Franklin Barbecue
A New York Times best selling complete meat- and brisket-cooking education from the country's most celebrated pitmaster and owner of the wildly popular Austin restaurant Franklin Barbecue.When Aaron Franklin and his wife, Stacy, opened up a small barbecue trailer on the side of an Austin, Texas, interstate in 2009, they had no idea what they’d gotten themselves into. Today, Franklin Barbecue has grown into the most popular, critically lauded, and obsessed-over barbecue joint in the country (if not the world)—and Franklin is the winner of every major barbecue award there is.   In this much-anticipated debut, Franklin and coauthor Jordan Mackay unlock the secrets behind truly great barbecue, and share years’ worth of hard-won knowledge. Franklin Barbecue is a definitive resource for the backyard pitmaster, with chapters dedicated to building or customizing your own smoker; finding and curing the right wood; creating and tending perfect fires; sourcing top-quality meat; and of course, cooking mind-blowing, ridiculously delicious barbecue, better than you ever thought possible.

Franklin Barbecue Details

TitleFranklin Barbecue
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 7th, 2015
PublisherTen Speed Press
ISBN-139781607747208
Rating
GenreFood and Drink, Cookbooks, Cooking, Food, Nonfiction, Reference, Culinary, Adult

Franklin Barbecue Review

  • Kelly (and the Book Boar)
    January 1, 1970
    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/DEAR VEGANS – PLEASE BACK AWAY FROM THIS REVIEW. I PROMISE YOU THERE IS NOTHING FOR YOU TO SEE HERE.If you know nothing about/are a beginner at cooking on a smoker, Franklin Barbecue: A Meat Smoking Manifesto is the cookbook for you. My husband was kind enough to volunteer his services in order to make this a legit review, but like I do with most everything else in my life, I’m going to take his contributions and make a complete mocker Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/DEAR VEGANS – PLEASE BACK AWAY FROM THIS REVIEW. I PROMISE YOU THERE IS NOTHING FOR YOU TO SEE HERE.If you know nothing about/are a beginner at cooking on a smoker, Franklin Barbecue: A Meat Smoking Manifesto is the cookbook for you. My husband was kind enough to volunteer his services in order to make this a legit review, but like I do with most everything else in my life, I’m going to take his contributions and make a complete mockery out of them. Ready? Me too! First step, if you don’t enjoy the process of outdoor cooking (bees? skeeters? ugh. pass.) you will need to find yourself a servant boy husband who is willing to tend to his meat all day. That shouldn’t be hard to do, right? Ha! I’m hilarious. Here’s a picture of my husband tending the grill . . . I don’t know who those bitches are in the background, but they better get the f*&^ out of my yard!Once you’ve found your sucker ahem, I mean soulmate, have them go rustle up a nice big slab of meat for cooking . . . I keed, I keed. I would never murder Booker T. Django, on the other hand? Perhaps. However, for this review we’re using a hunk of pork butt . . . Hold on tight, those suckers are slippery! Once you’ve caught your pig, you’ll need to slaughter it . . . [IMAGE DELETED DUE TO ITS EXTREME GRAPHIC NATURE]The next step is seasoning the meat to your liking (FYI – I have zero originality so I have totally stolen and modified Paula Deen’s recipe for rub, which contains the same ingredients this book will tell you about - my husband cheats and uses this - he also likes to slather the whole thing in mustard first) until you get a little something like this . . . Once all that is done it's time for the boring stuff actual cooking. The husband begins with a charcoal stack and then adds his expertly prepared wood (*that’s what she said*) . . . which results in what is apparently professionally known as “clean smoke” – probably since it’s so clear you can’t even see it (aren’t I a genius????) . . . You then let that little piggy who went wee wee wee all the way home cook for infinity until the handy-dandy meat thermometer says it’s done, while continually checking on/tending to the needs of the smoker (this is the part where you noobs realize you need to buy the book in order to make sure you don’t f*&^ everything up). Note: If your pig can still do this . . . it needs to cook longer.At the end of infinity the day, you should end up with something that looks a little like this . . . That will satisfy not only your gluttonous teenager, but also the pickiest of child, and which will obtain a reaction from your wife something kinda along these lines . . . It’s up to personal taste whether you want your pulled pork sammiches Southern style with a big ol’ dollop of coleslaw, or topped with a little bbq sauce . . . No matter what, if you did it right (or married the right fella) it should be delicious and have you retrieving your “Thanksgiving Pants” before you sit down to eat. Bon appétit! Endless thanks to the hubs for all of the hard labor he put forth in order for me to post this review. Luckily I get paid zeroes of dollars for reviewing so I’m totally willing to split the profits 50/50 with him ; )ARC provided by Blogging for Books in exchange for an honest review
