed. I'm n Interesting book from a unique perspective. This is my first graphic novel, so I wasn't expecting the depth that I found. The characters became real to me and their emotions and feelings were easily felt. The story line took a very unpredictable turn with the bombing. Not that it wasn't expected, considering the title, but the abrupt corner it took opened up the story into a broader vista than the original direction was leading to.There are some interesting subplots that could be followed. I'm not sure how the actual film deals with everything, but reading the novel makes me want to see.A great read. Highly recommend it. Dale Garris
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  • Jayna
    January 1, 1970
    Everyone should read this graphic novel and then watch its companion documentary. This vivid retelling leading up to and occurring after a tragic suicide bombing in Israel is compelling and sheds light on the realities of which westerners can only feign understanding (myself at the front of that line). By immersing the reader in the process and lives of the creatorsof an actual documentary that was being filmed at the time of the bombing, the truth that life and tragedy happen in the middle of t Everyone should read this graphic novel and then watch its companion documentary. This vivid retelling leading up to and occurring after a tragic suicide bombing in Israel is compelling and sheds light on the realities of which westerners can only feign understanding (myself at the front of that line). By immersing the reader in the process and lives of the creatorsof an actual documentary that was being filmed at the time of the bombing, the truth that life and tragedy happen in the middle of things becomes fully realized.
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  • Michael Kerr
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. A graphic novel created by documentary film-makers who were shooting a feature on Mike's Place, a bar in Tel Aviv. Their film was intended to show an alternate view of the middle east - one where people can hang out and be themselves without focusing on politics and religion. During the filming a suicide bomber wreaks his mayhem on the bar (which may have been selected due to the attention the place was receiving as a film subject). A recommended non-fiction graphic novel about life i 3.5 stars. A graphic novel created by documentary film-makers who were shooting a feature on Mike's Place, a bar in Tel Aviv. Their film was intended to show an alternate view of the middle east - one where people can hang out and be themselves without focusing on politics and religion. During the filming a suicide bomber wreaks his mayhem on the bar (which may have been selected due to the attention the place was receiving as a film subject). A recommended non-fiction graphic novel about life in Israel.
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  • Perlie
    January 1, 1970
    It's hard to "like" a book about a topic as sensitive as this. The book hearkens back to the second intifada, and touches on how terrorism impacts on Israeli life.
  • Dantanian
    January 1, 1970
    My word. Devastating.
  • BARBII
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this book!!!!!
  • Kulturozpyt Prumerny
    January 1, 1970
    povedené. smutné. pravdivé.
  • OpenBookSociety.com
    January 1, 1970
    http://openbooksociety.com/article/mi...Brought to you by OBS Reviewer ScottThe political landscape of Israel is and was often a harsh and unforgiving road, with terror a palpital feeling on both sides of the street; the air is thick with tension and amidst the peace talks of 2003 and 2004 lies a tale well worth the cost of admission. In the middle of this chaotic time sits Mike’s Place, an excellent, graphic biographical history of a momentous period.As the graphic novel’s Epilogue states, “Thi http://openbooksociety.com/article/mi...Brought to you by OBS Reviewer ScottThe political landscape of Israel is and was often a harsh and unforgiving road, with terror a palpital feeling on both sides of the street; the air is thick with tension and amidst the peace talks of 2003 and 2004 lies a tale well worth the cost of admission. In the middle of this chaotic time sits Mike’s Place, an excellent, graphic biographical history of a momentous period.As the graphic novel’s Epilogue states, “This was the first time in the middle east conflict that foreign nationals carried out a suicide bombing inside Israel. In 2004 HAMAS claimed responsibility when they released the martyrdom video.” This is the scenario that Mike’s Place takes place in. The characterization shows how life unfolds during difficult times and people’s coping strategies to events beyond their control.The story centers about a live music club, appropriately called “Mike’s Place,” (which also happened to be the name of my local University’s graduate bar – what are the odds?) in which politics and religion are left at the door, with live music and people just having a good time – the “real” Israel as the graphic novel puts it. The characterization makes each individual immediately unique and you know who is who in any given panel. The art even shows signs of being aware of it being a documentary depiction of a documentary, showing the “off-camera” point of view beautifully. The voices are natural and the story easily accessible.The writing is well executed, opening up doorways to a single characters thoughts and an omniscient point of view otherwise. It imposed, at least to me, the feeling of a “documentary of a documentary.” It is brisk, and full of local Tel Aviv dialect and slang (though always translated tastefully). I really enjoyed being pulled into the story, and in letting the characters build their history as the “documentary” unfolds, the lead protagonist’s voice carries the flow of the book naturally and fluidly. The lettering is clear and unique, and is transparent once you start the graphic novel.The art, I have to admit, is incredibly well done, most likely using photo reference, to convey a tangible feeling of immersion in any of the environments, from Tel Aviv, to the Gaza Strip Crossing, to Mike’s (with its large Guinness sign). The inked “camera’s eye” is well played with often striking angles and gossamer movement from page to page. The characters are drawn with an open, simple style that keeps their identities straight, throughout the story, wherever they appear. Photographs often introduce each chapter, and the quotes from the Quran that accompany them are apt and appropriate. The entire work stands out on its own as a graphic work, independent of the story.For those who enjoyed Joe Sacco’s Palestine, or documentary enthusiasts who want something different in their collection, or lovers of a good true life story, Then Mike’s Place might be worth hanging out in for a while. It will definitely introduce you to the “real” Israel of 2003. It’s a change, for sure.*OBS would like to thank the publisher for providing a copy for review*
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  • Kristen
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. This graphic novel blew me away. Lots of feels and a bit of history I hadn't read much on. Love the way this was told and illustrated.
