Nearly Orthodox
From Catholic schoolgirl to punk rocker to emergent church planter, Angela Doll Carlson traveled a spiritual path that in many ways mirrors that of a whole generation. She takes us with her on a deep and revealing exploration of the forces that drove her toward Orthodoxy and the challenges that long kept her from fully entering in.

Nearly Orthodox Details

TitleNearly Orthodox
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 1st, 2014
PublisherAncient Faith Publishing
Rating
GenreAutobiography, Memoir, Religion, Nonfiction, Christian, Christianity, Faith

Nearly Orthodox Review

  • Ben
    January 1, 1970
    Honest and open. Composed of snapshots and stories and struggles; the road, roadblocks, and roadwork. Nearly Orthodox is a window into the life of Angela Doll Carlson and her personal journey of faith. This book will expose things in your own soul and engage you to seek healing. Carlson writes about punk rock, cigarettes, and first kisses. Feminism, Mary, confession, and fasting. Pain, tears, and healing. Motherhood and career and spirituality and balance. This book is a book about life. Carlson Honest and open. Composed of snapshots and stories and struggles; the road, roadblocks, and roadwork. Nearly Orthodox is a window into the life of Angela Doll Carlson and her personal journey of faith. This book will expose things in your own soul and engage you to seek healing. Carlson writes about punk rock, cigarettes, and first kisses. Feminism, Mary, confession, and fasting. Pain, tears, and healing. Motherhood and career and spirituality and balance. This book is a book about life. Carlson's pain is her offering to a hurting world--outstretched to bridge the gap of formality. This is a book about struggle. This is a book that is real. Full review to come
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  • Jane G Meyer
    January 1, 1970
    Told with an open heart--revealing a journey of faith, hurt, upset, and healing. This book offers another narrative of seeking Christ; we get a picture of a woman on her own unique road, fighting her own unique battle, with words that are fresh, and sometimes raw. If you like memoirs, and are at all interested in a journey of a culture-current woman headed into the realm of ancient Orthodoxy, then this book will not disappoint.
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  • Kaitlyn Rose
    January 1, 1970
    I won this on a Goodreads giveaway.I loved this book from start to finish. Carson has a way of being honest that makes you like her from the start. being born into Orthodoxy I know the struggles one faces in this religion. it was refreshing to hear this story.when you read this you will feel like you are sitting down having a cup of coffee with the author. amazing book
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  • Andi
    January 1, 1970
    Angela is an intensely good writer and reading her book was a great pleasure. I learned a lot about a subject of which I knew nothing at all--Eastern Orthodox faith and practice. But in this beautiful literary memoir, I also learned about Angela as a wife, mother, feminist, writer, artist, and searcher, all places of connection for me. She's a gifted storyteller and has woven together a book about many things, with Orthodoxy as the thread pulling it all together.
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  • Sally
    January 1, 1970
    This is a thoughtful, fluent story of a contemporary American woman's journey into the Eastern Orthodox faith tradition. I loved how Carlson takes such a finely-crafted approach to the memoir, eschewing a chronological approach for a braiding of her life at different times into a thematic narrative. This construction creates powerful thematic connections and makes such compelling emotional sense. I have no personal history with the Eastern Orthodox tradition, but I identified so strongly with th This is a thoughtful, fluent story of a contemporary American woman's journey into the Eastern Orthodox faith tradition. I loved how Carlson takes such a finely-crafted approach to the memoir, eschewing a chronological approach for a braiding of her life at different times into a thematic narrative. This construction creates powerful thematic connections and makes such compelling emotional sense. I have no personal history with the Eastern Orthodox tradition, but I identified so strongly with the author's position, and personal struggles, as a feminist, mother, and spiritual seeker, and I loved following her conversion experience and learning where it took her. The insightful, courageous ways she takes on potentially opposing aspects of her own perspective and values--the way the story weaves punk rock, feminism, and ancient/traditional Christian practices and prayer--are both moving and enlightening. The writing is distinguished by a strong prose style that captures a sense of exploration beautifully. Carlson writes with a lyrical flair that allows for layering of her imagery and music, presenting her insights in a way that makes them develop organically, and that does justice to their complexity.
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  • Samantha (AK)
    January 1, 1970
    I picked this up on a whim while looking for another book, and while I don't regret it, I also didn't like it as much as I'd hoped. Maybe I've just read too many conversion stories over the years, and the genre's lost it's charm. Who can say?As a memoir, I don't care for the style. Ms. Carlson moves freely along her timeline, past and present, and only occassionally gives the reader the courtesy of line breaks. This leads to a sort of free-floating, 'fuzzy' narrative that I might enjoy in fictio I picked this up on a whim while looking for another book, and while I don't regret it, I also didn't like it as much as I'd hoped. Maybe I've just read too many conversion stories over the years, and the genre's lost it's charm. Who can say?As a memoir, I don't care for the style. Ms. Carlson moves freely along her timeline, past and present, and only occassionally gives the reader the courtesy of line breaks. This leads to a sort of free-floating, 'fuzzy' narrative that I might enjoy in fiction (if done well) but mostly just find frustrating in a biographical context.It's not all bad, though. Despite her Catholic roots (to my Protestant ones) and an age gap of about 20 years, there are things about her journey to Orthodoxy that resonate strongly with my own. And if I don't care for her style, I at least identify with her moods and struggles. Solid 3/5.
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  • Alexander Nadel
    January 1, 1970
    A sincere, refreshing and nicely written book. The author provides glimpses of her life woven around her spiritual journey to Orthodox Christianity. I really liked the poetics of the book. Recommended!