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  • Janel Gradowski
    January 1, 1970
    Barbecue is an art form and Aaron Franklin is a superstar pitmaster. He went from cooking brisket for his friends, to opening a food truck, to owning a now world-renowned restaurant that has sold out of meat every single day since it has opened. People travel from all over the world to sample his barbecue. This book is a detailed chronicle of how he produces his spectacular barbecue.The first chapter explains how Aaron and his wife, Stacy, came to be the owners of a restaurant where people wait Barbecue is an art form and Aaron Franklin is a superstar pitmaster. He went from cooking brisket for his friends, to opening a food truck, to owning a now world-renowned restaurant that has sold out of meat every single day since it has opened. People travel from all over the world to sample his barbecue. This book is a detailed chronicle of how he produces his spectacular barbecue.The first chapter explains how Aaron and his wife, Stacy, came to be the owners of a restaurant where people wait for hours to get a taste of the food. It’s a story of humble beginnings, chasing a dream, and dogged determination. Then, the manifesto begins. Everything about the techniques Franklin uses is detailed. If you are handy with a welder, there are instructions on how to build a smoker from scratch, just like the ones they use at the restaurant, but on a smaller scale. Diagrams explain the mechanics of the smoker while photos show the building process. From there the book goes on to what kind of wood to use, how to build fires and how to prepare meats – from the famous brisket to turkey breast.This is not a cookbook full of recipes, although there are a few for things like beans and espresso barbecue sauce. Instead, this is a step-by-step guide on how to reproduce barbecue similar to what is served at Franklin Barbecue. There is a lot of information, from how to start a proper fire in the smoker to tips on concocting your own rubs. Glimpses of what it’s like to run what is probably the most popular barbecue joint in the world right now are offered in between the barbecue-making wisdom. I love that there is an espresso maker in the kitchen for employees, since there are workers there literally around the clock to prepare the thousands of pounds of meat every day. For anybody that is interested in making truly great barbecue, this is a wonderful resource.I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.
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  • Greg
    January 1, 1970
    First book of 2018!Got a smoker for Christmas so grabbed this book based on reccomendations. Great book! The author is clearly passionate and knowledgeable about not just smoking meat but the culture and taste surrounding good BBQ. He went in-depth about everything from wood selection to slicing meat well, without being inaccessible or annoying. Also, the photography in this book is excellent and will make you hungry the entire time you read.Note his smoking techniques are mostly for offset smok First book of 2018!Got a smoker for Christmas so grabbed this book based on reccomendations. Great book! The author is clearly passionate and knowledgeable about not just smoking meat but the culture and taste surrounding good BBQ. He went in-depth about everything from wood selection to slicing meat well, without being inaccessible or annoying. Also, the photography in this book is excellent and will make you hungry the entire time you read.Note his smoking techniques are mostly for offset smokers, which I didn't realize until partway into the book. However if you're wanting to learn on a bullet smoker (like me) it is still very worth your time and energy to read this/
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  • Clay
    January 1, 1970
    There are two general points that are made clear throughout the book: (1) Aaron Franklin knows what he's talking about and (2) he seems like one of the nicest guys in the world. The restaurant is truly unbelievably awesome and this book shows you how it's done. One day I will have a smoker, and on that day I will have this book at my side.