  • Kimber
    January 1, 1970
    This is a trimmed down version of my review, to view the full review visit The Book Ramble.I received a copy of this book from First Second Books on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Mike's Place tells the true story of events that occurred in 2003 in Israel when two suicide bombers attacked a nightclub and killed 3 people. The club was having a documentary made about it at the time which has since been completed and released (Blues by the Beach). This book relates the making of the doc This is a trimmed down version of my review, to view the full review visit The Book Ramble.I received a copy of this book from First Second Books on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Mike's Place tells the true story of events that occurred in 2003 in Israel when two suicide bombers attacked a nightclub and killed 3 people. The club was having a documentary made about it at the time which has since been completed and released (Blues by the Beach). This book relates the making of the documentary and the events of the bombing. The book also promotes a message of peace and of hope for the future.I found this to be an interesting read. At times it was a little hectic which made it a little tiring to me, but it was still interesting. There's a lot of political references as well which means its hard to understand with knowledge of the specifics of the political situation in the Middle East. I don't know that I was a huge fan of this graphic novel, its hard to find heavy content enjoyable, which is why deciding on a rating was hard for me.An easy place to start is the art. I think the art was good though I'm not a huge fan of some stylistic choices. The proportions and overall body sketches were kind of weird to me at times, though not always. The amount of detail was good for the most part.In terms of content I think it was well written and the choice of subject was really good. I'm not an expert on the political situation in the Middle East so I can't really comment on the political content of the book beyond saying I think the focus of the book, on the non-political and on the hope for the future, was very good and is an important part of education about the situation. I think the fact that this book tried to correct misconceptions that people have about the Qur'an, by way of several quotes from the Qur'an throughout the book, was really a great idea. I think the focus on hope and peace is also excellent. The overall message you get from the book was quite good.I wasn't aware of this suicide bombing in particular, so reading about it was really interesting. I think it was informative which was a positive. The epilogue was extremely helpful in filling in any information I didn't even realize I was missing out on. I definitely think the content was excellent and had an extremely good focus. As I mentioned there are some problems with flow as the story follows a lot of characters and frequently bounces around, breaking up the flow of the book and sometimes creating confusion.Overall, this is a very compelling story about some very interesting and wonderful people. I would recommend this book to readers of political science book as it may be a little harder for general comics fans to get into.
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  • Elliot Ratzman
    January 1, 1970
    In 2003, an American documentarian finds himself in Israel filming the denizens of a blues bar, Mike’s Place. No spoilers—the cover of the graphic novel has a suicide bomber on it—the bar is targeted by a pair of British Hamas terrorists. I didn’t know the story, or the actual documentary, Blues on the Beach, before reading this. While it is a fine glimpse of the daily life of Ashkenazi secular Israelis, it’s not very cognizant of Palestinian life and struggle. In the name of banishing politics In 2003, an American documentarian finds himself in Israel filming the denizens of a blues bar, Mike’s Place. No spoilers—the cover of the graphic novel has a suicide bomber on it—the bar is targeted by a pair of British Hamas terrorists. I didn’t know the story, or the actual documentary, Blues on the Beach, before reading this. While it is a fine glimpse of the daily life of Ashkenazi secular Israelis, it’s not very cognizant of Palestinian life and struggle. In the name of banishing politics from the bar, the author/documentarian fails to note the varieties of problems with his “hey bro’!” subjects: one lives on an illegal settlement in the West Bank, others revel in their military adventures, another espouses racist claims about Palestinians. The annoying bro culture of Israeli dudes is on full display. The single Arab barfly is a sort of ideal Arab (for Israelis), non-political, near silent. The bombers’ motives are reduced to (bad) religion, not politics. Satisfying but superficial.