  • Sandra Vander Schaaf
    January 1, 1970
    "Nearly Orthodox" is a cover-to-cover pleasure to read. Angela Doll Carlson tells a story of faith and doubt with humour and exquisite vulnerability. There is no preaching in this book, no Orthodox how-to's or admonitions, no judging of one faith expression over another. Readers are offered an up-close-and-personal glimpse of what happens when a woman chooses to take a closer look at what drives her own spiritual hunger. The author turns a compassionate eye toward her Catholic upbringing, her pu "Nearly Orthodox" is a cover-to-cover pleasure to read. Angela Doll Carlson tells a story of faith and doubt with humour and exquisite vulnerability. There is no preaching in this book, no Orthodox how-to's or admonitions, no judging of one faith expression over another. Readers are offered an up-close-and-personal glimpse of what happens when a woman chooses to take a closer look at what drives her own spiritual hunger. The author turns a compassionate eye toward her Catholic upbringing, her punk rock angst and feminist convictions, her commitment to family, her high hopes and the many ways such hopes are dashed, transformed, resurrected. It's the sort of book that inspires personal reflection not as a religious requirement but as a way through our everyday doubts and fears, a way toward beauty. In Chapter 3, she describes the act of writing in the dark quiet of the night, when the writing is a kind of prayer, and she knows it's prayer "because it makes room for something holy to happen." That pretty much describes "Nearly Orthodox"… the kind of writing that makes room for something holy to happen, for writer and reader alike.
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  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    Nearly Orthodox: On being a modern woman in an ancient tradition by Angela Doll Carlson I loved the writing in this book! Especially the last couple paragraphs of each chapter. The poetic flow and the slight repetition of certain phrases really tickled my literary senses. (which is rare for me since I usually read more for the story then the writing and don't really pay too close attention to the writing style). I loved the humorous buts too. One particular line that made me chuckle was when Ang Nearly Orthodox: On being a modern woman in an ancient tradition by Angela Doll Carlson I loved the writing in this book! Especially the last couple paragraphs of each chapter. The poetic flow and the slight repetition of certain phrases really tickled my literary senses. (which is rare for me since I usually read more for the story then the writing and don't really pay too close attention to the writing style). I loved the humorous buts too. One particular line that made me chuckle was when Angela is describing the rambunctiousness of her sons and how they can't help it because the testosterone makes them do it. Yes I have 3 boys and could totally relate! I didn't know too much about being Orthodox and still don't know a lot about it. The book is not a teaching tool into becoming Orthodox (I don't think) it is the story of one womans journey within herself in becoming as she puts it "nearly orthodox" since she says she never really gets there it is always a becoming and a road being travelled. I received this book from the author for my honest review.
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  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    I like this book but it didn't hit me with any grand thoughts. I would recommend it to teenagers or young ones, new to the Church. Angela tells her story in a very interesting narrative. Although she is actually in her 40s (my age), she is able to recall the feelings of her younger self and share it with the audience.
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Traveling through Angela's journey via the medium of this book has been a journey of emotions, not many people can express the true nature of the residue life has left with them and on their doorstep with such understanding and grace. This is something you will pick up to read and not want to put down until it's finished.
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  • Rachel Stevens
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed reading about her journey into Orthodoxy from Catholicism. I have read reviews that stated they do not like that she doesn't tell you why she went on the journey until the end of the book, but I think t fits much better there as you follow her on her journey. I love the way she writes.
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  • Sarah Wells
    January 1, 1970
    I loved accompanying Angela Doll Carlson along on her journey of faith searching and wandering and wrestling, especially all of the ways that life intersects the holy and how that shapes our pursuit of what matters to us.
  • Lori Neff
    January 1, 1970
    I loved every moment I spent with this book. Approachable, honest, and beautiful for anyone on the human journey.
  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    An interesting self reflection on the the process of spiritual growth, questioning faith, and finding a new community.
  • Deborah Bloom
    January 1, 1970
    This book deserves a bigger audience than it's probably getting. If you like good writing and/or honest faith narratives this is a must read.
  • Eric Taft
    January 1, 1970
    I am grateful for this book. One of the difficulties I often have with Orthodoxy is the seemingly limited concern for equality or opportunity for women within the Church. It was wonderful to hear from a "modern woman" who struggles with these issues herself and how she reconciles herself with them. We need more books like this.
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  • Stephen London
    January 1, 1970
    This was a very honest book. Much of it I really enjoyed as a story of conversion. Some of it though was trying too hard to be like Kathleen Norris and it felt disjointed. My favourite parts were her descriptions of wanting to be part of sacramental life.
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  • Suzanne Tourville
    January 1, 1970
    A very nonlinear look at converting to orthodoxy.
  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    The perfect read for anybody struggling with committing to the Orthodox faith.
  • NormaCenva
    January 1, 1970
    Such a great book, very happy I read it - a real treasure!
  • Karli
    January 1, 1970
    Such a relatable read as a current Catechumen! Wow.
  • Nina Hedin
    January 1, 1970
    Poetic writer shares her journey through religion. I enjoyed this book.
  • Cori P. Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Need 1 copy
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