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  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    Last night, I smoked first rack of ribs since reading this book. They were markedly better then I've done any time recently. Enough little tips across this book made for a much better result.
  • Michael Russell
    January 1, 1970
    Franklin Barbecue in Austin, Texas, is as famous for its mind-blowing array of smoked meats as it is the hours-long line of customers hoping to get barbecue before they sell out. In pitmaster Aaron Franklin's first book on barbecue, he readily admits he's still learning his craft. Co-author Jordan Mackay, credits Franklin's success to being able to "think like smoke." Franklin admits that a barbecue book is daunting because of all the variables that go into the process, and while recipes might l Franklin Barbecue in Austin, Texas, is as famous for its mind-blowing array of smoked meats as it is the hours-long line of customers hoping to get barbecue before they sell out. In pitmaster Aaron Franklin's first book on barbecue, he readily admits he's still learning his craft. Co-author Jordan Mackay, credits Franklin's success to being able to "think like smoke." Franklin admits that a barbecue book is daunting because of all the variables that go into the process, and while recipes might look like magic, there is no "just one way" or "black and white" magical method of barbecue. So much of it depends on things like time, temperature, the kind of wood, the placement of the wood, the smoker, the choice of meat, and on and on. Rather than focus on recipes, Franklin focuses on the process of barbecue, including how to build your own smoker. He doesn't even get to the actual cooking of meat until chapter six because he's so focused on all the other things that go into the loosey-goosey it-all-just-depends craft of being a pitmaster. This book is barbecue nerd nirvana, especially considering the detailed science Franklin goes into regarding how barbecue works. Franklin spends the first 37 pages telling the story of how he built Franklin barbecue, more than anything because he wants to show that one of the world's most famous barbecue restaurants started less than a decade ago from absolutely nothing. He had a few dollars of savings, a strong work ethic, and he loved cooking barbecue for people. After one party where the lines stretched down the block (an omen of what was to come), he began thinking he might be able to open a restaurant. Clearly, things worked out. His point, though, is that he started from little more than the average home barbecue fan had. There is plenty of DIY here. Franklin shows how to build your own smoker and modify store-bought smokers, how to split wood and the various properties of different kinds of wood. There are tips on how to build a fire and cheats for the home cook starting out on a tiny grill (like he did). He rhapsodizes for pages on smoke, as that is the heart of his craft, and he also goes in depth with how to buy a brisket, select short ribs and spare ribs, even how to inspect sausage casings. After a long chapter on various meats, he hilariously offers just a single paragraph on turkey. There are a handful of recipes in the book, mostly sauces and sides, things that aren’t as impacted by all the other variables involved in creating a perfectly smoked piece of meat. Give this book to anyone with a dream of doing more with barbecue than just tossing some burgers on the propane grill. As the title suggests, this is a meat-smoking manifesto designed to elevate everyone’s barbecue game -- with plenty of knowledge from one of the barbecue world’s biggest stars.
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  • Jackie
    January 1, 1970
    Warm, fun, informational, and inspirational for anyone with a food dream or a love of BBQ.