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  • David Schaafsma
    January 1, 1970
    An account of actual events, a 2003 suicide bombing at a popular bar in Tel Aviv known for being open to all religions and perspectives. Leave your politics at the door kinda place. Rare? In Tel Aviv, in the middle east, very rare. Each section is countered by quotations from the Qu'ran that counter the assumptions of the terrorists and the organization that sponsored the attack. It's essentially the most political statement the book makes. Filmmakers were making a documentary of the bar when th An account of actual events, a 2003 suicide bombing at a popular bar in Tel Aviv known for being open to all religions and perspectives. Leave your politics at the door kinda place. Rare? In Tel Aviv, in the middle east, very rare. Each section is countered by quotations from the Qu'ran that counter the assumptions of the terrorists and the organization that sponsored the attack. It's essentially the most political statement the book makes. Filmmakers were making a documentary of the bar when the bombing occurred, which led them to believe the attack might not have taken place there had they not been filming there, which is probably true. That part of the story is interesting and complex. Overall, however, the art and story are just okay. The bar and its patrons eschew politics so this becomes the story of people who like to be free to party and are above political and religious divisions who have to wake up to reality. So they choose to party on, and they make the free-to-party film. .. which reminds me of a New Yorker cartoon after 9/11, which goes something like this: Two guys ar drinking in a bar and one of them says, "We have to have another martini or the terrorists have won." I don't know, it's an interesting story, I guess. And I like the fact it is a politically neutral bar. And hey, I like to drink, and escape reality, as much as the next person. But there is still something missing from this story that I would have liked to have seen. The art is pretty solid. The story is authored by the filmmakers themselves, a kind of making of the film tale, and they get an okay illustrator to illustrate it. It has a sort of filmic quality to it, not surprising given they are filmmakers making a graphic comic about a film, and this makes the storytelling somewhat more complex than it might have been. This is pretty decent documentary comics work, but think Joe Sacco and you see the standard this tale fails to meet.
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  • Ondra Král
    January 1, 1970
    Komiks podle skutečných událostí.Americký novinář v Jeruzálemě náhodou narazí na bar Mike's Place - místo, kde se neřeší politika ani náboženství a lidé tam chodí za zábavou. Z nějakého důvodu mu to přijde strašně super a rozhodne se o baru natočit dokument. Hlavní problém komiksu pro mě bylo moc postav. "Kamera" skáče z jedné na druhou a i když jsem komiks četl na jeden zátah, občas jsem se ztrácel. Majitelé, novinář, barman, servírka, barmanova gf, servírčin kamarád a další a další a další. Te Komiks podle skutečných událostí.Americký novinář v Jeruzálemě náhodou narazí na bar Mike's Place - místo, kde se neřeší politika ani náboženství a lidé tam chodí za zábavou. Z nějakého důvodu mu to přijde strašně super a rozhodne se o baru natočit dokument. Hlavní problém komiksu pro mě bylo moc postav. "Kamera" skáče z jedné na druhou a i když jsem komiks četl na jeden zátah, občas jsem se ztrácel. Majitelé, novinář, barman, servírka, barmanova gf, servírčin kamarád a další a další a další. Ten mluví o tom, ta zas o tom, jsme v půlce komiksu a nic se vlastně nestalo.Pak dojde události z obálky a v baru se odpálí sebevražedný atentátník. Komiksu se daří zachovat duch Mike's Place a vůbec se neřeší korán, politická situace nebo problematika atentátníků - v centru jsou jen pozůstalí a jejich životy. Problém s počtem postav zůstává a nejspíš mi i díky tomu byli docela lhostejní. V pár scénách jde moc hezky vidět trauma některých aktérů (cyklista, druhý atentátník), ale celkově se tomuhle komiks mohl věnovat víc a víc to rozpracovat - což ovšem nebylo kvůli tuně postav a dějových linek možné. Strašně moc prostoru dostávají třeba osudy mladého páru, ale ten vztah mi pro příběh nepřišel nijak extra podstatný a celkově je tahle linka dost klišoidní (dále furt sledujeme amerického novináře v nemocnici). Postavy si řeší svoje obyčejné životy a každodení problémy a nic víc bohužel nečekejte.Mike's Place je docela zajímavý počin o obyčejných lidech, kteří se vyrovnávají s atentátem a točí film. Bohužel je to komiks, který mi za pár dnů vyšumí z hlavy, protože kromě bombového útoku a pár bezprostředních scén poté tu není nic zapomatováníhodného, a ke kterému nemám důvod se vracet.