  • Eric Moote
    January 1, 1970
    Overall: a repository of Central Texas Barbecue history and methods of turning the toughest, cheapest piece of meat and turning it into the most delicious, tender and awe-inspiring bite of your life. A true miracle.Aaron Franklin has gone from regular guy to world renown BBQ rockstar for a reason: his meat is good. People ask me, "was waking up at 7 am to stand in line for 5 hours worth it?" If you have ever eaten at Franklin Barbecue, then you know my answer: "A resounding Yes!" I cannot think Overall: a repository of Central Texas Barbecue history and methods of turning the toughest, cheapest piece of meat and turning it into the most delicious, tender and awe-inspiring bite of your life. A true miracle.Aaron Franklin has gone from regular guy to world renown BBQ rockstar for a reason: his meat is good. People ask me, "was waking up at 7 am to stand in line for 5 hours worth it?" If you have ever eaten at Franklin Barbecue, then you know my answer: "A resounding Yes!" I cannot think of a better way to spend a morning than taking part in this Austin (albeit quickly becoming American) ritual. It's as worthy a cause as watching the sunrise over the Grand Canyon, watching a baseball game at a historic field, or driving across Route 66. And it may be more rewarding.I digress. "Franklin Barbecue" puts all of Aaron Franklin's secrets out there in printed form. All of this information is already out there on YouTube and PBS, but having it in a handy coffee table book with pretty pictures makes it that much more real. Why would a man who has found fame in smoking meat give all his secrets away? Because he knows that you can try to replicate, but you will never duplicate what he does? Because smoking meat is an art and a fickle mistress? I like to think it's because he knows what the people like and he loves to give it to them (see: cutting brisket for all of his customers, taking pictures with fans, doing a show on PBS!).Aaron Franklin is the rare breed of celebrity who is just like the next guy. He drinks beer, loves food and is willing to show you what, how and why he does the things he does. I love a man who is humbled by his notoriety and you will too. His Texas roots and southern charm will have you wanting a copy of his book for your coffee table, not only for reference, but for the connection you feel you have made to the BBQ Royalty who is as knowable as the dude next door.I would recommend this to: you. Everyone. Don't like BBQ? Read this book and discover how it should be / could be / is being done by the right people.
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  • Britney
    January 1, 1970
    Franklin Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto is an excellent meat-smoking resource! Aaron Franklin, an award-winning pitmaster, shares his knowledge and secrets of success in this meat-smoking manifesto. His love and enthusiasm for Central Texas barbecue is evident and he shares his passion in these pages. Franklin Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto is a book my husband and I both use and enjoy. From building or modifying a smoker to serving and eating, this book is brimming with detailed informa Franklin Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto is an excellent meat-smoking resource! Aaron Franklin, an award-winning pitmaster, shares his knowledge and secrets of success in this meat-smoking manifesto. His love and enthusiasm for Central Texas barbecue is evident and he shares his passion in these pages. Franklin Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto is a book my husband and I both use and enjoy. From building or modifying a smoker to serving and eating, this book is brimming with detailed information and includes step-by-step instructions, beautiful pictures, and mouth-watering recipes. This meat-smoking manifesto is exceptional, and we look forward to using it again and again! Whether you are a beginner looking for direction or a seasoned pitmaster looking to perfect your method, Franklin Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto is the book for you! I received a complimentary copy of this book through Blogging for Books and appreciate the opportunity to offer my honest opinion.
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  • Adam
    January 1, 1970
    Anyone with interest in good barbecue, done right, will love this book but so will people who just like reading food stories. Aaron starts with the back story of his restaurant and how he got into smoking meats, so the book reads more like a story. Then he gets into smoker design, wood selection, and finally the cooking techniques/recipes. I've already adjusted the way I smoked meats and I have a strong desire to build my own smoker.
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  • Aaron Cochrill
    January 1, 1970
    If you are looking for recipes, this isn't the book for you. But if you are looking for insight about the passion and techniques in genuine BBQ, Aaron Franklin offers insightful advice and direction for the novice enthusiast! I loved this book.
  • Russell Branca
    January 1, 1970
    This is a tome on the art and theory of smoking meat, and it contains a wealth of wisdom and know how. As a geek interested in the details and technique of barbecue, this book is truly a diamond in the rough and one I cannot recommend highly enough.
  • David King
    January 1, 1970
    This is what a cookbook ought to be: 130+ pages of explanation before about 50 pages of recipes, which are also mostly explanation. Oh, and the pictures are glorious too. We must go to Austin.
  • Chuck
    January 1, 1970
    Back in the '90s, while living in West Virginia, I mentioned to a neighbor--a woman who had quite a reputation as an accomplished home chef--that I was going to barbecue a brisket. She seemed puzzled, but allowed that barbecuing a brisket seemed ... "interesting." I think she was just being nice. To her, brisket was for corned beef or New England boiled dinners. Period. I've been back in Texas for 21 years, and it's hard to imagine anyone anywhere who has not by now heard of Texas style smoked Back in the '90s, while living in West Virginia, I mentioned to a neighbor--a woman who had quite a reputation as an accomplished home chef--that I was going to barbecue a brisket. She seemed puzzled, but allowed that barbecuing a brisket seemed ... "interesting." I think she was just being nice. To her, brisket was for corned beef or New England boiled dinners. Period. I've been back in Texas for 21 years, and it's hard to imagine anyone anywhere who has not by now heard of Texas style smoked brisket. These days Texas barbecue is having a day in the sun, a Golden Age. Thanks to Texas Monthly's Daniel Vaughn and his incredibly popular coverage of the Texas smoked meat scene and the proliferation of TV shows such as Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives that frequently feature Texas barbecue joints, smoked brisket has never been more popular, even far beyond the state's borders. While the old joints like Smitty's, Kreuz Market, and Black's in Lockhart, TX, have been elevated to near saintly status, new places continue to emerge. Aaron Franklin started selling brisket out of a trailer in 2009 and moved his operation into its current brick and mortar location about a year later. Recognitions, awards, media coverage, and long lines of customers have characterized his life ever since. This book is not just recipes; in fact, the recipes are few and basic. But Franklin’s deep explorations of smokers, wood, fire, smoke, meat, and cooking should be required reading for anyone who’s ever hauled a brisket home from the store with visions of succulent slices of perfectly smoked beef. While obviously a barbecue authority of the highest order, Franklin imbues his writing with an engaging humility and the underlying message that if he can do it, so can you. And throughout the book Franklin pays his respects to the Texas legends who came before and continue to serve their customers some of the best smoked meat anywhere. Franklin Barbecue: A Meat-Smoking Manifesto is a pleasure to read. Franklin, with the help of writer Jordan Mackay, has turned out a volume that informs and inspires. If you read it cover to cover, don’t be surprised if you suddenly want to weld together your own custom smoker and dive in deep.
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  • Guy
    January 1, 1970
    A good light read for the home barbecuer or anyone who just likes Texas BBQ As a transplant to Texas, Texas BBQ was somewhat foreign to me. Sure we have BBQ in PA but it is mostly pork based (this has changed somewhat since I moved here and the growing popularity of TX style BBQ). Pig roasts are the brisket equivalent for large gatherings.I was no stranger to the work involved in processing meat. When I was young and most of the great uncles were still alive, we would butcher our own hogs as par A good light read for the home barbecuer or anyone who just likes Texas BBQ As a transplant to Texas, Texas BBQ was somewhat foreign to me. Sure we have BBQ in PA but it is mostly pork based (this has changed somewhat since I moved here and the growing popularity of TX style BBQ). Pig roasts are the brisket equivalent for large gatherings.I was no stranger to the work involved in processing meat. When I was young and most of the great uncles were still alive, we would butcher our own hogs as part of a huge family gathering in the fall. Smoke our own bacon and hams in a wooden smoke house, rend and press scraps for lard and cracklins and stuff sausages. Yes, we also made scrapple. We processed our own venison and other wild game during hunting season.That said, I fell in love with brisket the first time I ate it at Rudy’s in Leon Springs on my first trip to San Antonio before moving here. A few years back my wife gifted me with a good 1/4 inch steel offset smoker from Dziuk’s Meat Market and I commenced to regularly smoking butts for pulled pork, hamburgers, chicken breasts, or just throwing a ham steak on for 20 minutes to get that hint of smoke before finishing it on the grill in the firebox.Smoking a brisket though was something I’ve largely avoided, it’s pretty daunting and all of the forums and articles make it out to be an unforgiving endeavor. My couple attempts have been....not horrible, but not great.After reading through Aaron’s own early attempts and the approach he’s developed, I’m feeling much more confident on my next go around.