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  • Corinne Edwards
    January 1, 1970
    When Jack goes to Tel Aviv, he's planning on making a documentary on the crimes of a local Palestinian leader. What he ends up filming, instead, is about Mike's Place, a beachfront restaurant and bar that plays live local music, where customers are invited to leave politics and religion at the door. One month into filming, a suicide bomber targets the bar and this book tells the story of Mike's Place, its employees and clientele as well as the aftermath of disaster.I like graphic non-fiction. Ob When Jack goes to Tel Aviv, he's planning on making a documentary on the crimes of a local Palestinian leader. What he ends up filming, instead, is about Mike's Place, a beachfront restaurant and bar that plays live local music, where customers are invited to leave politics and religion at the door. One month into filming, a suicide bomber targets the bar and this book tells the story of Mike's Place, its employees and clientele as well as the aftermath of disaster.I like graphic non-fiction. Obviously, it's a pared down version of actual events but I like the overview just the same. I was able to follow the story and care enough that it was actually upsetting when tragedy did strike, even though I knew it was coming. It's hard to wrap your brain around terrorist attacks in general, but even harder sometimes here in my cozy little suburb. To read this and know these were REAL people, leading REAL lives, just trying to find some happiness and purpose and then have strangers just literally blow it up - how do you come to terms with that? Some of the little side plots didn't super interest me (the relationship ups and downs etc) but I am glad that I took the time to think about the Middle East for a while and remind myself that while there are some out there who are willing to kill themselves and others for their beliefs, there are far more of us who want to just peacefully live and let live.note: this is not a book for kids - there are some upsetting images/sexual references
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    This fascinating account of an act of terrorism in Israel in 2003 shines in many aspects. Not only does it recount the build-up to the bombing of a bar where individuals come to enjoy a couple of drinks, listen to blues music, and hang out with friends, but it also describes the aftermath of the suicide bombing and how the bar's owners and patrons manage to keep going. Written by the two filmmakers who recorded a documentary about the events called "Blues by the Beach," this account helps reader This fascinating account of an act of terrorism in Israel in 2003 shines in many aspects. Not only does it recount the build-up to the bombing of a bar where individuals come to enjoy a couple of drinks, listen to blues music, and hang out with friends, but it also describes the aftermath of the suicide bombing and how the bar's owners and patrons manage to keep going. Written by the two filmmakers who recorded a documentary about the events called "Blues by the Beach," this account helps readers see the resilience of everyone involved in the tragedy and the documentary and even features Jack Baxter, the original filmmaker, realizing that the bar was probably targeted because of his film. It provides insight into Israel and Israelis today, which cannot help but be affected by the war and politics that swirl among them. Readers will come to care about Dom while not completely understanding her and worry about Gal, Dom, Josh, Jack, Lenny, and Avi while wondering about what lies in store for each of them, touched in so many ways by this unexpected act of violence. I appreciated the detail provided, even down to how the terrorists entered the country, and some conjecture about what happened to the man whose bombs didn't explode as well as descriptions of the clean-up efforts in restoring Mike's Place.
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  • Kitty Red-Eye
    January 1, 1970
    I have only two small critical comments to this one, and that's that It's difficult to keep all the characters apart, and that some of the drawings look a bit stiff. None of these matter much in such a story. Highly recommended. The characters are so charming, young, full of life, and all the while, you know that some of them are doomed. It's second intifada time, and what's gonna make everything alright if not, you know, some blowing-up of random civilians who are committing the heinous sins of I have only two small critical comments to this one, and that's that It's difficult to keep all the characters apart, and that some of the drawings look a bit stiff. None of these matter much in such a story. Highly recommended. The characters are so charming, young, full of life, and all the while, you know that some of them are doomed. It's second intifada time, and what's gonna make everything alright if not, you know, some blowing-up of random civilians who are committing the heinous sins of having some drinks and listening to music? New to me was the connections between the suicide bombers here and the 7/7 London ones. That angle could have been explored a little better, I'd be most interested to hear it. Maybe the contrast to the loving human angle would have been too strong, I don't know. Glad I finally got around to read it, anyway. Very sad. And very full of life. At the same time.
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  • Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*
    January 1, 1970
    Baxter, Jack, Faudem, Joshua, and Shadmi, Koren, Mike’s Place. pgs. 185. First Second Books, 2015. GRAPHIC NOVEL. Language: PG-13, Mature Content: PG-13, Violence: PG-13Set in a blues bar on Tel Aviv beachfront, Mike’s Place is where people can go and grab a beer as long as they don’t talk about religion or politics. Things take a dark turn, however, when the bar is the place for a documentary film. Less than a month after they begin filming, they bar is a target for a suicide bombing. They surv Baxter, Jack, Faudem, Joshua, and Shadmi, Koren, Mike’s Place. pgs. 185. First Second Books, 2015. GRAPHIC NOVEL. Language: PG-13, Mature Content: PG-13, Violence: PG-13Set in a blues bar on Tel Aviv beachfront, Mike’s Place is where people can go and grab a beer as long as they don’t talk about religion or politics. Things take a dark turn, however, when the bar is the place for a documentary film. Less than a month after they begin filming, they bar is a target for a suicide bombing. They survive, but at a price. Can the owners pick up the pieces and survive?Based off a true story, the story is true to events. Illustrations are detailed and the text does a great job of complementing the illustrations. Readers needing to read a non-fiction book or a graphic novel will enjoy reading this book. MS, HS. ADVISABLE. Reviewer: Kira M, Youth Services Librarian, WHI Public Library.
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  • Emilia P
    January 1, 1970
    This is a "oh it's First Second and it's about Israel so I guess I have to read it" pick. But I have read so many good and interesting and compelling books about Israel and the conflicts and tensions and etc etc there-in that this one felt super flat to me. Like -- the premise is interesting (a documentary crew is filming this cool bar and ends up filming a suicide bombing and its aftermath), but the storytelling was like... oh hey, reader, don't you just care about Israel and its conflicts impl This is a "oh it's First Second and it's about Israel so I guess I have to read it" pick. But I have read so many good and interesting and compelling books about Israel and the conflicts and tensions and etc etc there-in that this one felt super flat to me. Like -- the premise is interesting (a documentary crew is filming this cool bar and ends up filming a suicide bombing and its aftermath), but the storytelling was like... oh hey, reader, don't you just care about Israel and its conflicts implicitly? Aren't these cool Israelis and the expats they attract so...cool? Meh! Also, the illustrations were serviceable at best! It was too documentary, in too slow of a style... I think the film that was made could possibly be pretty interesting, but rehashing it a book seemed increasingly unneccessary as the book went on. Oh well! I will keep making this mistake. :)
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  • Dominika
    January 1, 1970
    Komiks Mike's Place zachycuje teroristický útok na stejnojmenný bar v Tel Avivu. Graficky je román podle mého názoru spíše průměrný, ale obsahově má rozhodně co říct. Průběh útoku je popsán do nejmenšího detailu a následně se také dozvídáme, jaký měl fyzický a psychický vliv na oběti. Díky komiksové podobě je jednodušší se do postav vcítit a představit si, co asi v dané situaci můžou prožívat. Pro oběti útoku a ostatní pravidelné návštěvníky baru je to pocit o to horší, že někdo zaútočil zrovna Komiks Mike's Place zachycuje teroristický útok na stejnojmenný bar v Tel Avivu. Graficky je román podle mého názoru spíše průměrný, ale obsahově má rozhodně co říct. Průběh útoku je popsán do nejmenšího detailu a následně se také dozvídáme, jaký měl fyzický a psychický vliv na oběti. Díky komiksové podobě je jednodušší se do postav vcítit a představit si, co asi v dané situaci můžou prožívat. Pro oběti útoku a ostatní pravidelné návštěvníky baru je to pocit o to horší, že někdo zaútočil zrovna na Mike's place, protože tento bar je vnímán jako místo, kde se neřeší politika a ani izraelsko-palestinský konflikt. Je to místo, kam si lidé chodí odpočinout a poslechnout dobrou hudbu, a kde se schází návštěvníci z různých koutů světa. I přesto, co se stalo, to majitelé nevzdali a bar je dodnes v provozu.
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