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  • Bram Cecilius
    January 1, 1970
    So, you've heard of Aaron Franklin and his award winning Franklin's BBQ. But the story of how he got there is the real fun part. He has done what so many other American success stories do, they have a passion, they are willing to work hard, attention to details and he actually cares. This isn't your typical BBQ book loaded with lots of recipes, this is more of a how to testimonial type book. I enjoyed all the background, how-to and why Franklin does the things he does. Honestly, who are we to ar So, you've heard of Aaron Franklin and his award winning Franklin's BBQ. But the story of how he got there is the real fun part. He has done what so many other American success stories do, they have a passion, they are willing to work hard, attention to details and he actually cares. This isn't your typical BBQ book loaded with lots of recipes, this is more of a how to testimonial type book. I enjoyed all the background, how-to and why Franklin does the things he does. Honestly, who are we to argue, he's got the awards and certainly the testimony to back it up. He'll tell you he doesn't have the "tradition or history" that other BBQ legends have, but he goes with what works for him and customers reward his restaurant with their patronage. Aaron discusses his failures, his favorites and what led him to BBQ, truly a fun read on what appears to be a genuine guy (I've never met him). He is well respected in the BBQ community with good reason, his product is legit and people seem to want his opinion on BBQ (food). So, if you want to read up on how to make good brisket or any other smoked meats, this book will put you on your way as it keeps it simple, which is what BBQ should be, simple goodness to be shared with those you love.
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  • Carine Bouery
    January 1, 1970
    This is not your ordinary recipe book, it's a manual on how to make the most delicious BBQ on the planet. My husband and I were in Austin recently and waited in line for 2.5 hours at Franklin's BBQ. The food was amazing and we both agreed without hesitation that we would wait in that line again. Aaron Franklin is a genius and everything we ate was sublime; brisket, ribs, turkey (I don't even like turkey!), pinto beans and cole slaw. We devoured everything on our tray without adding BBQ sauce to This is not your ordinary recipe book, it's a manual on how to make the most delicious BBQ on the planet. My husband and I were in Austin recently and waited in line for 2.5 hours at Franklin's BBQ. The food was amazing and we both agreed without hesitation that we would wait in that line again. Aaron Franklin is a genius and everything we ate was sublime; brisket, ribs, turkey (I don't even like turkey!), pinto beans and cole slaw. We devoured everything on our tray without adding BBQ sauce to any of the meat. I am a serious cook and my husband enjoys smoking meat so naturally we had to buy this book. What I love about this book is he takes you through every aspect of the preparation; the smoker, the wood, the meat, trimming the meat, tending the fire, and so on. He is very generous in sharing his techniques and the right technique is what separates a decent meal from a meal so delicious that you keep an eye out for cheap flights to Austin.
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  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed it. If you're looking for a recipe book, this isn't what you want. He does have some recipes for side dishes at the end, but the bulk of the book is the story of how the restaurant came to be and a detailed analysis of everything that goes into a good barbecue: the smoker, wood selection, starting/monitoring the fire/smoke, the meat itself, and then the actual cooking part. I've got a smoker and this book has me excited to start trying out some of his ideas. Barbecue is an inexact scie I enjoyed it. If you're looking for a recipe book, this isn't what you want. He does have some recipes for side dishes at the end, but the bulk of the book is the story of how the restaurant came to be and a detailed analysis of everything that goes into a good barbecue: the smoker, wood selection, starting/monitoring the fire/smoke, the meat itself, and then the actual cooking part. I've got a smoker and this book has me excited to start trying out some of his ideas. Barbecue is an inexact science, and Franklin's message is to do a lot of trial-and-error. That's what he did, and if people are willing to stand in line for hours and hours for his barbecue, that should be good enough for the rest of us.
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  • Tyler Varisco
    January 1, 1970
    Unlike a lot of readers, I have an offset bbq pit and have been making bbq with varying levels of success for about 10 years. After moving from college station to Austin for grad school, I noticed that the bbq in the area was totally different than what I grew up with. Simple yet incredibly complex. Cooked with time and technique rather than a gas rotisserie and a few shakes of Sysco seasoning. Franklins’ book has changed my techniques dramatically. I ripped the door off my little smoker’s fireb Unlike a lot of readers, I have an offset bbq pit and have been making bbq with varying levels of success for about 10 years. After moving from college station to Austin for grad school, I noticed that the bbq in the area was totally different than what I grew up with. Simple yet incredibly complex. Cooked with time and technique rather than a gas rotisserie and a few shakes of Sysco seasoning. Franklins’ book has changed my techniques dramatically. I ripped the door off my little smoker’s firebox, started cooking with all wood rather than chunks and charcoal, stopped worrying should little temperature changes, and began to produce restaurant quality meats at home. Real Texan bbq deserves a savior and a bible and we all have Mr. Franklin to thank for that.
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  • Joe Prosit
    January 1, 1970
    Where Meathead breaks down the science of barbeque, Franklin breaks down the art. The two books should be companion required reading for anyone serious about smoking. A word of caution, Aaron cooks by intuition and feel that normal humans aren’t capable of out the gate. It blows my mind to watch him use a meat thermometer to probe the meat for tenderness while never looking at the actual temp! You can learn to cook the way he does, but you’re going to fuck up a lot of meat along the way.My recom Where Meathead breaks down the science of barbeque, Franklin breaks down the art. The two books should be companion required reading for anyone serious about smoking. A word of caution, Aaron cooks by intuition and feel that normal humans aren’t capable of out the gate. It blows my mind to watch him use a meat thermometer to probe the meat for tenderness while never looking at the actual temp! You can learn to cook the way he does, but you’re going to fuck up a lot of meat along the way.My recommendation is to apply the science of barbeque first, and learn the art through experience. As you watch your thermometers and cook by-the-book, pay attention to how the meat looks and feels and smells. Eventually, you might develop the instinct that Franklin was apparently born with.
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  • Ben
    January 1, 1970
    I've been getting more and more into smoking and have always preferred the Central Texas style the best. I have really wanted to try and do a brisket, but was a bit intimidated, that is until reading this book. When I first opened it I was disappointed by the lack of recipes, but reading through it I saw the pages were filled with so much more info than recipes. In a way it was still recipes, but instead of being for the edible parts of the meal they were for the non-edible parts of bbq such as I've been getting more and more into smoking and have always preferred the Central Texas style the best. I have really wanted to try and do a brisket, but was a bit intimidated, that is until reading this book. When I first opened it I was disappointed by the lack of recipes, but reading through it I saw the pages were filled with so much more info than recipes. In a way it was still recipes, but instead of being for the edible parts of the meal they were for the non-edible parts of bbq such as the smoker, wood, fire, and smoke (plus a good history lesson on Central Texas BBQ, himself, and his restaurant). That being said the recipes he did include were (supposedly, because I've never had it) the same as what he serves in the restaurant. Can't wait to get the meat in the pit now!
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  • John
    January 1, 1970
    From backyard griller, to owning and operating the most famous barbecue restaurant in the world. This is the story of Franklin Barbecue's Aaron Franklin. When I ordered the book, I wasn't really sure what I'd be getting, but I knew I had to read it. The book is Aaron Franklin's story, and he should be admired for his apparent lack ego and pretense. The themes running through the book are about the quality of the meat, fire (and smoke) management, the quality of the wood, and to never cut corners From backyard griller, to owning and operating the most famous barbecue restaurant in the world. This is the story of Franklin Barbecue's Aaron Franklin. When I ordered the book, I wasn't really sure what I'd be getting, but I knew I had to read it. The book is Aaron Franklin's story, and he should be admired for his apparent lack ego and pretense. The themes running through the book are about the quality of the meat, fire (and smoke) management, the quality of the wood, and to never cut corners. There are very few simple recipes he generously shares that take the mystery out what he does.Franklin's story has inspired me to plan a pilgrimage to Austin to eat at his fine establishment.
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  • Lex
    January 1, 1970
    We recently got a smoker and I got some books out of the library to give us some background on what the heck to do with it. I was really looking for something practical (which I found in another book I'll review shortly) that would give dead-simple specific recipes to a complete beginner. While this book is definitely worth reading, it is more memoir and theory than practical guide. It gives good background and rationale for certain aspects of smoking but will not be my go-to book when we finall We recently got a smoker and I got some books out of the library to give us some background on what the heck to do with it. I was really looking for something practical (which I found in another book I'll review shortly) that would give dead-simple specific recipes to a complete beginner. While this book is definitely worth reading, it is more memoir and theory than practical guide. It gives good background and rationale for certain aspects of smoking but will not be my go-to book when we finally fire this thing up. It made me want to go back to Austin, too, although I wouldn't be caught dead waiting in this guy's place's line! Too much good BBQ in Austin for that.
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  • Jon Stone
    January 1, 1970
    Aaron Franklin lets his humor, and most importantly his passion, shine through in this book. It was meant to be a "read through and get ideas" kind of book. But it's turned into somewhat of a utility tool. I've read through this a few times now, and the takeaways aren't the recipies. It's the idea that you've got to get you heart into what you are doing. No matter if it's BBQ, welding, carpentry, data mining...whatever you do, you need to do it with passion. Then the work is still work, but it's Aaron Franklin lets his humor, and most importantly his passion, shine through in this book. It was meant to be a "read through and get ideas" kind of book. But it's turned into somewhat of a utility tool. I've read through this a few times now, and the takeaways aren't the recipies. It's the idea that you've got to get you heart into what you are doing. No matter if it's BBQ, welding, carpentry, data mining...whatever you do, you need to do it with passion. Then the work is still work, but it's gratifying.
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  • Brien
    January 1, 1970
    Giving Franklin Barbecue 5 stars was easy, because, as he states in the introduction, it is less a recipe book than it is about the PROCESS of barbecuing. Getting the right equipment, the right wood, the right temperature, and he gets into details--should a grill and/or smoker (we're talkin' serious barbecuing) be insulated, and with what, and why or why not. He is partial to Texas, so beef afficianados may feel a special privilege, but he is informative and understandable to both the novice and Giving Franklin Barbecue 5 stars was easy, because, as he states in the introduction, it is less a recipe book than it is about the PROCESS of barbecuing. Getting the right equipment, the right wood, the right temperature, and he gets into details--should a grill and/or smoker (we're talkin' serious barbecuing) be insulated, and with what, and why or why not. He is partial to Texas, so beef afficianados may feel a special privilege, but he is informative and understandable to both the novice and the pro. And his recipes, which are not extensive, are excellent and versatile.
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  • Prestoni
    January 1, 1970
    Delicious, informative, jealousy inducing instructional, inspirational book. Desperately keen to cook and eat this type of barbecue, but not so easy with what is available in NZ to do this, also slightly prohibitive with the time required - even worse than my sourdough croissant cooking time addiction ! This is a one day when I've got plenty of time and equipment book. But such a great read all the same.
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  • Rachael
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent. We'll written, but I can still hear Aaron's voice and passion for smoking meats. He talks a lot about why he does this or that when working with this or that piece of meat. He talks about the science behind what he does, though he might need to spend a bit more time in the kinetic molecular model and thermodynamics to flesh out his understanding of how and why heat moves like it does. This book belongs on your shelf if you think you want to smoke meat.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    Franklin's BBQ is deservedly famous here in Texas. We measure all other brisket and pulled pork against Franklin's and almost none measure up. One of my children gave me this book as a gift and, although I won't be welding together any smokers for home use, I have used it to improve my home kamado smoked brisket between trips to Austin. Aaron is a really nice guy and that comes through in the book. I particularly like how he gives a shout out to other outstanding BBQ places in Texas.
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  • Wade Fontenot
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting read about the beginnings of one of the most popular eateries in Austin, TX and the techniques and science of what Pitmaster Aaron Franklin learned along the way. Not a cookbook but a textbook on what to look for/do when buying or building your own smoker, choosing your wood and purchasing and cooking your meat. Valuable information for the novice and the pro.
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  • Hockessinmom
    January 1, 1970
    Great for StickburnersLots of great advice for back yard bbqers. Very easy to read written in a very personal style, telling Franklin’s life story from his (failed) backyard cooks to barbecue greatness. Should be very valuable for stick burners, but not so much for other types of smokers.
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